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Geography for All!
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Curated by Trisha Klancar
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Sahel food crisis

Sahel food crisis | Geography for All! | Scoop.it
The hunger crisis in the Sahel region of Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger and Chad has been deepening since the start of this year.

 

The Sahel is a classic transition zone--a border that is not a sharp division, but a gradual shift from one region to the next.  This area has environmentally marginal lands, but is as population pressures continue, marginal lands need to sustain more people. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Elizabeth Allen's comment, November 24, 2012 11:17 PM
There have been major differences between Americans food consumption compared to Africa's consumption for as long as I can remember. Here we are many years later and the devastation continues.... Comparing articles http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/interactive/2012/jul/19/sahel-food-crisis-guardian-interactive and http://ecocycle.org/holidayguide/10ways(Today, 11:16 PM) (Today, 11:16 PM)
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 3:25 PM

With an ongoing hunger crisis in the Sahel, areas such as Chad, Niger and Mali find it hard to make ends meet. These areas in the Sahel are not having the best of luck with their crops this year. Areas suffer from infestation of locusts, drought, and high food prices. Over 13 million people are affected and could suffer from hunger.

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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

Until now, there has been a lack of solid, comprehensive spatial data about African groundwater resources.  Researchers have now done so.  For a more academic article on the subject, here are their findings in Environmental Research Letters. 

 

Tags: water, Africa, resources, physical, environment, environment depend.    


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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | Geography for All! | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


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Ricardo Salaya Monsell's comment, November 5, 2012 1:31 PM
Although I do not think they do to "trick", it is true that confuses many people and makes them believe in a world disproportionate. (Apologies for my terrible google-English)
Laurence Cuffe's curator insight, August 1, 2013 4:46 AM

While size is not every thing, and Ireland seems to have returned to the UK, This is an image worth discusing in Class.

Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

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AfriGadget: Recycling

FANTASTIC!!!

A Cameroonian boy shows the recycled parts used to construct a toy RC car.

 

I originally found this video on one of the coolest websites ever: http://www.afrigadget.com/ ; The website seeks to show people "solving everyday problems with African ingenuity." While the developed world lives in a commercial, disposable society, Africans often need to maximize the useablity of all objects. The solutions they come up with can show students that it is not all doom and gloom in Africa, an represent a triumph of the human spirit.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 5, 2012 2:40 PM
This video is short but it was interesting to me, that "car" made out of pipe, rope, etc. was built great with the resources they had. Those kids are very smart.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 9:59 AM

This video is nothing short of amazing.  The boy in the video demonstrates a toy car that he built himself using recycled objects such as slippers and string.  The video is mindblowing because children in the United States have thousands of dollars worth of toys that are cheaply made and only excite the children for a few minutes before moving onto a different activity.  The boy in the video represents human spirit in Africa because he maximized the use of objects that would otherwise not be used to build a toy car and he is very pleased about his creation.