Geography Education
1.4M views | +1.2K today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument

"President Barack Obama designated tens of thousands of acres of Maine forest as a national monument on Wednesday, one day before the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service.  The area, known as the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument, spans 87,500 acres of the state’s stunning northern woods. The area is named for Mount Katahdin, which is Maine’s highest mountain and is located within the adjacent Baxter State Park."

 

Tags: conservation, physical, biogeography, environment.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Surging Seas Interactive Map

Surging Seas Interactive Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Global warming has raised global sea level about 8" since 1880, and the rate of rise is accelerating. Rising seas dramatically increase the odds of damaging floods from storm surges.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map from Climate Central dramatically shows what locations are most vulnerable to sea level rise.  You can adjust the map to display anywhere from 1 to 10 feet of sea level rise to compare the impact to coastal communities.  This dynamic map lets to view other layers to contextualize potential sea level rise by toggling on layers that include, population density, ethnicity, income, property and social vulnerability.   

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change, environment, resources, watercoastalmapping, visualization, environment depend, political ecology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Pros and Cons of Cotton Production in Uzbekistan

Pros and Cons of Cotton Production in Uzbekistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This case study considers the pros and cons of cotton production in Uzbekistan. Since the country's independence from the Soviet Union in 1991, revenues from cotton taxation have contributed substantially to developing the industrial sector, boosting the current account, achieving energy and food-grain self-sufficiency, and buffering domestic shocks in food and energy prices. Nonetheless, some argue that the state procurement system hampers the development of the agricultural sector. Often the payments for cotton hardly cover farmers' production costs, and the quasi mono-culture of cotton production has adversely affected environmental sustainability."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Uzbekistan is a top world producer and exporter of cotton. There are many sectors involved in managing the cotton commodity chain to partake in the production. Not only is it a source of income, but provides labor jobs and food consumption. However, the land where the cotton production takes place is suffering. This land faces many types of land degradation that has an impact on the cotton. In order to secure the land, there are possible solutions and policies to improve the agriculture and the cotton benefits. Once the world’s fourth largest lake, the Aral Sea, is located in Uzbekistan, and has had a major impact on the cotton industry. This production has given Uzbekistan a world-wide reputation in cotton production, but is also known for destroying one of the world’s largest lakes.  Just because it is your greatest economic competitive advantage, doesn't mean that it is environmentally sustainable.

 

Questions to Ponder: How much does the cotton production contribute to Uzbekistan economically? What are the solutions to address the demising Aral Sea? Who is impacted the most because of the land issues?

 

Tags:  agriculture, labor, Uzbekistan, physical, weather and climateland use, environmentAral Sea.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

NOAA's GFS model visualized on NOAA’s Science on a Sphere

NOAA's powerful Global Forecast System model was upgraded on May 11, 2016, providing forecasters with a more accurate 4-D picture of how a weather system will evolve. The upgrade is the latest of a number of model improvements rolling out this spring and summer, thanks to increased supercomputing power NOAA acquired earlier this year.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There's some good science with practical applications underneath this very artistic rendering of the planet's atmosphere...it is more fluvial than we give it credit for if we only think of air as empty space.  This video also reminds me of the words of one pilot and his perspective on both the atmosphere and Earth from above: "Geographically speaking, the sky is like a whole other planet encasing our own."

 

Tags: atmosphere, space, video, physical, fluvial.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought

India to 'divert rivers' to tackle drought | Geography Education | Scoop.it
India is to divert water from major rivers like the Brahmaputra and the Ganges to deal with severe drought, a senior minister tells the BBC.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The drought has been bad enough that (coupled with rising debt to seed companies) many farmers are committing suicide to escape the financial pain of this drought.   The monsoon rains can be lethal, but critical for the rural livelihoods of farmers and the food supply.

 

TagsIndia, agriculture, labor, agriculture, South Asia, physical, weather and climate.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

TagsNational Geographic, physicalbiogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Himalayas from 20,000 ft.

"Have you ever dreamed of seeing Mount Everest or fantasized about hiking through the peaks and valleys of the Himalayas? This video, by Teton Gravity Research, might be even better."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Simply stunning.  Sometimes an earth-bound perspective and it's inherent limitations make me want to be able to soar overhead.  Until I get wings, this virtual tour will have to do.  These mountains and the communites that live so close to their heights both invoke a great sense of awe and wonder in me about the beauties of this world.   

 

Tags: Nepal, physicalvideo, landscapeimages.

more...
amahendru's curator insight, April 22, 9:53 PM

www.amitmahendruphotography.com

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 23, 6:17 PM

brilliant for studies of mountain landscapes and landforms 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Volcán Popocatépetl 27 de marzo 2016

"The Popocatépetl volcano, situated in Puebla, Mexico, erupted between March 28 and 29, spewing hot ash and gas into the atmosphere. According to reports, a 7-mile exclusion zone was put in place around the volcano." Credit: www.webcamdemexico.com

Seth Dixon's insight:

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   UPDATE: This nighttime eruption on the 30th of March with the magna is worth watching as well.  

 

Tags: disastersMexico, physical, volcano.

more...
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 1, 7:56 PM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, April 3, 6:42 AM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 3, 12:01 PM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid?

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Scientists think an asteroid killed the dinosaurs. In today's extinction, humans are the culprit.  [In this podcast] our guest is Elizabeth Kolbert, author of the book The Sixth Extinction.  The book begins with a history of the big five extinctions of the past and goes on to explain how human behavior is creating this sixth, including our use of fossil fuels which has led to climate change."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tagsphysicalpodcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

more...
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 20, 8:22 AM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, podcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 20, 2:41 PM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tagsphysicalpodcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

Tania Gammage's curator insight, March 20, 9:26 PM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, podcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

America’s year without a winter: The 2015-2016 season was the warmest on record

America’s year without a winter: The 2015-2016 season was the warmest on record | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Every state but two were warmer than normal and all six New England states set winter records.

 

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, climate change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

A Decades-Long Quest to Drill Into Earth's Mantle May Soon Hit Pay Dirt

A Decades-Long Quest to Drill Into Earth's Mantle May Soon Hit Pay Dirt | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geologists have had to contend with bad luck, budget cuts and the race to the moon in their efforts to drill deep into our planet

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, geology.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

Glaciology in Greenland

Glaciology in Greenland | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Sharyn Alfonsi goes to the top of the world to report on scientists trying to get to the bottom of climate change and sea level rise by studying one of the largest glaciers in the Arctic Circle."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The 13 minute video clip from the show "60 Minutes" is a good introduction to the importance and difficulty of studying glacial melt, climate change, and the impacts of a receding ice sheet.  

 

Tags: physical, erosion, climate change, Greenland.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Interactive Climate Map

Interactive Climate Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Obsessed as we are with cartography we in Staridas Geography perceive any aspect of the actual 3D World as a constant opportunity for another pretty map creation!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great interactive map of the world's climate zones. 

 

Tags: ESRIStoryMapedtech, GIS, mapping, cartographyphysical.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 19, 7:47 PM

Great map to discuss global distribution of biomes and links to climate 

Sally Egan's curator insight, August 21, 6:24 PM
Fun way for students to learn about the diverse climates around the world, by selecting a location on the map students are shown the climatic data of the selected place.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Live chart: Fish stocks

"The world's fish are in danger—as is everyone who depends on them."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Every semester I share with my students this New York Times video about the rapid rise in industrial fishing and the production of Talapia.  Even with the rise of aquaculture as a major source of seafood, the world's oceans are still depleted.  As the world's population rises, many folk cultures with their roots in small fishing villages have transformed into primarily urban societies, but these urban societies still have a strong cultural preference for seafood and consume at levels that are not sustainable.    

 

Tags: environment modifyfolk culturesconsumption, water, physical.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 6, 1:24 AM

Impact of overfishing and ecosystem disruption on marine environments 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How Geospatial Analytics Are Changing Habitat Conservation

"The BirdReturns program is an effort to provide 'pop-up habitats' for some of the millions of shorebirds, such as sandpipers and plovers that migrate along the Pacific Flyway, a route that spans from Alaska to South America. Birds flying on this journey seek out the increasingly rare wetlands teeming with tasty insects to fuel their long-distance flights.  Over the last century, California's Central Valley has lost 95% of the wetlands habitat to development, agriculture, and other land use changes. As a solution, scientists use big data, binoculars, and rice paddies."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This project combines data from satellite imagery to map surface water in California's Central Valley, and individual bird observations to select locations that can be temporarily converted into wetlands to aid the migratory birds (for more information than the video provides about this project, read this article). 

 

This is a great example of using both 'big' geospatial data as represented by the satellite imagery and combining it with field data and actual observations to make the world a better place.  We need more decision makers that can think spatially and use geographic skills.  

 

Tags: physicalCalifornia, water, environmentbiogeography, remote sensing.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Volcanic ash covers Costa Rica towns

Volcanic ash covers Costa Rica towns | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A volcano erupts in central Costa Rica, belching smoke and ash up to 3,000m (9,840ft) into the air and choking nearby communities.

 

Tags: Costa Rica, disasters, physical, volcano.

more...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers

Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

On occasion, we are reminded of how utterly captivating and gorgeous nature is, its visual poetry surrounds us. It just takes a step back, a shift in perspective, to realize how amazing the constructs of this planet are; it’s a beautiful constant balance between order and entropy. Case in point, what appears to be well-crafted, intricate abstract paintings, or works of art, are in reality, mindblowing aerial images of Iceland."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Andre Ermolaev, through his photography has captured the beauty of Iceland's geomorphology.  Being on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has abundant volcanic ash which adds rich color to the fluvial systems.  

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.

more...
The Science & Education team's curator insight, May 11, 6:15 PM
Having lots of volcanoes, ash, lava, snow, rain and hills gives great potential for dramatic geography for Iceland
Joaquín del Val's curator insight, May 27, 1:20 PM
Espectaculares imágenes de canales fluviales en Islandia
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er!

Meander? I ‘ardly know ‘er! | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is brilliant.  I can't say how much I love this. 

 

Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, landscape, funart.

more...
YEC Geo's curator insight, April 28, 9:08 AM
Love geomorphology comics.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Thanks to Humans, the Great Salt Lake Is Drying Up

Thanks to Humans, the Great Salt Lake Is Drying Up | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Diverting more water could pose serious health and economic threats to Utah.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Follow-up: The drying up of the lake can't be blamed on the current drought, this is a human-induced modification of the environment.  This lake is not exceptional, even if the imagery is startling.  Like many lakes in dry climates with growing populations, the people are using the freshwater flow into the lakes more extensively than they have in the past.  The Great Salt Lake, the Aral Sea, Lake Chad, Lake Urmia, and the Dead Sea are all drying up.  

 

Tags: physical, Utah, environment modifyenvironment, water.

more...
Mary Grace Bunch's comment, April 21, 10:21 PM
The Great Salt Lake in Utah is drying up which will lead to an unpromising future for the environmental health of the area. This is occurring due to the consistent reductions from rivers feeding into the lake that have been taking plays for 150 years. This past year the Great Salt Lake reached record low levels, dropping 11 feet. As a result of this increase in salinity and loss in half the volume of the lake, there is going to be trouble involving the economy and ecology of the state of Utah. This can be seen by dust storms or pollution.

The agglomeration of these rivers and gateways into the lake for human use are leading to the backwash effect. The backwash effect can be seen as the drained/dried out of water, an important resource to Salt Lake City, being drained in its regions. The impacts of the rivers outside of the lake are affecting the resources of the lake, even though it may not seem direct. Primary Economic Activities such as fishing will be impacted by the drying up of the Great Salt Lake. As a result of this, the development of Utah will be threatened. Utah is very reliant on the lake for it’s valuable resources that help them develop. A solution may be found through ecotourism. If the city is motivated in solving this problem, they could very well promote ecotourism in order to preserve the lake since Salt Lake City is very popular and many people travel there.

This article was relative to the Development Unit we are in now. It made me aware of what is going on in Utah. I never would have known this issue was occurring until I took the time to read it. I look forward to following along with this issue in the future and to see how the state of Utah will deal with it.
Kayla McIntosh's comment, June 1, 11:14 PM
I agree with Mary Grace that they should use ecotourism to conserve the Great Salt Lake. Since the Great Salt lake is so economically important to Utah, ecotourism would help bring money into the state and make people more aware on what human use of rivers can to do the environment, which will eventually dry up the river that can cause dust storms, creating more air pollution.
Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 10:23 PM
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Utah's Great Salt Lake is shrinking

Utah's Great Salt Lake is shrinking | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Human activity is playing a role in the dwindling size of Utah's Great Salt Lake, according to new research.While the research group acknowledged the role that climate fluctuations, such as droughts and floods, have played in the shift of the lake's water levels over time, the decrease in the lake's size is predominantly due to human causes. According to the report, the heavy reliance on consumptive water uses has reduced the lake level by 11 feet and its volume by 48 percent.

 

Tags: physical, Utah, environment modifyenvironment, water.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The railroad causeway that creates the color difference between the northern and sotuhern portions of the Great Lake is as the Union Pacific plans to change the causeway; the proposed bridge would allow for the two distinct salinities to intermingle more.  Environmentally, this lake is not exceptional.  Like many lakes in dry climates with growing populations, the people are using the freshwater flow into the lakes more extensively than they have in the past.  The Great Salt Lake, the Aral Sea, Lake Chad, Lake Urmia, and the Dead Sea are all drying up.  

more...
Sally Egan's curator insight, April 10, 11:05 PM
Another great example of human activities changing the biophysical environment.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

BioBlitz 2016

BioBlitz 2016 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Learn more about the National Parks BioBlitz 2016 events, from National Geographic.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The network of geographic alliances will be working on a BioBlitz national initiative in 2016. This article highlights two mobile apps that will enable users to use their smartphones to explore and archive the natural world around them and run an awesome BioBlitz. 

 

Tags: National Geographicphysical, biogeography, environment, edtech.

more...
Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 27, 3:53 PM

The network of geographic alliances will be working on a BioBlitz national initiative in 2016. This article highlights two mobile apps that will enable users to use their smartphones to explore and archive the natural world around them and run an awesome BioBlitz. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, edtech.

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, March 27, 6:19 PM

The network of geographic alliances will be working on a BioBlitz national initiative in 2016. This article highlights two mobile apps that will enable users to use their smartphones to explore and archive the natural world around them and run an awesome BioBlitz. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, edtech.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, March 28, 12:31 PM

The network of geographic alliances will be working on a BioBlitz national initiative in 2016. This article highlights two mobile apps that will enable users to use their smartphones to explore and archive the natural world around them and run an awesome BioBlitz. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, physical, biogeography, environment, edtech.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You

What Are You Flying Over? This App Will Tell You | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Flyover Country uses maps and data from various geological and paleontological databases to identify and give information on the landscape passing beneath a plane. The user will see features tagged on a map corresponding to the ground below. To explain the features in depth, the app relies on cached Wikipedia articles. Since it works solely with a phone’s GPS, there’s no need for a user to purchase in-flight wifi. Sitting in your window seat, you can peer down on natural features like glaciers and man-made features, such as mines, and read articles about them at the same time.

 

Tagsmobilitytransportation, technology, physicalgeology.

more...
YEC Geo's curator insight, March 12, 10:01 AM
Kind of like your own personal Google Earth.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

It's official: a global mass extinction is under way

It's official: a global mass extinction is under way | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tagsphysical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

more...
Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 28, 7:03 PM

Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends; Interrelationships;

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This still image above doesn't do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources.  On #DarwinDay, it is important to consider the connections between biology and geography; many of the greatest biological discoveries were spatial and geographic in nature.   

 

Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.

more...
No comment yet.