Geography for All!
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Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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The Electronic Afterlife

"E-Waste is a growing problem in our consumer-based society. The geography of e-waste is an ‘out of sight out of mind’ problem that we rarely think about but need to due to the ecological impacts of our collective consumption." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1LT

 

Tags: pollution, sustainability, environment, resources, Ghana, Africa.


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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, November 10, 2015 11:37 AM

Maybe getting that new iPhone isn't such a good idea, eh?

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Dropping water levels reveal hidden church

Dropping water levels reveal hidden church | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
A 16th century church has emerged from the receding waters of the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir in the southern Mexican state of Chiapas. This is the second time water levels have dropped low enough to reveal the church since the reservoir was completed in 1966.

 

Tags: drought, Mexico, water, environment, religion, culture, Christianity,  colonialism, architecture, landscape.


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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:59 AM

water Chiapas

www.cheapassignmenthelp.com's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:39 AM

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Where China and Kazakhstan Meet

Where China and Kazakhstan Meet | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"While people often say that borders aren’t visible from space, the line between Kazakhstan and China could not be more clear in this satellite image. Acquired by the Landsat 8 satellite on September 9, 2013, the image shows northwestern China around the city of Qoqek and far eastern Kazakhstan near Lake Balqash.

The border between the two countries is defined by land-use policies. In China, land use is intense. Only 11.62 percent of China’s land is arable. Pressed by a need to produce food for 1.3 billion people, China farms just about any land that can be sustained for agriculture. Fields are dark green in contrast to the surrounding arid landscape, a sign that the agriculture is irrigated. As of 2006, about 65 percent of China’s fresh water was used for agriculture, irrigating 629,000 square kilometers (243,000 square miles) of farmland, an area slightly smaller than the state of Texas.

The story is quite different in Kazakhstan. Here, large industrial-sized farms dominate, an artifact of Soviet-era agriculture. While agriculture is an important sector in the Kazakh economy, eastern Kazakhstan is a minor growing area. Only 0.03 percent of Kazakhstan’s land is devoted to permanent agriculture, with 20,660 square kilometers being irrigated. The land along the Chinese border is minimally used, though rectangular shapes show that farming does occur in the region. Much of the agriculture in this region is rain-fed, so the fields are tan much like the surrounding natural landscape."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, environment modify, food, agriculture, agricultural land change.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 15, 2015 10:24 AM

It is amazing what irrigation can produce.  The border between China and Kazakhstan is a perfect picture of land with irrigation and one without supplied water.  Eastern Kasakhstan has farmland but it is only subsidized by natural rainfall whereas on the greener Chinese side of the border it is supplemented with water by the farmers.  Great picture!

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 12:00 PM

Seeing such a striking difference between two countries that are so close together is strange and thought-provoking. Knowing a little bit about the two countries can make a world of difference, though. In this case, we have China and Kazakhstan, two countries located in East/Central Asia. Kazakhstan borders China to the west, along the northern part of its western border. Much of China's inland land use is devoted to agriculture, as the majority of its industry is located near its coast. This is evident by the amount of green space seen in the satellite image above. With well over a billion people to feed, China needs to make use of as much of its arable land as possible. Kazakhstan, on the other hand is a much smaller country with much less land devoted to agriculture. Its farmland is mostly large and industrial, as a result of Soviet-era farming and is rain-fed rather than irrigated, like China's.

 

Knowing the history as well as the economic strengths of a country can therefore be useful in interpreting satellite images such as the one in this article. A lack of knowledge about China and Kazakhstan's economy and history may lead to an assumption that the Chinese are just better farmers than the Kazakhs. This is of course not necessarily true, but what is true is that China has a much larger and more immediate need for agriculture than does Kazakhstan and so devotes more of its land, time, and energy to farming. Likewise, it shouldn't be assumed that Kazakhstan has no need for agriculture at all. Instead, its history has largely influenced its economic strengths and needs, and the result is a country that looks very different from China. 

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 19, 2015 12:41 PM

It's crazy to see how much human influences can reshape the landscape, or how things we tend to think of in more abstract terms- like national boundaries- can be very physical in nature. I liked reading about the differing agricultural approaches the two nations take, and being able to see the physical manifestations of those two different approaches so obviously. It's impressive to think that China is able to support such a massive population- one in every 5 people alive on the planet is Chinese- with so little land, and the consequences are plain to see in the image above. Increased irrigation efforts leads to the unnaturally bright green patches in the middle of a relatively dry area, serving as a symbol of man's attempts to bind mother nature to his will. Although not always successful, such attempts appear to be working well here. In contrast, Kazakhstan's population demands vary wildly from that of China's, and its solution for feeding its people can therefore take a more natural, backroads approach, with food production concentrated in a few areas. I wonder what other international borders can be seen so neatly with the naked eye.

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EnviroAtlas

EnviroAtlas | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

EnviroAtlas is a collection of interactive tools and resources that allows users to explore the many benefits people receive from nature, often referred to as ecosystem services. Key components of EnviroAtlas include the following:

A multi-scaled Interactive Map with broad scale data for the lower 48 states and fine scale data for selected communitiesThe Eco-Health Relationship Browser, which shows the linkages between ecosystems, the services they provide, and human healthEcosystem services information, GIS and analysis tools, and written resources
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steve smith's curator insight, May 23, 2014 3:59 PM

This looks great, will be having a play with this soon !

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 24, 2014 3:38 PM

Enviro Atlas. Mapa Interactivo.

Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 25, 2014 9:21 PM

Unbelievable, tremendous resource. I wish I had this one growing up. It is a US gov site (EPA), and is for US geography. I'm betting you can search around for similar sites for other locales around the world. Great demo. Demo runs on Adobe Captivate. The demo took a little bit of time to load on a wired connection through a high speed fiber optic connection. Or skip the demo and play around with the maps. Site not all that fast. Still, it's worth waiting for if you want the data.

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Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.

 

This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 

 

Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.


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Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
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Top 10 Ways to Go Green this Holiday Season

Top 10 Ways to Go Green this Holiday Season | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
10 ways to go green this holiday season. Zero Waste holiday tips from Eco-Cycle.

 

This infographic combined with these recommendations are some simple reminders that mass consumption and waste does not contribute to global joy or cheer. 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 25, 2012 8:10 PM
I shared this on Facebook and Google+. Hope for lots of readers and followers!
Seth Dixon's comment, November 25, 2012 8:36 PM
Thanks Mary!
Javier Curso CFIE's curator insight, April 8, 2013 7:37 AM

beautiful, as Susan

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Climate Change, Disaster Mitigation and City Planning

TED Talks As Vicki Arroyo says, it's time to prepare our homes and cities for our changing climate, with its increased risk of flooding, drought and uncertainty.

 

Our major cities are suceptible to environmental catastrophes for a whole host of reasons.  Cities depend on a smooth of goods, money and services provided by infrastructure that we take for granted and assume will always work 24/7.  Presented in the video are some ideas about how we should rethink our cities with a different ecological paradigm to protect our cities more in the future. 

 

Tags: planning, urban ecology, environment adapt, sustainability.


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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:44 PM

Governements around the world are slowly but surely creating new plans to ensure the safety of the people. They have already worked on evacuation plans and tranportation for getting people out but, they also need to think about where would people go and how will they adapt to their new enviornment. I'm glad that some places started working on plans to build houses, highways, and churches at a higher elevation, but other countries also need help figuring this stuff out. They need a solution to better secure homes and lives. Everyone needs to work together to prepare for climate change and natural disasters, especially those places where are most likely to hit.

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How future urban sprawl maps out

How future urban sprawl maps out | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Projections of urban growth indicate areas where biodiversity is at high risk.

 

The AAG Smart Brief is a fantastic source of geographic news.  This is what they said about this article:  "Areas such as tropical Africa and eastern China are expected to be hot spots of urbanization during the next several years, according to researchers, who used satellite imagery and other data to project future urban expansion through 2030. 'We're not forecasting population, we're forecasting the expansion of urban space,' said Yale University geographer Karen Seto. Their efforts could be used to assist conservation initiatives, Seto noted."

 

Tags: AAG, urban, sprawl, land use, urban ecology, biogeography, unit 7 cities, environment.


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Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 24, 2013 7:56 AM
This article is about urban growth and decline, Africa and Asia are predicted to be hot spots of urban growth in the next few years. Geographer Karen Seto of Yale University in New Haven has creted a graph that finally accounts for variations in how individual cities occupy their land and the impact they have on local ecosystems.
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Which cities are the most electric car-friendly?

Which cities are the most electric car-friendly? | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

San Francisco, predictably, is near the top of the list of cities with the most electric car-charging stations. But it couldn't beat out winner Portland, Ore. and a surprising chart-topper from Texas.


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The Human and Natural World

I am seeing a great class opener.... WE ARE ALL INTERCONNECTED and we affect nature around us!

 

"While I do enjoy this video, it is especially interesting in in how it conceptualizes the world in the two frames.  Urban, human, civilized society on one side, with natural, unsettled wilderness on the other.  The video attempts to bridge the divide, hoping that more people will see more interconnections between the human/urban world and the natural/wildlife world.  While geographers recognize that all elements of the planet are interconnected, most people still think of the world through dichotomies such as these: civilization vs. wilderness, cultural vs. natural and human vs. animal.  How do these terms shape our thinking about the world? "    

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July 2012 Hottest Month Ever in U.S.

July 2012 Hottest Month Ever in U.S. | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
By Climate Central's Michael D. Lemonick: July 2012 was officially not only the warmest July on record, but also the warmest month ever recorded for the lower 48 states, according to a report released Wednesday by scientists at the National Oceanic...

 

The drought footprint cover 63% of the contiguous states during the hottest month in American history.  It's the hottest 12 month stretch (August 2011-July 2012) on record for the lower 48, making it the fourth consecutive month to set a new record (i.e. old record was July 2011-June 2012).The biggest difference from other hot months is the nighttime temperature have been exceptionally high.  The most current drought monitor map can be found at:  http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu


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Global CO2 emissions

 Great visual for kids ( and adults) learning about climate change and what we are doing to continue global warming.

"Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization."


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..

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Changes in Three Gorges Dam

NASA's animation of China's Three Gorges Dam construction over the years.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2015 6:32 PM

Inland water - environmental change 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 5:40 PM

The impact of the Three Gorges Dam on the residents upstream is amazing. I cannot imagine anything like this happening in the US, mostly because of the impact on the people both upstream and downstream. Ecological damage from this dam may not phase the Chinese government, but I think any North American or European government would shudder at the thought of the backlash among their citizens this would create.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:27 PM

Three Gorges damn in China is the largest dam ever constructed. This was created to save on power by creating hydroelectric power for the people of the land. One of the issues with this was the the flooding of the land up streams displacing millions of people. It created a larger up stream area and very small down stream. A lot of the people that lived up stream had to be relocated further inland and faced changing climatif weather. The banks of the river are carved out between what seems like mountainous regions so as you move more uphill the weather and temperature will be a whole new category of life (Depending on how far you relocated).

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Human activities are reshaping Earth's surface

Human activities are reshaping Earth's surface | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"By moving the slider, the user can compare 1990 false-color Landsat views (left) with recent true-color imagery (right). Humans are increasingly transforming Earth’s surface—through direct activities such as farming, mining, and building, and indirectly by altering its climate."


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:31 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:35 AM

Give a great interactive way to see how humans have impacted the earth. 

Sally Egan's curator insight, February 14, 5:45 PM

This is a great interactive showing change in a range of environments from 1990 to current as a result of human activities including agriculture, industry and urban expansion. The slide bar allows you to show differences in the location on a split image.

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Au départ, on l'a pris pour un fou. Maintenant, on le traite de génie. Découvrez Boyan Slat.

Au départ, on l'a pris pour un fou. Maintenant, on le traite de génie. Découvrez Boyan Slat. | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Boyan Slat vient d'annoncer que son projet fou The Ocean Cleanup est viable. Découvrez comment un entonnoir géant peut nettoyer les océans du plastique.
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The Great Green Wall

The Great Green Wall | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The Great Green Wall initiative uses an integrated approach to restore a diversity of ecosystems to the North African landscape.

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Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:53 PM

The great green wall initiative project, is a project which wants to plant tens of thousands of trees, roughly fifty thousand trees alone in Senegal. The point of this is to restore a failing  environment. Around five hundred million people are living in a desertification area. Both human and nature is at fault for this creation of a transition zone getting bigger and bigger, Humans are not necessarily taking care of the land like it should be taken care of and as for factors of nature such as climate change, drought and not enough rain. There are social impacts that may affect the area too, experts think that improvements in land and economy may help curb terrorism in Mali. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:59 PM

The great green wall is a way of separating the desert from the rain forest in Africa The Sahel is the area that separates the deforestation and the desert and would be a way to keep the desert in a different climatic region of the country.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:40 PM

this a great i think, the only way that countries in an area with such harsh environments can survive is by helping eachother and using their own beneficial land to help other and recieve help for their own deficiencies. 

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Sahel food crisis

Sahel food crisis | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The hunger crisis in the Sahel region of Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger and Chad has been deepening since the start of this year.

 

The Sahel is a classic transition zone--a border that is not a sharp division, but a gradual shift from one region to the next.  This area has environmentally marginal lands, but is as population pressures continue, marginal lands need to sustain more people. 


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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:25 PM

With an ongoing hunger crisis in the Sahel, areas such as Chad, Niger and Mali find it hard to make ends meet. These areas in the Sahel are not having the best of luck with their crops this year. Areas suffer from infestation of locusts, drought, and high food prices. Over 13 million people are affected and could suffer from hunger.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 2:41 PM

This map presents the struggles being faced by those living in the Sahel region during their major food crisis. The Sahel region is a transition zone separating Northern Africa from Central and Southern Africa by a dry, harsh landscape. Besides acting as just a physical divide, it also divides the Arabic and Islamic northern region from the southern and central regions and their differing religions and languages. While the Sahel region is historically very dry, droughts have become more and more common. The people living in the Sahel can no longer depend on the land for food and have turned to aid in order to stay alive. As an area of increased desertification, many are worried that climate change will make this region unlivable, thus uprooting different peoples and causing strife in other regions. 

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 1:44 PM

The Sahel is a region that lies basically in the middle of Africa and extend from West to East. It represents the boarder between the desert and the savannah. Having a semi-arid climate this region is not the most ideal place for living conditions. This comes in part because Africa is so large that the transport of goods and travel is almost impossible without the use of motor vehicles and access to the coast. Taking this into account one might predict severe hunger in areas of the Sahel, especially those that lie in the middle. As the population continues to rise, the shortage of food continues to take a toll on the local communities. Aside from food, proper healthcare is also needed to prevent lethal diseases from spreading

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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 12, 2015 4:58 PM

Unnatural landscapes. Amongst all the new technology and graphics, the world still holds phenomena’s that can leave any persons jaw dropped. This article on buzzfeed shows 25 images that can amaze you. In Mt. Roraima, Venezuela there is a slab of land that seems to be suspended in the clouds. The Metro in Stockholm, Sweden resembles a space station in the rocks. The tunnel of love in the Ukraine looks like a path carved out of bush and also a romantic place for a date. The tulip Fields in Lisse, Netherlands looks like a grounded rainbow. Lapland, Finland is home to massive natural snow creatures. The mountains of Zhangye, China resembles the colors and look of Zebra stripe gum. Lake Rebta in Senegal looks like your floating in tomato soup.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 11:43 AM

Physical geography and landforms are something that have amazed people for millennia. The world's tallest mountains, deepest oceans, widest rivers, and largest deserts have, at various times, astounded, baffled, and hindered human beings. Some physical features are helpful to human progress (cities built on hills are more defensible, rivers allow for irrigation for agriculture) and others delay it (mountains are difficult to traverse, oceans are large and treacherous to navigate). And then there are landforms or geographic features that are just downright strange or unusual, like the ones listed in this article. 

 

While looking at pictures of these places or visiting them may be fun, they also provide us with a valuable lesson about nature. Nature is a force to be reckoned with, as it can produce some pretty amazing and unusual things. People sometimes do not stop to think what nature can do and as a result, suffer the consequences (Napoleon, and later Hitler's ill-fated invasions of Russia, for instance). Geography and natural landforms can be invaluable tools in human progress, but it should also be kept in mind that they are part of nature, and that nature is an unpredictable and sometimes violent force. As with anything, then, nature and geography must be respected and feared to avoid making the same mistakes that others have made in the past. 

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 17, 2015 11:34 AM

Another interesting failure of the Soviets during the Cold War. One really begins to question their competence when reading about this, Chernobyl and the Aral Sea. I honestly don't see how anyone would consider lighting a major gas leak on fire would help the situation either. Regardless this site stands as a testament to the influence we have on the geography of area through our reshaping for society. The incident also now helps Turkmenistan economically because it offers tourist attraction revenue. Additionally while the gallery had many fascinating images from around the world this one captivated me due to its historical nature and affect it would have had on the region. Hopefully the site doesn't ever become too dangerous do to the flammable substances because I would imagine that is a possibility (also hopefully there is not too much environmental damage from it either).

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Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses

Bridges For Animals - Wildlife Overpasses | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Our modern society depends on greater connectivity between places.  Regionalized economies, politics and transportation networks are increasingly integrated with far-flung places now more than ever before.  Our biosphere and natural environments are exceptions to this pattern.  Wilderness areas are 'islands' in an ocean of human controlled environments.   We create transportation linkages that unite people economies and cities, but separate herds from there extended habitat. 

 

We've all seen road kill on major highways.  Species like deer, elk, and grizzly bears and other large-bodied animals need a wide range for numerous ecological reasons.  These bridges are an attempt to ameliorate some of the problems that our roads pose for the non-human species that still call Earth home.  From a purely economic standpoint, many argue that these bridges save society money given the accidents and property damage that can be avoided. 

 

Tags: biogeography, transportation, environment, land use, sustainability, environment adapt.


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Carly Schaus's comment, October 3, 2013 9:48 PM
I think this would be a great idea! it would keep the animals, nature and people safe. They have protection from motor vehicles where they crash on.
Courtney Gritman's comment, October 4, 2013 3:22 PM
I think this would be a wonderful solution from innocent animals from being killed and thousands of car accidents being prevented.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 15, 2013 8:55 PM
This is very interesting! Good scoop!
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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Until now, there has been a lack of solid, comprehensive spatial data about African groundwater resources.  Researchers have now done so.  For a more academic article on the subject, here are their findings in Environmental Research Letters. 

 

Tags: water, Africa, resources, physical, environment, environment depend.    


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Philippines floods: the aftermath

Philippines floods: the aftermath | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The torrential rains that caused widespread flooding in Manila, the capital of the Philippines, have left the city reeling...

 

This is a grim, but captivating photo gallery showing how people adapt to environmental disasters.  Human settlements are vulnerable to disasters based on their environmental situations but people still display an amazingly capacity to be resilient in the face of danger.  "The torrential rains that caused widespread flooding in Manila, the capital of the Philippines, have left the city reeling. Thousands of people remain in evacuation shelters, and those who stayed in their homes during the deluge face a major clean-up operation." 


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Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:57 PM
its sad to see how the harsh climate in the Philippines affecting the people living there
Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:19 AM

Pictures truly are worth a thousand words. Seeing the disaster occur in someone home, or seeing how a locasl business has lost so much due to the disaster is powerful. It is one thing to read an article and it is another to see precious photos ruined by the disaster.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:57 PM

Flooding causes serious damage both emotionally and physically. People lose everything when floods happen. Their homes, cars and lives literally get lost in the water. Tragedy like this happens more often than we think. Being prepared for when something like this strikes is the key.

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'Sharp drop' in India poverty

'Sharp drop' in India poverty | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Poverty in India has dropped sharply thanks to increased spending on rural welfare programmes, the country's Planning Commission says.

 

KV: Government intervention has decrease poverty in rural India. More people are getting out of poverty in rural areas than urban areas. Programs funded by the government to help the poor has significantly changed many lives. People are given education, welfare, and proper sanitation. Once assistance is provided to the poor, the welfare and well being drastically changes for the better. As the Indian government prospers because of new business ventures, some of the increased revenue should be set aside to help many regions that are affected by poverty.

 

SD: For more resources on population, the environment and society by KV, see: http://storify.com/Kimbodiantree/population-and-the-effects-on-society-and-the-envi


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luisvivas64@hotmail.'s comment, February 3, 2013 10:19 AM
La pobreza es el càncer de la sociedad humana, ojalà sea posible reducirla, aunque soy escèptico, el dinero es muy sabroso y los pocos que lo tienen no lo sueltan, de allì las revoluciones, guerras ect.
Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 8, 2013 4:56 PM

Poverty in rural India has declined drastically, and much faster then in urban India. The decline is due to increased spending on rural welfare programmes, and rural poverty fell by 8% while urban poverty fell by 4.8%. I think this is great that the government is finally taking action and helping their people, instead of just 'sweeping them under the rug' in a way and pretending the issue isnt there.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 11, 2015 11:26 AM

This is yet another sign that India is developing into a great world power. The government has sought to curb the rates of rural poverty by instituting social welfare programs.  The programs are designed to provide those living in the rural areas of the nation, with education and proper sanitation. These programs appear to be succeeding, as a sharp drop has occurred in rural poverty. The governments recognition of the poverty issue is a major step towards tackling the major inequities in Indian society. Largely a legacy of the caste system, Indian society is still terribly divided along socio-economic lines. In order for Indian to achieve the status of a developed nation, the government must take action to bridge this inequities. An new  society based on equality may be on the horizon in India.

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Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational

Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"The final 32 generators went into operation this week, making it the world's largest hydropower project, pictured, built on the Yangtze River in China."  This photo gallery has a tremendous video at the end that displays vividly the raw power that moves the turbines.  Economically, what are the benefits? Environmentally, what are the costs?    

 


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:07 PM

The three gorges dam displays the extraordinary things man can do to manipulate the environment.  This man made dam also shows how much technology influences our geographic space.