Geography for All!
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Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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Thousands of Earthquakes Recorded in Puget Sound in Just Two Weeks

Thousands of Earthquakes Recorded in Puget Sound in Just Two Weeks | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Residents can't feel most of them, but there have been a lot of earthquakes in Puget Sound lately.

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.


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Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

"Flooding caused by some of the Philippines' heaviest rains on record submerged more than half the capital Tuesday, turning roads into rivers and trapping tens of thousands of people in homes and shelters. The government suspended all work except rescues and disaster response for a second day."


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Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 26, 2015 1:24 PM

For the second day in a row, the Philippines government has been forced to shut down all work, except for rescuers and disaster responders. Flooding has submerged more than half of the cities capital, Manila. Roads have turned to rivers and tens of thousands of people are trapped in homes and shelters. 7 deaths have been recorded so far. The capital holds 12 million people and more than 200 hundred evacuation centers have been opened. The monsoon that caused the floods is expected to travel north and cause havoc throughout the provinces surrounding Manila.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 11:03 PM

The area of Minila received more rainfall in day than it typically gets in a month.  Flights were delayed and cancelled, roads were turned into rivers.  Some of the thoughts of why this is happening are because of deforestation of mountains, clogged waterways and canals where large squatter communities live, and poor urban planning

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 28, 2015 6:44 AM

Flash flooding is probably the least understood natural disaster in the world. People often underestimate, how dangerous a flash flooding situation can become. The Philippines and South East Asia suffer from widespread monsoons. The regions fertile farmland is a result of the widespread heavy rainfall. A darker consequence of this phenomenon is the occurrence of dangerous flash flooding conditions. This particular rain in the Philippians was strong enough to submerge more than half of the capital underwater. The government in Manila has suspended all government operations that do not pertain to response and rescue missions. There will be major economic effects from this event. The loss of private property, and infrastructure such as roads will put a dent into the local economy.

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Climate Change, Disaster Mitigation and City Planning

TED Talks As Vicki Arroyo says, it's time to prepare our homes and cities for our changing climate, with its increased risk of flooding, drought and uncertainty.

 

Our major cities are suceptible to environmental catastrophes for a whole host of reasons.  Cities depend on a smooth of goods, money and services provided by infrastructure that we take for granted and assume will always work 24/7.  Presented in the video are some ideas about how we should rethink our cities with a different ecological paradigm to protect our cities more in the future. 

 

Tags: planning, urban ecology, environment adapt, sustainability.


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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 1:44 PM

Governements around the world are slowly but surely creating new plans to ensure the safety of the people. They have already worked on evacuation plans and tranportation for getting people out but, they also need to think about where would people go and how will they adapt to their new enviornment. I'm glad that some places started working on plans to build houses, highways, and churches at a higher elevation, but other countries also need help figuring this stuff out. They need a solution to better secure homes and lives. Everyone needs to work together to prepare for climate change and natural disasters, especially those places where are most likely to hit.

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Philippines floods: the aftermath

Philippines floods: the aftermath | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The torrential rains that caused widespread flooding in Manila, the capital of the Philippines, have left the city reeling...

 

This is a grim, but captivating photo gallery showing how people adapt to environmental disasters.  Human settlements are vulnerable to disasters based on their environmental situations but people still display an amazingly capacity to be resilient in the face of danger.  "The torrential rains that caused widespread flooding in Manila, the capital of the Philippines, have left the city reeling. Thousands of people remain in evacuation shelters, and those who stayed in their homes during the deluge face a major clean-up operation." 


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Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:57 PM
its sad to see how the harsh climate in the Philippines affecting the people living there
Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:19 AM

Pictures truly are worth a thousand words. Seeing the disaster occur in someone home, or seeing how a locasl business has lost so much due to the disaster is powerful. It is one thing to read an article and it is another to see precious photos ruined by the disaster.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:57 PM

Flooding causes serious damage both emotionally and physically. People lose everything when floods happen. Their homes, cars and lives literally get lost in the water. Tragedy like this happens more often than we think. Being prepared for when something like this strikes is the key.

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."


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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.

 

This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 


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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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Mammoth Storm Plunges NYC into Darkness

Mammoth Storm Plunges NYC into Darkness | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
Subway tunnels and parts of the Financial District have been flooded...

 

The flooding has been as devastating as expected given the height of the storm surge, but this image of Ground Zero still is chilling. 


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Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay

Extreme Weather and Drought Are Here to Stay | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

No further link...unless you are a member BUT a great point and graphic.

 

It is increasingly clear that we already live in the era of human-induced climate change, with unprecedented weather and climate extremes.

 

I don't delight in sharing the bad news.  So is this drought just a freak anomaly or a sign of a new normal?


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Seth Dixon's comment, August 13, 2012 2:28 PM
The graphic was not connected to the article. It was linked on a PBS facebook page and I linked the juxtaposition of the graphic and the NY Times article. Here is the FB page: https://www.facebook.com/EarthTheOperatorsManual.Page Personally, an entire century as a baseline of comparison does not feel like cherrypicking data. True the Earth is an incredibly complex system that controlling for all variables is in essence impossible, but denying that the system has changed seems foolish to me. Why has the system changed? I'm okay with that being a reasonable debate worthy of academics.