Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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If The World Were 100 People

If the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like? How many people would have shelter? Clean water? Education?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tagsstatisticsdevelopment, perspective.

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Ella Price's curator insight, March 29, 2:19 AM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 5:57 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, April 1, 9:06 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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Changing How We Think About Africa

Do you speak African? Well, neither do the 1 billion people on the continent.Africa is home to 54 different nations, more than 2,000 languages and four of the world's 10 fastest growing economies, but is often painted with a sweeping stroke of doom and gloom. In this week's Reality Check, Mehdi Hasan exposes popular misconceptions about the African continent.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

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8A Luiza 's curator insight, March 11, 4:59 PM
I really loved this video, they showed that we must stop judging someone or something based on the "first impression" or in the media, who has a huge influence in our lives. When we think about Africa, almost everyone has the bad habit of thinking immediately in a poor country, undeveloped, with a hunger crisis..
Africa is much more than that! Has Africa poverty? Yes they have, but they also have wonderful things that we have never though about. 
Even as Thailand, Brazil, United States have bad things but they also have amazing things to show to the world, I believe that everyone, including me and you, has a talent to do something to help our planet. Enter in CMIS made me start thinking "out of the box", before this I had a formed opinion about the countries and people who lived there just based on what media said to me. Now I know that everyone in the world is different, and is what makes our world amazing! We cannot judge someone because of the place where comes from or the "first impression". We must know better people or the thing (such as countries or places)  before just throw words based on what people said to us. 
The Planetary Archives / San Francisco, California's curator insight, March 11, 11:23 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, March 21, 7:07 PM

This short video is full of with examples and statistics that show that many of the 'doom and gloom' perspectives and ways of thinking about Africa are outdated (at best).  Here are some good facts to update how we talk about Africa. 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective.

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xkcd: Terminology

xkcd: Terminology | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I use this classic xkcd image every semester that I teach world regional geography.  The explanation of this image is helpful if the students fail to understand the context or the point of this comic strip.  The very idea of 'western' and 'eastern' is very much an idea that comes from 'the west' (Greek and Roman civilizations anciently, and a broadly European more recently). The Euro-centric view of the world from a single 'starting point' is one reason some geographers don't like the term 'Middle East,' but prefer Southwest Asia and North Africa.  The Middle East implies a European starting point as does the Far East.     

 

Tagsregions, perspective.

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Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 22, 5:04 PM

I use this classic xkcd image every semester that I teach world regional geography.  The explanation of this image is helpful if the students fail to understand the context or the point of this comic strip.  The very idea of 'western' and 'eastern' is very much an idea that comes from 'the west' (Greek and Roman civilizations anciently, and a broadly European more recently). The Euro-centric view of the world from a single 'starting point' is one reason some geographers don't like the term 'Middle East,' but prefer Southwest Asia and North Africa.  The Middle East implies a European starting point as does the Far East.     

 

Tags: regions, perspective.

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The Danger of a Single Story

Our lives, our cultures, are composed of many overlapping stories. Novelist Chimamanda Adichie tells the story of how she found her authentic cultural voice -- and warns that if we hear only a single story about another person or country, we risk a critical misunderstanding.
Seth Dixon's insight:

To gain a global perspective inherently requires understanding multiple perspectives.  Africa is frequently portrayed as 'the other' but also homogenized within a single narrative that 'flattens' truth.  How can we teach and learn about other places in a way that develops geographic empathy and shows the many stories of that can belong to any one place? 


Tags: Africa, perspective, TED.

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Hailan Yu's curator insight, December 4, 2015 2:23 PM

To gain a global perspective inherently requires understanding multiple perspectives.  Africa is frequently portrayed as 'the other' but also homogenized within a single narrative that 'flattens' truth.  How can we teach and learn about other places in a way that develops geographic empathy and shows the many stories of that can belong to any one place? 

 

Tags: Africa, perspective, TED.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:41 AM

The broad paint brush that we paint over Africa as a place of poverty, underdevelopment and lack of education  is just mind blowing. The story that Ms. Adichie told about her life was very interesting and fascinating at the same time. It seems like she grew up from well off household, reading English books and having a normal life. However, when she went over aboard to U.S she experienced a culture shock of how people generalized Africa as a whole continent without any diversity. 

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Are you ignorant about the world?

Are you ignorant about the world? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The world is spinning so fast that it can be hard to keep track of everything going on. And most of us aren't doing a good job of it, writes Hans Rosling.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This article (with the embedded video) is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias makes combating global ignorance difficult. 


Tags: media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:47 PM

perception of place units 1 &3

John Puchein's curator insight, November 9, 2015 1:42 PM

Hans Rosling is a very important influence on Geography. He created Gapminder and continuously makes great Ted Talks.

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:18 PM

I believe that there are many people in the U.S. who do not pay attention to the news. Some are too poor to own a phone or television to keep up with what is going on in the world (although they can read the news paper, but you get my point). Others are too rich to care. And some base there opinions off of other peoples views and don't have an opinion of their own. Am I ignorant about the world? No, because I like to know what's happening world wide, especially if there are issues going on that can affect the survival of the human race, survival of the environment, and survival of my country.

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Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad?

Why Mercator for the Web? Isn’t the Mercator bad? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As you may know, Google Maps uses the Mercator projection. So do other Web mapping services, such as Bing Maps and MapQuest. Over the years I’ve encountered antipathy toward the use of the Web Mercator from map projection people. I know of two distinct schools of opposition. One school, consisting of cartographic folks and map aficionados, thinks the Mercator projection is 'bad': The projection misrepresents relative sizes across the globe and cannot even show the poles, they are so inflated. The other school, consisting of geodesy folks, thinks mapping services have corrupted the Mercator projection, whether by using the wrong formulæ for it or by using the wrong coordinate system for it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this article you will find a thoughtful discussion of the reasons why the Mercator projection is disliked by many, but still so prevalent.  In ArcGIS online, you can Search For Groups and then enter Projected Basemaps to see many map projections on that platform. For more resources on understanding map projections, click here


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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The true size of ...

The true size of ... | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This site is used to highlight the distortion issues caused by the Mercator map projection. It can be used to show the true size of countries

How it Works

1. Enter a country or state name

2. Hover over selection for size information

3. Click on selection to drag

4. Right-click on selection to delete


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective.

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Children and Space

"In just a few generations, we have tightly restricted American kids' freedom to roam, play, and become self-sufficient. The percentage of children walking and bicycling to school has plummeted from almost 50 percent in 1969 to about 13 percent today. Although distance from school is often cited as the main barrier to walking and bicycling, many families still drive when schools are close to home. According to the Safe Routes to School National Partnership, driving accounts for about half of school trips between 1/4- and 1/2-mile long — which in most cases shouldn't take kids much more than 10 minutes to walk."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a controversial topic and I certainly don't have all the answers. The free range parenting is a new to to our cultural conversations about parenting, but the ideas are anything but new. Most free range advocates want their children to have the rights to roam about their neighborhoods that others today would see as parental neglect. Many argue that as automobiles have become more prominent in urban design, it has come at the expense of children's ability to be in public unsupervised (yes, children used to be encouraged to go out to play in the streets). Children don't know their own neighborhoods as well anymore and this isn't just about architecture and design. Culturally our communal notions of proper parenting and child safety have shifted in the United States, but they are also very different around the world.  

 

Questions to Ponder: How is parenting shaped by cultural norms? What are the spatial implications of changing parenting strategies? What are the factors that shape your opinion about the 'proper' range for kids to roam unsupervised?  


Tags: housing, placeneighborhood, perspective, cultural norms, culture, transportation, planningspatial.

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asli telli's curator insight, August 15, 2015 6:34 AM

Also applies to unfortunate Turkey w/her recent urban transformation wave...

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Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled

Bad Maps Are Everywhere These Days. Here's How to Avoid Being Fooled | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tips from a geographer who's seen it all.


Tagsmapping, cartography201, perspective, map.

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lackingingot's comment, June 30, 2015 7:58 AM
Excellent...!!
Kevin Barker's curator insight, June 30, 2015 3:35 PM

Excellent article with examples for exploring the ways in which maps can fail or mislead us.  This is particularly important considering how easily maps can be created by anyone through the availability of digital resources.

Angus Henderson's curator insight, July 2, 2015 7:04 AM

A mapping 'take-down' of great detail, with lots of of interesting linked examples

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Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn

Ramadan in Sweden with no dusk, no dawn | Geography Education | Scoop.it
During summer, the sun never sets in Sweden's northernmost town, posing challenges for Muslims observing the holy month.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets in the summertime (in 2015, Ramadan is from June 17 to July 17)?  Some Muslims in the West (and north) argue that ancient customs from the Arabian desert need updating now that the religion has diffused beyond the Middle East.    


Tags: Islam, perspective, religiondiffusion, culture.

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 8:57 PM

Like many early religious traditions, Ramadan is observed based on measurements from the moon and sun. The start of Ramadan is determined by the sighting of the new moon, which moves about 11 days back in the Gregorian calendar each year. During Ramadan the consumption of food and water is prohibited between dawn and dusk, how do Muslims observing the fast manage in the far north of Scandinavia, where the sun never sets in the summertime (in 2015, Ramadan is from June 17 to July 17)?  Some Muslims in the West (and north) argue that ancient customs from the Arabian desert need updating now that the religion has diffused beyond the Middle East.    


Tags: Islam, perspective, religion, diffusion, culture.

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Americans truly are exceptional — at least when it comes to circumcision

Americans truly are exceptional — at least when it comes to circumcision | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There's no question that among the world's wealthy nations, the U.S. stands out when it comes to circumcision. The WHO estimates that the overall male circumcision rate in the states is somewhere between 76 and 92 percent. Most Western European countries, by contrast, have rates less than 20 percent.  But even these numbers mask considerable regional variation within countries."


Tags: perspective, cultural norms, culture, genderregions

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High Def Earth

NASA Commentator Dan Huot talks with David Hornyak, the project manager of the High Definition Earth Viewing experiment, about the first year of the project’s operation and screens some of its memorable scenes. From a perch on the nadir side of the International Space Station’s Columbus module, HDEV’s four high definition off-the-shelf video cameras have been transmitting clear, sharp views of Earth from an altitude of 250 miles, providing impressive views while testing how the hardware holds up in the harsh environment of Earth orbit.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you are impatient, the 'highlight reel' of this high definition video begins at 3:50 in this clip (but understanding the 'behind-the-scenes' context helps to understand how we get these videos of our planet). 


Tags: mapping, perspective, images, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 28, 2015 2:12 PM

No matter how High Def these images are, how many geopolitical frontier lines can be viewed? The ones that stand out, are where political and economic practices have visible degraded the environment in one country, and not in the other. Otherwise, it's all still one planet for all.

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The Daily Show–Spot the Africa

Between rampant racial inequality and Ebola outbreaks, South African comedian Trevor Noah admits he hesitated to visit a country as underdeveloped as America.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Since social media is buzzing with the news that Trevor Noah is replacing Jon Stewart as the host of the Daily Show, I wanted to show a geographically themed clip from one of Trevor's previous correspondence pieces on the show.  This clip was filmed during the height of the Ebola hysteria and Ferguson protests; the main topic is misconceptions in the United States about Africa.  His life itself is a portal into mixed South African geographies.


Tags: Ebola, Africa, regions, perspective.

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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, November 5, 2015 12:46 AM

Re-scooped from Professor Dixon. This correspondent is actually from South Africa and he's pretty damn funny. I remember how freaked out my ex-girlfriend was that she was going to get Ebola. And the reference to saving African's for just five cents a day made me giggle. Also, it's pretty funny how bad the FDR looks.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, December 14, 2015 2:54 AM

There is no doubt that there a stereotype and a generalization people make to Africans. This clip really emphasize those points and turn it into comedy, which is very creative. It makes people like me laugh at ourselves sometimes at the things we do as far as branding a group of race base on popular culture.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:15 PM
As comical as this is, it goes to show the kind of racism and pride we have in our country. Here the guest speaker says he took multiple photos of different places and wanted the host to figure out if it is America or Africa. Most of the photos showed undeveloped or terrible sections of the US and opposite for Africa. Each time the pictures were shown, the host assumed it was Developed America and underdeveloped Africa.
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Doreen Massey on Space

Doreen Massey on Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In honor of the late Doreen Massey, an eminent geographer who died Friday at age 72, we repost her Social Science Bites podcast, which has long been one of our most popular. In this interview, Massey asked us to rethink our assumptions about space -- and explained why.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tagsspace, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

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Michele Fitts Barnaby's curator insight, March 16, 4:14 PM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond.

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 20, 12:38 AM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 22, 1:40 PM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

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Geography as a Primary Source

Geography as a Primary Source | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A geographic perspective is a way of looking at and understanding our world. When you view the world through the lens of geography, you are asking who, what, where, when, and how people, places, and things are distributed across the surface of the earth, and why/how they got there. In other words, it means that you are analyzing something with a geographic perspective. The understanding and use of a geographic perspective is critical for decision making skills in the 21st century. Using spatial concepts such as location, region, movement, and scale to help us understand:

  • Interactions - How the world works
  • Interconnections - How systems in our world are connected
  • Implications - How to make well-reasoned decisions"

---@natgeo, Geography as a Primary Source

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographicperspective.

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, January 27, 8:59 PM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, March 23, 9:52 AM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, perspective.

is bell's curator insight, March 30, 3:28 AM

This is a field guide designed by National Geographic to help students strengthen their geographic skills. 

 

Tags: National Geographic, perspective.

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Americans Try Norwegian Christmas Food

See staff at the U.S. Embassy in Oslo try traditional Norwegian Christmas dishes. Se ansatte på den amerikanske ambassaden i Oslo smake på norsk julemat.

 

Tags: Norway, food, culture, seasonal, perspective.

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A Few Things You (Probably) Don’t Know About Thanksgiving

A Few Things You (Probably) Don’t Know About Thanksgiving | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"President Abraham Lincoln established Thanksgiving as a national holiday during the Civil War, and the feast has since become an American tradition. Yet the story of the Wampanoag and the pilgrims who first broke bread is not commonly known." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good source of information that runs counter the mythologized Thanksgiving story that is seen by so many as central to our heritage and national narrative.  Personally, a nice slice of turkey with cranberry sauce is not ruined by knowing that there is more than one perspective to the story. 


Tags: Thanksgiving, food,perspective, historical.

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Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent

Why Little Kids in Japan Are So Independent | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Japan, small children take the subway and run errands alone, no parent in sight. The reason why has more to do with social trust than self-reliance.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some cultural practices can be transplanted just about anywhere; others require a cultural environment wherein that particular practice is sufficiently well-known and communally supported for it to thrive.  The idea of sending kids this young out on errands is almost unthinkable in the United States given our cultural norms connected to youth and space.  As additional food for thought, here is an article about 9 parenting strategies around the world that culturally don't mesh well within the United States.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why do cultural norms vary so much from place to place?  How are your actions shaped by cultural norms?  Can you think of an example of a cultural practice that is accepted somewhere, but wouldn't work in most other societies?


Tags: JapanEast Asia, place, perspective, cultural norms, culture.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 2:59 PM

unit 3

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 11:49 AM

If this happened in the United States, it would lead the cable news channels for about a year. Most Parents in our country will hardly ever let their small children leave the house, never mind actually be by themselves for a long time period. This video is an excellent showcase of the differences between western and eastern cultures. The eastern culture prioritize independence at an early age. They make a point of making sure that children can become self sustainable. In the west, we go to extraordinary links to shield our children from the ugliness of every day society. We are more fearful of the horrors that might occur to our children if we allow them to explore society. Neither approach can be judged as correct or wrong. They are just two different ways of raising children in a complex and often freighting world.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 7:27 PM

It's interesting to see the cultural differences that facilitate these drastically different parenting strategies held by the Japan and the United States. In the US, our capitalistic society puts every man on his own- we are told not to help others, nor to ask for help. From the treks we made across the continent to our reluctance, as a society, to accept welfare programs as a necessity in an industrialized democratic society, Americans strive for solitude and independence. There isn't a sense of community in many parts of the country, and as a result, we are less likely to trust one another- I remember reading about two parents being invested by Child Services because they allowed their 9 year old child to walk with his younger sister to school. To think that such attitudes could be held on such a large scale, as they are in Japan, is laughable. We are told as we grow up how unsafe we really are. In Japan, the community- the collective- is held as the ideal, and people are taught to be able to trust strangers, to expect the best from them. The result? A safer society and the perception that Japanese society as a whole is safer. Children are able to walk freely in public and not be afraid, and public transit and walking are more widely accepted in urban areas. Tokyo may or may not be the world's safest large city, but it certainly feels so for its inhabitants, and I fail to see how that isn't better than the fear Americans have for our neighbors. This is something we need to address as a society, and we should start by looking at our ally across the Pacific. 

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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 19, 2015 4:32 AM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Map Projection Transitions

Map Projection Transitions | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In some ways, all 2D maps of Earth are interrupted at some point, even if it’s just along the antimeridian at 180°. Interruptions are often in areas of less interest e.g. oceans for a land-focused map."

Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations from Jason Davies mapping project.   


Tags: mapping, visualization, map projections, cartography, perspective, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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Lilydale High School's curator insight, September 3, 2015 11:01 AM

New ways to see the world.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 3:33 PM

map projections

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 9:23 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

No screenshot could do justice to this animation.  It transforms a map of the world from one map projection to another, and in the 5 second interval it 'spins the globe' to give you a sense of the the spatial distortions inherent in all projections.  This is but one of the many visualizations fromJason Davies mapping project.   

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How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place

How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It’s a good time to reflect on what truly inspires us. What gives us, as individuals, our own sense of independence? And how can we apply that sense of joyful independence to help us engage more actively and participate more readily in the world—to make it a better place, even? Cultivating a better geographical and cultural appreciation for the world, in the next generation as well as in our own, is a pretty good place to start."


TagseducationK12geography educationperspective, worldwide.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 18, 2015 12:50 PM

This is awesome !!!

Luigi Cappel's comment, July 18, 2015 9:08 PM
Great story, perhaps a Montestory. I made the pun because I had a terrible geography teacher. He wasn't interested in his subject and he was there as a job. Consequently whilst I scored high in most subjects, I failed this one. Despite that I have traveled the world many times for business an pleasure, learned many languages, which have seen me learn and appreciate countries and cultures. There are those of us who naturally have high IQ, but I believe all children have a brain that says "feed me and I will flourish". We must have teachers that elicit that.
Kenneth Peterson's curator insight, July 19, 2015 5:59 PM

Montessori shines once again!

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Navigating and Occupying Gendered Space

Navigating and Occupying Gendered Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How we occupy and move through space is based on many cultural norms and many of those norms and assumptions are based on gender." 


Tagsspace, gender, place, cultural norms, culture, perspective.

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Fruit and Map Projections

Fruit and Map Projections | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Bare with me here; this culinary hack shows several images that are helpful for explaining how map projections represent parts of the Earth (or the orange in this example).  The Polar regions are often displayed in azimuthal projections which are most accurate near one specified point.  Slicing the orange at the top and bottom is akin to creating polar azimuthal projections.  Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) is a system that divides Earth into 60 "slices" with each wedge representing 6 degrees of longitude.  Each wedge has a Meractor projection map with perfect representation along a central line of longitude.  If we imagine the peel adjacent to one wedge has been flattened out, that is good way to visualize UTM maps.  


Tagsmappingmap projections, cartography, perspective, map.

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Augustin Zusanné's curator insight, June 17, 2015 4:35 PM

Great artistic tips !

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Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake

Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It's difficult to comprehend the ridiculous amounts of water that have fallen in such a short time in a state that, until recently, had been in the grip of a historic drought. But one place to start would be to look at reservoir levels in the state. In the past 30 days, Texas reservoirs have gone from being 73 percent full to 82 percent full, according to data maintained by the Texas Water Development board. All told, about 8 million acre-feet of water have flowed into the state's reservoirs."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just how much of water is 8 million acre-feet?  It's almost impossible for most people to visualize that, but this series of graphics is designed to put the scale of the recent flooding in Texas into perspective (and yes, I love that Rhode Island is almost a unit of measurement).

  

Tags: water, fluvial, perspective, scale, Rhode Island.

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Women's Restroom Sign Breaks Stereotypes

Women's Restroom Sign Breaks Stereotypes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The It Was Never a Dress campaign is not only taking social media by storm, it is also changing the way we view the traditional women's bathroom sign. We see that the men's figure wears pants and the women's symbol wears a dress, but what if it was never meant to be a dress in the first place?  Tania Katan launched the popular #ItWasNeverADress campaign at last week's 'Girls in Tech' conference with the idea that the female figure is instead wearing a cape, asserting that women can be superheroes or anything else they choose to be."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These restroom signs are so ubiquitous that we might fail to realize how they are a part of the gendered landscape in which we live.  This takes that well-known icon that was designed to generically represents women and makes us see the sign (and women maybe?) in a new light.  It's delightfully playful and yet powerfully subversive; it challenges us to see beyond what we've been told to see and what society tells us what we should see.  The designers called this "an invitation to shift perceptions and assumptions about women and the audacious, sensitive, and powerful gestures they make every single day."


Questions to Ponder: what other elements of the cultural landscape convey gendered messages? What impact do these message have? 


Tags: perspective, cultural norms, culture, gender, popular culture.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 3:30 PM

I love this! Unit 3: Cultural landscape and norms.

Katie's curator insight, May 22, 2015 5:19 PM

In this article it suggest that the stereotypical dress for the the women bathroom sign is not a dress, but a cape. This hows that women can be superheroes or whatever they want to be. Still today there is a lack of women in he workforce compared to men. For every 4 men working working for Google there is 1 women and half of them quit because of the poor work environment. I think this helps represent that women are capable of anything. This is an example of women in the workforce and gender equity.  

Seth Forman's curator insight, May 27, 2015 2:08 AM

Summary: This article basically explains the story of the recently emerged #ItWasNeverADress campaign. This is a pretty cool article because I never really payed attention to how even a restroom sign could be considered gender inequality. 

 

Insight: This article is relevant to unit 6 because gender inequality is an important measure of development.