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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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The Autumnal Equinox

The Autumnal Equinox | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the Northern Hemisphere, the fall equinox marks the first day of fall (autumn) in what we call astronomical seasons. There's also another, more common definition of when the seasons start, namely meteorological definitions, which are based on average temperatures rather that astronomical events.  Equinoxes are opposite on either side of the equator, so the autumnal (fall) equinox in the Northern Hemisphere is the spring (vernal) equinox in the Southern Hemisphere and vice versa."

 

Tags: Sunseasonal, space.

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ROCAFORT's curator insight, September 23, 2:46 AM
The Autumnal Equinox
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How to say Merry Christmas in different European Languages

How to say Merry Christmas in different European Languages | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map by Jakub Marian shows you how to say Merry Christmas in European languages.
Seth Dixon's insight:

To those that celebrate Christmas I was going to wish them a Merry Christmas in English, but this gives us so many other options...Feliz Navidad!   For any interested in exploring the setting of the Christmas story from a geographic perspective, read on. 

 

Tags: religion, Europeculture, historicallanguage, seasonal.

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Jean-Simon Venne's curator insight, December 19, 2015 12:45 PM

Working on the pronunciation....

John Peterson's comment, December 19, 2015 1:32 PM
I learned something new. Thanks.
Marianne Naughton's curator insight, December 24, 2015 8:54 AM

Merry Christmas To All !!!

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The Origin of Krampus, Europe's Evil Twist on Santa

The Origin of Krampus, Europe's Evil Twist on Santa | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The mythical holiday beast is once again on the prowl, but beware, he's making his way across the Atlantic
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: So what kind of cultural diffusion is this?  Expansion diffusion, contagious diffusion, stimulus diffusion or hierarchical diffusion?  Why so?

 

Is this more as a pop culture phenomenon or a revitalization of a folk cultural tradition?  How come?

 

Tags: religion, Europeculture, historical.

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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:35 AM

Very interesting opposite of Saint Nick that came from a lore displaying Satan figure. I've never heard of this Krampus character but from the origins of it, the character makes it feel very mysterious and give a little spookiness to the holidays. In addition, it gives refugees the chance to explore European culture as a way to adapt to different culture. 

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 4:29 PM

With new movies always coming out, its nice to hear films that are based on true stories or myths come to the theaters. Krampus is a movie that came out recently and is based on a myth that originated in Austria. This is scary tail of a beastly creature coming out Christmas and deals with the bad kids. Krampus is known to beat bad kids with birch branches or to be taken to his lair to be eaten or tortured. An interesting myth, people always look at Christmas as a good time with family.

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For Florists, Roses A Nerve-Racking Business Around Valentines Day

For Florists, Roses A Nerve-Racking Business Around Valentines Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Valentines Day is this one day when one product — a red rose — is worth two or three times more than it is at any other time of the year. If a florist catches that window, he's golden. But the process of getting the roses to is fraught with risk, middlemen, crazy expense and bad weather.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This NPR podcast looks at the economic fluctuations of the flower market based on the cultural festival that is Valentines Day, and this Guardian article examines the economic development issues in the commodity chain for cut flowers (focused on Colombia). 

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Nicky Mohan's curator insight, February 14, 2015 7:07 PM

Valentines day followed by Mother's day and Father's day etc etc

Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 16, 2015 1:03 AM

International dependency. Economics and Business. A clever way to bring many dimensions into one by following the flower market. 

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Probability of a White Christmas

Probability of a White Christmas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See which places have the best chance of being a winter wonderland on Christmas Day according to weather history.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not a weather report; we are still too far out to start predicting that with any accuracy.  What this map does show is the statistical probabilities of snow cover throughout the United States for December 25th based on past climatological data.   

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Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 28, 2015 8:55 PM

I believe that we haven't had a white Christmas here in Rhode Island in  at least 3 years. This map would explain that there is an 11-25% chance of it snowing on Rhode Island. This map also fascinates me because I am currently taking an Earth's Physical Environments class and on the first day of class, I've learned why seasons occur. In this case, the Earth tilts to the point where the southern United States gets more sun than the northern United States. After there's a precise equinox on September 22nd, the Earth tilts as the United States goes closer to the top so it gets less sun rays.

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Geography of Thanksgiving

Geography of Thanksgiving | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I am very pleased to be blogging for National Geographic Education.  Here is the link to my first post on the geography of Thanksgiving. 

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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 28, 2014 2:34 PM

Dr. Seth Dixon also has geographyeducation.org, one of the finest sites of its kind...

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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial, historical and cultural components to it...here are some of my favorite teaching resources to use as Thanksgiving approaches."


Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal.

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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:13 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspectives of geography

This map shows the consumption of sweet potato pie on thanksgiving in the u.s. it also shows the production of these pies also. It is also interesting how the south is again labeled and stereotyped in a certain way of being irrelevant or redneck.

This map relates to unit 1 because it shows the functional regions of local sweet potato pie production. It also shows the parts of the south as the most consuming people. Again pinning the south as weak and less educated. This is a possible vernacular map also because of that.

Raven Blair's curator insight, December 2, 2014 7:46 PM

The home of the first Thanksgiving, Plymouth County, is one of three of the only places that produces cranberries.It is interesting how Thanksgiving includes multiple assortments of the geography of food production and food consumption.  

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, January 4, 2015 6:49 PM

Culture Unit 3 - This map shows the spacial relationship of an aspect of thanksgiving in the United States. It demonstrates how even popular culture is not always same throughout a particular area or country. It may actually change around perceptual regions rather than formal regions.

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Pumpkin Geography

Pumpkin Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"During the month of October, I take advantage of the pumpkin harvest to bring hands-on geography to my students.  After spending a month becoming familiar with the location of the seven continents and the major bodies of water, each student is given a pumpkin to turn into a globe. Students paint the entire surface of the pumpkin blue to represent water. Next, they use pushpins to position and trace the outline of each continent onto their pumpkins. They use actual globes as models and are careful to place the continents in the correct hemisphere. Then, they paint and label each continent a different color. They label the major bodies of water and use white paint to represent the North and South Poles."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.   


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 23, 2014 9:17 AM

Happy October everyone!  The pictures above (from a friend's website) show how teachers and parents alike can get children involved in a fun craft that will strengthen kids' mental maps--all with a seasonal twist.  If you really love idea of pumpkin globes, you should also see this one.  Besides the fun and games here are some resources to teach the geography behind Thanksgiving.     


Tagsart, K12, fun, seasonal.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 11:14 AM

This is a great use of connecting education and culture. Carving pumpkins is something that most children connect with this season. I think it is an effective strategy to connect these traditions with education. I think its a great way to put a educational spin on a childhood tradition. 

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Revolutionary War Battles

Revolutionary War Battles | Geography Education | Scoop.it
America's war for indpendence began on April 19, 1775, when the first shots were fired at Lexington and Concord in Massachusetts.


Tags: USA, historicalmapping, National Geographic.

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Facts for Features: Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick's Day

Facts for Features: Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick's Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Originally a religious holiday to honor St. Patrick, who introduced Christianity to Ireland in the fifth century, St. Patrick's Day has evolved into a celebration for all things Irish. The world's first St. Patrick's Day parade occurred on March 17, 1762, in New York City, featuring Irish soldiers serving in the English military. This parade became an annual event, with President Truman attending in 1948. Congress proclaimed March as Irish-American Heritage Month in 1995, and the President issues a proclamation commemorating the occasion each year."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We celebrate St Patrick's Day to commemorate him for driving out the snakes from Ireland in the 5th century (or to just have an excuse to party, kiss and pinch people).  What does the biogeography of Ireland have to tell us about this legend?  Some believe that the non-believers (figurative 'snakes') were what he drove out of the Emerald Isle, a land with a rich culture.     

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Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day

Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. once stated,"A man who won't die for something is not fit to live." Arrested over twenty times, stabbed in the chest, his house firebombed and, ultimately shot and killed, King embodied the idea that equality and the African American Civil Rights Movement were worth dying for.He was a husband and father to four children as persecution and death threats filled his days, yet his example was one of nonviolent, civil disobedience.Had he not been assassinated, King would have celebrated his 85th birthday on January 15th."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Dr. Martin Luther King fought racial segregation (which, if you think about it, is a geographic system of oppression that uses space and place to control populations).  Dr. King has been described as a critical geographer for some of his insights.  In 1967, MLK stated, "The expansion of suburbia and migration from the South has worsened big-city segregation.  The suburbs are a white noose around the black necks of cities… suburbs expand with little regard for what happens to the rest of America.”  If you are a Maps 101 subscriber, please read the rest of this article that I co-authored with Julie Dixon.  You can also sign up for a free trial subscription or listen to the article as a free podcast on Stitcher Radio.  

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:16 PM

Martin Luther King Jr. is an iconic figure in American history. A man that will be remembered forever, as he overcame so much adversity and risked his life on a daily basis for the greater good of America. After being arrested multiple times, injured and threatened, most people would have given up, but not him. He is one who never gave up on his dreams and proves that anything is possible.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 2014 1:27 PM

We celebrate Martin Luther King JR because he was a man of pride. In history, those who are remembered did something great most likely. He was an activist for the Civil Rights movement and had a dream that one day the world would treat everyone as equals. He was assassinated and unfortunately that is another reason we celebrate and honor his life.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:40 PM

This article wouldn't open when I clicked on it. It said I had to sign into some website that I have never used so I couldn't access this article. So I'm basically winging this one and making it an opinion scoop. I think that celebrating Martin Luther King Day is very important. Not only did he do all he could to make the blacks be treated equally, but he went through hell trying to do it. He was tortured by people in the town and his house was even set on fire. This is just as important as the Rosa Parks incident and the Brown V.S. Board of Education. We celebrate this day to remind us about how he died trying to set things right and have everyone be treated equally. We also celebrate this day to continue his love and peace in this world. Because of Martin Luther King Jr., we now can all live, work, and be a part of the same community, whether you are black or white.

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Santas Around the World

Santas Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This story map shows some of the historical and regional differences in Santa Claus, as well as the cultural diffusion.  Here are pictures from the BBC of Christmas around the world.  Also this is the mythical beast that was why children needed to be good for goodness sake.  Merry Christmas to those that celebrate it and a Happy New Year to all. 

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Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:10 PM
This was definitely an interesting reading. I believe @Spencer Levesque had a very good point. They all have similar features, but are different in little ways. And who would of thought someone came on New Years too?
Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:23 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries precieve Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country perceives him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 2014 10:28 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries perceive Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country precieves him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

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Thanksgiving Resources

Thanksgiving Resources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network on Maps101.com that shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes).

Seth Dixon's insight:

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:14 AM

This website is interesting because it gives us the geography of where specific foods in the country are manufactured such as cranberrie sauce, turkeys, sweet potatoes and helps us develop a rich cultural history and earn solidarity of where we come from and the traditions that make us who we are in terms of culinary choices. The original thanksgiving with the early puritan settlers in New England most likely reflected dishes that were synonomous with foods that natives grew and other local items that were family in this area. Now because of industry we to choose foods that have their origin from markets nationwide.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 17, 2013 12:35 PM

Love to see where the traditional American Thanksgiving food comes from.  We have that, but growing up in an all Italian household Thanksgivng was more then Turkey...it had an added Italian flavor.  Start with antipasto that had a prosciutto that would met in your mouth, plus cheeses, muhrooms, other meats, then would come the soup, then the pasta, could be any variety then the Turkey, but you would also have a ham because you never knew who was going to stop by, plus all the trimmings and then finally dessert with Italian cookies and pastires along with the Thanksgivng traditions of pumpkin and apple pies.  We took breaks inbetween courses to watch some football and make room for more food becasue it was all good.  We literally ate all day.  So for us out food came form all over the world.  In a nation of immigrants, we added our own flavor to an American Holiday..and to me whats more American than brining in some of your own hertitage into a holiday..we are after all a "melting pot"

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Americans Try Norwegian Christmas Food

See staff at the U.S. Embassy in Oslo try traditional Norwegian Christmas dishes. Se ansatte på den amerikanske ambassaden i Oslo smake på norsk julemat.

 

Tags: Norway, food, culture, seasonal, perspective.

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Transportation Geography and Religious Greetings

Transportation Geography and Religious Greetings | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Happy Hanukkah from Brooklyn! Card design by Cheryl Berkowitz, via Subway Art Blog.

 

Tagstransportation, Judaism, religionseasonal.

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Labor Day 2015

Strengthening America's workforce. Sharing stories, news and info on U.S. workers, jobs, employment, safety and regulations. Learn more at www.dol.gov
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights (see the Labor Day 2012 video as well).  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

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BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:06 AM

If you are a fan of the 40 hour work week, 8 hour work day, health benefits, child labor laws and this lovely thing called "the weekend," you have the labor movement to thank.  The Department of Labor has put together a page entitled 'The History of Labor Day.'  This helps us understand that the benefits that we enjoy today are the legacy of generations of workers who courageously fought for for workers rights (see the Labor Day 2012 video as well).  

 

Tags: Labor, industry, economic, unit 6 industry and video.

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Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day

Why We Celebrate Martin Luther King Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Last year, Julie and I wrote this article for Maps 101 (which was also created into a podcast) about the historical and geographic significance of Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights movement.  Martin Luther King fought racial segregation, which, if you think about it, is a geographic system of oppression that uses space and place to control populations. Derek Alderman and Jerry Mitchell, excellent educators and researchers, produced lesson plans to help students investigate the politics behind place naming, specifically using the case study of the many streets named after Martin Luther King.  


Questions to Ponder: Why are streets named after Martin Luther King found in certain places and not in others? What forces and decisions likely drive these patterns? What is the historical legacy of Martin Luther King and how is it a part of certain cultural landscapes? 


Tags: seasonal, race, historical, the South, political, toponyms, landscape.

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Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 2015 7:01 PM

Interesting and different way to view MLK.

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Cultural and Historical Geography of Santa Claus

Cultural and Historical Geography of Santa Claus | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A look into Smithsonian's vast archives reveals that Father Christmas tends to get a makeover with every generation that embraces him
Seth Dixon's insight:

The picture archives show the historical evolution behind the cultural representations of Santa Claus.  Additionally this ESRI story map shows some of the regional differences in Santa Claus, showing how the cultural diffusion of this icon of a Christian holiday takes on real local attributes.  I also enjoyed these pictures from the BBC of Christmas around the world.  Merry Christmas to those that celebrate it and a Happy New Year to all.

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Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch

Giving Thanks—or Miigwetch | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Gathered around the Thanksgiving table, Americans tell stories about colonists and Native Americans coming together. But do Native Americans even celebrate Thanksgiving? And what would Native American heritage food look like? This November, With Good Reason takes a look at the indigenous side of a Thanksgiving table.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This podcast is a great look at the diverse ways in which a national holiday can be celebrated.  The cultural connections in the podcast are quite rich.  


Tags: Thanksgiving, food, seasonal, folk culture, culture, indigenous.

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JebaQpt's comment, December 1, 2014 11:56 PM
For each new morning with its light,
For rest and shelter of the night,
For health and food, for love and friends,
For everything Thy goodness sends.
~RalphWaldoEmerson http://www.thequotes.net/2011/11/thanksgiving-day-quotes/
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Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar

Decoding The Food And Drink On A Day Of The Dead Altar | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Mexican tradition celebrates the dead and welcomes their return to the land of the living once a year. Enticing them to make the trip is where the food, drink and musical offerings come in."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Like many things in Mexico, the celebrations around the Day of the Dead are a combination of indigenous and Spanish traditions that collide to make something that is uniquely Mexican.  This podcast goes through the symbolism in the cultural artifacts that are such a vibrant part of the festivities as does this Smithsonian interactive.   


TagsMexicofolk culture, culture, podcast.

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Rachel Phillips's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

I've always been really interested in the Day of the Dead, and this article actually taught me a lot.  I always knew the general meaning of the day, and what they had and did, because I learned about it throughout high school in my Spanish classes, but this article shed some new light.  I never knew what exactly each element stood for, and now it's even more interesting to me.  I never would have guessed that there was Catholic influence, and that it is still incorporated today.  I think this is a beautiful ceremony, and a fantastic way to honor loved ones who have passed, and it certainly seems better than spending three hours at a funeral crying.  Their lives should be celebrated, and made out to be something happy and beautiful, instead of dark and depressing.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, March 1, 2015 10:17 PM

This is such a neat tradition.  I love all the vibrant colors and the fact that its a joyous celebration instead of mourning which is traditional in the US.  There is even an animated movie that was just released called Book of the Dead.  Its only taken decades for movie giants to release animated films that reflect the population of the US.  I can remember when Pocahontas was released then Mulan.  

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:29 PM

I love reading about Mexico's day of the dead tradition because it is a piece of Mexico's culture that is only Mexico's. It is such a strong piece that they take very seriously, it has not been  Americanized and is original to them. It is like the Muslim Hajj pilgrimage, a specific component of Muslim tradition. Many cultures have been muddled with since the dawn of globalization.

http://www.koreaherald.com/view.php?ud=20150929000378

The above link is an interesting read about how globalization affects traditions.

Reading this article is proof that some traditions are to strong to break. Learning about specific customs like the day of the dead also gives you a great opportunity to learn a vast amount about the populations culture and beliefs.

I

 

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Flip-Flop Summer Caused by Strange Jet Stream

Flip-Flop Summer Caused by Strange Jet Stream | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Temperatures across the Northeast have been unusually cool, and they have been unusually hot across the northwest.  A strange jet stream is behind the flip-flop between summer conditions in the two northern corners of the country. The polar jet stream is the prevailing band of wind that blows west to east across the upper half of the U.S. in summer. (There is a subtropical jet, also, that typically crosses northern Mexico).  We often see the jet stream depicted on TV weather reports—that big, wavy line across the U.S. and Canada that bends south then north then south again. Low-pressure weather systems, sometimes called cold fronts, ride along the jet stream, bringing us much of our daily weather. But this summer the polar  jet steam seems to be somewhat flattened out, and it’s been in that position more than usual."


Tags: physical, weather and climate, seasonal.

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 16, 2014 7:51 AM

A strange jet stream is the cause of this flip-flop summer. People in the Northeast have experienced a cooler summer while people in the West have experienced hotter summers than usual. Boston typically experiences 90 degree weather about fifteen days throughout the summer. This summer, it only hit that mark about four times. In Oregon, they hit 90 degrees twelve times already and this usually only happens a few times a year. The polar jet stream is banding the wind that blows across the upper half of the US, this makes their summers colder than usual. This jet stream seems to be flattened out and has lately been in that position more than expected. Forces in the atmosphere make the stream flat. The climate change, as said by S.Y. Simon Wang, is said to be not "global warming" but "global weirding". This article goes through most of the summer and stops at the weather for the week of August 18th.

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Maximum Summer Heat

Maximum Summer Heat | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new analysis shows when summer reaches peak heat across the U.S.


Tags: physical, weather and climate, seasonal.

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Heart-shaped landscapes

Heart-shaped landscapes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The top image is of a mangrove stand in New Caledonia, Glaslyn (Blue lake) is in Northern Wales and this cave is in the 4 corners region of the United States. 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Happy Valentines Day!  I decided to compiles some heart-shaped landforms from a Google search.  For the Google Earth enthusiast, you can find the top image at 20°56’15.47″S, 164°39’30.56″E.  Like love, some were artificially manufactured and others were purely natural.  If you don't want cutesy heart pictures but prefer a sociological critique of Valentines Day, this is for you.   

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Estelblau's comment, February 14, 2014 4:03 PM
Really great ;)!
Estelblau's comment, February 14, 2014 4:03 PM
Really great ;)!
Pasquale Abiuso's curator insight, February 17, 2014 5:23 AM

Storie di natura.

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great photo gallery, but I wanted to make a special note of this image.  The caption for this picture says, "Egyptians watch as Muslims march on the street to mark the birthday of the Prophet Muhammed in Cairo, Jan 13, 2014."  Is this a representative group of Egyptians?  What demographic group would we expect to see in the second story balcony?  What does the architecture tell us about the cultural norms of the society?

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2014 2:50 PM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:53 PM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2014 1:52 PM

Women and Men in some Islamic countries live entirely different lives in regards to their geographic spheres. The women dominate the private sphere, they are sheltered from the public sphere. Their architecture reflects that fact. Windows and balconies are constructed so people can see out but not see in from the street. Homes are built so the houses across from one another are not lined up with the front doors directly across from one another. Streets are winding and made so the homes are extremely private. This reflects society in regards to how people view gender. Females are kept out of the public sphere and when they do venture out into the streets, they are encouraged to have a male escorting them. This image above shows the balcony as a barrier keeping females "protected" from the public sphere.

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GNN Podcast: Plymouth and the Pilgrims

GNN Podcast: Plymouth and the Pilgrims | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving has some fascinating spatial components to it.  My wife and I prepared an article for the Geography News Network that was converted to a podcast; this podcasts shows the historical and geographic context of the first Thanksgiving and in the memorialization of Thanksgiving as a national holiday (if you don’t subscribe to Maps 101, it is also freely available as a podcast on Stitcher Radio or iTunes)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

One of my favorite combinations of maps for Thanksgiving involves the geography of food production and food consumption.  When we start looking at the regional dishes on Thanksgiving plates we can see some great patterns.  This ESRI storymap asks the simple question, where did your Thanksgiving Dinner come From?

 

This StoryMap is a great resource to combine with this New York Times article that shows the regional preferences for the most popular Thanksgiving recipes.  Where are sweet potatoes grown?  Where do people make sweet potato pie for Thanksgiving? 

Plymouth County, MA is heart of only 3 cranberry producing regions and is was also home to the first Thanksgiving.  How has this New England local ecology and traditional food patterns influenced national traditions? 

For these and more Thanksgiving resources on scoop.it, click here.

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