Geography Education
Follow
Find tag "map"
829.6K views | +722 today
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective:  Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography teachers and students.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.


Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.

Seth Dixon's insight:

On the flip side, here is a 19th century map highlighting how "colonizable" particular regions of Africa were considered back then by Europeans.  

more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 23, 5:00 PM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Christian Allié's curator insight, November 24, 3:30 AM

.............""""""""""""""""""""""""""""""..................

 

....... Africa's problems were caused by the borders drawn by European colonists in ignorance of tribal lines.

 

[ ... ]

 

.......... slam of course did not originate in Africa, and some would claim that its dominance of large areas of Africa, at the expense of pre-existing belief systems, is as much an example of foreign cultural imperialism as the spread of Western religions and languages is in our day. But that is material for another thought experiment. This one aims to filter out the European influence.

Neither European nor Arab influence is in evidence in the southern part of Africa – although some toponyms relate directly to states in our timeline: BaTswana is Botswana, Wene wa Kongo refers to the two countries bearing that name. Umoja wa Falme za Katanga is echoed in the name of the DR Congo's giant inland province, Katanga. Rundi, Banyarwanda and Buganda, squeezed in between the Great Lakes, are alternative versions of 'our' Burundi, Rwanda and Uganda.

[ ... ]

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Visited States Map

Visited States Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Create a Map of all the places you've been."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly limited mapping platform, but if all you want to do is put states of the United States into two simple categories (such as 'states I have visited' and 'states I have not visited'), then this works. 


Tags mapping, 201, edtech, cartography, mappingUSA.

more...
Joy Kinley's curator insight, November 18, 2:55 PM

This is a pretty cool visual representation of the different US states that you have visited.

Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, November 19, 9:45 PM

really cool site!

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
Scoop.it!

The Second Languages Of Every Part Of The World In One Incredible Infographic

The Second Languages Of Every Part Of The World In One Incredible Infographic | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some of these will surprise you.


Tags: language, culture.

more...
Christopher L. Story's curator insight, November 7, 9:59 AM

any surprises?

Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 7, 2:35 PM

It is never a second language,  my grandmother used to say : "As many languages you learn, is never to much, never enought".!!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

This Grave Atlas Shows Where to Find the Distinguished Deceased

This Grave Atlas Shows Where to Find the Distinguished Deceased | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We know where the bodies are buried ... take a virtual tour of world cemeteries that host famous artists and rogues


Tag: cemetery.

more...
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 11, 3:22 AM

This Grave Atlas Shows Where to Find the Distinguished Deceased

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Literary United States: A Map of the Best Book for Every State

The Literary United States: A Map of the Best Book for Every State | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Two weeks ago, we published a literary map of Brooklyn, highlighting the books we felt best represented the neighborhoods in which they were set. Compiling the list of books for that map had us thinking about what it means for a story to not just be from a place, but also of it, and why it is that some places have an abundance of literary riches (we’re looking at you, American South), while others, well, don’t. There are those stories that so beautifully evoke a time and a place and a way of life that it becomes close to impossible to separate the literary perception of a place from its reality—one winds up informing the other.  All [books on this states list] are literary in voice and spirit; every last one will let you understand a time and place in a more profound way than you maybe thought possible.


TagsEnglish.

more...
BI Media Specialists's curator insight, October 27, 10:03 AM

This looks neat! How many of these books have you read?

 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography

World War II Led to a Revolution in Cartography | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"More Americans came into contact with maps during World War II than in any previous moment in American history. From the elaborate and innovative inserts in the National Geographic to the schematic and tactical pictures in newspapers, maps were everywhere. On September 1, 1939, the Nazis invaded Poland, and by the end of the day a map of Europe could not be bought anywhere in the United States. In fact, Rand McNally reported selling more maps and atlases of the European theaters in the first two weeks of September than in all the years since the armistice of 1918. Two years later, the attack on Pearl Harbor again sparked a demand for maps."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Author of Mapping the Nation, Susan Schulten explains how historical events created a huge demands for maps, revolutionizing the industry and leading to many new ways of visualizing the world.  


Tags: historical, mapping, war.

more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 10:04 AM

Global interaction and maps. WWII. 

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:59 PM

APHG-U1

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 14, 2:06 PM

Whenever there is war, Americans want maps.  They want to know about where conflict is, how far away from home it is, and why people are being sent to the places they are being sent.  With the new map ideas in World War II from Harrison maps were made to better display distance and direction to people.  He used different projections in areas.  He also drew maps from different places, for example what does Japan look like when you are in Siberia.  Transforming flat maps back to having some sort of global shape was exactly what we needed to get away from the old outdated unreliable style of maps.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.
Seth Dixon's insight:

China is attempting to bolster its geopolitical claims through cartographic validation.  It as if to say, 'it's on a map, who can question that it is legitimately our territory?'  Why is a map such a powerful and convincing document?  Why is the Philippines upset by this map?  I think that explains this rival Filipino map as the Philippines and China engage in the cartographic version of dueling banjos.  (note the uage of the South China Sea or West Philippine Sea to refer to the same body of water) .  But this is more than just a map; it's production has the potential to destabilize regional security.     

For more resources, the Choices Program has put together supplemental materials to investigate China on the world stage.


Tags: borderstoponyms, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.

more...
MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:14 PM

APHG-U4

James Hobson's curator insight, November 21, 7:12 PM

(East Asia topic 2)

The aggressive stance which China is seen as taking towards its oceanic claims can be tied closely with its lack of a mainland frontier. Having no where else to go westward, the only other option is apparently to go very-outward into the south and east. The fact that there is virtually no land in this region is a mute point due to the huge resources which lie under the ocean's surface.

   This action taken by China seems to eerily represent actions of the United States around 70 years ago; once the western frontier had been settled and firmly claimed, the desire to continue expansion can be seen through the U.S.'s involvement with Hawaii, the Philippines, Guam, Midway Island, and the like. Though there may have been the use of war as a reason to do this in the case of America, the nationalistic desire for expansion can clearly be seen. European powers, which have especially been short on land frontiers, certainly have exhibited the same traits in history.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 22, 9:46 PM

This new map of China, not surprisingly produced by China, may not look any different than the maps you see now, until you notice the dashed lines in the South China Sea.  These lines are meant to outline the area of Chinese territory.  They have also claimed, which has turned up as false, that they had ancient claim to this area.  This wouldn't be such a big deal except the fact that there are oil reserves in the area in which China has marked its claim.  Not only would this specific area become a new resource for China but also the international waters that they have greatly increased for themselves.  With China's new claim to this area in the South China Sea they have expanded the area that they control as well as gaining a great deal of international water that they would have drilling rights to.  This has neighboring countries up in arms for good reason.  China is trying to take over land that isn't theirs with no validity solely for the oil claims.  Although they are controlling the area in which they have staked a claim on, the courts could soon make sure this isn't happening.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Uneven Population Distribution

Uneven Population Distribution | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"60% of Iceland's population lives in the red area."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Similar to Iceland, Australia's population is also highly clustered.    


Questions to Ponder: Why is Iceland's population so highly clustered?  What is it about the red (and white) areas on the map that explain this pattern?  What other layers of information do we need to properly contextualize this information?  


Tags: Iceland, population, density.

more...
Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 12:39 PM

The majority of Iceland's population lives in that one space.

The geography of Iceland keeps the majority of people in the place that sustains life and comfort the best and easiest.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

European word translator

European word translator | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Translate any word from English to more than 30 other European languages, on a map
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredible resource to visualize the linguistic similarities between European languages all on one interactive map.  Just type in a word or phrase as it will translate it for you and place the results on the map.  I just found this, but I think it still belongs on my list of favorite resources.   


Questions to Ponder: Do you see any regions forming?  How does language impact the diffusion of people, ideas and goods?  Hoe do you think these languages diffused?   


Tags: language, culture, English diffusion.

more...
Mick D Kirkov's curator insight, April 11, 3:43 AM

Haha, hehe, hihi, or Ho-ho-ho! Maybe even huhuhuy!

Helen Rowling's curator insight, April 17, 4:57 PM

English; Toursim; Geography

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 8:19 PM

unit 3

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Facts for Features: Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick's Day

Facts for Features: Irish-American Heritage Month (March) and St. Patrick's Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Originally a religious holiday to honor St. Patrick, who introduced Christianity to Ireland in the fifth century, St. Patrick's Day has evolved into a celebration for all things Irish. The world's first St. Patrick's Day parade occurred on March 17, 1762, in New York City, featuring Irish soldiers serving in the English military. This parade became an annual event, with President Truman attending in 1948. Congress proclaimed March as Irish-American Heritage Month in 1995, and the President issues a proclamation commemorating the occasion each year."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We celebrate St Patrick's Day to commemorate him for driving out the snakes from Ireland in the 5th century (or to just have an excuse to party, kiss and pinch people).  What does the biogeography of Ireland have to tell us about this legend?  Some believe that the non-believers (figurative 'snakes') were what he drove out of the Emerald Isle, a land with a rich culture.     

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

An Atlas of Poverty

An Atlas of Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We think we know what poverty looks like. But how do we accurately account for it? How do we know where to look?

Poverty maps are one place to begin. Technological advances of the past decade—the increased capability to both collect and process improved data—make it possible to reveal the face of the poor in finer detail than ever before. By translating data into the visual accessibility of a map, we can locate poverty more precisely, understand its sources more comprehensively—and attack it more effectively. Such maps can even be used to monitor the results of anti-poverty efforts. Poverty maps can be part of a strong, new foundation for building and tailoring policies and programs, to reach those people that will benefit the most.
more...
Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 9, 8:27 PM

This is very revealing

Sieg Holle's curator insight, March 10, 9:10 PM

solutions anyone......

Suggested by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

40 more maps that explain the world

40 more maps that explain the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I've searched wide and far for maps that can reveal and surprise and inform in ways that the daily headlines might not.
Seth Dixon's insight:

And here is another list of for 40 maps, part one and part two and part two

more...
Terheck's curator insight, January 26, 5:58 AM

Une sélection de 40 cartes qui permettent de mieux comprendre notre monde.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 2:30 PM

When looking at this map there area few things that stick out to me and not just the colors. Fistly what I founf interesting was that South America in relation to where we live is quite different. For example, The US economic status is High Class at $12195 or more for most of the East and West Coast and then it is dull in the middle. These facts compared to South America where they are mostly upper middle class at around $3946-12185 and a portion of them are the lower middle class which rings in at around $886-3945.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2:39 PM

 On map 33, it shows the religious borders map of the different religions that are occupying certain areas of the Middle East. The area of Baghdad and east is mostly Shiite Islam and west of Baghdad is Sunni Islam. What I found to be most interesting is that even though Jerusalem is surrounded by many different religions they still celebrate Judaism. They are religiously protected by its borders. There is some sign of Sunni Islam being practices within their borders but it is mostly dominated by Judaism. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Santas Around the World

Santas Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This story map was created with the Esri Map Tour application in ArcGIS Online.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This story map shows some of the historical and regional differences in Santa Claus, as well as the cultural diffusion.  Here are pictures from the BBC of Christmas around the world.  Also this is the mythical beast that was why children needed to be good for goodness sake.  Merry Christmas to those that celebrate it and a Happy New Year to all. 

more...
Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 8:10 PM
This was definitely an interesting reading. I believe @Spencer Levesque had a very good point. They all have similar features, but are different in little ways. And who would of thought someone came on New Years too?
Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 10:23 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries precieve Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country perceives him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Kate Loy's curator insight, January 13, 10:28 PM

I find it very interesting on how other countries perceive Santa Claus. The history on him, what he looks like, how he gets around, and what they call him. Each country precieves him differently, depending on their culture and history. His clothes, age, language, and personality.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Asian Border Disputes

Asian Border Disputes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: borders, political, conflict, infographic, map.

more...
Asie(s)'s curator insight, November 23, 10:23 PM

A good overview on the matter!

Kevin Barker's curator insight, Today, 8:20 AM

A great primer for discussions over border disputes.  In this modern geopolitical climate, some of these claims can seem aggressive to say the least.  The strategies/responses can also be very interesting when military options are put aside.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, Today, 12:36 PM

I was looking at the disputes between the Paracel Islands, the Spratly Islands, and the Scarborough Shoal. What I notices with all oft he disputes, the land being fought over is all claimed by China but the land location itself is all closer to the country china is disputing it over. For the Paracel Islands, China and Vietnam are in dispute especially after China put 2 oil rigs by their land. The other dispute between the Spratly Islands, China and the Philippines each claim entire ownership of the lands but Malaysia, Indonesia, and Brunei all claim some part of the islands as well. For the Scarborough Shoal, it is a lot closer to the Philippines than it is to China but China claims it as their own since they discovered the land. Now china has restricted access to the island following a standoff.    

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Map shows how race is a social construct

Map shows how race is a social construct | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Americans' understanding of who counts as 'white' has changed dramatically throughout the country's history and even over the last century alone. This map — which covers a decade of immigration to the US, from 1892 to 1903 — is a dramatic illustration of what it looked like when 'white' wasn't the same thing as European.  Mouse over any part of the map to magnify it."


Tags: race, historical, USA, map.

more...
LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, November 9, 3:23 PM

And a political construct, too ...

Caterin Victor's curator insight, November 10, 8:43 AM

 Up to me, race and colour don`t matter. Most important is the personality. America have now a black President. Is it better??

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map?

State Borders Were Drawn in the Distant Past. Is It Time to Reimagine Our Map? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers.  Most state borders were drawn centuries ago, long before the country was fully settled, and often the lines were drawn somewhat arbitrarily, to coincide with topography or latitude and longitude lines that today have little to do with population numbers."


Tags: cartography, mapping, visualizationregions, gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, density.

more...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Canada: land-wise, it's one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, it's anything but.The map comes from the Government of Canada's 'Plant Hardiness Site,' which contains images showing 'Extreme Minimum Temperature Zones' throughout the Great White North."


TagsCanada, map, North America, weather and climate.

more...
Emily Bian's curator insight, November 1, 8:47 PM

Most of Canada's population lives very close to the USA border. The further north you go in Canada, less people live there because it is too cold! That's why the places people live and visit in Canada are so crowded, is because it's very dense due to the fact that most people can't live in northern Canada. 

Sreya Ayinala's curator insight, November 7, 12:52 PM

Unit 2 Population

        The population density in Canada is very low and this is due to various factors, including the fact that most of  Canada is inhabitable.   As the map displays there are many extremely cold zones/ regions in Canada which can't be lived in/ farmed in.

        Canada most likely has a very low arithmetic population density and a slightly higher physiological population density. Since most of the population is clustered at the bottom of the country this increases the physiological population density.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 4:33 PM

While many believe that having or living in a large country would be most desirable, larger states often have to deal with varying limitations on land use. Canada may be huge, but majority of the land cannot sustain life. It is estimated that 75% of the Canadian population lives within one hundred miles of the US border. While Canada has an overall cold climate, the central and northern regions are unable to sustain vegetation. Historically, people have always been able to thrive where they can grow crops to survive. With a northern region part of the Arctic Circle, it is no wonder that Canadians try to live as south as possible. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

More than half of all Americans live in states where same-sex marriage is legal

More than half of all Americans live in states where same-sex marriage is legal | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"More than 168 million Americans now live in states where marriage for same-sex couples is legal following the Supreme Court’s decision Monday to not hear five states’ appeals.  That number represents about 53.17 percent of the U.S. population, according to data from the Census Bureau and visualized on the map above."


Tags: sexuality, USA. regions, mappolitical.

Seth Dixon's insight:

UPDATE: As of November 20, 2014 this is now the new map of same-sex marriage in the United States.  Notice that all the states that oppose same-sex marriage are part of one single, territorially contiguous block of states.  How come that is the spatial pattern for this issue?    

more...
Julia Keenan's curator insight, October 7, 7:57 PM

Shows states that allow same sex marriage or have laws for or against them

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 4:29 AM

Concept of Human Rights in USA

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Visualizing Time and Space

Visualizing Time and Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The question, "what time is it?" does not have one right answer.  The correct answer is dependent on your location on the Earth and the cultural and political conventions of the society in which live.  Don't mistake a cartoon for a map without substance.


Tags: map, perspective.

more...
sriddle geo's curator insight, July 24, 9:04 AM

Once again the educator in me is at work.  My little girl is asking me all the time , "If it's day here is it night on the other side of the world?"  Now I can show her.

Cory Erlandson's curator insight, July 24, 9:48 AM

Great spatial representation of time and time zones, which is a weirdly fascinating topic for my students.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 7:00 PM

APHG-U1

Suggested by Sylvain Rotillon
Scoop.it!

Maximum Summer Heat

Maximum Summer Heat | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new analysis shows when summer reaches peak heat across the U.S.


Tags: physical, weather and climate, seasonal.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Military Mobilizations: Ukraine and Russia

Military Mobilizations: Ukraine and Russia | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An important look at the military reality of the crisis.
Seth Dixon's insight:

We have known that pro-Russian forces have taken control of government buildings in part of Ukraine, and that forces on both sides have been mobilizing along the border.  It is hard to make sense of all the news reports but this map helps to bring the reality on the ground into sharp focus.  

more...
Gorete Queiroga de Figueiredo's curator insight, May 4, 7:30 PM

Infográfico para entender a crise ukraniana

Jim Doyle's curator insight, May 9, 10:56 PM

They have to work something out

Jennifer Brown's curator insight, November 11, 2:04 PM

Russia has a lot more arrows or troops towards the Ukraine but it looks like Ukraine has has more power with its tanks.

Suggested by cafonso
Scoop.it!

New York Public Library Puts 20,000 Hi-Res Maps Online

New York Public Library Puts 20,000 Hi-Res Maps Online | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When I was a kid, my father brought home from I know not where an enormous collection of National Geographic magazines spanning the years 1917 to 1985. I found, tucked in almost every issue, one of the magazine’s gorgeous maps—of the Moon, St. Petersburg, the Himalayas, Eastern Europe’s ever-shifting boundaries. I became a cartography enthusiast and geographical sponge, poring over them for years just for the sheer enjoyment of it, a pleasure that remains with me today.  Whether you’re like me and simply love the imaginative exercise of tracing a map’s lines and contours and absorbing information, or you love to do that and you get paid for it, you’ll find innumerable ways to spend your time on the new Open Access Maps project at the New York Public Library."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Demographic Atlas

Demographic Atlas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This atlas shows how the population is changing - growing in some parts of the country, while shrinking in others. The maps show the entire United States by county, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census and Esri. How do things look in your neighborhood?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Exploring Mexico through Dynamic Web Maps

Exploring Mexico through Dynamic Web Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"One of the people I regard most highly here at Esri has created an online atlas of Mexico.  The maps can be accessed in many different ways, such as an ArcGIS Online presentation with a description here, as an iPad iBook, but I think most importantly, as a series of story maps.  Each of these separate story maps contains 1 to 6 thematically related maps on the following topics:


more...
Cam E's curator insight, February 11, 11:00 AM

I had no idea Honduras was the country with the highest murder rate in the entire world! These map are extremely interesting, as we see the obvious tourist destinations are everywhere on the coasts as opposed to the interior of the country of Mexico, yet the majority of the historical structures are in the interior centered around Mexico City.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, February 13, 3:14 PM

This site is neat.  The ability to use interactive maps to explore this country is very informative.  I recommend this site to anyone interesting in learning more about Mexico!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 17, 10:17 AM

These maps all come together in a somewhat story-like sense. They are thematically related and can be separated to be able to look at each map individually. I like how there are multiple ways to access the maps.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2

Seth Dixon's insight:

Have you ever wanted to watch a video and to have a map handy at the same time?  Ever since I first watched Raiders of the Lost Ark, I love the idea of combining video with maps.  I produced this bare-bones map on ArcGIS online to spatially index over 50 videos that I enjoy using in my classes; all are place-specific videos (so they can be ‘located’ on the map).  These videos have also been shared here earlier, but this map can function as a more user-friendly way to search for engaging video clips.  Do you have a great place-based video that teaches the principles of geography that you love?  Please share the URL in the comments section with a brief paragraph.        


Tags: mapping, video, ESRIgeography education.

more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 5, 11:39 PM

This link is great. So many insightful videos. The one that we saw in class on the nuances of what makes up the UK was very interesting and fun to watch. The UK is a good example on how different geographies exist within the same "borders". In the UK there are many cultures, ethnicities, and politics that work together to make up a nation of nations. The historical scope of the British empire has led to many people around the world having shared connections through their shared past.

Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.