Geography for All!
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Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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AP Human Geography: Cities

AP Human Geography: Cities | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Resources for Teaching the AP Human Geography Cities and Urban Land Use Topic (RT @NatGeoEducation: Awesome collection of AP Human #Geography materials on urban areas: http://t.co/lTYcb9ljII #education)...
Trisha Klancar's insight:

Tons of material , thanks!

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

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Strange Things in Google Maps

Strange Things in Google Maps | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Just because it is fun ...the more things kids are googling that have to do with SEEING the world the better!

 

This site "Map of Strange" is dedicated to showing strange things that can be seen in Google Maps. Displayed here is a beach that I loved to go to growing up in San Diego.  Coronado is written in large stones on this part of the beach right next to the red roof of the famous Hotel Del Corondo (this tab is labeled 'writing of the beach').


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Back to School with Google Earth

Back to School with Google Earth | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

If you aren't using Google Earth... YOU SHOULD BE!

 

Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...

 

If you've never seen the Google Earth Blog, this post is a good primer to the educational possibilities that this technology opens up to teachers.  It is not just for geography teachers; it can be a visualization tool for any subject that has real-world applications that take place somewhere. 


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Lindsey Robinson's comment, August 27, 2012 5:22 PM
Google Earth is an amazing way to teach children of all ages (and adults for that matter) about the geography of the Earth. It is such an abstract way of conveying geographic concepts. What an amazing teaching tool....and as an added bonus, it's FREE!!
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EnviroAtlas

EnviroAtlas | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

EnviroAtlas is a collection of interactive tools and resources that allows users to explore the many benefits people receive from nature, often referred to as ecosystem services. Key components of EnviroAtlas include the following:

A multi-scaled Interactive Map with broad scale data for the lower 48 states and fine scale data for selected communitiesThe Eco-Health Relationship Browser, which shows the linkages between ecosystems, the services they provide, and human healthEcosystem services information, GIS and analysis tools, and written resources
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steve smith's curator insight, May 23, 2014 3:59 PM

This looks great, will be having a play with this soon !

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 24, 2014 3:38 PM

Enviro Atlas. Mapa Interactivo.

Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 25, 2014 9:21 PM

Unbelievable, tremendous resource. I wish I had this one growing up. It is a US gov site (EPA), and is for US geography. I'm betting you can search around for similar sites for other locales around the world. Great demo. Demo runs on Adobe Captivate. The demo took a little bit of time to load on a wired connection through a high speed fiber optic connection. Or skip the demo and play around with the maps. Site not all that fast. Still, it's worth waiting for if you want the data.

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As coast erodes, names wiped off the map

As coast erodes, names wiped off the map | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
For decades, south Louisiana residents have watched coastal landmarks disappear as erosion worsened and the Gulf of Mexico marched steadily inward.

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Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 9, 2013 2:57 PM
The eprverse effect of maps is that they give the false idea that our physical world is steady. It's the case as we see here for coastal environments, but also for rivers.
Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 11:12 AM

I find it quite facinating how the world changes. Some of the worlds most beautiful things may not be here 30 years from now. It is quite humbling that things that man builds can be taken away by Mother Nature. As the years pass the memories made will be vanished by the environment.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:40 PM

Interesting how the physical landscape of one country can be effected by the surrounding water that connects two different countries. To have some areas of Louisiana be overtaken by the Gulf of Mexico is astounding, seeing an area that has stayed relatively the same be wiped off the map is interesting

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Latitude and Longitude of a Point

Latitude and Longitude of a Point | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Find the latitude and longitude of a point using Google Maps.

 

Simple, straightforward and easy to use.  All you do is point and click on the map to get latitude and longitude in both decimal degrees and DMS (degrees, minutes and seconds).  You can also quickly enter coordinates in either format an have the location displayed on the map.

 

Tags: GPS, mapping, location.


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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 2014 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

This is from 'worldmapper' - it is a great sight to help you understand using technology the most densely populated areas of various countries. What do you think they are? 

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Stories Displayed on Maps

Stories Displayed on Maps | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Ok...So this is neat... Only thing is you must SIGN IN with a social media account or SIGN UP. ... It is free.

Cool way to create a visual, moving timeline. For the moment I might use this more in HIstory,but the door is completely open!

 

On myHistro you can create advanced geolocated timelines that you can play as presentations. Pin your events, videos and photos to the map and share them with friends and family.

 

This new resource, myHistro, combines interactive maps with timelines to organize stories, journeys or historical events as the move over time and place.  By embedding photos, videos and links this creates an incredibly dynamic platform for telling historical and geographic stories.  By combining these features, this is a powerful tool to create customized resources for you students.  Pictured above is a sample timeline that shows the spatial and temporal journey of the Olympic torch for the 2012 Games.   


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A History of Conflicts

A History of Conflicts | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

 So there are a few missing...but still a fun interactive resource for teachers and kids.

 

Browse the timeline of war and conflict across the globe.

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click the both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.     


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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, August 16, 2012 8:06 AM
Oh... You are lucky ;-)
Paul Rymsza's comment, August 22, 2012 2:15 PM
the potential of this site is amazing between the interactive learning system and the correlation between the timeline and location. If the human geography class is anything like this i can't wait for it!
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 3:34 PM

 

This database of global wars and conflicts is searchable through space and time.  You can drag and click both the map and timeline to locate particular battles and wars, and then read more information about that conflict.  This resource would be a great one to show students and let them explore to find what they see as interesting.  This site is brimming with potential.