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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.


A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.


Tagscoastalclimate change, urbanmegacitieswater, environmenturban ecology.

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An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City

An Intriguingly Detailed Animation of How People Move Around a City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Watch the commuting patterns of New York, San Francisco and Los Angeles.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This CityLab article and the embedded maps show the rhythms and patterns that make city life so beautifully complex.  The Center for Advances Spatial Analysis has compiled numerous maps, time-lapse videos and other animations to show flows of urban life.  These are great resources to visualize the 'spaces of flows.'  


Tags: mobility, mapping, visualization, urban, planning, unit 7 cities, transportation.

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Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2:49 AM

possibly useful for studying complexity

Linda Alexander's curator insight, July 13, 7:41 AM

You can actually plug-in income levels for these 3 cities and view daily commutes.  Fascinating CityLab data!

 

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, July 13, 3:28 PM

Another fabulous post for Year 7 from Seth Dixon. An aspect of liveability  in colour!

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Beijing's Facelift

"A government-initiated redevelopment plan will transform one of the oldest neighborhoods in Beijing into a polished tourist attraction."

Seth Dixon's insight:
This 2010 video (and related article) showcases one of China's urban transformation projects.  Urban revitalization plans are not without critics, especially those who see the cultural transformation of a neighborhood they deem worthy of historical preservation.  This process is occurring all over the world (we've recently seen this in Brazil as they were preparing for the World Cup).  This is one of the videos that I've put into my interactive map with over 65 geography videos to share in the classroom.
 
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The Rise of Innovative Districts

"Today, innovation is taking place where people can come together, not in isolated spaces. Innovation districts are this century's productive geography, they are both competitive places and 'cool spaces' and they will transform your city and metropolis."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As described by the Brookings Institution in their exploration regarding innovation districts, they are geographic areas where leading-edge companies, research institutions, start-ups, and business incubators are located in dense proximity. These districts are created to facilitate new connections and ideas, speed up the commercialization of those ideas, and support urban economies by growing jobs in ways that leverage their distinct economic position.


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities, labor.

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The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010

The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two maps and six charts take sprawl rankings to another level.
Seth Dixon's insight:

One of the great results of the decennial census is that geographers, demographers, sociologists, urbanists and countless others, can track the same population or spatial pattern and note historical changes over a 10 year span.  This series of maps and charts highlights some of the major changes.  You shouldn't be surprised that Atlanta is the United States' most sprawling major city and that San Francisco is the most compact, but this article dives beneath surface in a way that is still very accessible.   


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, sprawlneighborhoodplanning, densityplanning

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François Arnal's curator insight, June 6, 11:18 PM

L'étalement urbain aux Etats Unis.

 

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a wide economic gap between the rich and the poor and in the spatial layout of urban settlements. Often an accompanying  tangible separation exists between the communities where these groups live.  These images (captured by a helicopter pilot with a keen eye for iconic and cultural landscapes in Mexico City) show neighborhoods in Mexico where this separation does not exist.   Collectively they are reminiscent of this famous photograph in Brazil that shows the uneasy juxtaposition of favelas and luxurious housing. 


Questions to Ponder: What are these neighborhoods like?  How are these two communities linked and separated?  Compare and contrast life on both sides of the fence.    


Tags:  housingeconomic, socioeconomicBrazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, Mexico

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Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 5:49 PM

Interesting look at the social mobility of a super-urban area. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:26 AM

An advertising campaign hopes to show the differences of income and living standards between neighborhoods in Mexico.

The place of these areas are so vastly different as well as there interactions as the lower class makes shanty architecture and the upper class develops large condos and buildings just for residence.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 5:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

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Growth Rings

Growth Rings | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Maps Of U.S. Population Change, 2000-2010.  Blue is population increase, red represents population decline."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This series of maps shows important patterns impacting American cities today.  Pictured above is Detroit, emblematic of urban decline, but some of the patterns that we see in Detroit are happening elsewhere in the United States (but not was pronounced).  Three patterns are especially noteworthy: 1) Decline of the urban core, 2) Growth in the suburban ring but most especially 3) a revitalization of the downtown (specks of blue in the sea red). 


Questions to Ponder: So what processes are creating these patterns?  Have does this information mesh with, or change our understanding of the urban models?     


Tags: urban, planning, unit 7 cities, urban models, economic.

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Kate Buckland's curator insight, May 17, 5:01 PM

The donut effect!

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:38 AM

These maps show the changes of urban areas in America and the patterns and problems each one goes through.

These human places go through similar development patterns and all focus economically but still have different landscapes as a place.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 29, 1:25 PM

Detroit has an increasing population, along with the outskirts of Chicago (suburbs). This  increasing population represents areas that are prospering  because of economic factors. Just as some businesses in Detroit are coming back, businesses in the suburbs in Chicago are also growing, contributing to an increasing population as well. This map reflects economic and social factors (ethnicity) in the present and can be used to get an understanding of America's population growth/decline. 

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America's fastest shrinking cities

America's fastest shrinking cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The U.S. population rose by just 0.72% in 2013, the lowest growth rate in more than 70 years. Not only has the country become less-attractive to immigrants than in years past, with net immigration down from nearly 1.2 million as of 2001 to 843,145 last year, but also the U.S.'s domestic birth rate has dropped to a multi-decade low.

While the population of most of the country's metro areas grew at a low pace in recent years, in a small number of metro areas the population actually shrank. Looking at the most recent years, the U.S. population rose by just 2.4% between April 2010 and July 2013, but in 30 metro areas the population shrank by at least 1%. The population in Pine Bluff, Arkansas, fell a nation-leading 4.4% in that time. Based on recently released U.S. Census Bureau estimates, 24/7 Wall St. examined the cities with shrinking populations."

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How architectural innovations migrate across borders

"As the world's cities undergo explosive growth, inequality is intensifying. Wealthy neighborhoods and impoverished slums grow side by side, the gap between them widening. In this eye-opening talk, architect Teddy Cruz asks us to rethink urban development from the bottom up. Sharing lessons from the slums of Tijuana, Cruz explores the creative intelligence of the city's residents and offers a fresh perspective on what we can learn from places of scarcity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As a geographer native to the San Diego region with family on both sides of the border, I found this TED talk very compelling personally, but also rich in geographic themes (city planning, diffusion, governance of space, socioeconomic differences in land use patterns, etc.).  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  San Diego and Tijuana have more to offer each other than economic markets--the ideas born out of distinct socioeconomic and political contexts can be just what is needed on the other side of the border.


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, sprawlneighborhood, borders. planning, urban ecology, densityplanning, TED

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.


Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 1:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 7:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.


By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 3:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 1:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

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3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere

3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Once thought to be symbols of prosperity, innercity highways are now just eyesores — and sources of civic dysfunction — to some new urbanists.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED Talk also explores what cities should be with old freeways, suggesting that they should be dismantled and the spaces revitalized (and yes, my inner-Californian linguistic roots demands that I call them freeways).


Tags: transportation, urban, planning.

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Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City

Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As the sprawling Zaatari camp evolves into an informal city — with an economy and even gentrification — aid workers say camps can be potential urban incubators that benefit host countries like Jordan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an intriguing article that explores the difficulties of forced migrations that arise from civil war, but it also looks at city planning as refugee camps are established to make homes for the displaced.  These camps have become into de-facto cities. The maps, videos and photographs embedded in the article show the rapid development of these insta-cities which organically have evolved to fit the needs of incoming refugees.  Size not investing in permanent infrastructure has some serious social, sanitation and financial cost, there are some efforts to add structure to the chaos, to formalize the informal.  Truly this is a fascinating case study of in urban geography as we are increasingly living on what Mike Davis refers to as a "Planet of Slums."  


Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, warsquatter, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities. 

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Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, July 13, 8:06 AM

beautiful intriguing post telling the story of something I - personally - never considered. It pictures a new city growing, with not only basic needs, ...

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This Is the Traffic Capital of the World

This Is the Traffic Capital of the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are only 650 major intersections here—but somehow only 60 traffic lights.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Dhaka is the capital of Bangladesh and (as I often tell my students) it is the biggest city that nobody has ever heard of.  The infrastructure is so incredibly limited that traffic jams cost the city an estimated $3.8 billion in delays and air pollution.  This is an excellent article to explore some of the problems confronting megacities. 


Tags: Bangladeshtransportation, planning, density, South Asia, development, economic, megacities.

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Teresa Gallego Navarro's curator insight, July 7, 3:43 AM

¿movilidad urbana?  -¿algo habrá que gestionar aquí?

 

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, July 7, 7:45 AM

seth dixon:This is an excellent article to explore some of the problems confronting megacities.

Jade ten Kate's curator insight, July 9, 10:01 PM

Megacities

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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As our cities have massively expanded in the last 70 years, so has the ecological footprint of these metropolitan areas.  This article discusses some of the challenges confronting megacities and their functions within the global urban network. 


Tags: sustainabilitydensity, megacities, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, June 26, 2:25 PM

Just a few years ago there were only  20 cities with a pop over 10 million.  I'll use this with my  10 geography class to compare Australia's population and size with these cities and  look at debates around policies.  I,ll try and get the students to debate around ecological sustainability.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 9:05 AM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 6:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 5:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

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Urbanization and the evolution of cities across 10,000 years

"About 10,000 years ago, hunter-gatherers, aided by rudimentary agriculture, moved to semi-permanent villages and never looked back. With further developments came food surpluses, leading to commerce, specialization and, many years later with the Industrial Revolution, the modern city. Vance Kite plots our urban past and how we can expect future cities to adapt to our growing populations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson briefly summarizes the history of urban development and the technological advances that enable it.  Towards the end of the video they offer some suggestions that would make cities more sustainable as urban populations continue to grow.  What do you think of these suggestions?  


Tags: historical, urban, planning, TED

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steve smith's curator insight, June 7, 6:01 PM

A great look at urbanisation. 

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 8, 6:48 AM

تاريخ التطور الحضري

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, June 14, 4:18 PM

Fabulous link between Geography and History

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Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World

Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the above poster the cities are arranged (roughly, in order to maximize space) by population. Clearly, size and population are not directly correlated. Some cities take up a lot more space for a smaller population. The relationship between the two, of course, is known as density (population density, urban density)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I shared this a while back, but the creator has since revised the data and updated the layout for the main infographic. The entire set of infographics are tremendous visual tools to compare urbanization patterns around the world. 

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, May 14, 1:38 PM

    Ce qui suit est une série d'infographies comparant les empreintes physiques de 56 villes à travers le monde. Ils sont présentés côte à côte à la même échelle, ce qui permet au spectateur de comparer ces villes. Parmi celles-ci 56 sont quelques-unes des principales villes du monde...

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 9:21 AM

Urban sprawl is a rising problem in the world due to the lack of control and its massive impact on the surrounding environment. These footprints show how unique each city's sprawl is. The surrounding environment is playing a huge role in where and how far each city extends. Chicago, for example, is limited on its eastern side due to Lake Erie's close proximity, and Cleveland is in a similar situation but on its north side where Lake Erie is. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:35 AM

The cities are organized (approximately) to population and shows the size of cities accordingly. The different sizes of cities and their correlating populations is thus revealed from urban places around the world. 

Urban regions stay rather functional and could be seem similar across the board, focusing on major economic activity and transportation.

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Primate Cities: Mexico City

http://geographyeducation.org/2014/05/05/primate-cities-mexico-city/

Seth Dixon's insight:

In 2011, one of the AP Human Geography Free Response Questions focused on identifying if the rank-size rule applied the urban hierarchy of a country (Mexico), or if a primate city dominated the network of metropolitan regions.  To prepare people to understand the rubric, I put together this presentation, based primarily on my time researching in Mexico City (download the PPT file to access my notes for each slide).  The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to Mexico City; this additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city. 


Tags: APHG, urbanunit 7 cities, megacities.

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2:52 PM

Seth Dixon, creator of this excellent resource, notes, "I put together this presentation, based primarily on my time researching in Mexico City (download the PPT file to access my notes for each slide).  The problems with primate cities are hardly unique to Mexico City; this additional BBC article bemoans Britain’s lack of a true second city, arguing that London’s shadow looms too large for sustained national development outside of the primate city."

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 9:24 AM

The concept of a primate city has both benefits and drawbacks for the country in which it is located. The large population of the primate city draws new technology and foreign investment into the country. Unfortunately, the large population of the primate city also leads to population and brain drain from the surrounding regions which can damage the overall economic and intellectual status of the country. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:45 AM

Primate Cities are furthered studied using Mexico as an example.

Primate cities affect movement by having a greater pull on migrants.

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade
Seth Dixon's insight:

The cultural landscapes of neighborhoods can change quickly as larger global economic forces restructure the places.  This is a great gallery of photos from the Smithsonian to document these changes in New York City.  Many mourn the passing of what once was as the landscape continues to be made and remade but subsequent generations. 


Tags: culture, landscape, NYCeconomic, urban, place, neighborhood.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 12, 4:28 AM

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 3:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 2:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. and CNN Money's list of the worst sprawl and a discussion of it's impacts.  


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 10:35 AM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 3:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video from National Geographic goes nicely with some of my recent posts about the dramatic changes that can be seen as some cities have exploded on the international scene.  The changes in metropolitan areas are dramatically presenting using satellite imagery in this great teaching video. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 4:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 4:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 4:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
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Not dead yet: The American shopping mall is changing, not going away

Not dead yet: The American shopping mall is changing, not going away | Geography Education | Scoop.it
J.C. Penny in peril, Sears is sinking. Is this the end of the American shopping mall?


Last Friday sandwich chain Quiznos filed for bankruptcy protection citing high debt loads and heavy completion. Coming just days after a similar filing from pizza chain Sbarro, Quiznos’ bankruptcy was the second half of a one-two gut punch for shopping malls at a time when they’ve never been more vulnerable. A decade ago there were more than 1,100 enclosed shopping malls in the U.S. Since then more than 400 have  either been “re-purposed” or closed outright. No new malls have been completed since at least 2009.

Seth Dixon's insight:

While all malls aren't dead, this chilling photo gallery of abandoned malls in a fascinating landscape portrayal of economic over-reach. 

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The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy

The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Boston-Washington corridor, home to 18 percent of Americans, produces more economic activity than Germany.
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