Geography Education
Follow
Find tag "scale"
730.7K views | +211 today
Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.


Seth Dixon's insight:

I really like this article because it briefly shares the language needed for students to able to successfully use maps in the classroom...plus it's highly adaptable for virtually any grade level.   


Tagsmapping, K12, scale, location.

more...
Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 8:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 5:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 2:53 PM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Comparing Rhode Island's Size

Comparing Rhode Island's Size | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I recently received this incredible shirt (I think the Easter bunny must stalk my Facebook page…but the shirt is also available online here).  I loved the idea behind it; the T-shirt mingles big-state bravado that declares regional superiority, with small-state insecurity that begs not to be forgotten. Both sentiments, even if they are on opposite side of the spectrum, display an enormous sense of regional pride and communal identity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

My first thought was to check the truthfulness of this map and to see how many “Rhode Islands” there are in state Texas.  I used this clever website that shows the number of areal units equal to the size of Rhode Island that are in any given country. And despite what that southwest bravado may lead you to believe, Texas isn’t its own country. So I needed to find a different website which lets you overlay any two places one on top of the other. This is a fantastic resource for help leverage your students’ local knowledge to teach them about places that are more remote and where their mental maps might have very little data.   And never mess with the Ocean State…even if this is Texas’ version of Earth Day.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

A New Type of Growing City

A New Type of Growing City | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“This is where the talent wants to live”


I believe there is a new class of city emerging across the country which are positioned to succeed in the coming decade – a class of city that has not yet been identified on a national scale. This city is a small/mid-sized regional center.

more...
Mary Rack's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:11 AM

Interesting idea - I wonder if it will take hold. Worth watching - 

Rescooped by Seth Dixon from Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance
Scoop.it!

How Many Rhode Islands?

How Many Rhode Islands? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How Many Rhode Islands is a simple web application that shows and tells you how many Rhode Islands would fit inside a given country.
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 10, 2013 8:38 PM

The Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance is as pleased as could be to discover this marvelously fun website.  While the Ocean State is larger than countries such as Andorra, Nauru, Tuvalu and Malta, there are not many countries smaller than the smallest of the United States of America.  Russia could contain 5,445 'Rhode Islands' and the United States could contain 3,066 Rhode Islands (that's a LOT of senators!). 

Suggested by Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
Scoop.it!

AIDS/HIV

AIDS/HIV | Geography Education | Scoop.it

AIDS is a global issue, but clearly this impacts Sub-Saharan Africa far more than any other region. 


Tags: Africa, medical, infographic, development.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."


What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   


Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Our Place in the World

Our Place in the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: scale, K12, location

more...
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 10:21 AM

As I am almost finished with my teacher degree I always look for great ideas that will help the students I will teach some day. This will be great for kids to get the concept of location and scale.  Scale is critical to know where something is, This is a great frame of reference.  

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.


Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

more...
Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 1:16 PM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Local Life Expectancies

Local Life Expectancies | Geography Education | Scoop.it

We often talk about life expectancy data at the national level; this simplification has a great deal of utility but obscures regional distinctions within a country.  Some counties in the United States have life expectancies on par with Japan (84), while the worst off counties are more similar to Indonesia (69).  Even more startling, in 661 counties, life expectancy stopped dead or went backwards for women since 1999.  This is a dramatic look at the importance of scale within any geographic analysis to arrive at reasonable conclusions.  So let's start looking at local demographic data instead of just nationally aggregated data.  For more on this press release, see:  http://www.healthmetricsandevaluation.org/news-events/news-release/girls-born-2009-will-live-shorter-lives-their-mothers-hundreds-us-counties

more...
Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 10:10 AM

Typically when I think about the average life expectancy today I think of how it has increased over the years. However I never thought of looking at it broken down into gender and area. When it is broken down the life expectancy of women is not increasing like it used too and in some places is even going down. In the graph it says that 54,000 women die every year because of excess salt. That stat is crazy! Even though that may not be a huge percentage of our population. It is something that can be monitored more and prevented. It would be interesting to see why people live longer in certain areas. What is it about specific areas that these people are living the longest? Even though the average life expectancy as a whole as increased I think we should look more into the decrease of life expectancy of women and why men's life expectancy's are increasing so much in comparison to women. 

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:59 PM
When I hear about life expectancy the first thought that pops into my head is that the U.S. must have a great life expectancy considering all the medicines and treatments we have available. But when I read that since such a large numbers of counties have seen woman life expectancy stop dead or go backwards since 1999, I was absolutely shocked! Why was the life expectancy of women's dropping in so many more counties, an why weren't the men's life expectancy also dropping?And why is it that women live the longest in North Dakota and men in Iowa? Reading further, we see that a large percentage of women dying each year is because of excess salt and a large percentage of men dying each year is because of smoking. Both of these things can be prevented, but yet we still see many Americans do them. One good thing we learn from this is that African American males life expectancy has improved greatly over the past two decades. I would be interested to find out why that is, and if it could help the rest of the population also increase their life expectancy.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 5:36 PM

Life expectancies do vary.  I know that one of my grandmothers died around when she was 60, and my other grandfather just passed away at age 84.  I am 23 years old, and the difference between their death ages is close to 24; one lived a whole "one of my current lifetimes" more than the other, which is strange to think about.  All that I've ever known can fit into the time that one lived longer than the other.  Life is transient, but just that.  The "death expectancy" is that everyone will die, absolutely.  No exceptions.  I was given a paper from a friend in high school, one of those motivational readings, on "What will you do with your 'dash'?"  It referred to gravestones, ie) someone lived from 1927-2012.  The two dates aren't really what matter, but the 'dash' in between, and how we choose to spend our lives is the true part that really matters!  So know what to expect, on average and based on where you are from, and be prepared for some differences from that average, but make your 'dash' truly matter! After all, it's the most we can do...

Suggested by Lou Salza
Scoop.it!

Scale of the Universe

Scale of the Universe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Everything in the known universe, created by 14-year-old twins.

 

After you follow the link, click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe).  This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels.   This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.  See this on the twins website at: http://htwins.net/scale2/

more...
Kalin B.'s comment, September 13, 2012 8:11 PM
I've seen this around, and it always reminds me of a fictional pair of glasses that would show you what little a part of the universe you are, causing you to go insane.

Erm, anyway.. Very neat.
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:55 AM
I like to sit and think about how big we think we are, not as just one countrh but as one planet! We think that we are so so big but looking at this scale of the universe it is interesting to see how much bigger things can get AND how small they can get compared to us. So if you think about it this way, we are SO tiny compared to the rest of the universe and if we stopped doing what we are doing now (i.e wars, sickness and natural resources etc.) and work together we would be SO MUCH bigger and as a result of that we would be able to explore more of our world and universe
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Nesting Cans Activity

Nesting Cans Activity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This blog post outlines an excellent craft activity designed for K-6 students to teach the concept of scale. 

more...
Melissa Marin's comment, April 9, 2012 2:26 PM
How cool!
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How Big is my World?

This type of mapping project is a fantastic way to teach scale to elementary school students. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Why Scale is Important

Discover why and how scale matters in geography education, with real-world examples using fieldwork, GIS, and much more. This video introduces the topic and ...

 

This is a sample Youtube clip from the 'geographyuberalles' channel which has over 800 videos produced by @josephkerski (NCGE president, Educational Manager at ESRI).  This is a great resource. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business?

Will American Pot Farmers Put the Cartels out of Business? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
They've driven prices so low that Mexican growers are giving up.


For the first time ever, many of the farmers who supply Mexican drug cartels have stopped planting marijuana, reports the Washington Post. "It's not worth it anymore," said Rodrigo Silla, a lifelong cannabis farmer from central Mexico. "I wish the Americans would stop with this legalization."  Facing stiff competition from pot grown legally and illegally north of the border, the price for a kilogram of Mexican schwag has plummeted by 75 percent, from $100 to $25.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Events that we think of as local (Washington and Colorado legalizing marijuana use) have national and global implications, especially in a globalized economy.  This article is but one example of why geographers try to approach every issue at a variety of scales to more fully comprehend the ramifications and ripple effects of any given phenomenon. 


Tags: Mexiconarcoticsscale

more...
Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, May 19, 12:36 PM

I wonder how true this story actually is??

Rescooped by Seth Dixon from Primary Geography for the Australian Curriculum
Scoop.it!

Using Scale in Elementary School

Using Scale in Elementary School | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Great idea to help early years learners understand their 'place'...


Via Maree Whiteley
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is would be a nice craft to help younger students understand the concept of scale.  This adapts some of the ideas from the classic picture book "Me on the Map" by Joan Sweeney.  


Tags: scale, K12, location.

more...
Maree Whiteley's curator insight, March 16, 8:33 AM
AC Geography key concepts Place, Space, Environment and Interconnection...all in a set of form cups! Love it...
Hoolee Nan's curator insight, March 30, 5:17 PM

A great way for children to explore countries, areas, positions on maps and get a grasp of their surroundings! Also a fun and interactive idea for the classroom.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale

Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A geographer and a biologist at Salem State University team up to curate a new exhibition, featuring confounding views from both satellites and microscopes
Seth Dixon's insight:

When I teach why scale is an important concept in geography, I say that depending on the situation a scientist might need a microscope or a telescope to properly understand a phenomenon.  Most images give us enough context clues to help us determine the scale of the image, but this set of 15 images does not.  So is it micro or macro?


Tags: scale, perspective

more...
Dean Haakenson's curator insight, October 17, 2013 6:15 PM

So cool!

Siri Anderson's curator insight, October 18, 2013 12:46 PM

Gives a whole new meaning to the sense of scale.

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 6:18 PM

Try your eyes at this!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City?

What If the Entire World Lived in 1 City? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Two Yale architects pose the question in an ambitious research project.


"Hsiang and Mendis have increasingly come to believe that the only way to study and plan for our urban planet is to conceptualize its entire population in one seamless landscape – to picture 7 billion of us as if we all lived in a single, massive city."

more...
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 17, 2013 1:54 PM

I was very exited by the work being done by Bimal Mendis and Joyce Hsiang.  I hear to much on the news and in conversation about over population, energy shortages and brutal living conditions.  Creating a digital interactive medium is the most efficient way to educate the internet consuming public about issues and developments all over the world.  It reminds me of the blue marble picture taken from Apollo 17, the first full color image of our planet.  This image is considered to be the defining moment that awoke the conservation movement and understanding that the earth is our home and should be treated as such.  I cant help hoping a program like “the city of seven billion” will help people to relies we are all one species and from that develop a move beneficial way of coexisting.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.


Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.

more...
olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 2:01 PM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 9:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.

Suggested by Mary Rack
Scoop.it!

Amazing view of Universe captured

Amazing view of Universe captured | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Hubble Space Telescope has produced one of its most extraordinary views of the Universe to date.


The Earth is an amazing place to study...but this makes it feel remarkably small. 


Tags: geospatial, space, remote sensing, scale, perspective

more...
Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 11:32 AM
I like this kind of stuff, if i didn't choose geography I would probably have chosen astronomy. Everything about it interests me, there's so much that we don't know and will probably never know.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, September 10, 2013 11:07 AM

I thought it was funny that even though many of the published telescopically captured photos are composites of different lens and filtered shots of a single item, or area of space, that if that item or area were really to be examined, to get more of a feel for the universe as it truly is rather than how we would ordinarily see it, would be to consider it from an infinite number of perspectives.  Rather than just one perspective, as humans are limited to, the universe has many eyes.  Instead of taking many photographs from the same perspective, we could, as many modern scientists do, do in-depth scans using X-ray technology, and magnetic resonance, assessing composition, to create a full picture of all angles, zooms, and subjects of everything, in order to determine more about origins and mysteries of the universe. I would endorse that to be done on an infinite scale, complete with documentation of all spatial anomallies and occurances, such that completion of understanding could, in theory take place by crossing the gap of the notion of infinity by utilizing technology to one's advantage.  This would allow us not to waste time looking at every detail, but to have something with more processing capabilities understand it for us, and communicate that infinity in a way that we could see it.  There are dangers of using X-ray technology, and it doesn't seem like NASA really cares about (as one could hope) not harming alien life, or planting life on other worlds, etc. I would more forcibly endorse that we do not try to observe other worlds and the Universe at all, because god forbid, some alien colony finds us and sees that we are not only cuturally divided, we are a torn world, shattered in the aftermath of the destruction that comes from our selfishness and pride that has long dominated the hearts of men.  They might be disappointed, and they should be.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Zoom from the edge of the universe to the quantum foam of spacetime and learn about everything in between."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Click "Start," and then use the slider across the bottom, or the wheel on your mouse, to zoom in -- and in and in and in... or out and out and out... It will take you from the very smallest features postulated by scientists (the strings in string theory) to the very largest (the observable universe). This really is a fabulous visual demonstration of scale at micro and macro levels. This is an excellent way to bring spatial thinking into the math curriculum as well.


Tags: Scale, perspective, space, spatial, Unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

more...
Dania's comment, September 7, 2012 12:47 AM
This is an excellent way to teach everyone about scale … I love it… I got a better view and compare of how things look like, plus those naked eyes cannot see. Things that I heard and learned in science class but I couldn’t image it, now I saw a picture and it gave me a better knowledge. This will be a great tool for teaching many students.
Mark V's comment, September 10, 2012 2:38 PM
I felt that this is an excellent way to understand spatial thinking which is important in many areas beyond geography.
Joe Andrade's curator insight, July 7, 2013 10:08 PM

This is a great method of teaching some of the principals behind understanding spatial analysis. An important skill in understanding the world we live in.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

OverlapMaps - compare any two places

OverlapMaps - compare any two places | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"An OverlapMap is a map of one part of the world that overlaps a different part of the world. OverlapMaps show relative size."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The above overlap map is the United Kingdom compared to the state of Pennsylvania.  This is a very simple way to demonstrate the true size of remote places, and 'bring the discussion home.'  This site is as simple and intuitive as it is powerful and easily applicable.  This is a keeper. 

more...
Hannah Provost's comment, September 9, 2012 9:23 AM
This is a very useful tool because as illustrated in our class activity with the oranges and trying to flatten it out onto a flat piece of paper, it doesn't work. This causes distortion with most maps in most textbooks because they are Mercator. This tool will help people realize the actual size of countries in comparison to other countries.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:07 PM
This toll will and can provide a reliable mapping source to geographers everywhere. It is useful and fun. A neat way to learn cartography
Josiah Melchor's comment, September 12, 2012 11:31 PM
The OverlapMap is a very useful tool that will allow a user to compare different places and parts of the world. Having a more accurate size of a place is critical when comparing 2 or more places. I think that many users besides me will find this very convenient when other resources are not available.
Suggested by Paul Sloan
Scoop.it!

Royal Geographic Society looks to spice up flight experience with Hidden Journeys project

Royal Geographic Society looks to spice up flight experience with Hidden Journeys project | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Royal Geographic Society is the latest to attempt to improve the flight experience with its Hidden Journeys project.

 

This is an article that describes the new, incredibly well-crafted module of instruction designed by the Royal Geographic Society.  Designed as an alternative to standard in-flight entertainment, the user could learn about the many places they are flying over on (at the moment) 19 set flight paths.  Most importantly, this modules uses the concept of scale nicely providing 12 imageswith linked information about each place at three scales: "flying at 12,000m," "flying at 1,000m" and "flying at ground level."  This would be a fantastic resource for a student-guided lesson of discovery and exploration.  To see the RGS modules, visit: http://www.hiddenjourneys.co.uk/  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

TeachSpatial: Resources for Spatial Teaching and Learning

TeachSpatial: Resources for Spatial Teaching and Learning | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This resource is a comprehensive approach to teaching spatial thinking skills. Terms with spatial reference (i.e.-place, diffusion, migration, situation, scale, region, centrality, proximity, etc.) are defined within their spatial context and related to their multiple curricular connections such as Life Science, Physical Science, Earth Science and (of course) Geography. These terms and concepts then link you to teaching resources, online modules, lesson plans and classroom activities. While useful for all units, this is especially useful for the beginning of a course to teach the importance of spatial thinking skills to then have them permeate the rest of the year. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

America Is Stealing the World’s Doctors

America Is Stealing the World’s Doctors | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Who wants to practice medicine in a country where they use power tools in surgery? The dilemma of doctors in the developing world.

 

This article's title is inflammatory, but it touches on some very real interconnected geographic issues.  Economic development in the many parts of the world is complicated by the migration issue of 'brain drain.'  The individual choices that doctors from the less developed world face often lead the best and brightest workers to leave their home country.  If you could make a very good living as in the United States (the median salary of a surgeon in New Jersey is $216,000) or go back to your home country where your skills are more desperately needed (in Lusaka, Zambia a surgeon makes about $24,000 a year), which would you choose?  This is not a hypothetical example (nor one with only one right answer) but one rooted in a globalized economy, where the places that offer the greatest opportunities for individual advancement get the top talent--excellent for the individual and family economies but problematic at the national scale.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Providence and the Virtues of Scale

Providence and the Virtues of Scale | Geography Education | Scoop.it

I live in the Providence metropolitan area so this particular blog posting about urban planning and economic revitalization hit very close to home.   

 

Rhode Islanders: how accurate do you feel this perspective on Providence and it's economic assets (and deficiencies) is?  What other aspects would you discuss in trying to understand the economic geography of the area?  What are the biggest obstacles for improving the city? 

more...
Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:20 AM

Well the providence area we are seeing a boost when it comes down to people getting jobs and also more people are coming to providence because of all it has to offer. Providence has lots to offer. One good thing that providence has to offer is one of the best schools in the area. Many people come and see and take in the scenery that just blows your mind. Also the economy seems to be getting better because this city seems not to be in such of a bad deficit. The city of providence in a couple of more years we will see a tremendous growth that the city will benefit from.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 19, 2013 9:52 AM

This article shows how you can improve a city to not only make it bigger but to make it better. not better in the sense that it has to beat out other cities and have the best buildings etc. but to allow the city to be more people friendly which means getting rid of congestion and traffic.