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Geography for All!
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Curated by Trisha Klancar
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Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Geography in the News: Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 18, 2013 8:28 PM

One thing I bet most people did not know is that we get most of our foregin oil from Canada ans not an OPEC country at all.  This source really can help the US, but it does have drawbacks.  Expensive to refine, dangerous to ship in the proposed pipeline as it can corrode the pide easily.  Again seems a cost benefit analysis needs to be done, especailly with the US have large oil reserves in shale oil.  Is that source of oil cheaper to produce thereby growing domestic oil production??  Or is it cheaper to import the oil because of other considerations, like labor and environmental regulations?

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:57 PM

The three main arguments against Keystone XL is, one; making liquid fuel from tar sands keeps the United States dependent on a very polluting source of energy. Instead of moving towards cleaner sources of energy, the US would continue being one of the highest in CO2 in emissions. Secondly; the pipeline  has risks that include spills because the tar sands oil could corrode the pipe line and leak. And thirdly, the oil from keystone could be sold to foreign markets instead of staying domestic. Although the US needs to start being less dependent on foreign oil the Keystone pipeline is not the way to do so. Oil itself is not a permanent solution, it will run out and it continues to harm the environment. This pipeline defiantly poses more risks than anyone should be comfortable with.

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


Via Seth Dixon
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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational

Three Gorges Dam Fully Operational | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"The final 32 generators went into operation this week, making it the world's largest hydropower project, pictured, built on the Yangtze River in China."  This photo gallery has a tremendous video at the end that displays vividly the raw power that moves the turbines.  Economically, what are the benefits? Environmentally, what are the costs?    

 


Via John Foden, Seth Dixon
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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, December 15, 2014 4:07 PM

The three gorges dam displays the extraordinary things man can do to manipulate the environment.  This man made dam also shows how much technology influences our geographic space. 

 

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World's Biggest Power Blackout in Human History Hits India

The second day of India's power grid failures were worse than the first. Nearly 1900 miles of India went dark, an area that is home to nearly half of India's...

 

How is this issue geographic?  What themes are present in this issue and how are they interrelated? 


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Unnatural Landscapes

Unnatural Landscapes | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

In a world where photoshop has made the unreal seem ordinary, these unearthly seemingly landscapes might seem likely fakes.  The world can be that extraordinary.  Pictured above is the "Door to Hell" in Turkmenistan.  Rich with natural gas, Soviets were drilling in 1971 when the drilling rig collapsed and left a huge (230 feet wide) hole.  In an attempt to stop gas leaks they hoped a fire would burn off any discharge, but it is still burning today.  Enjoy this gallery of 25 'unnatural' images.   


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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, March 9, 6:52 PM

Some of these pictures are amazing. Im lucky enough to have been able to experience a few of these in my life.  The fire in Turkmenistan is unreal. I cant believe that fire has been burning since 1971. It really does seem like the "Door to Hell".

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 12, 4:58 PM

Unnatural landscapes. Amongst all the new technology and graphics, the world still holds phenomena’s that can leave any persons jaw dropped. This article on buzzfeed shows 25 images that can amaze you. In Mt. Roraima, Venezuela there is a slab of land that seems to be suspended in the clouds. The Metro in Stockholm, Sweden resembles a space station in the rocks. The tunnel of love in the Ukraine looks like a path carved out of bush and also a romantic place for a date. The tulip Fields in Lisse, Netherlands looks like a grounded rainbow. Lapland, Finland is home to massive natural snow creatures. The mountains of Zhangye, China resembles the colors and look of Zebra stripe gum. Lake Rebta in Senegal looks like your floating in tomato soup.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 11:43 AM

Physical geography and landforms are something that have amazed people for millennia. The world's tallest mountains, deepest oceans, widest rivers, and largest deserts have, at various times, astounded, baffled, and hindered human beings. Some physical features are helpful to human progress (cities built on hills are more defensible, rivers allow for irrigation for agriculture) and others delay it (mountains are difficult to traverse, oceans are large and treacherous to navigate). And then there are landforms or geographic features that are just downright strange or unusual, like the ones listed in this article. 

 

While looking at pictures of these places or visiting them may be fun, they also provide us with a valuable lesson about nature. Nature is a force to be reckoned with, as it can produce some pretty amazing and unusual things. People sometimes do not stop to think what nature can do and as a result, suffer the consequences (Napoleon, and later Hitler's ill-fated invasions of Russia, for instance). Geography and natural landforms can be invaluable tools in human progress, but it should also be kept in mind that they are part of nature, and that nature is an unpredictable and sometimes violent force. As with anything, then, nature and geography must be respected and feared to avoid making the same mistakes that others have made in the past. 

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Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

No further link...unless you are a member BUT a great point and graphic.

 

It is increasingly clear that we already live in the era of human-induced climate change, with unprecedented weather and climate extremes.

 

I don't delight in sharing the bad news.  So is this drought just a freak anomaly or a sign of a new normal?


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 13, 2012 2:28 PM
The graphic was not connected to the article. It was linked on a PBS facebook page and I linked the juxtaposition of the graphic and the NY Times article. Here is the FB page: https://www.facebook.com/EarthTheOperatorsManual.Page Personally, an entire century as a baseline of comparison does not feel like cherrypicking data. True the Earth is an incredibly complex system that controlling for all variables is in essence impossible, but denying that the system has changed seems foolish to me. Why has the system changed? I'm okay with that being a reasonable debate worthy of academics.
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Global CO2 emissions

 Great visual for kids ( and adults) learning about climate change and what we are doing to continue global warming.

"Animated time-lapse video of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions in map form, spanning the 18th century until this current first decade of the 21st centur...

 

This is not a complete data set, but the video still shows the striking connection between CO2 emissions and  the historical geography of industrialization."


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 2, 2012 2:21 PM
I'd love to take credit for this, but I didn't create this video, but am simply sharing a resource that I found online with the broader community. Follow the YouTube link to see info about the creator there (Cuagau1).
Mark V's comment, September 4, 2012 11:41 AM
Frightening and guilt inducing. The US and Europe the biggest historical violators, plus living in the northeastern part of the country which shows the highest concentrations.
Rafael CAYUELA's curator insight, February 3, 2014 3:18 PM

Interesting and well done..