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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Why do competitors open their stores next to one another?

"Why are all the gas stations, cafes and restaurants in one crowded spot? As two competitive cousins vie for ice-cream-selling domination on one small beach, discover how game theory and the Nash Equilibrium inform these retail hotspots."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED-ED lesson shows the economic and spatial factors that lead to businesses to cluster together.  This video is a very simple introduction to the concept of agglomeration that is based on competition.

 

Tags: APHGTED, models, spatialK12, location.

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Kelsea Messina's curator insight, July 23, 6:45 AM

Hotelling method

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 6:46 AM

Nice intersection of geo and economics (for the social studies teachers out there) on a very high-interest topic.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 7:02 AM

Hoteling model

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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs produces easy-to-use population charts and graphs (including population pyramids).  This image (courtesy of Hans Rosling) shows the impending changes on Brazilian society based on changing fertility rates. How is this chart an example of population momentum and of the Demographic Transition Model? 


Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodels, Brazil.

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 2:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 10:27 AM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 2:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.
Seth Dixon's insight:

These time-lapse demographic charts help to visualize the impacts of the demographic transition principles on a society.  In the GIFs of the United States and Japan for example, you can clearly see the baby boomer generation and the 'greying' processes respectively. 


Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, population, demographicsmodels.

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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2013 8:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 7:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 2:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?
Seth Dixon's insight:

The demographic transition is an important model in human geography that explains many of the declining birth rates in the more developed parts of the world and the high fertility rates in less developed countries.  This is often discussed within a demographic and economic context.  This article from TIME Magazine struck quite a nerve recently. While it noted that from 2007 to 2011 the fertility rate dropped 9% in the United States, it wasn't the statistical analysis that got people talking (here is another article on the topic).  What did strike a nerve was the discussion of the cultural shifts that are at the roots of this demographic decline, the cover picture that glamorizes a childfree life and a subtitle (when having it all means not having kids) that idealizes not having children.  The demographic transition has what some call a 'cultural lag' where a large family size is still culturally preferred even if it no longer makes the same agricultural and economic sense as it did in the past.  This piece demonstrates the new secularized 'post-cultural lag' values that see children as obstacles to preferable career paths and a limitation on their freedoms.  For one commentator that was opposed to this article's cultural perspective see this article.  While these pieces are decidedly not neutral on the subject, that is the point; opinions widely differ on the cultural impact of these demographic shifts.   

 

Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels, popular culture.

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 12, 2013 9:36 PM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 8:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:23 AM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns

Transportation Networks Impacting Urban Patterns | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Essay #3 for the AP Human Geography 2013 exam focused on how railroads and highways impacted the size and form of U.S. cities.  Andy Baker, one of the great readers on that question has put together an interactive map filled with tangible examples of how Indianapolis' land use history has been heavily influenced by the railroads and highways.  This would be a great resource to prepare students to answer that FRQ. 


Tags: transportationurban, models, APHG.

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Ally Greer's comment, June 11, 2013 10:58 AM
This brings back memories from when I took this in high school!
Andy Baker's comment, June 17, 2013 1:03 PM
Thanks for "scooping" this. When I click the link, it takes me to the Google home page. Here's the link: https://maps.google.com/maps/ms?msid=215141888958669508744.0004bb9c881395bd56662&msa=0&ll=39.772659,-85.940552&spn=1.06603,2.364807
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Toronto at Night

Toronto at Night | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Ironically, some land use patterns become more visible as the sun goes down.  There are some sharp borders in this image of Toronto that was taken by the Canadian astronaut, Chris Hadfield and it is a wonderful teaching image. 


Questions to ponder: Why is there such sharp divisions between the illuminated and obscure portions of the image?  What does this sharp division say about the land use patterns?  Would we see this pattern in the United States?  Why or why not?  What urban model(s) can help explain the spatial layout of Toronto? 


Tags: urban, planning, remote sensing, geospatial, Canada, models, unit 7 cities.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 17, 2013 12:45 PM

What urban model is this?

Demitre Athwal's curator insight, April 24, 2013 7:06 AM

The other city that never sleeps

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John Snow's cholera map of London recreated

John Snow's cholera map of London recreated | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What would John Snow's famous cholera map look like on a modern map of London, using modern mapping tools?
Seth Dixon's insight:

John Snow's cholera map is often noted as a prime example of using spatial thinking to solve a scientific problem.  Here are a variety of resources to explore this classic example.  Here is an article that highlights the spatial thinking that produced this map, with KML files and in Google Fusion Tables.  See also these online GIS layers of Dr. Snow's famous map. 


Tagsmedical, models, spatial, mapping.   

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 8:00 PM

THere is a map of this in your textbook HUGGERS

 

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As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The nation's fertility rate has slipped below replacement levels partly because of the recession and a decline in immigration. That's raising concern about the nation's future."

Seth Dixon's insight:

During this recent recession, fertility rates in the United States have dropped with many speculating that the financial investment in child-rearing caused this shift.  The big question is this: will birth rates bounce back when the economy fully recovers or is the United States population going to follow the example of Western Europe?  What would the impact be for both of these scenarios?


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels, unit 2 population.

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Brett Sinica's comment, April 23, 2013 12:11 PM
These stats are hard to take in, because it seems like even though birth rates are considered to be dropping, the country’s total population continues to rise, and fast. Immigration probably plays a major role in the adding of new citizens, though just because birth rates are decreasing it shouldn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. With a slow increase of people, there could possibly be drops in the unemployment rate, or even poverty level at a big stretch. With fewer people in the country, it could mean less competition among others, leaving more options for people to pursue. It says at the end of the article that, “there are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” This may hold true to an extent, but look at China for example. Their population is the largest in the world, containing roughly 20 of the 30 most polluted cities and being the top consumer of energy. Though the country has an unemployment level which is half of ours, they must put in place family planning methods such as the “one-child policy” to hope for better population control. If I know the United States, I highly doubt they would ever resort to such measures, unless the government wants uproars. So maybe I’m optimistic about the birth rate drops, but it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Maybe we should rid of the self-checkouts and automated answering machines and slowdown in technology so we don’t find ourselves in a situation that’d become too hard to handle.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 11:48 AM
This decline in birth rates is largely due to the recession; people don’t want to have children because they can’t afford the care. We need to have a balance in our population. Having one age group, like elderly people, dominating over other generations can be a problem. Even though the birth rates are decreasing, our population is still growing at a steady rate. Immigrants trying to make a home for themselves and their families in the United States contribute in a big way to our population increase.
I think that when and if the economy bounces back, families will start to feel comfortable with their finances and the birth rate will spike. Yet, if the birth rate does get back to normalcy and the immigrants continue to come to this country maybe our population will see too much of an increase and overpopulation could be a problem. But I doubt our country will ever adopt the “one-child policy” currently in use in China, we will find some other way to control our population, whatever that may be.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 7:45 PM
The recession is a huge factor as to why the birth/fertility rate is dropping. It costs a lot of money to have a child and most people can’t afford to care for themselves never mind another baby. Even though the birth rate has been decreasing over the years, the population is still increasing due to immigration. With the birth rate decreasing the level of poverty could potentially decrease as well because there will not be an economic burden. I don’t think there should be too much of a concern about the birthrate dropping because once the economy returns to normal I’m sure people will want to expand their family. I do agree to a certain extent with the statement in the article: “Population growth leads to human innovation, and innovation leads to conservation ... There are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” Overpopulation, like in China, causes many issues, not just economically.
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Elderly Spur Japan Stores

Elderly Spur Japan Stores | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Unicharm Corp.’s sales of adult diapers in Japan exceeded those for babies for the first time last year. At Daiei Inc. supermarkets, customers can feel Japan aging -- literally: It has made shopping carts lighter.


Japan's demographic shifts are well-chronicled: the Japanese are having fewer children and the improvements in healthcare mean that the elderly are living longer than ever.  Combined this means that Japan's population pyramid is getting "top heavy."  This population change is having huge econmic impacts as the percentage of Japanese people is now over 23%.  Retailers and industries are heavily targeting this expanding demographic with financial clout that outspends all other cohorts.


Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia, consumption.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.


This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  


Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 25, 2013 8:01 PM

We will be learning about Malthus in Chapter 2.  Take a sneek peek!

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 8:57 AM

The Malthusian ideas maintain that food growth is only linear, while population growth is geometric, so soon population will outgrow food production and famines will occur,

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 4:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

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Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World

Ten Geographic Ideas that Changed the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Adapted from the book by Professor Susan Hanson...

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an excellent review/summary of an edited volume that shows the value of geographic thought and its importance in the modern world.  This review conveniently gives a one paragraph synopsis of each chapter.  It does not need to be read chronologically, so you can pick and choose what you find relevant to your course.  The top 10 are (in order of inclusion in the book): the Idea of the Map, the Weather Map, GIS, Human Adjustment, Water Budget Climatology, Human Transformation of the Earth, Spatial Organization and Interdependence, Central Place Theory, Megalopolis and Sense of Place.

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Role of U.S. Airports in Epidemics

Public health crises of the past decade — such as the 2003 SARS outbreak, which spread to 37 countries and caused about 1,000 deaths, and the 2009 H1N1 flu p...

 

The spread of infectious diseases is inherently connected to the mobility of infected.  Airports are important nodes in this complex transportation network.  Which airports would have the greatest potential to spread diseases?  At MIT, they've gathered data that incorporates variations in travel patterns among individuals, the geographic locations of airports, the disparity in interactions among airports, and waiting times at individual airports to create a tool that could be used to predict where and how fast a disease might spread.  To read more, see the associated article

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Biggest transnational companies

Biggest transnational companies | Geography Education | Scoop.it
THE giant American conglomerate General Electric (GE) holds more assets abroad than any other non-financial firm in the world—over $500 billion worth. Its foreign assets make up over 70% of its total.

 

While we may think of Volkswagen as a "German" company, 78% of their assets are in other countries. What advantages is there for companies to have operations in multiple countries? How do transnational corporations change the geographies of production, consumption and economics?

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Growth Rings

Growth Rings | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Maps Of U.S. Population Change, 2000-2010.  Blue is population increase, red represents population decline."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This series of maps shows important patterns impacting American cities today.  Pictured above is Detroit, emblematic of urban decline, but some of the patterns that we see in Detroit are happening elsewhere in the United States (but not was pronounced).  Three patterns are especially noteworthy: 1) Decline of the urban core, 2) Growth in the suburban ring but most especially 3) a revitalization of the downtown (specks of blue in the sea red). 


Questions to Ponder: So what processes are creating these patterns?  Have does this information mesh with, or change our understanding of the urban models?     


Tags: urban, planning, unit 7 cities, urban models, economic.

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Kate Buckland's curator insight, May 17, 5:01 PM

The donut effect!

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:38 AM

These maps show the changes of urban areas in America and the patterns and problems each one goes through.

These human places go through similar development patterns and all focus economically but still have different landscapes as a place.

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 29, 1:25 PM

Detroit has an increasing population, along with the outskirts of Chicago (suburbs). This  increasing population represents areas that are prospering  because of economic factors. Just as some businesses in Detroit are coming back, businesses in the suburbs in Chicago are also growing, contributing to an increasing population as well. This map reflects economic and social factors (ethnicity) in the present and can be used to get an understanding of America's population growth/decline. 

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 3:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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Agricultural Models

Agricultural Models | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Models in geography, even if they are at times limited in their explanatory power, are excellent pedagogical tools to promote students to think spatially. 

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:23 PM

We will be studying this model in Chapter 10 HUGGERS

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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

  • The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.
  • The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.
  • A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.
  • The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: population, demographicsmodels, AfricaKenya.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 1:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 10:49 AM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 1:01 PM

As the years go on, the world is learning how to live longer. With new medicinal practices and people supplying clean water and food to third world countries, there is definitely room for Kenya to grow old with the U.S. and other countries that have higher life expectancies.

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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

~ Jonathan V. Last (author) More about this product
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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster [Jonathan V. Last] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers. Look around you and think for a minute: Is America too crowded?
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have yet to read this book, but the title alone says that it could be an intriguing supplemental text for a unit on population (or an 'opposing viewpoint' to consider).  For those that have read the book, please comment below. 


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 28, 2013 4:36 PM

I really wasn't sure where to put this scoop. There may be a time when the GMOs affect our fertility as many think GMOs are affecting herds fed GMOs. The physical environment might affect this as well. The social and economic challenges may impact fertility and plain selfishness and putting industrial needs over human needs could affect it as well. It looks like an interesting book so I thought I would make note of it.

Tara Cohen's comment, May 1, 2013 11:58 AM
I ordered this book from Amazon because I thought it would be a great fit for AP Human. I read the first 20 pages last night and was blown away. It totally covers all the information in the Demography Unit and the author has a sense of humor. Only 20 pages in, but I give it two thumbs up!
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Business Geography

Business Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Grant Thrall, Ph.D., pioneered a new field of study — business geography — at the University of Florida.


Business geography involves using sophisticated technologies to interpret and analyze data to help businesses make decisions.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I understand that my readers are not people that I need to convince the geo-literacy is an essential component for a 21st century education; but we are the people that need to convince principals, politicians, school administrators, teachers and parents that teaching geography is fundamental.  Consider this an accessible article to use to make the case for geography for someone who sees the educational value from a business perspective.


Tags: edtech, unit 1 GeoPrinciples, geo-inspiration, geography education, models, spatial.

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Tony Hall's curator insight, April 15, 2013 6:43 PM

While I find business quite boring, I do understand it's necessity. I think this illustrates very nicely the relevance of studying geography and how it relates to the "real" world. 

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Central Place Theory

Central Places:Theory and Applications produced by Ken Keller (kellek@danbury.k12.ct.us) adapted from Don Ziegler.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The Central Place Theory is a model that is not used much today in academic geography, but given it's explicitly spatial nature, it is used in many geography curricula (including AP Human Geography) to show systems thinking and spatial patterns.  This powerpoint goes over the main ideas of the theory developed by Walter Christaller as well as some examples.  

 

Tags: APHG, models, spatial

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chris tobin's comment, March 12, 2013 3:27 PM
This is interesting. Threshold and ranges are excellent tools to market goods and services especially within the hexagon model but also with statistical informaton on socioeconomic status and dispersement within a population for marketing purposes. Thanks- great information.
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 2:15 PM

Another way to think about Central Place.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 20, 8:09 PM

Good Review HUGGERS

 

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Time-Space Compression

Time-Space Compression | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In this age of fast travel and instant digital communications, we tend to forget that not so long ago, distances were subjectively very different.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  


Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  

 

Tags: transportation, models, globalization, diffusion.

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geofoodgraz's curator insight, December 15, 2012 1:35 AM
Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight:

"This series of maps shows the great leaps and bounds that were made during the 19th century in transportation technology in the United States.  This impacted population settlement, economic interactions and functionally made the great distances seem smaller.  This is what many call the time-space compression; the friction of distance is diminished as communication and transportation technologies improve.  

 

Questions to Ponder: When someone says they live "10 minutes away," what does that say about how we think about distance, transportation infrastructure and time?  How is geography still relevant in a world where distance appears to becoming less of a factor?  "

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | Geography Education | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.


The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 25, 2013 4:50 PM

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.


Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.

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olivia estrugo's curator insight, November 12, 2013 11:01 AM

Interesting video.

Alison Antonelli's curator insight, December 4, 2013 6:37 AM

After watching this short clip, it puts the popluation into perspective. I never knew how quickly the populaiton could grow and this video is a pure example of how it does. Over population is going to be a major problem in the future.

Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:07 AM

Watching this video made me think how or if it's possible to have that many people on earth and still have enough food, jobs, and shelter for everyone. The carrying capacity seems way too densed. It is possible to fit a high number of people in one area year by year as long as we know how to use the space thats given to us. I dont think many countries have come up with an good logic or plans on how to sustain the overpopulated areas throught the globe. If they did, then there would be enough food, shelter, and jobs. There wouldn't be so many people unemployed, malnourished, and homeless if the government would come up with a plan.

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Americans put off having babies amid poor economy

Americans put off having babies amid poor economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Births have plummeted since their 2007 peak, and the recession is a factor. There's worry that the birthrate will be affected for years.

 

The graph for this article is an incredible visual that highlights how the economic conditions of a country can impact its demographics.  Not surprisingly, Americans have less children during tough times.  Questions to ponder: would this phenomenon be expected in all parts of the world?  Why or why not?  Demographically, what will the long-term impact of the recession be?    

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Amazon’s New Push for Same-Day Delivery Will Destroy Local Retail

Amazon’s New Push for Same-Day Delivery Will Destroy Local Retail | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Amazon has long enjoyed an unbeatable price advantage over its physical rivals. When I buy a $1,000 laptop from Wal-Mart, the company is required to collect local sales tax from me, so I pay almost $1,100 at checkout.

 

Just-in-Time production has reshaped the logistics of manufacturing.  How does same-day online delivery impact local retail businesses?  How might this change urban patterns of retail stores and of areas of warehouses?   

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Roland Trudeau Jr.'s comment, July 12, 2012 2:17 PM
People like to shop, not everyone but most. If there's one thing I've learned from being in retail all my working life it's that people need to hold and look and inspect something. Certainly you can return the item, but that takes time and sometimes extra money. The promise of physically seeing the item is better for most. The other side of the coin is people who simply can't get out or don't want to. For elderly or disabled who are computer literate they have ease of access and can just click on what they want to buy. Internet purchases unfortunately also are easier for fraud.. and it sounds to me that those lockers may be an even easier way for it to happen. Not to look on a darker side but that will increase sales too... for a short time anyway.