Geography Everywhere
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Geography Everywhere
A collection of resources for geography enthusiasts and instructors.
Curated by Aimee Kelly
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Growth Rings

Growth Rings | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it

"Maps Of U.S. Population Change, 2000-2010.  Blue is population increase, red represents population decline."


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Kate Buckland's curator insight, May 17, 2014 8:01 PM

The donut effect!

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:38 PM

These maps show the changes of urban areas in America and the patterns and problems each one goes through.

These human places go through similar development patterns and all focus economically but still have different landscapes as a place.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 29, 2014 4:25 PM

Detroit has an increasing population, along with the outskirts of Chicago (suburbs). This  increasing population represents areas that are prospering  because of economic factors. Just as some businesses in Detroit are coming back, businesses in the suburbs in Chicago are also growing, contributing to an increasing population as well. This map reflects economic and social factors (ethnicity) in the present and can be used to get an understanding of America's population growth/decline. 

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Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

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Heidi Hutchison's curator insight, October 12, 2013 1:46 PM

Just incredibly awesome, but so, so sadly true.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

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High School Students Interviewed

Jay Leno interviews high school students knowledge of global issues and geographic understanding...as I'm sure you can guess, it isn't pretty. 


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Patti Griffiths Bryant's curator insight, August 27, 2013 12:17 PM

It's our virtual reality folks, kids' worlds are still only a big as their arms' length. #LetsGet4D #GlobalLearning for our #GlobalCommunity

 

Joe Blauw's comment, August 28, 2013 1:08 PM
I think it's sad that people aren't educated enough to know where main superpower countries are such as Great Britain or some of the terrorist countries that have been all over the news for several years I was surprised and disappointed
Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 7:28 AM

Worth sharing

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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."


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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 11:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, September 26, 2014 11:34 AM

This map shows how linguistically diverse the United States is today. This map reminded me of one of the slides that we went over in class about how in the Northwest Region the predominant language was German and now it is mainly English, with some German and Native American languages still spoken in certain parts.

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 26, 2014 10:29 PM

This data is very interesting because you can see that most of these statements speak Spanish. I noticed that most people who speak another language at home (in this case Spanish)  besides English are located in the south western of United States. I wonder if this has something to do with people who immigrated to U.S  from south America.

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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."


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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Worldometers - real time world statistics

Worldometers - real time world statistics | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
Live world statistics on population, government and economics, society and media, environment, food, water, energy and health.
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This group creates algorithms for a diverse set of world statistics including population, health, media, food, the environment, among other topics. 

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Surging Seas / Counties / Virginia Beach, Virginia

Surging Seas / Counties / Virginia Beach, Virginia | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
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Surging Seas - Interactive website lets you manipulate the amount of sea level rise to see the impacts on specific cities in the United States.

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Klallam dictionary opens window into tribal heritage

Klallam dictionary opens window into tribal heritage | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
A three-decade effort to preserve a native language has resulted in the first-ever dictionary of the language, which previously was only spoken.
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A story about a great effort to preserve the Klallam language through the creation of a dictionary, and the incorporation of Klallam as a language option for public school students.

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A Trail of Bullet Casings Leads From Africa’s Wars to Iran

A Trail of Bullet Casings Leads From Africa’s Wars to Iran | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
Independent arms-trafficking researchers worked for six years to pin down the source of rifle and machine-gun ammunition in regions of protracted conflict.
Aimee Kelly's insight:

This article chronicles research that uncovered the source of ammunition that has been used in many African conflicts, including places that were under a UN arms embargo.  Another aspect of state-sponsored terrorism that doesn't get a whole lot of attention.

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Global Positioning System Overview

Global Positioning System (GPS) Overview
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Here's an overview of GPS by Dr. Peter H. Dana.  It hasn't been revised in a long time, but is a good starting place that presents information in an outline type format.

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All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography

All Over the Map: 10 Ways to Teach About Geography | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
We have created 10 activities for teaching about geography using Times content, all related to the National Geography Standards.

 

This is a set of 10 activities that all use New York Times resources are all connected to the National Geography Standards and applicable to any social studies classroom.  It's great to see geography getting this publicity in the NY Times, but it's fantastic to have these easy-to-use ideas for the classroom that are rich in content.  

 

Tags: K12, Geography Education.


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SVS Animation 3827 - Perpetual Ocean

SVS Animation 3827 - Perpetual Ocean | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it

NASA GSFC Scientific Visualization Studio...This visualization tool shows ocean currents for a few years ending in December 2007

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What Will Swing the Swing States?

What Will Swing the Swing States? | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it

Here’s how to judge what voters in Ohio, Florida, Virginia and the other tossups are deciding as the votes come in.  This resource does a nice job showing the importance of key locations in the national election, highlighting the concept of scale. 

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'I will sell them,' Boko Haram leader says of kidnapped Nigerian girls

'I will sell them,' Boko Haram leader says of kidnapped Nigerian girls | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
Fears for the fate of more than 200 Nigerian girls turned even more nightmarish when the leader of the Islamist group that kidnapped them said he'll sell them.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 7, 2014 9:46 AM

I have hesitated to post about this topic for several reasons (unsure of the regional context, painful topic, religious overtones, etc.) but feel that it is important enough that it simply can't be ignored.  The abductions have triggered massive protests as we see the convergence of modern social mobilization and intelligence versus old-fashioned brute force.  This video is a quick introduction to the group Boko Haram and this article discusses their current activities.  Boko Haram came to power because of ecological disaster, oil politics and corruption.  Amnesty Internat'l answers the difficult question, "what can be done?"

 

Tags: Nigeria, slavery.

SwagQueen's curator insight, May 8, 2014 8:28 PM

i think Boko Haram is a Stupid moron who should be put into jail. the Nigerian government to save our girls. Innocent girls are being taken away from their homes and their parents want them back.

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 2014 12:33 PM

Every one should see this video 4 reasons why Boko Haram does what it does. A bunch of idiots

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Fed Up on the Prairie, and Voting on Seceding From Colorado

Fed Up on the Prairie, and Voting on Seceding From Colorado | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
In November, 11 rural counties will hold a vote on whether to secede from the state and work to form their own — or maybe join Wyoming.
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A current example of a region within Colorado that no longer identifies with the rest of the state, and its attempt to change the political geography of the area.

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The Best Map Ever Made of America's Racial Segregation | Wired Design | Wired.com

The Best Map Ever Made of America's Racial Segregation | Wired Design | Wired.com | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all.
Aimee Kelly's insight:

According to Wired magazine, this series of maps created by Dustin Cable of the University of Virginia's Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service shows just how segregated some cities in the United States remain at the same time that we do see some levels of spatial integration.  While maps of segregation are not new, this map uses a dot to represent one person, providing an extremely detailed map with 2010 Census data.

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As Amazon Stretches, Seattle’s Downtown Is Reshaped

As Amazon Stretches, Seattle’s Downtown Is Reshaped | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
Jeffrey P. Bezos, Amazon’s founder, is helping remake the corporate giant’s hometown with an ambitious plan for a new headquarters, one of the biggest development projects in city history.
Aimee Kelly's insight:

This article discusses the impact Amazon's move to build employment offices in downtown Seattle is having on the urban structure of the city.  It identifies a potentially new trend in urban geographies, where big businesses are locating in urban centers rather than suburban settings, attracting more people to urban living.

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More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities

More Risk, but Less Fear, in Cities | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it

"This week's Boston Marathon bombing fit with the norm of U.S. terrorist events and threats in one important way: it occurred in a major city. American concerns about terrorism, however, seem to ignore that pattern...There’s a divide on people’s thoughts about terrorism. People that live in places most likely to be hit by terrorism seem the most sunny about the country’s anti-terror prospects and efforts. And those in rural places,  are more concerned and pessimistic."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 23, 2013 2:01 PM

This article cites data from the PEW Reseach Center that implies that city dwellers seem to feel less dread about terror threats than their suburban and rural counterparts, despite the fact they live in the primary target zone (see full size infographic here--note that the data was assembled before the Boston Marathon attack).  


Question to Ponder: Why are the Americans most vulnerable to terrorist attacks the least concerned with terrorism? 

 

Tagsterrorism, statistics, USA, infographic, urban.

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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An Incredibly Detailed Map Shows The Potential Of Global Water Risks

An Incredibly Detailed Map Shows The Potential Of Global Water Risks | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
Remember the drought that hit the U.S. in 2012? It was a big deal, even if it didn’t personally affect you. In fact, 53% of the country was dealing with what the USDA calls "moderate to extreme drought" by July.
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This website describes a new map from the World Resources Institute called Aqueduct.

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Time-Space Compression

Time-Space Compression | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
In this age of fast travel and instant digital communications, we tend to forget that not so long ago, distances were subjectively very different.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 7:54 PM

With the development of modern equipment useful in maneuvering around the world, the time it took those living in the 1800's has been reduced to getting anywhere around the world with time spanning from 30- 24hrs. This of course has been made possible due to the development of roads, better boating constructions and air travel.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 10, 2014 8:12 PM

Since 1800 the rate of travel has increased exponentially through the years. From the very beginning of travel, it would take close to a week just to get from the east coast to the middle of the United States. Through the use of railroads we have overcome the "time" factor and essentially eliminated it from playing a role in the way we travel. Today's advances in transportation has made seeing others much easier and most importantly it has developed a connected world that allows for transport of goods and services possible to such an extent that as citizens of the United states we are able to access almost anything we need from a day to day basis. A technology like this will continue to expand and grow to make the life of people that much easier.

Cade Bruce's curator insight, March 19, 7:26 PM

This belongs under the category of Major geographical concepts underlying the geographical perspective, because it involves the geographic concept of time-space compression since the 1800s, and how the time it takes to travel has decreased greatly since the 1800s. This affects many things like economy because of the difficulty of trading over distance.

 
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NASA | Looking Down a Well: A Brief History of Geodesy

Geodesy is a field of study that deals with the measurement and representation of the Earth, and it all started when a clever human named Eratosthenes discov...
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A brief video summarizing the science of geodesy in a entertaining way.  Good for use in an online classroom too.

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Alarm as China Issues "Rules" for Disputed Area

Alarm as China Issues "Rules" for Disputed Area | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
New rules announced last week to allow interceptions of ships in the South China Sea are raising concerns in the region, and in Washington, that simmering disputes with Southeast Asian countries over the waters will escalate.

 

According to this new announcement, Chinese ships would be allowed to search and repel foreign ships if they were engaged in illegal activities (but that is open to interpretation) if the ships were within the 12-nautical-mile zone surrounding islands that China claims. This makes the disputed territorial claims of China all the more at the center of this geopolitical maneuverings.  Much of the South China Sea would then be under Chinese control if this announcement becomes the new reality. 

 

Questions to Ponder: Why is China making this announcement?  Is China within their rights to make this declaration?  Who might oppose this? 


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The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods

The Geography of Thanksgiving Foods | Geography Everywhere | Scoop.it
The terms cooks enter into search engines can provide clues as to what dishes are being cooked around the nation.

 

Some fascinating (if not entirely scientific) maps that show the most common searches on www.allrecipes.com and regional differences in food preferences.  More importantly, it also is an interesting glimpse into the geography of language.  Some similar dishes are called by more regional names (e.g.-"Stuffing" in the Northeast and West, "Dressing" in the Midwest and South).  This set of maps also reinforces the concepts of regions.  This is a fun way to teach some actual content and enjoy the holiday.

 

Tags: language, food, diffusion, regions, seasonal.


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