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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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If Atlantic and Pacific Sea Worlds Collide, Does That Spell Catastrophe?

If Atlantic and Pacific Sea Worlds Collide, Does That Spell Catastrophe? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
While the Arctic ice melt is opening up east to west shipping lanes, some 75 animals species might also make the journey

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arcticbiogeography, climate change.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 31, 6:14 PM

.Mientras que el derretimiento del hielo del Ártico se está abriendo de este a oeste  , especies de unos 75 animales también podrían hacer el viaje.

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The memory of a river

The memory of a river | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If you measure the contours of a river valley with Lidar (like radar with lasers), you get a beautiful map of all the historical river channels."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Here's a meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

 

Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 19, 4:58 PM

Very impressive.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 22, 12:04 PM

This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Here's a meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 29, 3:42 AM

For the beauty of this picture. Follow the link to see the ancient courses of Mississippi River, I had once the idea to draw maps of the lower course of the Loue River in France not in a scientific purpose, but just for a kind of fractal art.

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Rare Ice Circles

The beauty and artistry of nature is truly shown in the phenomenon of ice circles!

 

Tags: physicalweather and climatefluvial.

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Www.TamSohbet.Com's comment, December 28, 2015 11:22 AM
http://Www.Tamsohbet.com /video/hadise.html :D
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The field guide, rebooted

The field guide, rebooted | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Map of Life joins a small but growing number of mobile applications seeking to reimagine the field guide by combining big data and mobile technology. Following in the footsteps of iNaturalist, a standard-bearer for natural history mobile applications, it allows users to instantly contribute their own geolocated, time-stamped species observations." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

The network of geographic alliances will be working on a BioBlitz national initiative in 2016. This article highlights two mobile apps that will enable users to use their smartphones to explore and archive the natural world around them and run an awesome BioBlitz. 

 

Tags: National Geographicphysical, biogeography, environment, edtech.

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Climate Change Is Here

Climate Change Is Here | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Record heat, fading ice, and rising seas show how climate change is affecting us. But there’s new hope we can cool the planet. Here’s how.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The National Geographic Magazine has recently created this interactive to accompany the magazine article on climate change (for those worried that the editorial direction would not be as environmentally focused because of the recent changes for the National Geographic Society, I think this is a resounding way for them to emphatically declare that they are committed as ever to their core values and mission).  This interactive is richly-laden with videos, images and case-studies, showing the tangible impacts of climate change and lays out what the future implications of these changes.  The interactive is organized to answer these main questions:

  • How do we know it’s happening?
  • How do we fix it?
  • How do we live with it


Tags: physical, weather and climateenvironment, National Geographic, climate change, water.

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Tony Hall's curator insight, October 30, 2015 2:21 AM

This is a very good resource on climate change. Well worth having a look:)

John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:30 AM

This site is great to show evidence of climate change. It has various sites with videos and articles.  The interactive is organized to answer these main questions:

How do we know it’s happening?How do we fix it?How do we live with it?
Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 10:15 AM

There is too much talk about helping the climate and environment. All politicians do is talk about cleaning the environment and having less pollution. Even Al Gore is big talk. I've only heard of little change. I want to see a difference. I want to see people actually doing things to help the environment. Enough talk. What should happen is a world wide clean up. Jobs should be created where people should clean in their own community. Its a simple job. Get a trash bag, get off your lazy butts, get out of the house, get a group together (who would be paid by the state) to pick trash up off the streets, beaches, trails in the woods, baseball fields, parks. This isn't hard to do. Not just one person, but if a group of people can come together and be employed by their state to clean their community, at least four days a week. There should also be a group of people, even fisherman to clean the ocean, go out and get what ever trash you can find. Using nets, and if fish are caught, throw them back in the ocean. Also, Trash Island has to be eliminated. It boggles my mind that who ever passed the law on trash being dumped into the ocean an Okay to do. Are you kidding me?? What is wrong with you? Our Earth is dying because of humanity. Also the oil spill that happened in 2012, I believe, I saw a man on the news that created a way to capture the oil floating on the surface of the ocean with a blanket like material, sure it would take a lot of those "blankets" but at least it would be helping to rid the ocean from oil. What are people thinking?? that the oil will just disappear?? Are you serious? So many people really have to open their minds. Look at what's happening you ignorant selfish fools. I will finish my rant right here.

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Wind Forecast

Wind Forecast | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ubercool wind animation all over the world. Wind and weather forecast for kiters, surfers, pilots and anyone else.
Seth Dixon's insight:

With people on the East Coast concerned about the possible trajectories for Hurricane Joaquin, I think it is the right time to share this interactive map.  In the past I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a mesmerizing digital globe with wind data.  This new one though, includes multiple meteorological layers with forecasts for the next two weeks...very cool.     

Tagsphysical, weather and climate, mapping, visualization.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, October 19, 2015 9:45 PM

Useful for examining wind power in various areas.

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Earth is Home to 3.02 Trillion Trees

Earth is Home to 3.02 Trillion Trees | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A new census that shows that Earth is host to a staggering 3.02 trillion trees — more than scientists expected.The most recent estimate only counted 400 billion trees, reports Rachel Ehrenberg. Because prior studies used satellite technology alone instead of including data from on-the-ground tree density studies, writes Ehrenberg, they missed the mark. They also estimate that since human civilization began, 45.8 percent of all trees been lost."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love satellite data, but ground-truthing is critical to so many research projects. 


Tagsremote sensing, conservation, physical, biogeography, environment, resources.

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Felipe Rengifo's curator insight, September 16, 2015 10:49 AM

Censo de árboles está en 3.02 trillones de arboles 

 

Suena como mucho, pero con en realidad son pocos para tanta gente. 

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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.


The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:33 PM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:42 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:20 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Ring of Fire

Ring of Fire | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, July 2, 2015 10:07 AM

“El Anillo de Fuego” es una cadena de volcanes y lugares de actividad sísmica, o temblores, alrededor de los límites del Océano Pacífico.

“L’Anneau de Feu” c’est une chaine de volcans et de sites d’activité sismique, ou tremblements de terre, autour de limites de l’Océan Pacifique.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

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India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt

India heatwave kills 800 as capital's roads melt | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"At least 800 people have died in a major heatwave that has swept across India, melting roads in New Delhi as temperatures neared 50 degrees Celsius (122 Fahrenheit).  Hospitals are on alert to treat victims of heatstroke and authorities advised people to stay indoors with no end in sight to the searing conditions.  In the worst-hit state of Andhra Pradesh, in the south, 551 people have died in the past week as temperatures hit 47 degrees Celsius on Monday." 


Tags: physical, weather and climate, India, South Asia.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article on MSN and this NPR podcast remind me about how extremes can create chaos.  While in Texas, the flooding has ravaged much of the state.  Weather from other places is never news unless it is so extreme that it becomes a crisis.   

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 10, 2015 5:58 AM

People often underestimate the effects of a strong heat wave. Extremely hot temperatures can be as deadly as hurricanes and tornadoes. The temperature  in India was so hot, that the pavement on the roads actually melted. At least 800 people have died as a result of this heat wave. That number is quit shocking. India does not have the inherit infrastructure to deal with large scale disasters. The rural areas of the nation have suffered the most casualties. Those areas are also the more undeveloped areas of India. This is yet another reminder of the terror nature can inflict on the human landscape.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 15, 2015 1:46 PM

The reality of everyday life in the differing geographies of the world vary, especially within the vast subcontinent that is India. From the freezing plains of the north to the tropical south, India experiences a wide array of weather, some of which can be extreme. This is certainly the case in this article, where some 800+ people have perished in the extreme heat wave that has hit much of the nation. Temperatures are warmer than the seasonal norm by 12 degrees Fahrenheit, leaving many restricted to the relative comforts of their homes. Such extreme highs of 122 degrees seem unfathomable to many Americans, particularly up north. Even in Las Vegas, where I spent 3 days this summer and felt like I was slowly being cooked, was a "meager" 108 degrees. The infrastructure of the US also allows for a level of comfort in these conditions that is virtually unattainable for many citizens of India, who often lack basic plumbing, let alone air conditioning. The death tolls will only continue to rise as these conditions persist, and their frequencies will most likely increase as human-generated climate change continues to accelerate. 

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:24 PM

we really ever hear about extreme weather like this unless it affects us directly. "551 people have died in the last week" This is a state of emergency but those in the west will never hear about it. What a shame. I wonder if part of it is that politics in the west wouldn't want you hearing about this as it might support the climate change agenda.

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The Anatomy of a Tornado

Jim Cantore gives an INCREDIBLE step-by-step description and 3D view into how a tornado forms - like you've never seen before!


Tags: physical, weather and climate, visualization.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 22, 2015 7:37 PM

JIM CANTORE MUESTRA PASO A PASO EL DESARROLLO DE UN TORNADO EN 3D

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 2:41 PM

This amazing video shows everything from funnel clouds and weak tornadoes to F5, tornadoes which cause major damage. It explains how a tornado originates from a super cell (rotating thunderstorm) to how it forms from a rear flank downdraft. 

When identifying the formation of a tornado and the direction in which it will be heading, satellite imagery and aerial photography are needed for accurate data.

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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatialmapping, video, ESRI.

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How to Donate Time to Help in Nepal

How to Donate Time to Help in Nepal | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How 'crisis mappers' activate after a catastrophe...and how you can join them."


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.

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Yunus Khan's comment, May 7, 2015 2:10 AM
God save nepal people
Katie's curator insight, May 22, 2015 12:37 PM

In Nepal, there was recently an earthquake. Crisis mappers have been working on better mapping data. Better mapping data increases the quality of imagery. Better mapping data greatly helps reduce suffering and saves lives. This is an example of how to use maps and geospatial data.  

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How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever

How Meteorology Changed Agriculture Forever | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Early meteorology helped farmers predict yield, transforming the agricultural industry.

 

Complaining over the weather is not new, but the science of studying the weather, and its effects on business, is fairly recent. Around [1920], economists were also starting to use statistical methods to predict yield. Although cotton’s price, as shown on the New York Cotton Exchange, fluctuated daily, a “well-known American economist” discovered that he could make the most accurate total yield predictions—more accurate than those of the government crop reports—by analyzing the average weather conditions from May to August. It was now possible to predict when the crops would have a bumper year or a poor one.

 

Tags: physicalweather and climate, food production, agribusiness, agriculture.

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Thousands of Earthquakes Recorded in Puget Sound in Just Two Weeks

Thousands of Earthquakes Recorded in Puget Sound in Just Two Weeks | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents can't feel most of them, but there have been a lot of earthquakes in Puget Sound lately.

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Scores of eastern U.S. cities to shatter Christmas Eve warm weather records

Scores of eastern U.S. cities to shatter Christmas Eve warm weather records | Geography Education | Scoop.it
70-degree weather will span from Florida into southern New England
Seth Dixon's insight:

Circles show locations where the record temperatures for this time of year are being forecast to be broken (or within a degree of the record). 

Tags: physicalweather and climate.

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The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"After historic rains, Atacama, Chile is exploding with vibrant wildflowers.  Here's a softer side to the disruptive weather phenomenon known as El Nino: an enormous blanket of colorful flowers has carpeted Chile's Atacama desert, the most arid in the world. The cyclical warming of the central Pacific may be causing droughts and floods in various parts of the world, but in the vast desert of northern Chile it has also caused a vibrant explosion of thousands of species of flowers with an intensity not seen in decades."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The driest place on Earth, the Atacama Desert in South America, has spectacular vistas and biogeography ... especially when it rains.  To read more (and see some stunning images) check out the links from the Washington Post, Yahoo, and the Smithsonian Magazine.   It is amazing that life can flourish in even some of the harshest of physical environments. 


Tags: physicalweather and climate, ChileSouth America, biogeography, environmentecology.

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Pierre Ratcliffe's comment, October 31, 2015 2:56 AM
How life forms have been dormant for decades or centuries or more. The DNA of these plants were there ready when conditions were favourable.
Leonardo Wild's curator insight, October 31, 2015 9:44 AM

Amazing Nature!

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 2, 2015 12:32 PM

Wow! This is such an amazing thing to see happened in the driest place on Earth. The disruptive weather phenomenon, El Nino really made this place come to life by bringing rainfall and floods. A spectacular site to see, that in the most harshest physical environment, life can flourished.

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GIS and Earth Science Week 2015

GIS and Earth Science Week 2015 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The 2015 Earth Science Week (Oct 11-17) theme is 'Visualizing Earth Systems.'   Esri’s Earth Science GeoInquiries help educators show and explore critical content in earth science."

 

Tags physical, mapping, geospatialESRI.

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Tsunami Animation

"The largest earthquake ever recorded by instruments struck southern Chile on May 22, 1960. This 9.5 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that crossed the Pacific Ocean, killing as many as 2000 people in Chile and Peru, 61 people in Hilo, Hawaii, and 142 people in Japan as well as causing damage in the Marquesas Islands (Fr. Polynesia), Samoa, New Zealand, Australia, the Philippines, and in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.  To see how this tsunami compares with two recent tsunamis from Chile, please watch http://youtu.be/qoxTC3vIF1U "


Tags: physical, geomorphologywater, tectonics, disasters, video.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In 1700, Japan was hit by a tsunami; they knew that tsunamis were caused by earthquakes, but there was no earthquake of that magnitude in Japan that could have caused it.  They called it the Orphan Tsunami, and it puzzled everyone.  Centuries later, data confirmed that a massive earthquake in the Pacific Northwest occurred in 1700 and it's tsunami traveled across the ocean much like the this computer simulation of the 1960 Chile earthquake.   

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, September 24, 2015 9:23 PM

Tsunami ocurrido en Chile el 22 de Mayo de 1960 donde murieron 2000 personas en Chile y Perú, 61 en Hilo Hawaii, 142 en Japón causando daños en Islas Marquesas Polinesia , Samoa, Nueva Zelanda, Australia, Filipinas, Alaska's Islas Aleutianas.....enlace para ver la comparación con el Tsunamis recientes en Chile (2015)

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Lakes On A Glacier

"How deep is that icy blue water on Greenland's ice sheet? Dr. Allen Pope, of the National Snow and Ice Data Center, is using data from the NASA/USGS Landsat 8 satellite to find out. In this video, Dr. Pope shares what he sees when he looks at a Landsat image of the Greenland ice sheet just south of the Jakobshavn Glacier.

Because the lakes are darker than the ice around them, they absorb more energy from the sun. A little bit of melt concentrates in one place, and then melts more, establishing a feedback mechanism accelerating the growth of the lake. When the lakes get big enough they can force open fractures that then drill all the way down to the bed of the glacier, transporting this water to the base where it can temporarily speed up the flow of the ice."


Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland, remote sensing, geospatial.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:06 PM

unit 1 and summer read

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Large Flash Flood

"A nice flood rolled down Johnson Canyon (southern Utah) on July 6th, 2015."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The raw power of Earth's natural forces can be truly amazing. 


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah, water, disasters.

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Sinkholes: Can we forecast a catastrophic collapse?

Sinkholes: Can we forecast a catastrophic collapse? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Sometimes the ground suddenly opens, consuming cars, homes and people. We may have a way to see these sinkholes coming – so why would anyone resist the idea?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Via the American Geographical Society: "Sinkholes - formed where groundwater dissolves soluble bedrock to form underground cavities. Sometimes, when the ceiling of a cavity can no longer support the weight of the overlying sediments, it can suddenly collapse, with catastrophic results."


Tags physical, disasters, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Plate Tectonics and the Formation of Central America and the Caribbean

This animation is made from a time series of maps reconstructing the movements of continental crust or blocks, as South America pulled away from North America, starting 170 million years ago. Note that South America is still clinging to Africa at the beginning of the series.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The land bridge connecting North and South America is hardly permanent (on a geological time scale that is).  This video is an animated version of the still maps from this article.  


Tags: Mexico, tectonicsphysical, video, Middle America.

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Sameer Mohamed's curator insight, May 27, 2015 8:54 AM

The intriguing thing about this video is that it puts into perspective the amount of time that humans have been on this earth. In in less than a million years we have gone from not existing to shaping the ground that we walk on.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:46 AM

Summer reading KQ1

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Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal

Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The May 12 7.3 magnitude aftershock was one of many that followed the April 25 earthquake that shook Nepal. Why is this part of the world such a hotbed of tectonic activity?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is in a series by National Geographic designed to show the geography behind the current events--especially geared towards understanding the physical geography.  Check out more videos in the '101 videos' series here.   

 

Tags physicalNational Geographic, tectonics, disasters, video.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 9:44 AM

Summer reading, tectonic plates

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:16 AM

Geography determines human activity, and not the other way around; that has been the theme of this course, and it holds true as we look at the devastating impacts of earthquakes in the nation of Nepal. Sitting right over one of the most active plate boundaries in the world, with the Indian subcontinent being violently forced under the rest of Asia, Nepal is therefore the home of both the infamous Himalayan Mountains and numerous earthquakes, varying in severity and frequency. As violent and as costly as they are, violent earthquakes are just another part of life in Nepal, as are other natural events in other parts of the globe, and the people who call it home adjust their lives accordingly, through a variety of means. However, nothing can prepare anyone for the extremes of earth's power, and the violent earthquake that shook the nation to its very core in May has left behind a great deal of human suffering and destruction. I hope that those who lost their homes and businesses are already well along on their path to recovery, although I don't think it's possible to every truly heal from such a traumatic experience, at least not completely.

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How 'crisis mapping' is helping relief efforts in Nepal

How 'crisis mapping' is helping relief efforts in Nepal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A team of Nepalis, backed by groups around the world, are helping guide what aid is needed where by "crisis mapping" Nepal, reports Saira Asher.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 8, 2015 10:16 AM

Crisis are a symptom that something underneath the surface of normalcy is terribly wrong ... especially when we come to realize that everything is interconnected, even politics—worldwide.