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Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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Rescooped by Trisha Klancar from Geography Education
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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:46 PM

I watched this short commercial with my geography class. While watching, you could almost forget that it was only a commercial. The commercial brings up that the internet can be a great tool in finding information. It also shows that the internet breaks down boundaries that had been impossible to get over physically.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 3:59 AM

These ads reflect the changing culture of India. There is a more progressive culture taking hold which is quite possibly caused by the effects of globalization. Along with India's industrialization, technology is a factor in the culture change. Taboo topics, like remarriage and the partition with Pakistan, are being used by advertisers be provocative without being offensive to most people.

 

The culture of India will undoubtedly be affected by its media representing more progressive ideas as well. Repeated exposure to these ideas will create new generations of Indians more comfortable with remarriage, much like newer generations in the United States are more comfortable with gay marriage.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:21 PM

Commercials work even when they don't. When its an annoying commercial, everyone still remembers exactly what the commercial is for. What Google does here is brilliant. This is very powerful and the reunited states could be an idea to get used to.

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Not all Olympic champions stand on the podium

Not all Olympic champions stand on the podium | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Amazing read, thank you! Where everyone's focus should really be!

 

"Tahmina Kohistani’s Olympics lasted exactly 14 and 42/100ths of a second.

 

This is a great article that highlights the Olympic successes that are underreported.  Due to geographic circumstances, simply competing is a remarkable accomplishment.  The women participants from Afghanistan and Iran are highlighted in this article. "


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lelapin's comment, August 11, 2012 1:27 PM
great article indeed. Thanks for turning the spotlight away from the podium, for a change.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:41 PM

The olympic games have become only about the podium winners in the media, if you dont win you dont matter. Tahmina Kohistani was the only female athlete from Afghanistan to compete in the games back in 2012. It is an amazing feat in itself that a female from Afghanistan even managed to get to the games never mind partacipate. She didnt win, she finished last, but it was her personal best time and the fastest she had ever run the 100 meter. But because she was not up on that podium none of that matter and many people did not even know she had run the race.  

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?

 

The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.


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Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:09 PM

I really love this article because the young girl being interviewed is angry and has had enough of the sexism in Pakistan. Malala Yousafzai has definitely become a role model for girls in her homeland and she has advanced girl's education by a large margin during her fight. The school systems in Pakistan are lacking because of the environments and the materials teachers focus on and Pakistani boys get a very different education in their religious schools but the girls have begun to work harder to equal up to them and make it to universities.  There are still many restrictions on the jobs women can take but girls are beginning to fight that too.  Pakistan has now had female political officials which has shown the generations of schoolgirls that they can truly do anything they set their minds too and Malala has helped prove that the movement can't be stopped by surviving her assassination attempt and continuing to campaign. 

Daishon Redden's curator insight, April 22, 10:00 AM

I chose this article because it talks about limit of freedom in LDC's and how girls are not allowed to get an education. This was the main idea of what Half The Sky was. Girls no being given the same rights as boy.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 1:40 PM

Starting this article response off with a quote seems only appropriate. This article follows Malala Yousafzai through her horrific experience being victimized by the Talaiban. She is an inspiring girl with all the set backs she has had to endure and she wants the right for an education for Women in her country and society. She is determined in order to create a better life for herself and her people. “The peasants had a very difficult situation, but they didn’t give up,” Aroosa says in English. “They fought back, and got power. Girls can fight back and can get an education. A girl can bring a big change.”