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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade
Seth Dixon's insight:

The cultural landscapes of neighborhoods can change quickly as larger global economic forces restructure the places.  This is a great gallery of photos from the Smithsonian to document these changes in New York City.  Many mourn the passing of what once was as the landscape continues to be made and remade but subsequent generations. 


Tags: culture, landscape, NYCeconomic, urban, place, neighborhood.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 12, 7:28 AM

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. and CNN Money's list of the worst sprawl and a discussion of it's impacts.  


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:35 PM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

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L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

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Changing Earth

Changing Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over the years, ISS astronauts have had a rare opportunity to witness climate change on Earth from space.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video from National Geographic goes nicely with some of my recent posts about the dramatic changes that can be seen as some cities have exploded on the international scene.  The changes in metropolitan areas are dramatically presenting using satellite imagery in this great teaching video. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 7:29 PM

A great illustation of the changes to the environment as a result of increasing technology and population. Plays for 1minute 30.

Sally Egan's curator insight, March 30, 7:34 PM

A short but fascinating illustration of the rapid changes to areas of teh Earth, observed by astronauts since 2000. Plays for 1 minute 30.  

BI Media Specialists's curator insight, April 4, 7:46 AM
This is a great resource for some of our science classes. It is an interesting presentation of the changes that we are making over time.
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Not dead yet: The American shopping mall is changing, not going away

Not dead yet: The American shopping mall is changing, not going away | Geography Education | Scoop.it
J.C. Penny in peril, Sears is sinking. Is this the end of the American shopping mall?


Last Friday sandwich chain Quiznos filed for bankruptcy protection citing high debt loads and heavy completion. Coming just days after a similar filing from pizza chain Sbarro, Quiznos’ bankruptcy was the second half of a one-two gut punch for shopping malls at a time when they’ve never been more vulnerable. A decade ago there were more than 1,100 enclosed shopping malls in the U.S. Since then more than 400 have  either been “re-purposed” or closed outright. No new malls have been completed since at least 2009.

Seth Dixon's insight:

While all malls aren't dead, this chilling photo gallery of abandoned malls in a fascinating landscape portrayal of economic over-reach. 

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The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy

The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Boston-Washington corridor, home to 18 percent of Americans, produces more economic activity than Germany.
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A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design

A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ukraine's Independence Square, and the revolutionary dimensions of public spaces.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article gives some background on the political purposes behind urban planning and public squares that carry cultural meaning.  While Ukraine is the reason for delving into the topic, the article explores the politicization of public squares in various regional and historical contexts.  The image above shows how monuments, despite their 'official' meaning, can be rearticulated and reinterpreted as other audiences inscribe meaning into the landscape.  

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 3:21 PM

Very interesting article about public spaces transformed by public protest.

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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.


The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.


A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."

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Annette Lengyel's curator insight, February 19, 2:49 PM

Would this population shift suggest that once self-sufficient rural communities are being forced into cities to become dependent on government while industry, corporate power, and developers confiscate their lands and turn producers into consumers? The implications are quite terrifying for all living things.

Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 3:27 PM

"The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers."

Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 10:23 PM

Unit VII

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9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe

9 Reasons the U.S. Ended Up So Much More Car-Dependent Than Europe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Understanding mistakes of the past can help guide U.S. transportation policy in the future.


In 2010, Americans drove for 85 percent of their daily trips, compared to car trip shares of 50 to 65 percent in Europe. Longer trip distances only partially explain the difference. Roughly 30 percent of daily trips are shorter than a mile on either side of the Atlantic. But of those under one-mile trips, Americans drove almost 70 percent of the time, while Europeans made 70 percent of their short trips by bicycle, foot, or public transportation.  The statistics don't reveal the sources of this disparity, but there are nine main reasons American metro areas have ended up so much more car-dependent than cities in Western Europe.

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Jeff Cherry's curator insight, February 12, 12:19 PM

The correlation to our obesity rates cannot e be ignored.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 10:48 AM

This article gives a nice comparison between American and European car use.  It points out cultural differences as well as governmental policy differences that lead to different views on public transportation and car usage.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 25, 1:58 PM

I understand why many Europeans travel by public transportation, foot or bicycle. If gas was twice the price and tax on an automobile was more expensive than it already is, I would find another way to travel. Economically, it does not make sense to use an automobile as a daily driver in many areas of Europe. Also, public transportation in most areas of the United States is not great and many people who have to travel on the highway to work have no choice but to use an automobile. 

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The Mystery House

"In Raleigh, N.C., there's a house... or what looks like a house. What's hidden inside is more important than most people realize. Read the story: http://wunc.org/post/video-whats-inside-house-wade-avenue "

Seth Dixon's insight:

What looks like a wonderful little "Scooby-Doo" mystery turns out to be a great place-based video on city planning, land use and utilities (I don't want to ruin the surprise that comes at the 2 minute mark, but don't worry, it's worth it).  If you are teaching a course trying to help students to think about the inner-workings of a city this article would be a very attention grabbing way to make a good point (NPR posted article on this as well).  What 'secrets' are hidden in plain sight in your local neighborhood?  


Tagsurban, planning.


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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 25, 10:06 AM

A great introduction to city planning

 

http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2014/01/17/263476645/whats-inside-this-mystery-house-in-north-carolina

 

 

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 4:11 PM

This short YouTube clip focuses on the Governments creative ways of keeping city planning out of the eyes of everyday people. Not only do these creative ways allow cities to remain unvandalised, but they also eliminate the eye sores of waterplants and towers. I think these ideas are great and allow communities to remain beautiful and inviting. 

Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 3:00 PM
This is a really nice example of a respect for the neighborhood. By disguising the building it doesn't create an eyesore in the community but will allow the plant to provide a service to the neighbors. This keeps property values high and the neighbors happy.
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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (see a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? Click here for more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees.

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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

In this map, all Zip codes with more than 500 people are ranked from 0 to 99 based on household income and education.  The 'Super Zips' rank 95 or higher. The map at the top shows the highest concentration of the nation’s 650 Super Zips. The typical household income in a Super Zip is $120,272, and 68 percent of adults hold college degrees. That compares with $53,962 and 27 percent in the other zips mapped.  Washington D.C. shows a powerful bifurcation: One-third of Zip codes in the D.C. area are considered ‘Super Zips’ for wealth and education and large swaths of the metropolitan area are considered food deserts.


This weekend I had the privilege of flying essentially from Boston to Washington DC at night and was mesmerized by the vast urban expanse beneath me.  It was the greatest concentration of wealth in the United States as well as the some of the most blighted regions of the country.  What explains the spatial patterns of highly concentrated wealth and poverty in the biggest cities?  Are cities a causal factor in wealth and poverty creation?  What does this zip code data tell us? What accounts for the spatial patterns in your region?    


Tags: Washington DC, urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 9:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 10:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 6:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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Fair Housing

Fair Housing | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This hour-long podcast addresses some has key issues in urban geography by exploring the history of redlining, the Fair Housing Act and other fair housing initiatives.  The urban cultural mosaic of the United States and the neighborhoods of our cities have been greatly shaped by these issues.   Currently gentrification is reshaping many U.S. cities and fits into the wider scope of the issues raised in the podcast.


Tags: housingracism, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood, ethnicity, race, podcast.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 3:54 AM

this podcast can gives us insight into other peoples experiences and decision making processes in choosing were to live and how that effects life for them. Depending on where we live rent may be cheaper but also living conditions and employment may not be all that great. Gentrification or community improvement also shows us, this renovating process helps change our old neighborhoods and tries to create better places for people to life, it speaks about fair housing and the various experiences that people have in the American way of living.

Mrs. B's curator insight, December 3, 2013 8:44 PM

PODCAST FOR URBAN UNIT

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Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have many more questions than answers after listening to this podcast.  Presumably, most governmental agencies during emergencies are seeking to assist the greatest number of people with limited time and resources; would this court ruling change that mandate?  How will this impact urban planning in the future?  Just how much can plans in times of emergency account for assisting the disabled?  Do you think the City of New York was negligent? 


Tags: disasters, NYC, transportationurban, planning, podcast.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:35 PM

I am disabled, and while I am not in a wheelchair, I would implore the politicians to come up with accommodations for those that are, or have other severe forms of disabilities.  I damaged my brain and spinal cord in an accident that cost me some of my psychological functions, as well as a lot of the fine motor skills in my hands and body.  I remember what it was like before my accident, and I know that there was nowhere along the line that I asked to be disabled.  The people in wheelchairs, or the people who cannot evacuate themselves from areas of danger, are people that should in fact be prioritized, not left behind, when it comes to evacuating during emergencies.  In class our group discussed that the average able-body person should be prioritized during evacuation, but I kept thinking- what if something happened to them? What if they broke their leg during a flood evacuation?  Should they be left behind?  I would suggest that rather than answer these James Wan-like instances of moral quandary, we prepare for them and come up with access for the handicapped to be evacuated- in such an instance where NO ONE would have to be prioritized OR left behind.  That is the only fair way to deal with this sort of idea, without leaving anybody behind.  I have had dealings with people with disabilities, and a guy I know that is in fact wheelchair bound, is one of the most productively creative people of his age that I have encountered- wheelchair or not, he has produced, written, and directed two full length feature films before his 22nd birthday, one of which has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.  I had the privilege of working with him during some photoshoots, and I was really quite inspired by what he does, enough to pursue film-making on my own.  I feel that people today don't really care until something affects them.  Negative thoughts against those that prioritize against the disabled in events of emergency do not enter my head; rather, I feel that there must be something we can work out now, in a time of no immediate emergency, that can save us all...

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:34 PM

In my opinion I do not think it was all of New Yorks fault that some handicapp people could not get the help they needed. There are a lot of people in New York and not everyone could make it out even if they were not handicapp. I think these people should have a back up plan as well just incase. You could have a family member, neighbor, or friend come and help you and give you a ride.  

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:01 AM

This subject is the definition of a gray area matter. Of course you want to treat everyone equally and have everyone come out of a sotrm unscathed, but to do soo you have to tip the scales so much that it becomes unfair for un handicapped people. Sure New York could of done this better. But also some neglegence has to fall on the citizens. If your and elderly handicap person and know a major storm is comming you should try to evacuate immediatly, you dont need the news to give you the A Ok to go. Yes the City should have gave a heads up atleast 10 hours in advance so people could better prepare better but the citizens have to be away of their own situation. This comes down to an ancient survival theme the survival of the fittest were if you weak and not smart you die off simple ass that.

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How architectural innovations migrate across borders

"As the world's cities undergo explosive growth, inequality is intensifying. Wealthy neighborhoods and impoverished slums grow side by side, the gap between them widening. In this eye-opening talk, architect Teddy Cruz asks us to rethink urban development from the bottom up. Sharing lessons from the slums of Tijuana, Cruz explores the creative intelligence of the city's residents and offers a fresh perspective on what we can learn from places of scarcity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As a geographer native to the San Diego region with family on both sides of the border, I found this TED talk very compelling personally, but also rich in geographic themes (city planning, diffusion, governance of space, socioeconomic differences in land use patterns, etc.).  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  San Diego and Tijuana have more to offer each other than economic markets--the ideas born out of distinct socioeconomic and political contexts can be just what is needed on the other side of the border.


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, sprawlneighborhood, borders. planning, urban ecology, densityplanning, TED

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In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas

In Pictures: Crackdown in Brazil's favelas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Brazilian government's 'pacification' initiative has led to drug busts and shootouts in Rio's favelas.


Just a few months before Rio de Janeiro welcomes visitors for the World Cup, and two years before it hosts the Olympics, security within the city remains a major issue.  The government currently promotes the policy of "pacification", where security forces engage in raids, drug busts, and even gunfights with suspected gang members. This pacification policy is supposed to pave the way for the development of long-neglected favelas in Rio, Brazil's second-biggest city and home to 11 million people.  However, many of the favelas remain in the hands of an army of drug dealers and criminals who are not willing to step down or be pacified.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, narcotics, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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creditrepairaid's comment, April 3, 3:27 AM
Thats stunning...
aiguarentacar's comment, April 4, 4:02 PM
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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.


By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 6:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 4:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 5:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

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3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere

3 Cities With Freeways Going Nowhere | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Once thought to be symbols of prosperity, innercity highways are now just eyesores — and sources of civic dysfunction — to some new urbanists.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED Talk also explores what cities should be with old freeways, suggesting that they should be dismantled and the spaces revitalized (and yes, my inner-Californian linguistic roots demands that I call them freeways).


Tags: transportation, urban, planning.

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Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings

Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The high-tech project would help officials decide which abandoned buildings can be demolished.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This crowd-sourced mapping project is an great example of how a community can work together (using geospatial technologies and geographic thinking) to mitigate some of the more pressing issues confronting the local neighborhoods.  Many optimists have argued that Detroit has "good bones" to rebuild the city, but it needs to built on as smaller scale.  This project helps to assess what is being used by residents and should stay, and what needs to go.  Want to explore some of the data yourself?  See Data Driven Detroit.      

 

Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhoodmapping, GIS, geospatial,


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In Mexico, a City's Scar Becomes its Most Prized Park

In Mexico, a City's Scar Becomes its Most Prized Park | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many good things are happening along a sliver of land that cuts through a crowded corner of Aguascalientes, a city of 1.3 million people. Fields strewn with garbage and a haven for criminals, followed the narrow path of an underground oil pipeline that traverses one impoverished neighborhood after another. In the past three years, the city has reclaimed almost all of this passage for the 300,000 people who live near it. The result is a 7.5 mile linear park that is one of Latin America’s most extraordinary urban green spaces: La Línea Verde  The Green Line."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The term "LULU" for city planners stands for local unwanted land use.  LULUs are necessary (prisons, landfills etc.) to the society at large but nobody wants to be close to the negative and undesirable aspects they bring to a community ("NIMBY"-not in my backyard).  Consequently, LULUs are usually concentrated in poorer neighborhoods with limited political capital and disproportionately bear the localized burdens of these sites.  Inspired by the urban transformations in Curitiba Brazil (see this TED talk from Jaime Lerner of Curitiba discussing sustainable urbanism), this is a great example of how an urban renewal project that was able to mitigate the negatives and even make a LULU a positive for a community. 

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 23, 7:59 PM

This is a great example of bringing about a positive to an impoverished area. The project was a success, as an unattractive area was transformed into something beautiful, making the people of the area feel better about the environment around them. Green grass and plants are much better than land filled with dirt and trash.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 2:57 PM

This is a wonderful example of how thinking outside the box can have a huge social impact.  The addition of this park to the Aguascalientes community allowed positive change for these people, whereas adding more guns and cops probably would not have.  The park also benefits larger institutions such as the major oil corporation, Pemex, because the park draws positive attention instead of vandalism and crime (the park is located on a pipeline owned by Pemex).  Using social resources and drawing inspiration from other's successful projects is what made this park come to life.  The park's physical location enables the citizens to foster a more cohesive sense of community, possibly drawing new businesses and events which will also benefit the community.    This transformation will naturally attract increasing positive change, in contrast to gentrification where everything that exists is essentially wiped out and built from scratch.  There are many places around the world that could be changed for the better like this site. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:43 AM

This land is in reality, a diamond in the ruff. Though it wasn't at one time, now it is an important part of this Mexican city. The green spaces has had a huge impact on its surroundings and has really made an impact on the people who can enjoy the park. Poverty is a huge problem in Mexico and to have a place like this where people can go to get away from that is important.

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Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States

Historical Metropolitan Populations of the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The graph and tables on this page attempt to show how the urban hierarchy of the United States has developed over time. The statistic used here is the population of the metropolitan area (contiguous urbanized area surrounding a central city), not the population of an individual city. Metropolitan area population is much more useful than city population as an indicator of the size and importance of a city, since the official boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary and often do not include vast suburban areas. For example, in 2000 San Antonio was the 10th largest city in the U.S., larger than Boston or San Francisco, but its Metro Area was only ranked about 30th. The same thing was happening even back in 1790: New York was the biggest single city, but Philadelphia plus its suburbs of Northern Liberties and Southwark made it the biggest metro area."

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, January 30, 2:56 PM

While the Northeast has typically been the ringleader for population centers in America, rising costs of living and population density has been pushing people out into other parts of the country. Along with that, discoveries of natural resources westward help incentivize people to move. Evidenced by the rise of San Fransisco, the settling of Alaska, the oil rich fields of West Texas, and the fertile lands of the mid-west to name a few. While these are early examples from the beginnings of America, even today we find these same reasons for the push out of the Northeast. With the new discoveries of resources in the Dakotas and the cost of living being so much cheaper in the South and especially in the major cities of Texas, where a house with a yard can cost half of what it does here in Rhode Island minus the lawn. The usefulness of a city and region plays a role in its population rise or decline as well. Take for example, Newport, RI in 1810 was listed as #13 being that it was a major transportation and shipping hub. Today, I would be very surprised if it was in the top 150. As the country expanded and other ports of entry were established, economic forces adapted. Sometimes this was for the better, such as the port of Los Angeles or for the worse, such as Detroit’s decline. Advances in technology make communication and transportation incredibly efficient and what was at one a cultural identity for some places to be a hub of manufacturing or shipping or what have you now become a global enterprise with perhaps a call center in India, a factory in Mexico, and a global HQ in Delaware. Because of Globalization, no longer does one metropolis have to be king of all and instead, a small town can provide tax breaks for a technology company even though none of the real production gets done in that locale due to cheap labor being half way across the world. People will move according to their needs and accessibility to those needs, and if what they need to survive are no longer accessible in location A, then they will move to location B, C, or X - if need be.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 11:29 AM

This information is a helpful illustrator for someone who knows about the geography and history of the United States.  It is important to note the use of "metropolitan populations" rather than "city populations" within particular city borders; as the creator states, "boundaries of a city are usually arbitrary".  In other words, the information that can be given from a "city" do not tell the whole story.  Metropolitan areas, even if spanning out of city borders, share similar local culture dynamics, industry, and infrastructure as the core city.  If one was to just examine the cities and not the entire metropolitan areas of the Northeast Megalopolis, they would be missing a huge part of the puzzle. Depending on the time period, the demanded resources, and the available technologies heavily influence how metropoloitan areas work, grow, and interact with others.   This can be seen in the charts and tables.  For example, the availability of the automobile and other transportation methods deeply affected how people and industry move and how metropolitan areas influence and interact with one another.

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:26 AM

Comparing and contrasting numbers is a huge part of todays world. Looking at this chart, it indicates the size of the population of the whole metropolitan area. The difference in size of cities and of areas differs greatly and the examples provided can show how the area of a city is different that its Metro Area ranking.

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Transportation and Planning

"When you combine a street and a road, you get a STROAD, one of the most dangerous and unproductive human environments. To get more for our transportation dollar, America needs an active policy of converting STROADs to productive streets or high capacity roadways."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this video, a road provides high connectivity between places, and a street is a diverse platform of social interactions that create a place.  A 'stroad' can be likened unto a spork--it tries to do it everything but does nothing especially well.  While you may debate the principle being shown, this video (found on Atlantic Cities) is a good way to show the spatial thinking that city planners need to utilize to improve the urban environment. 


Tagstransportation, urban, planning.

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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 5:03 AM

the danger of stroads

François Lanthier's curator insight, January 31, 2:19 PM

The Stroad - an unfortunate phenomenon... NYC is taking action to minimize its' STROADS... more cities should do the same.

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In Florida, A Turf War Blooms Over Front-Yard Vegetable Gardening

In Florida, A Turf War Blooms Over Front-Yard Vegetable Gardening | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A woman in Miami Shores is suing after her town insisted she remove vegetables from her garden.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This podcast highlights the political governance issues surrounding urban agriculture. 

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 18, 2013 7:38 AM

Not just Florida. Condos do not like use of landscape for gardening.

Purple Media Lady's curator insight, January 4, 7:38 AM

Science related

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 27, 4:33 PM

Where you can and can not plant vegetables can become a major issue in communities that want to maintain their "reputations". While some gardeners plant crops where they can get the most sun and access to supplies, neighbors and neighborhoods, such as that in Miami Shores, do not always approve of planting in the front yard. This story focuses on a woman's need to garden for food and the shift into "turf-wars."

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Urban Exploration

Urban Exploration | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The French have a wonderful word—flâneur—for someone who seeks to explore and understand the nature of a city’s landscape, usually by taking spontaneous adventures amidst the ebb and flow of life going on around them. In this week’s theme we invite you to lose yourself reading about the flâneur-esque adventures of Maptia’s streetwise connoisseurs and explore a myriad of cities through their eyes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you have yet to discover Maptia, a hybrid map/storytelling online platform, this is a good introduction.  This article also serves as portal for 21 city profiles of cities around the world. 


Tags: neighborhoodurban, place.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, December 1, 2013 11:04 AM

A wonderful site that currently explores 21 global cities.  If you've ever traveled to India (any major city within it), Mexico City, Rome, or any another travel destination where the human street population is somewhat off the charts, you'll enjoy these blog posts.  Meanwhile, I am thinking about entering a post of my own!  This is a perfect site to share with students prior to journal writing or school trips abroad. 

Helen Rowling's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:18 PM

Gr8 immersion of stories of lives in other countries.

Tony Gough's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:09 AM

Travel the world and read the short stories to learn more!

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This Is What Detroit Could Look Like In 2033

This Is What Detroit Could Look Like In 2033 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you've never been to Detroit and only know what you see in the news, a story about the city's future could seem confusing. Detroit is bankrupt.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Yes, the news about Detroit has been grim, as de-industrialization has negatively impacted this region more than any other in the United States.  Still, many consider Detroit's economic problems akin to flesh wounds and organ failure.  Extending the analogy, they see Detroit as having 'good bones,' something to build on for a new future.  This article represents some visions of that new future.  


Tags: urban, economic, industry, Detroit.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 12:42 AM

2033 seems pretty hopeful for the city that was once the Ford motor capital and the city of Rock and Roll. It is interesting to note in this article the various before and after images and the way they hope that this bankrupt city be look in 15 years. There are hopes to completely transform certain landscapes and renovate old warehouses for recreational/educational purposes. There is hope for the city of Detroit as developers continue planning and working on investing money making condemned areas livable and changing the economic culture of each neighborhood.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, December 8, 2013 1:38 PM

Looking at these pictures it it is amzaing to think that by 2033 Detroit could look like this. However I think the most confusing part to me would be where the money is coming from to rebuild this city. The city was recently declared bankrupt. How is it that they are going to be able to afford the billions of dollars needed to get detroit to this point? However if the plan does go well and detroit ends up building all of these attraction sites and educational building I believe that Detroit will no longer have a fear of debt, and the culture there would be a lot different. I think this would be a place that families and people vaction to. There would be many nice state parks to visit, a beautiful downtown area with hotels and other attractions. This is the exacct opposite of the type of experience you would have going to Detriot today. By making these changes and moving forward I think there is a huge culture change to will occur for the better of Detroit. If they can pull it off I don't think Detriot will have to worry about bankruptcy in the future.