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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Gendered Cultural Narratives

Gendered Cultural Narratives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As a Muslim woman who chooses to wear hijab,I'd like to apologize for this poster, to my non-hijab wearing cohorts. http://pic.twitter.com/IoLfDPEGx7

Seth Dixon's insight:

The hijab is an incredibly complex cultural artifact full of social meanings all over the political spectrum.  This poster shows some of the social pressures exerted on women in Iran to wear the hijab.  This poster comes from Iran where the government is using this platform to encourage traditional values and gendered norms using a chocolate bar/candy analogy.  This poster struck a nerve on social media throughout the Middle East in part because blends some modern cultural diffusion elements with some older folk traditions.  Many hijab-wearing women don't want other women to be shamed into conforming, and many women wear it the hijab in public, but privately subvert the cultural norms on social media.  What stereotypes and perspectives are embodied in this poster?  Why do you think this poster was seen as inflammatory or culturally insensitive by many?  This image would be a great discussion starter for cultural  patterns and process as well as the geography of the Middle East. 


TagsIran, gender, MiddleEast, Islamreligion, culture, social media.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 7:18 AM

unit 3 and 6 Why is this viewed as inflammatory by some?

Nancy Watson's curator insight, Today, 7:07 AM

Interesting discussion

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Malaysia's 'Allah' controversy

Malaysia's 'Allah' controversy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Is limiting the use of the Arabic word for God a sign of growing intolerance towards minorities?
Seth Dixon's insight:

In Arabic, the word Allah means God.  Christian Arabs refer to God as Allah and Arabic versions of the Bible reference Allah.  As Arabic and Islam have diffused in interwoven patterns, the linguistic root and the theological meanings have became intertwined to some.  BBC World and Al-Jazeera have reported on this issue as the Malaysian government has attempted to ban the use of the word Allah to any non-Muslim religious group.  Language and religion just got very political.  


Tags: languagereligion, political, Malaysia, SouthEastAsia, culture, Islam.

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Caterin Victor's curator insight, June 25, 1:25 PM

 Yes !!  The religion of love and peace, is not a religion, and sure that  not a pacific love,  just a bunch of hatred and criminals wich endanger  the  world, in the name  of a pedophile crazy, Muhamad, and  and  inexisting  allah, a  Devil, not a  God !!  The  Obama`s   "Holly  Curan ", a  dirty   instruction book  for killing !! 

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World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think

World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are about 1.6 billion Muslims, or 23% of the world's population, making Islam the second-largest religion.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you think that most of the world's Muslim population lived in the Middle East and North Africa?  If so you are not alone, but the Middle East and North Africa account for only 19.8% of the global Muslim population.  In fact there are more Muslims in India and Pakistan than the Middle East and North Africa.   


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, Middle East.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 7:40 AM

Religion is a widely popular theme throughout the world. People participate in thousands of different religions and who know Islam could become the second largest in the world?

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 10:29 AM

The Muslim world is very misunderstood, especially in the United States.  When someone hears "Muslim" they might immediately think of Arabs in the Middle East.  However, Muslims are spread throughout the world and Islam is practiced by many types of ethnic groups (not all Arabs are Muslim either!)

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:09 PM

Islam is a huge widespread religion. There is no surprise that it could ever become so large. The majority of Islamic followers is in the Asia-Pacific part of the world where that is no shocker either.

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Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs

Muslims masquerade as Hindus for India jobs | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Facing religious discrimination in the Hindu-dominated job market, many are forced to assume fake identities.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not that uncommon in India unfortunately.  As the articles states, a government commission was appointed in 2005 to investigate the degree to which Muslims were disadvantaged in social, economic and educational terms.  The commission concluded the socio-economic condition of most Muslims was as bad as that of the Dalits, who are at the bottom rung of the Hindu-caste hierarchy, also referred to as the "untouchables." 


Tags: labor, industry, economic, poverty, India.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 11:16 AM

It is sad that this kind of discrimination exists in the world. I will never understand how the religion you follow affects how you wash the dishes or cook the food while you are at work.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:46 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:11 PM

In the marketplace, one of a different religion has to mask her true identity to be able to sell the food there. Not only is this woman facing pure discrimination she is facing it because of what she believes in. Nothing is more horrible than being stripped away from something you believe in. In order for her to sell food in this marketplace, she must do so to survive.

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Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth?

Mount Moriah: The most contested real estate on Earth? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Muslims call it the Noble Sanctuary. Jews and Christians call it the Temple Mount." 


What happens when various religious groups claim the same territory as their own?

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Mrs. B's curator insight, February 10, 6:08 AM

#Jerusalem

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 14, 8:35 AM

This article and picture points out just how hard it is to “solve” the problems in Israel.  The constant overlapping of buildings on holy sites complicates the issues more than anything political ever could.  Belief is one of the biggest driving forces for conflict in the world and this illustration reminds us of that.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 4, 10:54 AM

In some of the oldest civilizations on earth, religion is the most important aspect of life. There will always be extreme conflicts in these ancient areas all over religion.

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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Gapminder is a tremendous resource that I've shared in the past and total fertility rates is an ideal metric to see in this data visualization tool.  As Hans Rosling said in one of his TED talks using Gapminder, religion and total fertility rates are not as connected as previously thought.  In this particular mode, you can see how three predominantly Catholic countries (Philippines, Argentina and Mexico) compare in Total Fertility Rates to three predominantly Muslim countries (Indonesia, Turkey and Iran).  


Questions to Ponder: Historically many have assumed that Catholic and Muslim populations would have higher birth rates; why is this changing?  How important a factor is religion in changing fertility rates?  What are other factors impact a society's fertility rate?


Tags: population, demographicsvisualization, religion.

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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 12:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 3:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

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Complexity in Syria

Complexity in Syria | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A color-coded map of the country's religious and ethnic groups helps explain why the fighting is so bad.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This map of the various ethnic and religious groups in being shown on major media outlets as some Western countries (including the United States) are considering military action in Syria.  This and other maps like it powerfully conveys while many may conceptualize Syrians as a single monolithic group, that idea is a fiction that was created in the absence of geographic content to fill the void. 


Additionally this diagram has also been circulating lately for the same reasons; this flow chart lays out the Middle East's political rivalries and alliances.  "The enemy of my enemy is my friend" is a well-quoted proverb to simplify Middle Eastern political alliances and rivalries.  Seeing this web, you can only imagine that living by that dictum can certainly lead to complicated geopolitical conflicts among countries and culture groups.


Tags: SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, political, ethnicity, religion.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 3:19 PM

This map shows tha tthere are an overwhelimg amount of Arabs especially in centeral Syria. And then on the coast lline it is mostly mixed with pink representing the overwhlming other majority.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 5:11 PM

It appears from this article that Syria is a complicated country. The map shows the different ethnic and religious groups of Syria, along with other groups, all of which live within a small area. Syria, along with other countries within the Middle East have been faced with one serious issue or another. Many different people live within a very small area; those people practice different religions and are ethnically and culturally different. Unfortunately, being different in this part of the world may get you killed.   

Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 10:25 AM

Maps such as this one are very valuable when trying to understand conflict.  In Syria and the greater Levant area, unbalanced power and representation in politics is the result of many different religious and ethnic groups living in such close proximity each other, allowing conflict to become very invasive.

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).

Seth Dixon's insight:

Religious traditions are interconnected and often share common roots and ancestries.  This stunning infographic is an attempt to visually reconcile these disparate strands of faith into one cohesive whole (the image above is far too small to do it justice, but I tried to show the image at various scales).


Tags: perspectiveculture, religion, culture, infographic, diffusion.

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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:32 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the origins of each religion. Also, it shows the various relationships between religions. 

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This shows how a lot of religions are interconnected, and even if people think two religions are completely different, they might have similar roots, just like languages.

 

Graham Shroyer's religion: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows where religions originated and how they are all connected, like judaism and christianity.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because it identifies the origions and relationships of the major world religions of today. These religious branches clearly show the relationships between majorly and minorly practiced religions.


Rishi Suresh:  This shows how, similiar to languages, many religions come in families and have distinct connections between them. 

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:42 AM

fascinating infographic on world religions.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:06 AM

The immense tree of world religions is presented as a graphic to tell connections of world religions and how far they've broken and changed.

The movement of ideas and people have helped caused these breaks in the religion by bringing ideas to new people, mixing with the present culture, and going further from the hearth of the religion.

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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).


TagsSaudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 6:53 PM

The article displays the constant battle the women of Saudi Arabia face on a daily basis. However, this is a small sign of women in this area slowly getting more rights. This is an important right granted to women. Being allowed to participate in sporting activities or other types of physical exercise is very important in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. 

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 11:49 AM

This is a push in the struggle for women's rights in Saudi Arabian. For the first time girls will be allowed to play sports in private schools. The ultraconservative kingdom still requires that the girls were descent and  decent dress and and Saudi women teachers are going to have priority in supervising the activities.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:23 PM

Female rights in countries like Saudi Arabia are nothing like in the U.S. Much like in other Middle Eastern countries, Saudi Arabia allows little to no extra curricular activities for girls and women. Allowing them to play some specific sports is a huge deal!

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Public Space, Gender and Religion

Seth Dixon's insight:

Recently, Five women activists have been arrested for wearing prayer shawls at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.  Israeli policewomen detained members of the religious group Women of the Wall for breaching orthodox rules governing prayers at the site, which only allow men to dress this way. This is Judaism's most holy site and orthodox traditions govern the legal code over who is permitted to be in this place and what they may do; this fight represents a struggle to redefine the meaning and usage of public space in Jerusalem (among other complex issues).


Tags: perspectiveIsrael, culture, gender. religion, culture,
Middle East.

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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:27 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This article relates to Key Issue #1 becuase it shows how religion affect different demographics. It also brings other components into play in the long-standing discussion about religion.

 

Vinay Penmetsa; This is related to the section because it relates religion and gender inequality in the world.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because it talks about religion and it also talks about how it conflicts with other issues like gender inequality.

 

Rishi Suresh: This relates to Half the Sky because it shows the relationship between religion and gender equality. 

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because this article shows the relationship between gender equality and religion. Gender Inequality can be influenced by religion.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 9:20 AM

This article is about a Jewish women's group and its desire to have equal rights when it comes to prayer at the holy site of the Western Wall. This battle touches on a number of political issues including equal rights, religious freedom (in how one worships), and restrictions which may be placed in public spaces. While this issue seems trivial to me, the traditionally male practices being used by women may be considered an insult to their religion, or this could just be another instance of overbearing patriarchy in the Middle East.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 12:33 PM

Women's rights are a huge issue in the past and in society today. Whether or not religion has anything to do with it, women's rights have been stripped for even the most absurd reasons. Religious reasons among others do trump women's rights. Its sad that women can be treated this way but its true.

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The Cyrus Cylinder: An Artifact Ahead of Its Time

The Cyrus Cylinder: An Artifact Ahead of Its Time | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This relic from ancient Persia had a profound influence on the Founding Fathers
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video can be seen as the three minute version of a 20 minute TED talk by Neil MacGregor, the Director of the British Museum.  He discusses the profound importance that the Cyrus Cylinder (A clay cylinder covered in Akkadian cuneiform script) had on modern political though on multiculturalism.


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David Ricci's comment, April 30, 2013 7:07 AM
I decided to write a comment on this video because there were no others. After watching the video though, i realized that it was quite interesting. I love looking into the history of ancient civilizations such as the Roman empire. This video takes an artifact from the ancient Persian Empire and proves that it was used by our founding fathers to help dictate the way we live today. Persia was the first empire that allowed complete religious freedom. When Jefferson was writing the Declaration he looked to Cyrus and the cylinder for inspiration. At this time period they were doing something unheard of by having complete religious freedom and the fathers were not sure how they could make it work. With little experience they went to the only know successful example of this type of society. All societies have gotten inspirations from history and this is an interesting bit of information about where our countries inspiration came from.
Kevin Cournoyer's comment, April 30, 2013 9:52 PM
Again, as a history major, I found this video to be particularly interesting. I was not aware of the Cyrus Cylinder despite my deep interest in both ancient history and the American Revolution.
The Cyrus Cylinder and the U.S. Constitution are unique because they both provided for equal protection of different races, religions, etc. Because of this, both pieces allowed for a united entity that encompassed diverse cultures, making for a heterogeneous geographic area. I think this video was most interesting because it shows that despite both spatial and chronological separation, common ideas can transcend all different barriers to be upheld and striven towards for a better world.
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Catholic Demographics

Catholic Demographics | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Infographics showing the distribution of the Roman Catholic population in the world, where it has risen and fallen in recent years.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As mentioned earlier, a South American pope was a symbolic recognition of the demographic shift in the Church's population away from Europe. 


Tags: culturereligion, Christianity.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 11, 9:29 AM

As the Roman Catholic population decreases in Europe, it drastically increases in Africa. However, Latin America still holds the largest population of Catholics according to the Vatican.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:33 PM

This infographic shows the changing world Catholic demographic. South America is home to by far the largest Catholic population in the world where once Europe was. Now Europe has a rapidly declining Catholic population over the past 40 years (probably due to declining religiosity and low birth rates) while Africa, particularly in DR Congo, is seeing the most rapid increase in Catholics (likely due to missionaries and converts). Interestingly, there's a growing number of Catholics in Asia, possibly due to missionaries or just migration.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 27, 4:37 PM

This is a distribution map, showing how Catholicism is spread throughout the world. It is a choropleth map and a bar graph on the side.

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The Struggle for Jihad

The Struggle for Jihad | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two opposing groups battle to define the word jihad on public buses and subways.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This New York Times video highlights two current media campaigns that are in their own struggle to shape the meaning(s) of the word jihad for the American public.  While the definition of "Holy War" is often quoted, it also means a struggle.  When you hear the word jihad, who's jihad do you think of first?  The cultural context within which a word is used might not be the same context in which the message is received and interpreted.  This disconnect can be a part of cultural conflicts and misunderstandings.   

 

Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, USA.

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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 30, 2013 5:07 AM
It is sad that these people are feeling the negative connotations of people who commit crimes under their own definition of the word jihad. When in actuality the word means to Islamic followers a personal struggle.
Conor McCloskey's comment, April 30, 2013 7:27 AM
Islamic cultural has been isolated and generalized in American society after September 11th, 2001. Because of this, the Islamic religion is often misunderstood or misrepresented. There are extremist factions of every religion, even Christian, though sometimes our culture forgets that. This video is about a Muslim organization that is trying to take back the definition of “jihad” in American society. Since 9/11, the world has been synonymous with violence, though many Muslims do not believe their struggle for a better life with God is a violent struggle.
Cultures are multilayer. While some Muslim’s believe jihad is a holy war, others see it as a personal struggle. American culture has a lot to learn about the Muslim cultures through out the world, including the differences between the extremist and non-extremist factions. Extremist factions tend to get the most press coverage and attention from outsiders because they are by name extreme. It would be interesting to see how this relationship with jihad would differ if September 11th never happened.
Zakary Pereira's comment, April 30, 2013 1:31 PM
Before seeing this video I had always thought of a Jihad as a religious war started by radical Muslims. After watching I felt bad personally that I had confused this word with something that many people hold as just a goal or a personal struggle for them. I do not know if it is because post-9/11 there was much anti-Islam and anti-muslim sentiment in the US (still are today) and that the word became a radical term in the United States, I don’t know. I agree with Conor and saying that the reason many people know Jihad as a religious war is because of the media attention that radical Islamists receive when they bomb/hurt/kill and that is hurting the image of Muslims and Jihad in America.
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Chinese Uyghurs defy Ramadan ban

Chinese Uyghurs defy Ramadan ban | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The government's attempt to clamp down on religious expression has backfired among Uyghurs."

Seth Dixon's insight:

China has used various means to eliminate minority groups' cultural identity, and human rights groups argue that this ban on Ramadan is no different (children and government employees are banned from fasting, allegedly for health and safety concerns).  Ethnic Uyghurs speak a Turkic language are more culturally connected to Cental Asia than East Asia.  Predominantly Muslim, the Uyghurs are defying some of the more controversial laws that they feel single them out.   


Tagsethnicityconflict, politicalreligion, China.

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Céline's curator insight, July 11, 11:32 AM
"Seth Dixon's insight:

China has used various means to eliminate minority groups' cultural identity, and human rights groups argue that this ban on Ramadan is no different (children and government employees are banned from fasting, allegedly for health and safety concerns).  Ethnic Uyghurs speak a Turkic language are more culturally connected to Cental Asia than East Asia.  Predominantly Muslim, the Uyghurs are defying some of the more controversial laws that they feel single them out."

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 7:50 AM

unit 3 and 4

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The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split

The Origins Of The Shiite-Sunni Split | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The division between Islam's Shiite minority and the Sunni majority is deepening across the Middle East. The split occurred soon after the death of the Prophet Muhammad, nearly 1,400 years ago.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The ghosts of religious wars past are rattling in Iraq; The geography of the Sunni-Shiite division is incredibly important for a good understanding of world regional geography as well as modern geopolitics. This NPR podcast examines the  historical and religious aspects of this split to then analyze the political and cultural implications in the Middle East today.  Additionally this Pew Research article highlights the 5 countries where the the majority of Muslims are Shiite, with some good demographic data to add to the analysis. 


Tags: MiddleEast, Islamreligionhistorical, culturepodcast.

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great photo gallery, but I wanted to make a special note of this image.  The caption for this picture says, "Egyptians watch as Muslims march on the street to mark the birthday of the Prophet Muhammed in Cairo, Jan 13, 2014."  Is this a representative group of Egyptians?  What demographic group would we expect to see in the second story balcony?  What does the architecture tell us about the cultural norms of the society?

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 11:50 AM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 11:53 AM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

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Cultural Syncretism

Cultural Syncretism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I found this image on social media from a great geography teacher (link to his site--looking for APHG group activities?  Try this).  This picture taken at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Memphis, TN shows an intrguing linguistic combination that I had never imagined before.  This is referred to as cultural syncretism, where two or more cultures or cultural traits combine together to make something new.  Globalization and migration are making more cultural combinations than we've ever seen before in this human mosaic we call home.


Tags: language, culture, the South, APHG, religion, landscape.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 10, 2013 9:01 PM

Interesting 


Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:02 PM

This was taken in Memphis, TN. I liked how it mixes the religion with the surrounding culture and dialect, really interesting and shows that people can have the same religion and different backgrounds. 

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National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality

National cemeteries create a 'sacred grove' of equality | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the end, rank falls away
Seth Dixon's insight:

This Veteran's day many will go to cemeteries to remember fallen soldiers.  These are secular sites, but still sacred space to many.  The sanctity of these places are intentional and considerable planning goes into the spatial layout and design of the cemeteries.  Enjoy the day off for Veteran's Day, but don't forget to remember.

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Expert's comment, November 11, 2013 3:42 AM
Hi, I'd be happy if you visit my site? http://oyunskor.toretto.org
Caren Izzo's curator insight, November 11, 2013 8:09 AM

Veterans' Day today.  Thank a vet for their service.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 11, 2013 9:44 AM

If you have never visited a veterans cemetery, I think it is important to go and just visit even if you do not have a realtive there.  These men and women gave their lives for us in one way or another.  No matter what creed, what belief or which religion they followed all are treated with same care.  If you really want to see an amazing site goto a US Military Cemetery overseas.  These gaves are maitained by the locals, French, Italians, Ducth, etc.  They keep them neat, clean, with flowers and make sure our soldiers that died for them are not forgotten.  The one overlooking Normandy is amazing.  I have had the privledge to visit the US Cemetary near Rome and the feeling you get...well undescribable.   Take a look here for a view of these cemeteries.  http://www.abmc.gov/cemeteries/index.php

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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is the geography of hijab?  Covering one's head pre-dates Islam in the Middle East but many associate this practice strictly with Islam and only for women--read this article (with teaching tips and supplemental resources) for more context on this cultural and religious practice.  


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, National Geographic.

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Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 4:27 AM

 understanding difference

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 11:39 AM
The hijab has become a very controversial issue on the global scale. For example, Saudi Arabian and Iran women are required to wear it where as other countries (most recently France) have banned the wearing of such religious garments. Under the U.S. constitutions first amendment of freedom of speech and freedom of religion allows the women to wear them. For many women it is a choice of modesty or a way to show her devotion to her religion. Many people today still are uneducated about the topic and see it as a way these women are being oppressed. Ultimately it is that woman's choice, but it is a shame that in some places it may come with a price.
Mary Rack's comment, September 19, 2013 12:20 PM
Thank you, Shelby!!
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Religious Geographies

Religious Geographies | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I recently got my hands on a fabulous atlas entitled Mapping Mormonism which shows the historical geographies of this particular Christian denomination (see a review here).  I'll briefly share just this one cartogram above that is from the atlas; it displays territory not by the size of the landmass but by the LDS population living within the given territory.  While we would expect to see Utah to be very large on this cartogram, are there other pockets of large LDS populations that are surprising to you?  What explains the small spatial distribution patterns of limited diffusion that you see?  The LDS church is well-known for its missionary program and proselytizing efforts—does that play a role in this map?


On a related side note I found a curious political/religious map of the United States (a map that is partially explained by understanding some of the patterns on the map above).  The most typical religious maps show where particular religions are pre-dominant.  This map shows territories marked not by the faith of the residents but by the religion of the local congressmen.  This make me wonder:  Is this map religious or political? Is there valuable information to glean from this maps or is it simply a fun curiosity?  How does the religious geography of the United States impact political geography (or vice versa)?    


Tags: religion, culture, diffusion, mapping, historical, cartography.

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Jacob Ramsey's comment, September 1, 2013 7:42 PM
Its really interesting how a so many people can collaborate on one topic to bring not only the history of a ideal, but the true history of a long line of people that were a big part of the development of the west in the United States. We always learn about how this and that president did something to help the country expand but it would very interesting to see how we as a country grew from the influences of someone outside of our own society. And not only does this book offer maps but it also includes charts and timelines!
Kendall Belleville's comment, September 2, 2013 2:11 PM
It is really cool to see how much of tho religions are in the United States. it is really nice to see that people are being supportive of them. It is interesting that there are large areas of religion and then some areas have very little.
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 28, 9:30 PM

This map conveys the population of Mormons in each state. The sizes of the states are presented as corresponding the the Mormon population in each. The map links to more than what it shows. When you ask why are so many Mormons in Utah you can look into the past of Utah and the past of Mormons and you will find that Mormons settled in Utah following one of their leaders. You can then even ask the question why are Mormons still migrating to Utah or the question why did they stay there. Human geography can help us find the answers to these questions. A shared ideology among the community. A lack of repercussion for being open about their belief. A sense of belonging. Family connections. Human Geography help us unravel these mysteries which were brought to our attention by a simple map.

Regional spaces of Mormon's (such as the rather Formal region of Utah) are shown through the map and show the distribution of Mormonism throughout the world.

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Geographic Imagination in the English Anthem 'Jerusalem'

Geographic Imagination in the English Anthem 'Jerusalem' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I first learned to appreciate this anthem as a child watching the movie Chariots of Fire with my father.  My father was an avid runner in the early 80's and still continues to run to this day; he also is a devout Christian who seeks to earnestly honor the Sabbath Day.  Clearly the movie Chariots of Fire would resonate deeply with him and become a Dixon family classic to be watched over and over."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I greatly enjoyed writing this article about the geographic imaginations and yearnings that are embedded in the great nationalistic anthem 'Jerusalem.'  The audio, lyrics and analysis are all available here.


Tags: UKlandscape, culturereligion, Christianity, music.

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This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now

This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When Anum Hussain heard about the Boston Marathon bombing, she immediately panicked, worried that the culprits would be like her. The 22-year-old Muslim was in the offices of Hubspot, the Cambridge marketing-software company she works for.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting article; place and context mediate cultural interactions.  I can only imagine how incredibly difficult it would be to be a Muslim in the Boston area right now.  This geographer wishes that everyone could feel safe everywhere.    


Tags: terrorism, religion, Boston, Islam.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 12:33 PM

Being from around the area and listening and watching the tv during the boston bombings all I really thought about was how the city and families were effected by the tragic event. However I never really thought about how it impacted muslim people in the area. For people to put a blame on all muslim people is not right. We are not all the same, which means not all muslims are the same. Some muslims have lived their whole lives in the US and for people to catogorize them all as terrorists isn't right. All people should be treated them same way. It is sad to read the article and think that some muslims in Boston walk around in fear of being beat up or killed just because of their culture. The bombings effected an entire city and muslim people people should be able to mourn with the rest of the city. They grew up there just like we did. So what makes them so different from me and you? Not all muslims are killers like the two boys from the bombings. It is really sad to me that they have to live their lives in fear everyday in a place that they call home, just because of their culture. No one deserves to live like that. I can't even imagine how difficult it is for muslim people in Boston. 

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 7:38 AM

Terrorism is a huge problem in our Country today. I'm not trying to racist saying this but I feel like they do it to themselves. Coming into our country and terrorizing our nation thats okay? Yes not every Muslim is a terrorist im not saying that but you never know if they are or not. Since 911 we cant trust anyone, and theres a reason for that. I understand that they should not have to feel any different then the average American but the past is what we all dwell on.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 7:19 AM

Some are saying that racism doesnt exist anymore but it does. Muslims still live in fear that they are being judged everyday because some Americans generalize Muslims with terrorism

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America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas

America's Most (and Least) Religious Metro Areas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Provo, Utah, and Burlington, Vermont, represent opposite ends of the U.S. religiosity spectrum.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The majority of the most religious metros are concentrated in the South or Utah.  This particular weekend, many of the rythmns of urban life in Utah cities are remarkably visible as the LDS church holds it's semi-annual General Conference.  On the opposite side of spectrum, 5 of the 10 least religious metros are in New England; the west coast is the other center of diminished religiosity (with a mini-center in Colorado). 


Questions to ponder: What cultural patterns help to partially explain the levels of religiosity in the United States?  What other factors explain the patterns of religiosity in your in your local area? 


Tags: USA, culture, religion, Christianity.

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Lyn Leech's comment, August 23, 2013 2:45 PM
The fact that as you get more westward (disregarding Utah,) religion looses popularity has to do with the people who, in the past, migrated there. It could be argued that super-religious people back in the old days who came from England to escape religious prosecution tended to get to the east coast and then settle there, whereas people who didn't have a church as a tether would be more likely to go out east to look for gold and things. It's an interesting map, regardless and the west's seeming lack of religion may be due to the fact that most of the population of the US is based on the east, due to extreme conditions in the west such as mountains and deserts.
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European women marry, give hope to Samaritans

European women marry, give hope to Samaritans | Geography Education | Scoop.it
MOUNT GERIZIM, West Bank (AP) — The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some folk cultures, such as the Samaritans, have historically intermarried and have been plagued by genetic diseases.  Recently, they have turned to global solutions to their local demographic woes.  "Five young women from Russia and Ukraine have moved to this hilltop village in recent years to marry local men, breathing new life into the community."  


Tagsfolk culture, gender, population, Russia, religion, culture,
Middle East


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:21 PM

I know a man who is Indian, and his grandparents came from India.  He tells me that their people do not formally or very much at all approve of interbreeding between their people and other cultures.  He says Indians stick with Indians, and that's how it's supposed to be.  I think in the future that the genetic diseases will be abolished by selective characteristic modification through reproductive alteration using technology- I think DNA modification will become a popular trick in both reproduction and everyday life that will allow for the end of illness.  This would allow people to marry into other cultures without fear of genetic complications, but they would still have that cultural barrier my Indian acquaintence referred to.  That same dude has some funny insight about Italians and other cultures, and noted that Italian-Americans are not really Italian at all.  We had a couple of interesting discussions regarding different cultures, and he told me that he is 100% Indian.  I don't mean to seem degrading AT ALL but the first thing that popped into my head was how people breed dogs to be purebreds, which are coveted and expensive, as well as pure.  I'm a blend of many different nationalities, and I'm proud of it... The universe is a blend of many nationalities, and I ever-ponder my connection with the Universe, and it's nice to know that I have a commonality with the Universe!

Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 9:00 AM

It's a very interesting and sad phenomenon when groups that thrived in the past begin to dwindle to a point where the acts of individuals can decide the entire future of the demographic. It brings in questions of tradition and if those people have a duty to propagate their genes to keep their group alive. I can only imagine how tense the environment could be when single accidents or deaths could mean the end of your people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 9:14 AM

This article describes a how the small religious group, the Samaritans, have seen their numbers shrink to unsustainable levels and have been forced to turn outside to find wives. These men are importing brides from places like Ukraine because of a significant gender imbalance and heightened risk of birth defects due to genetic homogenization over the centuries. These circumstances present an fairly unique case of migration, one which should it become a standard practice, could have an effect on the culture of the Samaritan communities.

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Habemus papam: There is a new pope

Habemus papam: There is a new pope | Geography Education | Scoop.it
(3rd UPDATE) The new leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics is expected to deliver a speech in an hour
Seth Dixon's insight:

The juxtaposition of the hypermodern coverage of the election of a new pope (telecasts, social media, instantaneous global network coverage, etc.) with the archaic medieval rituals of the conclave (locked doors, smoke signals, etc.)  is endlessly fascinating to me.  Even in the 21st century, there is a place for the traditional.   So who is Pope Francis?  As the first South American pope, some feel this reflects the southern demographic shift within the Catholic Church. Also, click here for the science behind the white vs. black smoke


Tags: culturereligion, Christianity.

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Maricarmen Husson's comment, March 14, 2013 5:42 AM
I'm so happy! The first Argentine Pope!
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:44 PM

As a Catholic I see the need for tradition in culture.  Even as culture changes, I think there is still a place for it even in today's modern, fluid culture.  Tradition gives us a base to build a culture.  Yes cultures do change, but they have to start somewhere and traditions are the place to start.  Question, where would you be without some of your traditions? what would you miss?  We all start somewhere, after I was married and had kids, we started our own family traditions, but alot of them are based on older traditions,like a huge dinner at Christmas....mmm 5 courses and an expanding wasitline :).

Al Picozzi's comment, July 10, 2013 12:46 PM
I agree, there still is a place for tradition even in modern culture. We need somewhere to start and traditions are a good place.