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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas

Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thirteen years after the Bamian Buddhas were blasted into rubble, opinion is split on whether to leave them as is, rebuild them, or make copies of them.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article work together to show a 'behind-the-scenes' glimpse of this heritage site, or the remnants of the old memorial which is an iconic part of the cultural landscape in their own right but for very different reasons.  This is a great example of sequent occupance and some of the difficulties in preserving heritage.  Some argue that by restoring the Buddha it will undo some of the damage done by the Taliban and create a tourist destination; others think that the damaged Buddha is a poignant reminder of problems with 'topocide' and religious intolerance. 


Questions to Ponder: What do you think should become of this place?  How come?    


Tags: Afghanistan, politicalculture, Central Asialandscape, perspective.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, March 28, 2:43 PM

Protecting significant landscapes

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2:17 PM

This video starts by talking about the issue at hand of who should recieve this specific historical site. The video and article overlap in talking about the division between which country should be entitiled to their ancestors Buddahs. This is an extremely important issue at hand the resolotion is crucial to the countries getting along again.

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T-Mobile's tech chief: I want to decimate Verizon's map ad campaign

T-Mobile's tech chief: I want to decimate Verizon's map ad campaign | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In an interview with CNET, T-Mobile's Neville Ray talks about the carrier's plan to fill out its coverage and why it's picking a fight with Verizon. Read this article by Roger Cheng on CNET News.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Maps are not innocent reflections of the truth; and if you do think that they are read some JB Harley.  Maps can be used to cleverly conceal the truth or to accentuate a particular perspective. 

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Muslim Woman Discovers Friendly New World When a Winter Scarf Covers Her Hijab

Muslim Woman Discovers Friendly New World When a Winter Scarf Covers Her Hijab | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Chicago's bitter cold temps led to an impromptu social experiment when Leena Suleiman bundled up in a knit scarf and cap.
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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 12:25 PM

Interesting article about a social experiment...

Linda Alexander's curator insight, February 24, 12:55 PM

A really interesting social experiment that took place in Chicago!

Joy Kinley's curator insight, February 26, 10:11 AM

One slight difference in dress - hijab or cap - and a world of difference in how she is treated.  What makes us "be" part of a group?  A hijab clearly marks a woman is Muslim and for some people that is scary, while others welcome you.

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40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.
Seth Dixon's insight:

And here is another list of for 40 maps, part one and part two and part two

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Christophe CESETTI's curator insight, January 23, 2:37 PM

Pearltree "Géographie" http://pear.ly/cqIbP

Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 2:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 11:30 AM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

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How to Read a (Good) Map

How to Read a (Good) Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. Just as there are no unbiased arguments, there are no unbiased maps."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a really good article that explores the idea of how to critically read maps. It gives good guidelines, techniques and questions to ask when assessing the positionality of the map.  If you are looking for a video for a younger audience to teach this same principle, see this clip.


Tags: mapping, perspective.

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John Slifko's curator insight, November 23, 2013 2:09 PM

Map skills are vital in the study of democratic place and space. 

YEC Geo's curator insight, November 24, 2013 1:44 PM

Good advice.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, November 25, 2013 10:09 PM

Exercise 14 :

 

Read the news and answer the questions:

 

a.What is the news talking about ?

b. There are two maps.Maps that is down has these questions ( Answer them ) :

Who made the map?What is the purpose of the map? That is, what is the map attempting to communicate?Who is the intended audience? (It is important to remember that the map may not have been designed for you, but a more specialized audience.)Does the map effectively achieve its communication goals? Does it present an interesting story or argument?

c.Sum up the news ( five sentences in english )

d.Choose another map ( of Internert  if you want ) and answer the questions 1,2,3 i 4. Add the map.

 

Send by moodle.Good luck¡

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Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale

Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A geographer and a biologist at Salem State University team up to curate a new exhibition, featuring confounding views from both satellites and microscopes
Seth Dixon's insight:

When I teach why scale is an important concept in geography, I say that depending on the situation a scientist might need a microscope or a telescope to properly understand a phenomenon.  Most images give us enough context clues to help us determine the scale of the image, but this set of 15 images does not.  So is it micro or macro?


Tags: scale, perspective

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Dean Haakenson's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:15 PM

So cool!

Siri Anderson's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:46 AM

Gives a whole new meaning to the sense of scale.

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 3:18 PM

Try your eyes at this!

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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How have I not found National Geographic FOUND until now?  The curators post approximately 2 pictures a day that generally have never been published before; the result is an archive that is a wonderfully eclectic treasure trove.  There are simply too many great teaching images to share them individually.  Pictured above is the Sutherland Falls which thunders down a 1,904-foot drop from Lake Quill in New Zealand (January 1972, Photo by James L. Amos).  I consider National Geographic FOUND as a must see and will include it in my list of best scoops (filed under the tag zbestofzbest). 


Tags: perspective, National Geographic. images, zbestofzbest.

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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:27 AM

I think that is a manigficient photo i can't believe that these phoos nev been published and also missing their original location.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:05 AM

this is amazing!

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The World Religions Tree

The World Religions Tree | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Dynamic infographic on world religions (don't be intimidated by the page being in Russian... The graphic is not).

Seth Dixon's insight:

Religious traditions are interconnected and often share common roots and ancestries.  This stunning infographic is an attempt to visually reconcile these disparate strands of faith into one cohesive whole (the image above is far too small to do it justice, but I tried to show the image at various scales).


Tags: perspectiveculture, religion, culture, infographic, diffusion.

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Juliette Norwood's curator insight, January 6, 8:57 AM

This shows the different branches of religions that people adhere to. This scoop was chosen to be the first on the page as a reference of each religion that mainly exists on Earth.

Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:32 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This relates to Key Issue #1 because it shows the origins of each religion. Also, it shows the various relationships between religions. 

 

Vinay Penmetsa: This shows how a lot of religions are interconnected, and even if people think two religions are completely different, they might have similar roots, just like languages.

 

Graham Shroyer's religion: This relates to key issue 1 because it shows where religions originated and how they are all connected, like judaism and christianity.

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because it identifies the origions and relationships of the major world religions of today. These religious branches clearly show the relationships between majorly and minorly practiced religions.


Rishi Suresh:  This shows how, similiar to languages, many religions come in families and have distinct connections between them. 

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:42 AM

fascinating infographic on world religions.

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Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side

Middle Earth: Why We Need to Turn Our Map on Its Side | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Though he never actually crossed it, the Greek mathematician Pythagoras is sometimes credited with having first conceived of the Equator, calculating its location on the Earth’s sphere more than four centuries before the birth of Christ.

Via Tony Hall
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting article on some Earth-Sun relationships that challenges the dominant north-centered normative view of how to think about our planet.  My favorite tidbit of information: "The velocity of the Earth’s rotation varies depending on where you stand: 1,000 mph at the Equator versus almost zero at the poles. That means that the fastest sunrises and sunsets on the planet occur on the Equator, and centrifugal and inertial forces are also much greater there. "

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Tony Hall's curator insight, May 23, 2013 5:31 PM

This is a very thought provoking article. I like seeing the established conventions challanged. I also like the conversations around the sense of superiority possed by the Northern Hemisphere. Enjoy!

Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks's comment, May 24, 2013 8:09 AM
Great article to include in our summer assignment packet!
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:42 PM

Definitly changed my way of thinking. also this brings up the many flaws with pre geospatial desinged maps. cartographers could push their own agenda to make their country or area look more promient than it actually is. also another prime example of something that has been taken as fact for many years (nobody questions a world map) and turns out to have some flaws

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How Many Rhode Islands?

How Many Rhode Islands? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How Many Rhode Islands is a simple web application that shows and tells you how many Rhode Islands would fit inside a given country.
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 10, 2013 5:38 PM

The Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance is as pleased as could be to discover this marvelously fun website.  While the Ocean State is larger than countries such as Andorra, Nauru, Tuvalu and Malta, there are not many countries smaller than the smallest of the United States of America.  Russia could contain 5,445 'Rhode Islands' and the United States could contain 3,066 Rhode Islands (that's a LOT of senators!). 

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Public Space, Gender and Religion

Seth Dixon's insight:

Recently, Five women activists have been arrested for wearing prayer shawls at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.  Israeli policewomen detained members of the religious group Women of the Wall for breaching orthodox rules governing prayers at the site, which only allow men to dress this way. This is Judaism's most holy site and orthodox traditions govern the legal code over who is permitted to be in this place and what they may do; this fight represents a struggle to redefine the meaning and usage of public space in Jerusalem (among other complex issues).


Tags: perspectiveIsrael, culture, gender. religion, culture,
Middle East.

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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 9:27 AM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This article relates to Key Issue #1 becuase it shows how religion affect different demographics. It also brings other components into play in the long-standing discussion about religion.

 

Vinay Penmetsa; This is related to the section because it relates religion and gender inequality in the world.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because it talks about religion and it also talks about how it conflicts with other issues like gender inequality.

 

Rishi Suresh: This relates to Half the Sky because it shows the relationship between religion and gender equality. 

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because this article shows the relationship between gender equality and religion. Gender Inequality can be influenced by religion.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 9:20 AM

This article is about a Jewish women's group and its desire to have equal rights when it comes to prayer at the holy site of the Western Wall. This battle touches on a number of political issues including equal rights, religious freedom (in how one worships), and restrictions which may be placed in public spaces. While this issue seems trivial to me, the traditionally male practices being used by women may be considered an insult to their religion, or this could just be another instance of overbearing patriarchy in the Middle East.

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012. Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, April 30, 2013 9:51 PM
This slideshow makes it painfully clear that the degree to which a country is developed makes for very different experiences when it comes to education and physically getting to a school. Less developed countries clearly present different, in many cases, more dangerous obstacles to arriving at a school than well developed countries present.
The climate and geographic features found in other countries seem to often be what creates the challenges in getting young people to schools. Economically, these countries are clearly disadvantaged, as the lack of a viable infrastructure would indicate. Due to this lack of infrastructure, the journey to school is dangerous and arduous. A certain resilience can be seen in these pictures, however. Those who take these dangerous trips to schools miles away or over dangerous terrain clearly value education, indicating a cultural emphasis on the importance of learning, many times in spite of harsh geographic factors.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:52 AM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 11:45 AM

unit 6 economic development

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Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners

Countries that are most and least welcoming to foreigners | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Blue countries are more welcoming, red countries less. Where does yours rank?
Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Economic Forum compiled a report on global tourism and part of that was an estimation of the attitude of each countries' population toward foreign visitors--this map is a visualization of that data.  Why would some particular countries be more or less welcoming? What surprises you about this map?

 

Disclaimer: according to this article, there is much that is methodologically wrong with this map. 


Tags: tourism.

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 2:25 PM
A lot of things about these rankings of countries that are least welcoming to foreigners surprised me, while others seemed blatantly obvious. It’s no surprise to me that countries like Iceland and New Zealand are among the most welcoming, they’re both in the middle of no where and no one ever visits them. I’m sure they jump at the chance for someone to visit! What did surprise me, however, was that the United States wasn’t less welcoming. I thought for sure we’d be in the red. The way Americans treats foreigners is appalling, no matter where their from (because we’ll probably mistake them from being from somewhere else that we don’t like), or if they’re here to visit or to live. Although we expect to be treated the exact opposite in any other country, and would prefer to be waited on and catered to. It’s very interesting to me that Mexico is more welcoming then the U.S., which is ironic, because we generally don’t welcome them.
Thomas D's comment, May 6, 2013 7:29 AM
I think this map of least and most welcoming countries to tourist is very interesting. I look at this through the American point of view and see that countries like Russia, Iran and Pakistan who are among the least welcoming states. These are all countries that we have had conflicts with throughout our countries history. I also find it interesting that the United States is such a neutral country towards tourism. A country that was based off of immigrants is no longer so welcoming to outsiders coming to our country. This could be due to the recent terrorist acts that have taken place within the United States in the past 15 years. Also just by looking at the map in a broader sense most of the countries that are unwelcoming are located in western Europe and Asia rather than anywhere else in the world.
Paul Beavers's comment, July 4, 2013 4:35 PM
Well the Chinese sure hide it well. I've visited there twice (once for a month) and I couldn't have been more welcomed. The people were the best part of both visits.
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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...
Seth Dixon's insight:

A new perspective can change our perception of reality, as demonstrated by this delightful photo gallery. 


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Linh Nguyen's comment, March 21, 8:42 AM
http://thietkenoithatbietthuecopark.com/thiet-ke-biet-thu-dep/ thiết kế nội thất biệt thự sang trọng, hiện đại
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 8:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

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World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think

World’s Muslim population more widespread than you might think | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are about 1.6 billion Muslims, or 23% of the world's population, making Islam the second-largest religion.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Did you think that most of the world's Muslim population lived in the Middle East and North Africa?  If so you are not alone, but the Middle East and North Africa account for only 19.8% of the global Muslim population.  In fact there are more Muslims in India and Pakistan than the Middle East and North Africa.   


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, Middle East.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 12:52 PM

This photograph and facts depict the rate at which the Muslim population is rapidly increasing. For example in the Sub-Saharan African region the number of widespread is 248,110,000 of Muslims deriving from this specific region. The total percentage for this region is 15.5% of people who make up Africa. Almost 75% live in these regions alone (North America, Europe, Latin America, Africa, North Africa and, Asia-Pacific regions.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 26, 3:15 PM

This map depicts that including Africa and the Middle East there is 317,070,000 population of Active Muslims practicing their religion. This region along with the Asia-Pacific region are the most highly dense regions with the Muslim population exceeding 130,260,000 Muslim worshipers in those two regions alone.

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A photograph (or landscape, map, etc.) is not an innocent reflection of reality.  They can be carefully crafted to tell a story which might reflect the bigger picture and your ideological framework--but it just as easily might obscure some important contexts and truths.  I use these images at the beginning of the semester to discuss the bias inherent in our own perspectives as I try to infuse my classroom with a variety of lenses with which to view different regions (images found here).


Tags: images, landscape, perspective, regions.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 3:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 1:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, Today, 10:35 AM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Great Circle Mapper

Great Circle Mapper | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Great Circle Mapper displays maps and computes distances along a geodesic path. It includes an extensive, searchable database of airports and other locations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The shortest distance between two points is not a straight line…well, that depends on your map projection.  A flat map always distorts something when representing our three-dimensional Earth—whether it is distance, direction, shape or area—something gets distorted on our maps.  A great circle is the shortest distance between two points on the surface of a sphere, so that’s going to be the quickest travel route between points (which is why so many airline routes seem to arc).  This website Great Circle Mapper generates great circles that show the shortest distance between two points on many map projects will be an arc.  Why does this particular route arc ‘bend’ north for a while and then south?  Get out a globe for added perspective.   

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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 15, 5:31 AM

Cool tool.

matthias brendler's curator insight, January 16, 7:34 AM

Maps Monster am I!

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 9:59 AM

Because this route from JFK Airport to SYD AUS Airport is not a straight route there are many factors that need to be taken in account because of the overwhelming idea of trade winds and how that affects flight plans and routing for different airways/airlanes.  The plane has to fight against the trafe winds in order to create a specific ETA for the passenger and the flight crue among the plane. This is all dependent upon the trade winds (prevailing and other kinds) transmitting against the plane.

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Assessing Online Sources

Assessing Online Sources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tweet from Earth Pics (screenshot preserved for when it gets taken down).  Retweeted over 1,000 times in the first hour.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a real island...well, sort of.  It is an island off the coast of Thailand (most certainly not Ireland) and there is no castle on the top.  Photoshopping and easy file sharing make it harder to assess the validity of online resources (this fantastic digital manipulation is the work of Jan Oliehoek).  Most students start their research with online sources.  This isn't to pretend that that I've never mistakenly assumed that some online content was accurate when it wasn't true; I think we all have.  I think that it's an important conversation to have with our students so they can be more critical consumers of online information and use some geographic skills to assess the quality of that information. 

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Tracy Kovach's curator insight, October 26, 2013 10:04 AM

Great internet literacy activity

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 3:10 PM

Real or not"  Ireland or Tahiland?  Photoshopped or not? - check the length and shape of the shadow!. 

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 31, 2013 8:57 AM

students need to be very careful in the type of sources that they used to glean information. People can manipulate photos and suggest things as fact when they are completetly made up. It is understandable that Wikipedia can not be used as an entireyl reliable source because people have access to add whatever they want to the content matter. Photoshop and other online tools can be used to trick people into beleiving certain things. This photo claiming to be from ireland is really from Thailand is a small island but the castle itself on the top os photoshoped and the image was retweeded like crazy within the first hor. wee must check our sources and make sure that we are getting good primary or at least good secondary services from legit websites.

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The Authoritative Map

Seth Dixon's insight:

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map. 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable?  

 

Tags: mapping, perspective, K12, video

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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:26 AM

In the Winnie the Pooh Movie Pooh's Grand Adventure, the character Rabbit has absolute confidence in the printed word and especially the map.

 

Questions to ponder:  How much do we trust any given map?  How much should we trust a map (or the printed word)?  What makes a document reliable or unreliable? 

Melissa Marshall's curator insight, November 27, 2013 10:04 PM

The user is putting total trust in the map to get from A to B. How can we trust the map? What are the features of good infromation? A useful discussion-starter.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 12:38 AM

I think this video is a perfect example of todays modern soceity. Many people in this would today are exactly like rabbit, they believe everything they see without questioning its integrity. this has cause alot of problems in todays internet fueled world with anyone being able to post whatever they want and call it fact. This is where we need more people like Pooh who question everything. Pooh sees where he wants to go with his own eyes and can tell that rabbit is leading him the wrong way. This is relateable to so much in geography but to keep it simple ill compare it to Pythagoras proclaimed the earth was spherical. He question something everyone in the world took as a fact and nobody believed him because it was already stated that the world was flat. Just like pooh questioning the "offical map"

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Hijab: Veiled in Controversy

Hijab: Veiled in Controversy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hijab is an Islamic concept of modesty and privacy, most notably expressed in women’s clothing that covers most of the body.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is the geography of hijab?  Covering one's head pre-dates Islam in the Middle East but many associate this practice strictly with Islam and only for women--read this article (with teaching tips and supplemental resources) for more context on this cultural and religious practice.  


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, culture, National Geographic.

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Norma Ellis's curator insight, September 2, 2013 4:27 AM

 understanding difference

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 11:39 AM
The hijab has become a very controversial issue on the global scale. For example, Saudi Arabian and Iran women are required to wear it where as other countries (most recently France) have banned the wearing of such religious garments. Under the U.S. constitutions first amendment of freedom of speech and freedom of religion allows the women to wear them. For many women it is a choice of modesty or a way to show her devotion to her religion. Many people today still are uneducated about the topic and see it as a way these women are being oppressed. Ultimately it is that woman's choice, but it is a shame that in some places it may come with a price.
Mary Rack's comment, September 19, 2013 12:20 PM
Thank you, Shelby!!
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Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries

Geography in the News: Eurasia’s Boundaries | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Europe and Asia, while often considered two separate continents, both lie on the same landmass or tectonic plate, the Eurasian supercontinent. The historic and geographic story of the Eurasian boundary is intriguing."


Via Neal G. Lineback
Seth Dixon's insight:

While most continental borders follow some physical geographic definition, the border between Europe and Asia is purely cultural and a remant of classical regional differentiation.  Some argue that Europe isn't a separate continent from Asia, and while they are not wrong, the concept of Europe is deep and pervasive in how many of us think about the world.   You can find more Geography in the News articles on Maps101.com.

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shawn Giblin's curator insight, July 15, 2013 6:42 AM

very interesting to think that Turkey is a transcontinental country, as well to find out that asia and europe are actually connected.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:14 AM

Here we can see that the continental boundary between Russia and the rest of Europe has historically been solely based on national borders. However, a large majority of Russia's population and major cities are in the western part of the country, which is closer to Europe than most Asian countries.  Because of this, Europe and Asia gained an imaginary cultural border. It only makes sense that part of Russia began to be considered a European region even though it physically is a part of Asia.  It is better to talk about the entire land mass of Eurasia rather than two split continents when talking about Russia's borders.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 8:06 AM

I find this discussion very interesting.  How we define the boarders of the continents may not seem important but they do hold much in the way of historical and cultural meanings.  Is Europe separate from Asia or is it one super-continent?  The answer to that has many implications politically and culturally as well as historically.

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?


Seth Dixon's insight:

I present this map (hi-res) without any context to my students and ask the question: is this statement true?  How can we ascertain the truthfulness of this claim?  What fact would we need to gather?  This exercise sharpens their critical thinking skills and harnesses the assorted bits of regional information that they already have, and helps them evaluate the statement.

The answers to these questions can be found here.

 

Tags: density, social media, East Asia, South Asia.

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lalita pradeep's curator insight, May 14, 2013 7:34 PM

wow....lovely map.........

Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, May 15, 2013 1:52 AM

It's quite amazing!

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 5:45 AM

When we first looked at this picture in class there was no way that I thought this map could be true. We are warned all the time to be careful what we look at on the internet, because for the most part a lot of the information is not true. When we looked at this photo in class we zoomed in on the area in the circle and first determined what was included  in that circle. Once we were able to detrmine what cities were within that circle we were then able to look up the population in each of those cities. We added up the total of each city to get the total population of the places within the circle. Then we researched the total population of the world. Once we were able to find this we subtracted the population from within the circle from the total population, and what we were left with was smaller than the total population within the circle. Which means that the map was true. I was shocked. There was no way that I thought this was true. What was interesting to me was the process we went through to determine that this map was even true. We had to detrmine the area we were working with and then research the information to get a solution. I think you learn a lot just by this simple picture. This map happened to be true however there are many picture listed under this map that are untrue that we are faced with all the time, that if we took the time to research we woudl realize are silly pictures. Just by researching information about a picutre like this can teach us a lot about a place. 

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Normative Gendered Messages

Normative Gendered Messages | Geography Education | Scoop.it


Here are two shirts are from the Avengers.  Both are designed for their children apparel production line, but I don't have to tell you which one is marketed for boys and which one is marketed for girls.


Questions to ponder: How (and why) do companies use cultural ideas and values to market their products?  How do companies shape cultural ideas and values?  What impact do messages like this have on a society's culture?  Do seemingly subtle differences is pop cultural products like this matter?  

 

Tags: perspective, culture, genderpopular culture.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:14 PM

Commercials don't always try to sell you stuff, they try to appeal to you.  Heroism appeals to people, but people are trying to sell you shirts that advertise comicbooks in a trinity of marketing efforts.  Social appeal, by referring to heros, sales by selling the shirt, and advertising comics.  I like comics, but I would rather spend money on comic books, or go into the world and make a difference and BE a hero (or eat a hero at a hoagie hut) than buy one of those shirts.  My spiritual beliefs are open to allowing the sales of these shirts, but my preference does not incline me to actually purchase one.  I am 'free' in this country to buy or not to buy a shirt.  I'm a long-time supporter of art, and I like the idea the shirt puts forward- supporting heroism and comic books, belief in scifi/fantasy art and concepts, and I agree that someone should buy that shirt... but I feel that I could do more by actually being a hero than telling people to be heros.  By using comic book heros, the advertisers say that nobody on this world is a hero, because they 'aren't real,' but also that anybody can be a hero by striving towards virtue of the pure ideal idols in the comics.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 6:15 PM

Companies before they put any product in the market they do research first for example; what people are buying, they take in consideration gender and culture. And why is that? Because they are not going to create a product that no one is going to buy. The impact that this type of messages like this have on a society’s culture. No matter how many laws are make in favor woman equality are created we are being  perceived as the weak sex, that we need the help of a man to do anything. Sadly but true this type of campaign it was sales

Michele Baker's curator insight, March 12, 8:39 AM

This is a really depressing trend, and one that, as the parent of a daughter, I am all too aware of. It's way past time we start rethinking the way we dictate gender roles in children.

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Chimamanda Adichie: The danger of a single story

"Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding."

Seth Dixon's insight:

To gain a global perspective inherently requires understanding multiple perspectives.  Africa is frequently portrayed as 'the other' but also homogenized within a single narrative that 'flattens' truth.  How can we teach and learn about other places in a way that develops geographic empathy and shows the many stories of that can belong to any one place? 


Tags: Africa, perspective, TED.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 8, 2013 6:11 AM

This is such an interesting TED talk.  Chimamanda Adichie of Nigeria talks about the danger of a single story.  That is, the danger of using one story to tell about an entire group of people or an entire country.  She says that using a single story is dangerous because it focuses on stereotypes that are not necessarily untrue, but they are incomplete.  There are so many more important pieces of a story of a group of people than just the single story.  She believes that the single story robs people of their dignity and shows differences between people rather than similiarities.  Her experiences in Nigeria, the United States, and Mexico are very interesting and lend meaning to her opposition of the single story.

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A world of projections

Welcome, Metafilter visitors! How can you map a sphere unto the plane? well you can't if you want to keep size, shape and proportions. Here are the alternatives... Learn more about the different projections.
Seth Dixon's insight:

We are accustomed to spatial distortion in maps; when we see that same distortion on a picture, it gives us an alternative perspective on the level of spatial distortion that we see on maps.  The Azimuthal projections (circular) are my favorite for this photographic project.   


Tagsmapping, cartography, perspective, map.

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 24, 2013 4:55 AM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde...une initiative photographique pour comprendre les projections.