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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The Next America

The Next America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Demographic transformations are dramas in slow motion. America is in the midst of two right now. Our population is becoming majority non-white at the same time a record share is going gray.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes.  Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs.      


Tag: declining populations, population, demographic transition model, USA.

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Gary Yarus ---> a #WaveOfAction Media Project's curator insight, Today, 5:35 AM

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

The demographic shifts in the United States are transforming the cultural fabric of the country and this interactive feature from the Pew Research Center explores some of these changes. Interracial marriage, declining fertility rates, migration, economic opportunities and politics are just some of the issues that can be seen in these excellent populations pyramids, charts, videos and graphs.

Connie Fink's curator insight, Today, 5:35 AM

Use with civil rights unti - changing face of US

Character Minutes's curator insight, Today, 8:52 AM

Very interesting chart of how the demographics of U.S. Is changing.

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Highly concentrated population distribution

Highly concentrated population distribution | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Only 2% of Australia's population lives in the yellow area. "

Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to Ponder: Why is Australia's population so highly clustered?  What is it about the yellow (and white) areas that explain this pattern?  How does this map of rainfall add to our understanding? What other layers of information do we need to properly contextualize this information?   


Just for fun, here is a Buzzfeed list that highlights the dangerous biogeography of Australia.  Maybe this is why people aren't living in the yellow region.   


Tags: AustraliaOceania, population, density.

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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 27, 6:01 AM

No hay cama Pa ' tanta Gente! 

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 30, 7:10 AM

What could explain the density of the white area? What is it about the yellow area that explains the lack of population?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 13, 4:32 AM

While the rainfall map offers a lot of explanation for why Australia's population is concentrated in areas of significant rainfall, it is not a complete picture. There could be a number of other factors contributing to the clustered population of Australia. Northern Australia receives significant rainfall, but is sparsely populated so there must be other reasons. A map with more topography would help as it could show mountainous barriers which would hinder expansion or major rivers on which civilizations thrive. Similarly, a climatic map could reveal areas which are tropical and less conducive to large populations of a more temperate climate.

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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs produces easy-to-use population charts and graphs (including population pyramids).  This image (courtesy of Hans Rosling) shows the impending changes on Brazilian society based on changing fertility rates. How is this chart an example of population momentum and of the Demographic Transition Model? 


Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodels, Brazil.

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 10:27 AM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 3:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.
Seth Dixon's insight:

These time-lapse demographic charts help to visualize the impacts of the demographic transition principles on a society.  In the GIFs of the United States and Japan for example, you can clearly see the baby boomer generation and the 'greying' processes respectively. 


Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, population, demographicsmodels.

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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2013 8:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 7:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says

China to ease one-child policy, abolish labor camps, report says | Geography Education | Scoop.it
China announces it will relax its one-child policy and abolish labor camps, the state-run Xinhua news agency reports.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Washington Post also answered 6 big questions you may have about the changes to the one-child policy and the 9 exceptions to the one-child policy.  

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 21, 2013 12:28 PM

For people with absolutely no education on China or Chinese history, they most likely have at least heard of the One Child Policy.  Even if they do not know the policy's details or its many exceptions, they do know that the policy exists in China.  This article is interesting in that it describes more changes that are being made to the policy to hopefully promote human rights in China.  Even though the One Child Policy lowered China's population, many Chinese believe that the policy hurts their families because it creates loneliness and it leads to abortions and heavy fines for having a second child.  Now, if one parent was an only child, that family may have a second child to ease loneliness.  There are many other exceptions to the policy, but hopefully new changes promote human rights and allow families to live better.

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:07 AM

Relaxing the one child policy will have many social impacts. In the article a few couples remarked that they would prefer to have 2 children as one child can be bored all alone. I bet that the number of abortions will fall and the number of female girls will increase as well.

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:26 AM

Throughout many years China has always had strict laws on how many children families should have. They recently started to ease their laws to allow people to have more than one child. I could see why they had their laws be only one child because they have such a big population. I also disagree with it because families should be able to have as many children as they want. 

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2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map

2013 World Population Data Sheet Interactive World Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The PRB World Population Data Sheet is a great resource; now you can access that same data through this interactive map

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Tracy Kovach's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:05 AM

use in populations unit

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:33 AM

The human popluation debate will always seem to be an issue. One can almost assume that the less developed countries are going to have the highest popluation but the most problems as well. A country that is classified as less developed are most definitely going to have low incomes due to the low number of jobs available, poor human development because there isn't enough people to be taking care of each other. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:28 AM

By looking at this data sheet you can see that the worlds population will increase by the millions in 2050. These populations will increase in areas that are already very populated and in areas that are not so heavily populated yet. 

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Should we be worried?

Seth Dixon's insight:

Overpopulation is a term that is often used and many assume that global population growth is a 'population bomb' to will be one of the major problems in the next 50 years.  Some researchers argue that the problem is overstated; in this 20 minute lecture geographer Danny Dorling says that overconsumption is the real issue, not population growth per se.  In this New York Times article, geographer Earle Ellis discusses how the world's carrying capacity expands with technological advances and that demographic statistics show that growth won't continue forever.  Others fear that humanity will outstrip the world's carrying capacity, including the letters to the editor responding to the original NY Times article.


Questions to Ponder: Do you see population growth as a looming problem that will negatively impact humanity?  If so how much should we be concerned? 


Tags: population, demographics.

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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 21, 2013 1:58 AM
Our current predicament in terms of resource depletion, pollution and climate change is mainly due to the industrialized lifestyle of the minority of the world population. Obviously, that's not a result of overpopulation per se.

However, population growth stops when living standards rise. We can't stabilize at 10 billion unless all 10 billion enjoy a reasonable standard of living. Given that even our current resource use is unsustainable, overpopulation is a real issue.
Hongsheng Li's curator insight, September 22, 2013 8:18 PM

人口资源环境承载力

人口过度 or 消费过度

Blake Welborn's curator insight, October 7, 2013 9:49 AM

This fits in well with our population chapter now as this is warning of over population

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Linguistic Diversity at Home

Linguistic Diversity at Home | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Counties where at least 10 percent of people speak a language other than English at home."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is ostensibly a map that would be great for a cultural geography unit, I'm also thinking about the spatial patterns that created this map.  What current or historical migrations account for some of the patterns visible here?  What would a map like this look like it it were produced 50 years ago?  Why are Vermont and West Virginia the only states without a county with over 10% of the population that speak another language at home?  


Tags: language, North America, mapping, regions, census, migration, populationhistoricalfolk cultures, USA.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 5, 2013 11:34 AM

The presence of large numbers of people that speak languages other than English at home occurs on the east and west coasts of the U.S., but largely in the south and western areas of the U.S..  In high school we used to have discussions about how there were many immigrants coming into the U.S. from or through Mexico.  With migration comes cultural diffusion, as the people coming into the United States bring their language and many other cultural elements of their country of origin with them.  I know there are certain neighborhoods in cities in Rhode Island where most people that I see on the street are speaking Spanish.  I have a relative that has married an immigrant from Guatemala, and she learned that the North East coast of the U.S. Is where many people from Central America move to- often in groups that settle as communities to help each other.  I can understand that it is essential to live near people that speak your language, and it makes sense that their strength and comfort in numbers is also a way of having a "home away from home."  Being the area of the world on the southern land border of the U.S., and that Central America consists mainly of Spanish speakers, it fills in the Southern areas of the U.S. with people that speak a language other than English.  The coasts overall can be explained as being populated by people that speak languages other than English at home because they contain ports of travel and trade, and are points where many flights from other countries would land and drop off travelers and migrants.  That and beautiful ocean views make the coasts a great place for foreigners to settle and live.  These pull factors are likely influential reasons for people to relocate to the areas on the map.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 10, 2013 8:02 PM

This map does not bring many surprises.  Places where there are a lot of Spanish speaking families are present in places where many Spanish people immigrate to, along the Mexican border and the southern tip of Florida, where Cuba is close by.  One interesting thing about the French areas seen in Louisiana is that their version of French is a regional dialect. Not only is their a cluster of French speaking families, but they are all speaking a language native to the region.  It is very surprising that there are not as many French speaking families along the Canadien border.

Maria Lopez's curator insight, February 6, 9:29 AM

This map is a great visual showing how multicultural the United States has become. This change is visible however is more states than others. For example, Most of the West Coast and Texas is made up of bilinguals that can speak both English and Spanish. I believe because they are so close to Mexico and that California sees a large influx of immigrants this would make sense. In addition, Florida is also another state that sees immigrants entering from overseas and has a large Cuban population because of this that Florida would be bilingual as well. It is interesting to see that in both Hawaii and Arizona, indigenous Native American languages are still spoken. Finally, the Dakota's have a large population of German speakers which I would have never associated together in the past. It is very interesting to see if these languages expand any further in the next ten years.

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?
Seth Dixon's insight:

The demographic transition is an important model in human geography that explains many of the declining birth rates in the more developed parts of the world and the high fertility rates in less developed countries.  This is often discussed within a demographic and economic context.  This article from TIME Magazine struck quite a nerve recently. While it noted that from 2007 to 2011 the fertility rate dropped 9% in the United States, it wasn't the statistical analysis that got people talking (here is another article on the topic).  What did strike a nerve was the discussion of the cultural shifts that are at the roots of this demographic decline, the cover picture that glamorizes a childfree life and a subtitle (when having it all means not having kids) that idealizes not having children.  The demographic transition has what some call a 'cultural lag' where a large family size is still culturally preferred even if it no longer makes the same agricultural and economic sense as it did in the past.  This piece demonstrates the new secularized 'post-cultural lag' values that see children as obstacles to preferable career paths and a limitation on their freedoms.  For one commentator that was opposed to this article's cultural perspective see this article.  While these pieces are decidedly not neutral on the subject, that is the point; opinions widely differ on the cultural impact of these demographic shifts.   

 

Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels, popular culture.

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 12, 2013 9:36 PM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:23 AM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents

In China, one-child policy compounds loss of child for parents | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One-child policy leaves some parents childless, hopeless and facing financial ruin in old age.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Population programs can have have diverse unintended consequences.  Many couples in China who have lost a child not only face the heartache of loss, but have also lost their economic future since that one child was supposed to support them in their old age.  Some elderly parents have a child, but one that does not financially support them as the cultural norms of the past would have required of the children.  These 'orphan grandparents' are casualties in the changing cultural, demographic, and economic patterns in China.

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Antonio Martinez's comment, September 12, 2013 12:36 PM
I can understand why this law is enforced. The obvious reason is that China has an unusually high population compared to other countries. Although, this law definitely has it's downsides. One being that if your child dies such as in the car accident in the beginning of the article, then you will be childless for the rest of your life.
jacob benner's comment, September 14, 2013 2:11 PM
China is overpopulated and it its becoming a problem, but by forcing parents to only have one child is leading to other problems. The childless parents describe there life to be empty and full of depression and without their child they are running into financial issues. Most of the time it is to late for the parents to have another child.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:43 PM

I understand the issues China is having with their large population but the one-child policy hurts the average family. Problems occur when a family can only have one child. If anything were to happen to that child, whether he/she dies young, runs away or gets thrown in prison. That can leave the parents vulnerable later in life. When the parents become elderly they may not have a child to take care of them. China must find another way to control their population. 

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the map above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to podcast versions of this article as well, one by NPR and a much more detailed one by Orion Magazine.


Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?


Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 4, 2013 10:45 AM

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 30, 2013 11:23 PM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 7:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US

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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

  • The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.
  • The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.
  • A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.
  • The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: population, demographicsmodels, AfricaKenya.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 2, 2013 11:16 AM

These projections given by the UN in regards to Kenya, specifically life expectancy and health, are very interesting and show how Kenya has the potential to grow.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 1:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 10:49 AM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

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Bye-Bye, Baby

Bye-Bye, Baby | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Birthrates are falling around the world. And that’s O.K.


Why do commentators, like Chicken Little, treat this worldwide trend as a disaster, even collective suicide? It could be because declines in fertility rates stir anxieties about power: national, military and economic, as well as sexual. In reality, slower population growth creates enormous possibilities for human flourishing. In an era of irreversible climate change and the lingering threat from nuclear weapons, it is simply not the case that population equals power, as so many leaders have believed throughout history. Lower fertility isn’t entirely a function of rising prosperity and secularism; it is nearly universal.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This op-ed from the New York Times provides excellent material for discussing demographic issues, especially regarding declining populations.  Many countries do fear the demographic uncertainty and are actively encouraging pro-natalist policies (with salacious ads such as Singapore's National Night and a Travel agency's 'Do it for Denmark' campaign).  The author of this article though, seeks to quell those fears.    


Tag: declining populations, population, demographic transition model.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 8:52 AM

This op-ed from the New York Times provides excellent material for discussing demographic issues, especially regarding declining populations.  Many countries do fear the demographic uncertainty and are actively encouraging pro-natalist policies (with salacious ads such as Singapore's National Night and a Travel agency's 'Do it for Denmark' campaign).  The author of this article though, seeks to quell those fears.  

Sally Egan's curator insight, April 9, 3:44 PM

Challenges the ideas about the impacts of declining birth rates across the world. Contains interesting graphs of changing Fertility rates from 1950 for the highest and lowest GDP nations. Relevant to Population Geography. 

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Demographic Atlas

Demographic Atlas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This atlas shows how the population is changing - growing in some parts of the country, while shrinking in others. The maps show the entire United States by county, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census and Esri. How do things look in your neighborhood?
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Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.
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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin
Seth Dixon's insight:

I was recently reminded of the graph and thought is was worth sharing again.  This is an excellent spatial graph that helps to explain the distribution of the human population.  Why do we live where we live?   The longitude map is still fascinating, but has less explanatory power.  What would be brilliant is a graph that charted population by latitude (as this does) AND charts the amount of land at each given latitude.  Click here for Frank Jacobs analysis on the "Strange Maps" blog.   

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dilaycock's curator insight, January 9, 3:03 AM

Interesting stimulus for discussion of why do we live where we live.

Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 6:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 5:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Population growth in an important topic that is connected to economic development.  If you've seen Hans Roslings TED talks, this is an hour-long version of many of the same concepts and data visualizations.  His Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data.  This is an article that looks at a different factor, arguing that overpopulation isn't the real issue.  
 

Tags: gapminder, population, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

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Angus Henderson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 10:20 AM

Hans conveys big concepts and facts about population and development  extremely well, usingh is gapminder website and quirky humour. 

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, January 8, 7:59 AM

Key insight:  The number of children stopped growing in 1980.  Most of the world is now having only 2 children per family.  The reason why the adult population will continue to grow is just because it takes a generation to balance out the bubble of having more children that survive to grow up and have their own children.

Crooms Human Geography's curator insight, February 4, 10:11 AM

Population

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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a glimpse into the BBC's "Don't Panic-The Truth about Population" which will be airing November 7th.  If you have never seen his TED talks or his Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data. 


Tags: gapminder, population, poverty, development.

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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 1:19 AM

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Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 4:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 7:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Gapminder is a tremendous resource that I've shared in the past and total fertility rates is an ideal metric to see in this data visualization tool.  As Hans Rosling said in one of his TED talks using Gapminder, religion and total fertility rates are not as connected as previously thought.  In this particular mode, you can see how three predominantly Catholic countries (Philippines, Argentina and Mexico) compare in Total Fertility Rates to three predominantly Muslim countries (Indonesia, Turkey and Iran).  


Questions to Ponder: Historically many have assumed that Catholic and Muslim populations would have higher birth rates; why is this changing?  How important a factor is religion in changing fertility rates?  What are other factors impact a society's fertility rate?


Tags: population, demographicsvisualization, religion.

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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 12:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 2:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 3:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

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Ethnic/Population Density Map

Ethnic/Population Density Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Drawing on data from the 2010 U.S. Census, the map shows one dot per person, color-coded by race. That's 308,745,538 dots in all."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly gorgeous interactive map of population density in the United States.  It is very reminiscent of this North American Map with two major differences.  On the down side, Mexican and Canadian data are not displayed but on the bright side, the added color component is used to show ethnic categories as defined by the 2010 U.S. census.  Please explore this map at a variety of scales and in distinct locales.   


Questions to Ponder: Is this a map of ethnic diversity patterns or is it a map of racial segregation?  How come?  Is there additional information that you would need to decide?  This review of the map on Wired and Atlantic Cities described this map as a map depicting segregation: why would they say that? 


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualization, population, density, ethnicity, race.

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Scott Langston's curator insight, September 4, 2013 5:11 PM

Population Density interactive

Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, September 4, 2013 5:58 PM

This describes challenges to human migration because it shows certain areas that people have moved to opposed to areas that have less population because of climate, area, etc...

ethanrobert's comment, September 16, 2013 1:24 PM
Robert wrote this comment btw.
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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map from Amazing Maps (a great follow on Twitter) is a clever way to divide the world into 5 equal population regions.  In many world regional courses, discussion of Asia might be 1/4 of the course content, while the "NATO and the Americas region" might be about half of the class.  Also, think about "the World News" that you see on TV: how much coverage do each of these 5 regions receive?  Why is our news coverage unevenly distributed?


This map would go together nicely with this one to show the demographic importance of South and East Asia.  


Tags: media, population.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 12:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 2:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 12:33 PM

A little perspective on population

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Understanding Global Statistics

Understanding Global Statistics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Infographics to explain global statistics."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Understanding global statistics is nearly impossible if you can't grasp just how large of a quantity 7 billion is.  This set of infographics are a great resource for teaching some of basic global demographics. 


Apparently the latest internet craze is a 40 maps mix-tape.  See the Washington Post's 40 Maps that explain the World for an interesting, eclectic compilation of maps as well as 40 maps they didn't teach you in school from Bored Panda and 40 maps that help you make sense of the world from Twisted Sifter. 


Tags: statistics, populationinfographic, K12.

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Helen Rowling's curator insight, August 21, 2013 1:13 AM

Gr8 Info simplifying stats.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 27, 2013 12:49 PM

Un conjunto de sencillas infografias para visualizar estadisticas de la humanidad en el tiempo presente

trampolinecalf's comment, September 26, 2013 11:46 PM
good one
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Population Density

Population Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"[This map's] an unabashedly generalized interactive population density map inspired/stolen from a map by William Bunge entitled Islands of Mankind that I came across on John Krygier‘s blog. I thought Bunge’s map was a novel way to look at population density, and I’ve tried to stay close to the spirit of the original."

Seth Dixon's insight:

At NCGE this week, I was pleased to hear a presentation from Alexander Murphy, a giant in the academic world.  He shared this interactive map from Derek Watkins, which is the best map I've ever seen to teach global population distribution patterns.  It is removed all extraneous information and allows the user to focus on the areas of heavy settlement and limited population.  The map can show regions that are settled at densities from 15 to 500 people per square mile; the changes at various densities are visually staggering and powerfully telling. I've shared some other maps that would work very nicely together with this in a lesson on global population settlement patterns.   


Tags: density, populationvisualization, mapping.

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Kamaryn Hunt's comment, October 7, 2013 3:22 PM
I really liked this map, because it showed me how spread out we are. I actually didnt realize the world was THIS populated!
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 2:23 PM

This interactive map shows the varying intensities of population density, and the first thing that I thought of was how low the population density is in my hometown, compared to some of the bigger cities or areas around the world.  I am from a rural area of Rhode Island, and there are plenty of farms near my home, as well as woods and ponds.  It really is a beautiful area, which made me think that if population densities were so high- the maximum density on the interactive map was over 500 people per square kilometer- that there would  be less room for the beauty of the natural world in those densely populated areas.  I grew up playing in my woods, and I am always shocked by city-dwellers that live in places where their yards have one or two trees (and are considered to live in 'woodsy' areas of their towns), or have no yards at all.  My town has a low population density, and much of the land is occupied by the reservoir, farms, and woodland areas that are not permissible for development.  Although my hometown is not a city, it serves the more populated areas- such as Providence- by providing water to their city.  It seems the more populated areas drain the surrounding areas of their natural beauty and resources.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:31 AM

Mindblowing interractive map dealing with the population desinty of the world.  From tinkering around with this ive seen some scary things. As we all know the North East metropolis area is compact with people from rhode island to delaware and everything in between. but when you take the map to 100 people per square to kilomete it almost disapears. This in itself wouldnt be that bad but when you move the image to 500 per kilometer almost the entireity of India is still there. This is a perfect compaitive example of how jam packed south eastern asia is and its actually pretty scary.

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White deaths outnumber births in US

White deaths outnumber births in US | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Deaths of white people outnumbered births for the very first time in US history, the Census Bureau revealed Thursday. The census predicts that significant drops in birth rates v death rates will be regular by 2025.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The United States as a whole does not have demographic numbers similar to European countries with declining populations...but 'white' America does.  The NY Times also noted that this statistical benchmark happened, but it was quietly mentioned with many other demographic statistics without an analysis of how this will impact the United States.  

Question to Ponder: how will this impact the United States in coming generations?  What will the cultural, economic and political impacts be?  Why explains the differents between the distinct populations in the United States?


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsethnicity.

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Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 10, 2013 9:41 AM

Shrinking white demographics will definitely have an effect on voting blocks in the future.  I would not be surprised if redistricting becomes a very important issue in upcoming elections.  And why was there an attempt to down play the significance of this statistic in the NY Times.  Are they trying to hide this fact from the public? What do they think will happen when it is discovered?

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 7:08 PM

Population