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Poles of Inaccessibility

Poles of Inaccessibility | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geography nuts have located the hardest place to get to on every continent and beyond.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The middle of nowhere...this is a common expression that is used to convey isolation, backwardness, wilderness, or a lack of network connections.  This article focuses on 8 places that are the farthest away from coasts as well as land (known as 'Poles of Inaccessibility').  The point on the map above is Point Nemo, right in the middle of the South Pacific Ocean; it is the farthest place on Earth from land and is one of the best candidates for the world champion title of "the middle of nowehere."  What is it close to?  Nothing. 

 

Tagsplace, distance, site, Oceania.

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Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen?

Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The ultimate list of the greatest wonders in the world."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have been fortunate enough to have visited 53 of the places on this list (I have gaping holes in my list and the list itself has some gaping holes itself).  All lists are highly subjective; this list, for example, is heay on urban/cultural/European tourism sites and light on physical/Asian/African destinations.  Most geographers already have enough reasons to go traveling, but this list might spark more.  Who wants to map out these places to verify that initial impression? 

 

Questions to Ponder: Which places are on your dream list?  Which places do you think should have been added to this list?  

 

Tags: place, tourismculture, landscape, geo-inspiration.

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Ken Feltman's curator insight, April 19, 8:13 AM
Where in the world have you been?
Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 19, 4:47 PM
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The End of America's Love Affair With Route 66

The End of America's Love Affair With Route 66 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For a brief time in American tourism, travel was about the journey. Here's how it came to be about the destination.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationplacetourism, historical.

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 31, 2:47 PM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 31, 3:00 PM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 1, 12:18 AM

Route 66 holds a special place in the America’s collective soul and taps into a feelings of nostaglia for a bygone era...but we don't really want to go back to that time (hence the economic decline of these withering small towns). "In 1956, Eisenhower's Interstate Highway System effectively bypassed Route 66. The straight-lined, speedy interstates often bifurcated cities. They also cut paths far from Route 66's small, idiosyncratic towns. The rise of modern air travel also diminished the appeal of the winding, open road.  Yet it was not only new modes of transportation that faded Route 66; it was also a changing definition of 'vacation.' Disneyland and Las Vegas staked their claims to the American travel budget in the mid '50s. Suddenly, the 'there' took precedence over the 'getting there.'"

 

Tags: mobility, transportation, place, tourism, historical.

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How well do you know the world? Play Geoguessr to find out!

How well do you know the world? Play Geoguessr to find out! | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Think you're a geography expert? Test your knowledge with BBC Travel’s Geoguessr – the game that proves how well you know the world!
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 21, 2:34 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, March 29, 5:37 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:58 PM

I've shared GeoGuessr before but they now have country-specific quizzes (this is for the United States).  When I was a child I used to wonder if woke up somewhere far from home, would I be able to know where I was just by looking at the places around me (I was a geo-geek from way back when).  GeoGuessr is the closest thing to finding yourself lost in the world and needing to figure out where you are without being wisked away.  GeoGuessr will display 5 locations in GoogleMaps "StreetView" and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It is a fantastic exploration exercise.   

 

Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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Geographic Profiling Has Revealed Banksy's True Identity

Geographic Profiling Has Revealed Banksy's True Identity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Art meets science in a new geographical profiling study from Queen Mary University of London, which probably just revealed the identity of the art world's most and least iconic figure."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: placespatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class

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Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 9, 9:12 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 9:38 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, March 9, 10:06 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

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The Most Aussie Interview Ever

"The 2 Aussie legends that prevented a fast food shop robbery get interviewed!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is hardly common in Australia, and most people don't speak this way, it only makes sense if you know Australian culture well.  There are so many jokes, phrases, and words that don't make sense if you don't understand the cultural context.  Just to help you start to make sense of this: busted pluggers = broken flip-flops.   

 

TagsAustralia, language, placeculture, Oceania.

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bridget rosolanka's curator insight, March 7, 2:16 PM

While this is hardly common in Australia, and most people don't speak this way, it only makes sense if you know Australian culture well.  There are so many jokes, phrases, and words that don't make sense if you don't understand the cultural context.  Just to help you start to make sense of this: busted pluggers = broken flip-flops.   

 

Tags: Australia, language, place, culture, Oceania.

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, March 8, 2:27 PM

While this is hardly common in Australia, and most people don't speak this way, it only makes sense if you know Australian culture well.  There are so many jokes, phrases, and words that don't make sense if you don't understand the cultural context.  Just to help you start to make sense of this: busted pluggers = broken flip-flops.   

 

Tags: Australia, language, place, culture, Oceania.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 9, 8:44 AM

While this is hardly common in Australia, and most people don't speak this way, it only makes sense if you know Australian culture well.  There are so many jokes, phrases, and words that don't make sense if you don't understand the cultural context.  Just to help you start to make sense of this: busted pluggers = broken flip-flops.   

 

Tags: Australia, language, place, culture, Oceania.

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Persian (or Arabian) Gulf Is Caught in the Middle of Regional Rivalries

Persian (or Arabian) Gulf Is Caught in the Middle of Regional Rivalries | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tensions between Iran and Saudi Arabia have been escalating on many fronts — over wars in Syria and Yemen, the Saudis’ execution of a dissident Shiite cleric and the Iran nuclear deal. The dispute runs so deep that the regional rivals — one a Shiite theocracy, the other a Sunni monarchy — even clash over the name of the body of water that separates them.

Iran insists that it be called the Persian Gulf, and has banned publications that fail to use that name. Yet this riles Arab nations, which have succeeded in pushing various parties to use their preferred term — Arabian Gulf."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Is it the Persian Gulf or the Arabian Gulf?  This mini-controversy is part of a broader fight to exert greater regional power and influence (see also this article on GeoCurrents on the same topic). 

 

Tags: placeregions, language, toponyms.

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Language Reflects Culture

Language Reflects Culture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Being a fluent speaker of English and Saulteaux, I have to say that I view the world in two different ways. I have two different attitudes and even two different personalities, depending on which language I use...English offers me one way to order information and cope with reality, one set of attitudes and behavioral styles, and Saulteaux offers me a different way. When I switch languages, I also move from one constellation of attitudes and thought patterns to another.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

This passage was written by Margaret Cote, a  member of the Saulteaux people, who are part of the larger Ojibwa or Chippewa Native American tribe. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does language shape cultural attitudes, traits, and customs? How does language shape a speakers world view and personality?  How does language influence how a speaker may feel about place?

 

TagsCanadalanguage, placeculture

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, January 21, 11:35 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This passage was written by Margaret Cote, a  member of the Saulteaux people, who are part of the larger Ojibwa or Chippewa Native American tribe. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does language shape cultural attitudes, traits, and customs? How does language shape a speakers world view and personality?  How does language influence how a speaker may feel about place?

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Skellig Michael: An Island Far, Far Away

Skellig Michael: An Island Far, Far Away | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Star Wars Epiosde VII was filmed on Skellig Michael island in Ireland. What better place to depict an ancient, mystical, martial asceticism in a galaxy far, far away than an actual ancient eremitic settlement, dripping with stone-cold monastic austerity, located at what was for centuries the very ends of the earth, seven miles off the very tip of a western Irish peninsula?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This island is dripping with geologic, biogeographical, and religious intrigue that makes this world heritage site a place that is shrouded in mystery.  This article from JSTOR Daily is a great introduction to the island for the incurably curious.  The already vibrant tourism industry is bound to increase after Star Wars used this incredible location in the recent film (much like New Zealand experienced a huge spike in tourism after the Lord the Rings films).  Filmmakers understand the power of place to deepen the narrative; they frequently situate their stories in a geographic context that will heighten the emotional impact of the story.  For more on the dramatic locations of Star Wars filming sites, see this article by National Geographic

 

Tags: geologybiogeography, religionChristianityplaceIreland, tourism.

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J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, January 4, 10:33 AM

Skellig Michael is sure to become a more common geographical interest since the success of Star Wars. 

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Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't

Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't | Geography Education | Scoop.it
American education is largely limited to lessons about the West.


When I turned 15, my parents sent me alone on a one-month trip to Ecuador, the country where my father was born. This was tradition in our family—for my parents to send their first-generation American kids to the country of their heritage, where we would meet our extended family, immerse ourselves in a different culture, and learn some lessons on gratefulness.

My family’s plan worked. That month in Ecuador did more for my character, education, and sense of identity than any other experience in my early life.


Tags: place, tourism, education, geo-inspiration.

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Tony Hall's curator insight, December 3, 2015 11:59 PM

This is a great article. I think it applies to people who live in all developed countries (not just the USA), as well as the privileged people from the less developed places. It touches on a lot of things I care about - seeing, feeling, smelling how other people live. Learning that we are not all the same. Knowing that it is ok to not engage with the "American/Australian/Western Dream". Knowing that it is ok to have your own dreams that are different to other people. 

Tina Little-Coltrane's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 AM

An Absolute #TRUTH !!

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 7:15 PM

Being able to travel is a great gift. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing new places and learning about cultures. Unfortunately, the last time that I could afford to travel far from home was when I was young and I didn't understand the amazing opportunity that I had at the time. I traveled to Aruba, and to New Brunswick, Canada. Both amazing places. If I could go anywhere, I'd go to Germany, London, and Ireland as soon as possible. My great grandmother was from England, and my great grandfather was from Canada, I'd like to visit their home towns. Traveling places would definitely be a better learning experience than leaning about a place in school. You get to experience the real thing. Interact with the locals and maybe even get involved with the local traditions. Traveling to learn is definitely an experience worth wild.

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Imaginary Geographies

Imaginary Geographies | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This fabulous 1927 map shows some of the key reasons why the movie industry flourished in Los Angeles–California’s physical geography is incredibly diverse. As the industry was emerging in the first half of the 20th century, they didn’t have massive budgets to travel the world to give their locations a great degree of geographic accuracy it their set locations. Southern California was the ideal home base for a wide range of locations that could physically approximate so many environments and ecosystems. This cost saving strategy had more than economic ramifications; this strategy reinforced many spatial (and cultural) stereotypes in the movies that powerfully influenced how people conceptualized what these places were like. These geographies of cinematic imagination, created for economic purposes, shape our regional perceptions.


Tags: place, California, landscape, popular cultureindustry.

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sharon siwela's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:59 AM

couldn't agree with this more.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:55 AM

unit 3

FCHSAPGEO's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:20 PM

Going to California next week and this is really interesting!

 

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How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different

How being surrounded by water made the Dutch different | Geography Education | Scoop.it
While researching a book on ‘Why the Dutch are Different’, Ben Coates realised that an amazingly large number of the things which an outsider might think of as ‘typically Dutch’ could be explained at least in part by a single factor: water.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural, political and economic patterns of a region are heavily influenced by the environmental settings.  Occasionally though, geographers can get overly-cautious when discussing how the environment can shape culture, worried about straying into realm of environmental determinism.  However, environmental factors can profoundly influence cultural attributes.  This article shows how Dutch cultural attributes such as diet, history, politics and landscape are influenced by their maritime physical setting. 

 

TagsNetherlands, culture, place, water, environment.

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asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:37 AM

What is "typically" #Dutch? #sea #saltwater #sailing #trade #ancient #heritage

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:50 AM

unit 3

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:55 AM

Environmental Determinalism....Unit 3

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Practicing an Open Mind

Practicing an Open Mind | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime.”


Tags: place, tourism, geo-inspiration.

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Greg Hill's curator insight, September 28, 2015 12:06 PM
I love to travel for it challenges what I already know or "think" I know.
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 30, 2015 7:16 AM

Travel

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Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents

Superblocks to the rescue: Barcelona’s plan to give streets back to residents | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Catalan capital’s radical new strategy will restrict traffic to a number of big roads, drastically reducing pollution and turning secondary streets into ‘citizen spaces’ for culture, leisure and the community.  Black routes allow public transport and cars at 50km/h, while green routes only allow private vehicles at 10km/h to prioritize pedestrians and cycling."

 

Tags: Catalonia, Spain, mobilitytransportationplaceneighborhood, urban, planning, urbanism.

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11 incredible wilderness photographs from the 1800s

11 incredible wilderness photographs from the 1800s | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Early American wilderness photographers were snapping gorgeous vignettes of mountain peaks and sunrises before Instagram's 1977 filter was even a thing. But, aside from their timeless appeal, the true value of these nineteenth-century photographs is derived from their role in the American conservation movement."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many National Parks (especially Yellowstone and Yosemite) are special to me because my grandparents took me there--these trips inspired in me a deep awe for the wonders of this Earth.    We owe a great debt of gratitude to these early photographers whose work captivated a nation to start a conservation ethos to protect wilderness.

 

Tags: place, images, art, landscape, California 

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Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?

Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Reports of bombings tend to get huge numbers of mentions on social media, but that doesn't always mean a similar level of news coverage.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The short answer is obviously "Yes."  Yet, this question brings up other questions about cultural empathy and how 'connected' we might feel to people of other places than our own global neighborhood.  This political cartoon-ish map

has more truth in it than we might like to admit; it is subtitled 'How terrible it is the the Western world when a tragedy happens in...?'

 

Questions to Ponder: Does the 'where' influence if we perceive the event as a true tragedy or not (or maybe just the magnitude or importance of the tradegy)?  How come?  What does this say about us as inidividuals, society, and the media?  How can we teach our students in a way to foster more cultural empathy?

 

Tagssocial mediaplaceculture, political, terrorism, media. 

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jorden harris's curator insight, April 4, 9:52 AM

to me it is mind boggling how we can pay more attention to countries with national threats than others especially with ISIS being so prominent which is a war that is going to take help from not only the united states but the other affected countries

                                                                                                        - J.H

Logan scully's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM
It somewhat bothers me how that terrorist attacks outside of Europe and North America is pretty much just ignored by the social media while people are sitting in the hospital for crimes in which terrorists and other religious radicalists have done to their area and country.-L.S.
Brealyn Holley's curator insight, April 7, 10:20 AM
For the question "Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?" In my opinion the answer would be yes because a lot of the terror attacks in the Western world are bigger and are expected more than terror attacks near  us. ~BH
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Walk Appeal and Public Health

Walk Appeal and Public Health | Geography Education | Scoop.it
"The core idea of Walk Appeal is that people walk longest and most often in places that entice them, but rarely walk just because they’re told they ought to. Some Walk Appeal factors are measurable, while others are immeasurable, and it has long been clear that Walk Appeal is the best predictor of the viability of neighborhood businesses."
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an appealing sense of place are more walkable.

 

Tags: urbanplace, transportationplanning, urbanism, architecture.

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Jessica Ruddy's curator insight, March 21, 10:58 AM

What is a reasonable distance to walk around town?  Research shows that cities with improved sidewalks, less parking lots, attractive storefronts and other amenities that encourage walking.  If  walking the urban environment is and of itself an experience worth having and makes the person feel like a flâneur, experiencing the city on a deeper level, automotive transport goes down and walking goes up.  Urban infrastructure is more important for most people than distance in deciding whether to get in the car or walk down the street (for distances under 2 miles).   Bottom line: neighborhoods that have an appealing sense of place are more walkable.

 

Tags: urban, place, transportation, planning, urbanism, architecture.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 16, 1:21 AM

The concepts of "liveable streets" and "placemaking" can enhance the liveability of places.

Read about " Eyes on the street" amd " broken window theory",  "walkability", "green infrastructure"  and " 20 minute neighbourhoods" and orher strategies to enhance liveability in Macmillan Geoworld 7 NSW 

10.3 Creating better communities

10..4 Places for people

10.5 Liveable streets 

10.6 Green places and open spaces 

Kristina Lemson's curator insight, April 16, 10:44 PM
Use Google Earth to examine the walkability of Banksia Grove. Can younidentify specific elements that look like they have been included to meet this aim? Conversely, what mitigates against people walking in BG?
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Mumbai or Bombay? A British newspaper reverts to a colonial-era name.

Mumbai or Bombay? A British newspaper reverts to a colonial-era name. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Independent's concerns over Hindu nationalism led to a change in policy.

 

The city has been officially known as Mumbai since 1995 when it was renamed by the far-right regional party Shiv Sena, an ally of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), which currently holds national office in India. Shiv Sena advocates the use of the Marathi language, which is dominant in the state of Maharashtra, of which Mumbai is the capital. Marathi speakers have long referred to the city as Mumbai, after the Hindu goddess Mumbadevi, the city's patron deity.

Shiv Sena had argued that the previous name, Bombay, was an unwanted relic of British colonial rule in India. That name is believed to be an Anglicized version of the city's name from when it was occupied by the Portuguese — "Bom Bahia," which means "good bay." Both Bombay and Mumbai are now used interchangeably by locals during casual conversation.

 

Tags: culture, India, South Asiacolonialism, placeregions, language, toponyms.

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We Don't Coast

We Don't Coast | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A celebration of who we are, where we are and how we operate. It belongs to the 30+ communities who make Omaha—Greater Omaha.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This website is a great example a city selling it's regional distinctiveness to create a sense of civic pride, promote tourism, and attract more businesses.  Often Omaha's distance for the coasts is portrayed as a major weakness, but in a clever play on words, the weakness is acknowledged and reformed into a strength.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would you promote your own city/region/state?  What would be highlighted on a similar page for your city?  What slogan would you use?

 

Tagsplacetourism, urban, culture, economic

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 5, 12:15 AM

This website is a great example a city selling it's regional distinctiveness to create a sense of civic pride, promote tourism, and attract more businesses.  Often Omaha's distance for the coasts is portrayed as a major weakness, but in a clever play on words, the weakness is acknowledged and reformed into a strength.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would you promote your own city/region/state?  What would be highlighted on a similar page for your city?  What slogan would you use?

 

Tags: place, tourism, urban, culture, economic. 

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QUIZ: Can you match the country to what it used to be called?

QUIZ: Can you match the country to what it used to be called? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
France has not always been called France.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Everybody know that Istanbul was Constantinople, but some countries have also known by other names.  This quiz of 18 countries is fairly easily, but I must object to the website's characterization for a perfect score: "You're basically a professional historian."  The word you were looking for was geographer...and if you now have a song stuck in your head, here is the They Might Be Giants version and the old school Four Lads version of Istanbul (Not Constantinople)--you're welcome. 

 

Tags: trivia, games, place, toponyms.

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Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, February 1, 8:46 PM

I am a citizen of which country?

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What's up with the historic photos around OTR?

What's up with the historic photos around OTR? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Look Here! is a site-specific, outdoor, public history exhibition on the streets of Over-the-Rhine.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is to announce (and explain) the new public art project in Cincinnati's gentrifying neighborhood, Over the Rhine.  The exhibition will "include historic photographs of Over-the-Rhine ranging in time from the late nineteenth century through the 1940s. The exhibit will turn Over-the-Rhine into a museum of the streets that will provide an historic and cultural experience for all comers, any time, day or night. The exhibition will run from November 2015 to March 2016."

 

Tags: neighborhoodlandscape, gentrificationurban, placeAPHG, Cincinnati

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Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds?

Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you guess where we are taking you today? Here's a clue: This city's name translates to "where the river narrows."
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a delightfully simple premise to National Geographic video's newest series: after seeing scenes from the cultural and physical landscapes of a place can you guess where in the world it is?  You can find more resources about this unnamed country (no cheating) here.   


Tags: images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Thanksgiving Recipes Across the United States

Thanksgiving Recipes Across the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"We’ve scoured the nation for recipes that evoke each of the 50 states (and D.C. and Puerto Rico). These are our picks for the feast. Dig in, then tell us yours." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR 

Seth Dixon's insight:

In addition to this list of distinctive Thanksgiving recipes from each state (I'd love to try so many on this list), the NY Times has also produced this list of the most 'Googled' Thanksgiving recipes in each state.  These are very late additions to my favorite Thanksgiving day resources. Happy Thanksgiving everyone, and may yours reflect some some regional distinctiveness and cultural context that you appreciate.   


Tags: Thanksgiving, place, food.

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Jana Esposito's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:42 PM

Deep fried turkey is a family tradition! Pumpkin pie and garlic mashed potato's are a must every year. Let's eat!

JebaQpt's comment, November 26, 2015 12:18 AM
Thanksgiving, after all, is a word of action. Thanksgiving day quotes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPSml4nQ7rA&list=PLK2ccNIJVPpB3TOPAzbivJTp1L8wSrKLH
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How Chicago became the country's alley capital

How Chicago became the country's alley capital | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How Chicago became the alley capital of the country and why so much of the rest of the region is conspicuously alley-free.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The alley is a reminder of past visions of how to best lay out a city.  In the 19th century, back when Chicago started booming, the city was laid out in a grid and it quickly became a filthy, stinky, disease-ridden place. "Rear service lanes were essential for collecting trash, delivering coal, and stowing human waste — basically, keeping anything unpleasant away from living quarters."  As we have moved towards curvilinear residential streets and more discrete public utilities, the newer neighborhoods abandoned the alley, but they are still very prominent in old neighborhoods (click here for an interactive map to explore all of Chicago's alleys). 

Also, Chicago's suburbs have lofty names (Mount, Heights, Ridge, etc.)  that don't match this flat topography--read here to find out why.  


Tags: Chicago, urban, placetoponyms, planning, urbanism.

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Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent

Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Japan, small children take the subway and run errands alone, no parent in sight. The reason why has more to do with social trust than self-reliance.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some cultural practices can be transplanted just about anywhere; others require a cultural environment wherein that particular practice is sufficiently well-known and communally supported for it to thrive.  The idea of sending kids this young out on errands is almost unthinkable in the United States given our cultural norms connected to youth and space.  As additional food for thought, here is an article about 9 parenting strategies around the world that culturally don't mesh well within the United States.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do cultural norms vary so much from place to place?  How are your actions shaped by cultural norms?  Can you think of an example of a cultural practice that is accepted somewhere, but wouldn't work in most other societies?


Tags: JapanEast Asia, place, perspective, cultural norms, culture.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:59 AM

unit 3

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:49 AM

If this happened in the United States, it would lead the cable news channels for about a year. Most Parents in our country will hardly ever let their small children leave the house, never mind actually be by themselves for a long time period. This video is an excellent showcase of the differences between western and eastern cultures. The eastern culture prioritize independence at an early age. They make a point of making sure that children can become self sustainable. In the west, we go to extraordinary links to shield our children from the ugliness of every day society. We are more fearful of the horrors that might occur to our children if we allow them to explore society. Neither approach can be judged as correct or wrong. They are just two different ways of raising children in a complex and often freighting world.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:27 PM

It's interesting to see the cultural differences that facilitate these drastically different parenting strategies held by the Japan and the United States. In the US, our capitalistic society puts every man on his own- we are told not to help others, nor to ask for help. From the treks we made across the continent to our reluctance, as a society, to accept welfare programs as a necessity in an industrialized democratic society, Americans strive for solitude and independence. There isn't a sense of community in many parts of the country, and as a result, we are less likely to trust one another- I remember reading about two parents being invested by Child Services because they allowed their 9 year old child to walk with his younger sister to school. To think that such attitudes could be held on such a large scale, as they are in Japan, is laughable. We are told as we grow up how unsafe we really are. In Japan, the community- the collective- is held as the ideal, and people are taught to be able to trust strangers, to expect the best from them. The result? A safer society and the perception that Japanese society as a whole is safer. Children are able to walk freely in public and not be afraid, and public transit and walking are more widely accepted in urban areas. Tokyo may or may not be the world's safest large city, but it certainly feels so for its inhabitants, and I fail to see how that isn't better than the fear Americans have for our neighbors. This is something we need to address as a society, and we should start by looking at our ally across the Pacific.