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Geography for All!
Geography that affects YOU!
Curated by Trisha Klancar
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Favela Images

Favela Images | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.
Via Seth Dixon
Trisha Klancar's insight:

Amazing images to bring this to life for kids who have no concept what the favela looks like.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, February 20, 6:18 PM

Favelas are the slums. These pictures depict exactly how living in these cities is. CRAMMED. OVERCROWDED. It is insane to look at how people literally live on top of each other, then we have other spaces such as farmlands that have nothing around them for miles. The amount of poverty this favela is suffering from is located within each picture. These people don't usually leave, instead they build up and up. You can see how some of the houses are multiple levels, whereas others are the single story.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2:50 PM

The favelas show that the country has not been able to keep up with the growth of urban population,  increasing population, and poverty.  It also shows how the people of Brazil use their resources to survive and build housing. There are many socioeconomic issues at stake in these favelas and with these favelas comes an increase in drugs and violence.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 8:57 AM

(South America topic 6)

These images seem almost unreal in the sense that these favelas appear to be like trees growing out of the hillside. I noticed that the homes towards the bottom of the hill appear much smaller than those at the top. If all were the same size the ones on the top would appear to be smallest from this angle. Even though this is considered a favela, it must be that some are willing to sacrifice space for convenience of location. Lastly, I would imagine that it must be easy to get lost on the way to one's home... the twisting paths and lack of any 'official' streets would be a maze to an outside visitor. I wonder if anybody has had the idea to start making a so-called road map of the paths through these favelas? That would be very interesting to see.

Rescooped by Trisha Klancar from Geography Education
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2014 World Cup: Will Brazil Be Ready?

ESPN Video: With the FIFA World Cup two years away, will Brazil be ready to host soccers premiere event?

 

This short sports documentary (12 minutes) looks at some of the socioeconomic and urban planning issues that are a part of the logistics for a country to prepare for a sporting event on the magnitude of the World Cup.  The discussion of demolitions in the favelas (squatter settlements) is especially intriguing.  Major sporting events of this magnitude that last for two weeks can reshape local geographic patterns for decades.  

 

Tags: sport, Brazil, planning, squatter.


Via Seth Dixon
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Brett Sinica's curator insight, October 1, 2013 5:11 PM

I know my soccer, and I know Brazil knows its soccer considering the country has one of the richest histories in the world.  The nation eats, sleeps, and breathes the beautiful game and to host a World Cup right now is immaculate timing.  Some of the best players (possibly ever) in the world would be playing next year, all from star-studded nations.  The forecast for this spectacle will surely be one of the best in history, but that's if it all goes to plan.  There's been many videos and articles of Brazil coming into more problems than solutions.  Repairing and even building new stadiums have set back schedules and have even angered many locals.  In some cities, there have been cases of gentrification, places such as favelas have fell victim.  Being such a passionate fan of the sport, it's almost upsetting that all of these people are being misplaced to house the tournament which has been anxiously waited on since 2010.  The main picture says it all with the three hands covered in blood...  A nation which cares so much about a sport, where it is a way of life and prosperity, is in fact doing more harm than good in some areas.  In the end I hope Brazil can get back on schedule, and leave as little people harmed in the process so the world can enjoy one of the greatest sporting events come summer of 2014.

Ashley Raposo's curator insight, December 19, 2013 12:16 AM

The World Cup is getting closer and all eyes are on Brazil. The Favelas are seeing the worst of it. To improve their country for it's soon to be influx of tourists, the Favelas are going through practically forced renovations. Not to mention safety hazards in Brazil are being pushed to the limits with the building anf remidelling of the soccer stadiums. Just last month 2 construction workers part of the rebuilding were killed by an accident. The question is especially true. Will Brazil be ready? Soccer fans around the globe sure hope so.