Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Long-time Iowa farm cartoonist fired after creating this cartoon

Long-time Iowa farm cartoonist fired after creating this cartoon | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Rick Friday has been giving farmers a voice and a laugh every Friday for two decades through his cartoons in Farm News.
Now the long-time Iowa farm cartoonist tells KCCI that he has been fired. Friday announced Sunday that his job was over after 21 years in a Facebook post that has since gone viral."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are some intriguing layers connected to the politics of agribusiness in this story.  First off, the political cartoon highlights a pithy truth--that while the 'traditional' farmer is a lucrative position, in the global economy, there are corporations that are amassing fortunes in agribusiness.  The second connection is more telling--the newspaper company felt compelled to fire the cartoonist as for voicing this perspective as the newspaper advertisers flexed their pocketbooks to change the direction of the news being reported.  

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, agribusiness, foodeconomicindustry, scale, media

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The Best News You Don’t Know

The Best News You Don’t Know | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I’ve covered massacres in South Sudan, concentration camps in Myanmar and widespread stunting in India, but it’s also important to acknowledge the backdrop of global progress. Otherwise, the public may perceive poverty as hopeless and see no point in carrying on the fight — at just the point when we’re making the most rapid gains ever recorded.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world is winning the war on extreme poverty, but most Americans think that poverty is getting worse. Doom and gloom can dominate media coverage because a horrific tragedy gets better rating than slow incremental improvements.  The general public is often ignorant of the measurable improvements going on in the world today.  No, the world isn’t perfect, but it is getting better. 

 

Tags: mediapoverty, development, economic, perspective.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, October 6, 2016 9:36 PM
This article provides a positive look at the advances made in global development measures.
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Why babies all over the world are now sleeping in boxes

Why babies all over the world are now sleeping in boxes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Finnish baby box, which the state has given to expectant mothers for 75 years, has sparked copycat boxes across the globe.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A few years back I shared a delightful article that demonstrated how the Finnish baby box lead to the Finland having the best infant mortality rates in the world.  This first article itself is the story now.  This great BBC article with geographic themes took hold and the act of this article getting shared around the world inspired similar initiatives--this type of diffusion shows layers and layers of good geography present in this viral phenonomen. 

 

Tags: Finland, medical, media, population, demographic transition model, unit 2 population, technology, diffusion.

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Are you ignorant about the world?

Are you ignorant about the world? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The world is spinning so fast that it can be hard to keep track of everything going on. And most of us aren't doing a good job of it, writes Hans Rosling.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This article (with the embedded video) is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias makes combating global ignorance difficult. 


Tags: media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:47 AM

perception of place units 1 &3

John Puchein's curator insight, November 9, 2015 8:42 AM

Hans Rosling is a very important influence on Geography. He created Gapminder and continuously makes great Ted Talks.

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 9:18 AM

I believe that there are many people in the U.S. who do not pay attention to the news. Some are too poor to own a phone or television to keep up with what is going on in the world (although they can read the news paper, but you get my point). Others are too rich to care. And some base there opinions off of other peoples views and don't have an opinion of their own. Am I ignorant about the world? No, because I like to know what's happening world wide, especially if there are issues going on that can affect the survival of the human race, survival of the environment, and survival of my country.

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Just making sure you were paying attention...

Seth Dixon's insight:

Because it's funny; that's why. 

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Scott Greer's curator insight, August 28, 2015 8:45 PM

All you need to know is that it is John Oliver....he's funny.

Gregory Stewart's curator insight, August 29, 2015 9:26 AM

This is a pretty funny clip.

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Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."

Seth Dixon's insight:

For younger audiences, hearing someone their own age discuss educational opportunities (or the lack thereof) based on gender can leave a profound impression. Today, Malala is a Nobel Peace Prize winner (deservedly so), as she's become an icon in her own right as she champions developmental opportunities for girls in cultures that historically have not had equal offerings for young women.  Watch this documentary to see who she was before she was thrust into the international spotlight, and hear her father's perspective.  Some, however, only see this as Western hypocrisy.    


Tags: developmentpoverty, gender, Pakistanmedia.

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analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:10 PM

unit 3 or 6

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 8:42 PM

Summary: In this interview, Jon Stewart talks with Malala Yousafzai, a girl who outwardly fought for women's education, and in doing so, was shot by the Taliban. Even now, she continues to fight for women's equality and their right to education, after she won her Nobel Peace Prize. 

 

Insight: In this interview, the main topic is gender equality, and how it can lead to better education for women, which, in turn, gives women more power. Although developed countries, especially in Western Europe, already display high gender equality, more developing countries, especially in the Middle East, have hardly anything close to gender equality. Even with low amounts of gender equality, people like Malala and advocates in Western countries are striving towards this goal of gender equality.

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Cultural commodities and the idea of beauty

"In Venezuela, women are confronted with a culture of increasingly enhanced physiques fueled by beauty pageants and plastic surgery."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Unrealistic mannequins are nothing new...but this happens for some important cultural and economic reasons.  Society produces mannequins and the mannequins are a part of the cultural landscape that has some normative ideals of beauty and gender.  How does the media and society's images of the 'ideal body' influence and shape cultural values and aspirations?  How has this changed over time and space?  

This New York Times article shows some of the connections between cultural norms, mannequin production and plastic surgery in Venezuela, while this NPR podcast tackles similar cultural issues in Brazil.  On the opposite side of the spectrum watch this video about the production of mannequins modeled on people with disabilities.  The tag line for the project was "because who is perfect anyway?"


Tags: Venezuela, South America, gender, popular culture, media, culture.

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Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:36 AM

In Venezuela, women are confronted with a culture of increasingly enhanced physiques fueled by beauty pageants and plastic surgery. The man at the beginning says that inner beauty does not exist and that's something that women who are not pretty invented just to justify themselves. This man happens to be the leader of the Miss Venezuela pageant. Another interesting thing he tells us is that in the rules of this contest, the girls don't have to be completely natural. They just have to be beautiful, but where that beauty comes from doesn't matter. For many people in Venezuela, beauty means perfection. Even though Venezuela's economic struggles mount, the search for an idealized and often inflated figure continues. Mannequins are being pumped up to match their outsized human counterparts. One of the workers at the clothing store says that when they had less developed mannequins, they sold less. So not only were mannequins being portrayed as busty because it was the ideal image, but because it also made them more money.

Kendra King's curator insight, February 8, 2015 4:27 PM

Venezuela added a whole new level to the unrealistic beauty standards that mess with some females minds. Putting these mannequins in numerous stores is just sickening. At least in the United States when we go to the mall, we don’t have a model staring us down (unless you’re in Victoria Secret). Yet, what is even worse is that the sales actually went up in one of the stores that introduced these mannequins according to the cashier. The only heartening bit of this clip was the cashier who actually went against societal norms by holding inner beauty above outer beauty.

 

A large part of me can’t grasp why more people don’t believe in inner beauty. As the 28 year old who looked like she was about to have surgery aptly stated, it is all due to “social pressure.” Yet, the last women interviewed about her body image caused by “social pressure” said she will never be “fully satisfied.” In fact, she already wants to get another boob job. If one realizes she will never be happy trying to chase the ridiculous standards of beauty, then why do it? The pressure will never get any better if you’re unfilled to begin with and going along the same path again is just nonsense. Yet, none of those women seemed to really ponder the norm. It’s why I wasn’t even remotely amazed that when asked “where this standard of beauty came from,” the male hand an answer and the female didn’t. At the same time though my parents raised me to understand there is more to outer beauty. So it is easy for me to pick apart their logic partly due to my social environment.     

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 13, 2015 12:39 AM

I think it is amazing to think how much one person can stand behind the scenes and yet play such a huge role in how a whole country sets its standards for beauty. I feel sorry for the women of Venezuela, they are being sold a lie.

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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes

Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?  

 

Tags India, borders, political, Pakistanmedia, gender, popular culture.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:11 PM

The most intriguing commercial that shows the differences and consequences of what happens between two nations. It shows hurt and feelings no human should have to go through. The biggest thing with this is how that after so much time apart two different people of different religions or countries can come back together and remain friends after so long of conflicting issues.

MA Sansonetti-Wood's curator insight, January 26, 2016 9:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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In Fact, the U.S. Has Been Winning the War on Terror

In Fact, the U.S. Has Been Winning the War on Terror | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Terror in the United States have evolved since 1970: once the tool of left-wing radicals, then right-wing radicals, terrorist attacks are now uncommon, often unsuccessful, and not nearly as deadly.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While terrorism is being discussed in the media as a rising trend in the United States after the Boston Marathon, the statistics don't show that analysis to be true.  This resources compiles maps, charts and graphs so you can evaluate the historical terrorist patterns for yourself.


Tagsterrorism, statistics, USA, media.

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Habemus papam: There is a new pope

Habemus papam: There is a new pope | Geography Education | Scoop.it
(3rd UPDATE) The new leader of the world's 1.2 billion Catholics is expected to deliver a speech in an hour
Seth Dixon's insight:

The juxtaposition of the hypermodern coverage of the election of a new pope (telecasts, social media, instantaneous global network coverage, etc.) with the archaic medieval rituals of the conclave (locked doors, smoke signals, etc.)  is endlessly fascinating to me.  Even in the 21st century, there is a place for the traditional.   So who is Pope Francis?  As the first South American pope, some feel this reflects the southern demographic shift within the Catholic Church. Also, click here for the science behind the white vs. black smoke


Tags: culturereligion, Christianity.

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Maricarmen Husson's comment, March 14, 2013 8:42 AM
I'm so happy! The first Argentine Pope!
Al Picozzi's curator insight, July 10, 2013 3:44 PM

As a Catholic I see the need for tradition in culture.  Even as culture changes, I think there is still a place for it even in today's modern, fluid culture.  Tradition gives us a base to build a culture.  Yes cultures do change, but they have to start somewhere and traditions are the place to start.  Question, where would you be without some of your traditions? what would you miss?  We all start somewhere, after I was married and had kids, we started our own family traditions, but alot of them are based on older traditions,like a huge dinner at Christmas....mmm 5 courses and an expanding wasitline :).

Al Picozzi's comment, July 10, 2013 3:46 PM
I agree, there still is a place for tradition even in modern culture. We need somewhere to start and traditions are a good place.
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London, the Olympics and Geography

London, the Olympics and Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Geographical Association has produced numerous resources specifically for the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games being held in London.  The Olympics as an event work as an important teaching moment that operates on numerous scales.  What local developmental projects reshaped the urban fabric of London in preparation for these Games?  Do international events such as the Olympics foster a global community?  Is this idea of a global community perfectly harmonious?    

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Alisa Miller shares the news about the news

"TED Talks Alisa Miller, head of Public Radio International, talks about why -- though we want to know more about the world than ever -- the US media is actually showing less. Eye-opening stats and graphs."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The U.S. News is remarkably USA-centric.   How does the media influence our perception of the world?

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LMullen's comment, February 2, 2012 5:28 PM
I really don't find this surprising.
Tejahne Malone's comment, May 18, 2012 4:47 PM
Our world is messed up. just because something is cheaper doesnt mean it is better. we should take actions in to our own hands and find out about global issues to increase our own knowledge for our own benefit
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American vs. International News: Time & Newsweek

American vs. International News: Time & Newsweek | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Americans are notorious for their ignorance of global issues and international news. This may be because Americans aren’t interested or it may be that our news outlets feed us fluff and focus us only on the U.S." 

 

Is the media only serving the consumers 'what they want?' Do the media have a responsibility to educate the populace and give us 'what we need?'  Socially speaking, what about American culture is so focused on looking in the mirror and not looking out the window? 

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Combatting FGM

"The United Nations Development Programme started to advocate against the practice of female genital mutilation (FGM) back in 2003 when it was taboo even to speak about it. In 2008, the practice was banned. The government of Egypt has institutionalized the adoption of FGM abandonment; while prevalence rates remain high (namely among older women), the response of younger girls and mothers of new generations to FGM abandonment campaigns is much higher."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is always a difficult topic for me to talk about in my college classes since it is such a sensitive topic.  However, because it touches on so many taboo topics, that is the very reason that that practice of FGM has continued in many African and Middle Eastern countries.  See the map embedded in this article to know which countries have the highest prevalency rates.  Some are concerned that through relocation diffusion, international migrants can bring this practice to areas such as Europe. Western efforts to eradicate FGM are usually ineffective and sometimes backfire (the author in the linked articles feels that the term mutilation, while accurate, is counterproductive).

 

Tags: culture, gender, media

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DON'T PANIC — Hans Rosling showing the facts about population

Seth Dixon's insight:

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

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Kelly Bellar's curator insight, September 22, 2016 6:54 PM

Over the years I've shared many video clips featuring Hans Rosling and the Gapminder resources (click here for archived links).  For many this is going to but a rehash of previous videos, but this in the 1-hour long version of global population data (2016 Population Reference Bureau).  Clearly he is a proponent of lowering fertility rates--here he paints the optimistic view that population growth growth and development can be balanced in a future that is more ecologically and economically sustainable.  

 

Tagspopulation, statistics, media, models, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

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Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?

Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Reports of bombings tend to get huge numbers of mentions on social media, but that doesn't always mean a similar level of news coverage.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The short answer is obviously "Yes."  Yet, this question brings up other questions about cultural empathy and how 'connected' we might feel to people of other places than our own global neighborhood.  This political cartoon-ish map

has more truth in it than we might like to admit; it is subtitled 'How terrible it is the the Western world when a tragedy happens in...?'

 

Questions to Ponder: Does the 'where' influence if we perceive the event as a true tragedy or not (or maybe just the magnitude or importance of the tradegy)?  How come?  What does this say about us as inidividuals, society, and the media?  How can we teach our students in a way to foster more cultural empathy?

 

Tagssocial mediaplaceculture, political, terrorism, media. 

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jorden harris's curator insight, April 4, 2016 9:52 AM

to me it is mind boggling how we can pay more attention to countries with national threats than others especially with ISIS being so prominent which is a war that is going to take help from not only the united states but the other affected countries

                                                                                                        - J.H

Logan scully's curator insight, April 4, 2016 10:11 AM
It somewhat bothers me how that terrorist attacks outside of Europe and North America is pretty much just ignored by the social media while people are sitting in the hospital for crimes in which terrorists and other religious radicalists have done to their area and country.-L.S.
Brealyn Holley's curator insight, April 7, 2016 10:20 AM
For the question "Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?" In my opinion the answer would be yes because a lot of the terror attacks in the Western world are bigger and are expected more than terror attacks near  us. ~BH
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How Not to Be Ignorant About the World

How much do you know about the world? Hans Rosling, with his famous charts of global population, health and income data (and an extra-extra-long pointer), demonstrates that you have a high statistical chance of being quite wrong about what you think you know. Play along with his audience quiz — then, from Hans’ son Ola, learn 4 ways to quickly get less ignorant.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This video is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias collectively make combating global ignorance difficult.   However, the end of the video shows some good rules of thumb to have a more fact-based world view.  


Tagsstatistics, placeregions, media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:32 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Language in the Media

"Ever notice how the media treats black protesters & white rioters differently?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some food for thought on how language in the media frames the narratives that most people receive.  Do you feel that the media treats all people and all groups fairly?  Can you think of some examples to make your case?  Can the media be free from all bias?

 

Tags: Languagemedia, race, class, culture.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, June 24, 2015 12:03 AM

The Eternal Subtext.

Thomas Johnson's curator insight, November 29, 2015 4:31 PM

The anchors are noticeably racist towards blacks.

Harsher language is used when referring to blacks.

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Media and Culture--Perspective and Bias

"Religious scholar Reza Aslan took some serious issue on CNN Monday night with Bill Maher‘s commentary about Islamic violence and oppression. Maher ended his show last Friday by going after liberals for being silent about the violence and oppression that goes on in Muslim nations. Aslan said on CNN that Maher’s arguments are just very unsophisticated.  He said these 'facile arguments' might sound good, but not all Muslim nations are the same. Aslan explained that female mutilation is an African problem, not a Muslim one, and there are Muslim-majority nations where women are treated better and there are even female leaders."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are far too many oversimplifications when people throw around the terms "Muslim-majority countries" and this video shows that a more nuanced understanding is needed.  That being said, it would be naive to pretend as though Islam today were without some structural problems.  As stated in the linked article, "In 2013, of the top 10 groups that perpetrated terrorist attacks, seven were Muslim. Of the top 10 countries where terrorist attacks took place, seven were Muslim-majority.  Of the 24 most restrictive countries (according to Pew Research), 19 are Muslim-majority. Of the 21 countries that have laws against apostasy, all have Muslim majorities."


Question to Ponder: How does the media play a role in shaping the conversations we have in society about different cultures and places?  How can 'painting with a broad brush' lead to stereotypes and inaccurate conclusions?  


Tagsplaceregions, culture religion, Middle East, media.

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Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 22, 2015 1:21 PM

Last semester i took a anthropology class on the middle east. The class was one of the biggest eye openers for me, When we started the class the professor asked all the students to right down the words that came to mind when they thought of the middle east. Their words were hurtful and mean, and our professor born and raised and turkey was not surprised. The media in America portrays the "Middle East" as this evil desert full of terrorist, disease, poverty, and oppressed women. It is painted with a very broad brush, and gullible America eats it up. It is also a huge injustice because the Middle East covers many countries and they are very diverse. There is many languages, religions, lifestyles, they range greatly. Not every country is " Bad" in fact none of them are, they are just under bad times. I also feel very sorry for the natives of these lands, the peaceful people that are just trying to survive and live. They are beautiful people and i loved studying about them and i always felt a little guilty for associating them with the groups performing heinous acts against their people. What i realized is that often the most vulnerable people, the ones who need us the most are the ones who get forgotten about and the media is part to blame for that.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 23, 2015 5:58 AM

The media plays a substantial role in enhancing stereotypes about Muslims. In order to simplify an issue, the media often lumps groups of people together and identifies them as sharing one set of beliefs. In a constant twenty four hour news environment ,nuance is often sacrificed for a quick ratings driven story. The media is often appealing to the lowest common denominator. The media should make a better effort to explain the differences between each Muslim nation. The Middle East is a complex area, and it deserves complex coverage.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:33 PM

yes, some Muslim countries have been lead by women. how many woman governors have there been. Texas is the size of Iraq. scale matters, and if all Muslim countries were merged they would never elect a woman as their leader, if one even ran and survived. the us has at least let them run.

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18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes

18 "Geography Fail" Media Gaffes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Maps are hard. Not that hard, though.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've tried to resist sharing each individual geographic gaffe that the media makes over the years as evidence that we need to strengthen geography education.  Unfortunately, though these media cartographic errors are all to common, geographic ignorance runs much deeper that.  Creating a geo-literate society entails so much more than just knowing where places are on the map...although that is a good start.  

  

Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, media.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, September 14, 2014 11:33 AM

Unit 1 Geography Nature and Perspective. These people need perspective and a Geography course or two.

Scott Langston's curator insight, September 18, 2014 8:05 PM

I like the 'not that hard, though' tag.

Nancy Watson's curator insight, August 28, 2015 1:07 PM

Why study geography?

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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map from Amazing Maps (a great follow on Twitter) is a clever way to divide the world into 5 equal population regions.  In many world regional courses, discussion of Asia might be 1/4 of the course content, while the "NATO and the Americas region" might be about half of the class.  Also, think about "the World News" that you see on TV: how much coverage do each of these 5 regions receive?  Why is our news coverage unevenly distributed?


This map would go together nicely with this one to show the demographic importance of South and East Asia.  


Tags: media, population.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 2014 3:33 PM

A little perspective on population

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Where North Korea wants to Attack!

From the NY Times: "North Korea, which seemed to be running out of tubs to thump, found a new target for its ire in a propaganda video released Saturday on Uriminzokkiri, a government Web site.

To a soundtrack of fervent synthesizers and inspirational light rock, the video announces that North Korea will aim nuclear weapons (that it may, or may not, be able to launch) at Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, Honolulu and… Colorado Springs, Co.

The unorthodox move — apparently an attempt to target the North American Aerospace Defense Command, or Norad, and the United States Air Force Academy — is compounded by the fact that Pyongyang does not quite know where the city is. The map shown in the video places it somewhere in Louisiana."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I wish this had sub-titles, but it is an incredibly awesome bit of North Korea's famous jingoistic propaganda from their media that essentially is the least free press in the world (maybe subtitles would ruin the unintentional comedy).  I find this equal parts hilarious and unnerving, but totally mesmerizing.


TagsNorth Korea, war, conflict.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:35 PM

We watched this video in class and its just absurd. North Korea has no idea what they are doing and what are they going to attack? Nuclear weapons are no joke but this video is pretty funny.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 2:24 PM

North Korea uses propaganda videos in order to convince its citizens that they are in fact, the biggest and baddest. This video is supposed to show North Koreans that they should not fear the United States because they (might?) have nuclear missiles that can potentially reach American soil, specifically DC, Los Angeles, Hawaii, and Colorado Springs (though they depict Norad as being in Louisiana, not Colorado). North Korea's policies regarding outside media keep the people dependent on the government as a source of information. While the United States is quite sure that North Korea cannot in fact reach the United States, the idea is still unnerving. As military technologies develop, physical geography may no longer be a form of defense, 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, May 7, 2015 8:54 AM

Of course it is going to be scary when you watch a video of missiles be launched towards your country.  That's simply just the surface of things, but any educated person knows that you need to put everything and anything into the proper context.  So, in order to get a true measure of this videos legitimacy you need to analyze a few areas.

 

First off, the video is in Korean, so I personally do not know what they are saying which makes me hesitant to overreact. There is a visual I see but sometimes pictures tell a whole different story than the actual situation.  Secondly, this could be simply propaganda to invoke confidence in its citizens.  Just like every government on the face of the earth, they might be just trying to convince its people that they are safe due to their military mite and the capability of defending their homeland.  Lastly, what type of weight would I put on a source that is inaccurate.  They clearly mislabel Colorado Springs.  If this attack was legitimately imminent don't you think they would have things accurate down to the millimeter?????  

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The Daily Mail Song

mp3 here: http://bit.ly/9zPBDi We're aware this video won't mean an awful lot if you've never heard of The Daily Mail (a British Newspaper), but on the plus side, you've never heard of The Daily Mail.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As more of our students go searching for information online, we need to also teach our students how to assess the quality of a particular media outlet and develop a critical eye.  This great song is a humorous way to approach that topic. 


Questions to Ponder: What makes a source reliable?  Can a source be reliable on some topics but not others?     

    

Here's an article about how an over-reliance on GPS (or Sat-Nav) can lead to the erosion of one's mental map.  And yes, the article is from the Daily Mail (as the images on the side clearly demonstrate).  Does that change how you approach the information? 

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Silly American CNN producers...Buy a map!

Silly American CNN producers...Buy a map! | Geography Education | Scoop.it

CNN has been getting hammered on Twitter for this, and rightfully so. 

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The role of social networking in the Arab Spring

The role of social networking in the Arab Spring | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A case study for our World Development text book...

 

How useful was digital technology, particularly social networking sites, to democracy protesters in Tunisia and Egypt?  How important are the democracy protests in the Middle East and North Africa to world development?  Social media has fundamentally changed the cultural and political paradigms. 

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Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:40 PM

While we sit here on Facebook and Twitter for a way to connect with friends, share photos of our vacations or follow our favorite celebrities every move places in North Africa and some of the Middle East are using social media to change their country.  In countries like Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt people have used these social media sites to disperse information to the general public.  Where a rally will be held, a map of where police forces will be located, and what to do in the event teargas is used are all topics for discussion on social media.  With the use of these websites a larger group of people are able to take part in the overthrow of the government.  With leaders restricting the access to the web even more people were intrigued to join the protests.  When people can't follow along on the internet the events they decided to go take part in the events themselves.  With the use of these social media websites the Arab Spring in these areas was able to be as successful as it was.

Kendra King's curator insight, April 27, 2015 5:27 PM

I think it is important that technology plays a role in these revolutions. Before, if a revolution happened, the dictator could just silence its population. Now the population has things like Facebook and Twitter to mobilize their plans of attack for meeting places and advice about how to confront the government. As such, the power of the citizens has grown and according to the article some argue it was this power that made the government officials in Egypt and Tunisia stand down. I tend to agree since the coverage of the event helped increase the size of the demonstrations.  

 

I love that these protests for democracy are being led by the citizens. Since the citizens actually want this type of government, there is actually a chance that this might  be what the country needs. As you mentioned during the Solar Diem video, what works for one society may not translate to another. The author of this piece is more than likely from a western democracy given how the author thinks "democratic change offers the only solution"  to issues like poverty and internal strife within "Arab" countries. Yet, that isn't the case in the Middle East. By forcing a democratic revolution on Iraq,  the region is more destabilized than it was under the harsh command of Saddam Hussein. As you mentioned in class, Iraq needed a dictator like Hussein to keep peace though. So as helpful as technology might be  for democratic revolutions, democratic revolution might not be the answer to every countries problems.

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 26, 2015 2:46 PM

The Arab Spring owes its origins to the mass use of social media websites to get organized and launch the protests that ultimately overthrew several dictators in the region. Social media was crucial for the movement to spread like wild fire, as young people all over North Africa and the Middle East banded together against the tyranny of their governments. Protests broke out in every capital of the region, noticeably in Cairo, where the protests briefly transcended ethnic and religious disputes in the name of freedom for all. Although the movement has long since fizzled out in the face of increased violence, instability, and the lack of a consensus among protesters as to what their next move should be, the Arab Spring served as a powerful example as to extent of which the Internet will now play in global affairs. It is a powerful tool that has completely revolutionized the way we live our everyday lives, and it has completely changed the game for much of North Africa and the Middle East.