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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline

Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Beaches are dynamic, living landscapes. The coast off of Chatham, Massachusetts, provides a prime example of beach evolution.
Seth Dixon's insight:

To quote coastal geologist Robert Oldale, "Many people view coastal erosion as a problem that needs to be addressed and, if possible, prevented.  However, storm and wave erosion along the shore of Cape Cod has been going on for thousands of years and will likely continue for thousands of years more. It is a natural process that allows the Cape to adjust to rising sea level. Erosion is only a peril to property. If we build on the shore, we must accept the fact that sooner or later coastal erosion will take the property away.”


Tagscoastal, remote sensing, mappingerosion, landscape.

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Sam Burden's curator insight, June 16, 7:40 AM

The NASA Earth Observatory is a teaching tool used to assist educators in teaching students about the environmental, including natural hazards with visualizations depicting the date and time these vast changes in the climate occurs. There are multiple global maps which  depict data over a period of time which can be used as a tool to see the effects of global warming it’s the implications on the environment on a global scale. Animations, videos and side by side images are also available to teachers to show how sustainable choices or designs can influence our environment. I really enjoyed looking at all of the real-world images on this site and it opened my eyes to how creating a more sustainable environment could influence our world on a global scale. 

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What is halal meat?

What is halal meat? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There have been calls for clearer labelling of halal products in shops, restaurants and takeaways. But what is halal food? And why are campaigners so concerned?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

I know just enough Arabic to read the word Halal (حلال) and know that it means permissible, the opposite of Haram (حَرَام‎) which means forbidden or illegal.  In the context of meat, it means meat that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people).  Today, Halal is becoming an important issue within the European Union for two main reasons: 1) more Muslims are migrating to Europe and 2) Europeans are searching for less artificial food products.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe.  If you want to see the inner workings of a Halal slaughterhouse in New York, this video will show you what it is like.   

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 17, 7:14 AM

Halal means permissible, the opposite of Haram  which means forbidden or illegal. 


Halal meat means that has been prepared in accordance with Islamic traditions and is therefore permissible for an observant Muslim to eat (very similar to Kosher for Jewish people). 


Within the European Union more Muslims are migrating to Europe.  Some Europeans, however, feel that the Halal labeling and marketing is a change to the cultural landscape that they are not comfortable with, and don't want to see it become more mainstream.  Other meat companies try to present their products as Halal, but don't adhere to all of the customs according to some more strict Muslims.  Halal, then is a lightning rod, in either direction right now in Europe. - From Seth Dixon

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Soviet Bus Stops

Soviet Bus Stops | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Photographer Christopher Herwig has covered more than 30,000 km by car, bike, bus and taxi in 13 countries discovering and documenting these unexpected treasures of modern art. From the shores of the Black Sea to the endless Kazakh steppe, the bus stops show the range of public art from the Soviet era and give a rare glimpse into the creative minds of the time."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a delightful glimpse into a time gone by, and what makes it even more surprising is that few would expect such creative architecture to dot the cultural landscape of the old Soviet Union.  I was recently looking at a photo gallery of old Russian Orthodox churches and just like these Soviet bus stops, they are perfect subjects for classic cultural landscape studies.  Geography students can analyze and interpret the cultural, political and economic material landscape as this photographer has.  What do these elements of the landscape mean?  How does it make us re-evaluate the society that created them?   


Tags: Russia, culture, landscape.
 

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, April 7, 5:15 AM

Las paradas de autobus siempre han sido algo interesante para diseñar. Son oportunidad para, como dicen los ingleses, "make a satement" y esta selección es prueba de ello. Herwig nos ofrece un buen muestrario de lo que se hizo en la antigua URSS.

54321ignition's curator insight, April 7, 7:14 AM

Uniformity has its place. But how brilliant would it be for communities and artists to be able to turn such utilitarian, soulless objects into celebrations of creativity!

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Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them

Seeing Landmarks From Far Away Might Shatter Your Perception Of Them | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Wow. I guess it's true when they say not everything is as it appears...
Seth Dixon's insight:

A new perspective can change our perception of reality, as demonstrated by this delightful photo gallery. 


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 21, 11:34 AM

I think it's awesome to see the past mixed with the present, and realizing how our imagination adds to the "mystery" of places.  However, seeing things in context truly changes perception - how could this be brought to your students?  Fascinating.  

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, March 28, 11:43 AM

LA PERCEPCIÓN A TRAVÉS DE LA DISTANCIA

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 5:33 PM

By looking at these images it is apparent that heir is a clear distincition between how one may view the monument from upclose andd then when you take asep back you can really appreciate it by seeing others appreciate it as well. As an observer you can also identify the different persepectives by looking at it in a different light by either taking a step back or viewing it from a different vanage point. Knowing the history of the monument also helps with a background story in order for better appreciation of the monument and the History that goes along with it.

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A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design

A Dictator's Guide to Urban Design | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ukraine's Independence Square, and the revolutionary dimensions of public spaces.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article gives some background on the political purposes behind urban planning and public squares that carry cultural meaning.  While Ukraine is the reason for delving into the topic, the article explores the politicization of public squares in various regional and historical contexts.  The image above shows how monuments, despite their 'official' meaning, can be rearticulated and reinterpreted as other audiences inscribe meaning into the landscape.  

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, February 24, 3:21 PM

Very interesting article about public spaces transformed by public protest.

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"Lost" New England Revealed

"Lost" New England Revealed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"New England's woody hills and dales hide a secret—they weren't always forested. Instead, many were once covered with colonial roads and farmsteads."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I love living in New England and finding stone walls from old farmsteads; an archaeology professor at UConn is using geospatial technologies to map out the remants of that historical landscape.  This is a great example of using spatial thinking across the disciplines. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatiallandscape, historical, environment modify.

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Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, January 8, 10:55 AM

Through the most recent technology, man has been able to discover that wooded areas of New England where once vibrant communities, homesteads and settled communities.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 26, 10:44 PM

Thanks to dedicated archeologists and the LiDAR, we can see the creations of a once small, abandoned community in New England. Even through the thick forest, the LiDAR can detect rocks walls and small dirt roads. Hopefully, we can find more of these ancient communities in other areas around the world.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, January 28, 12:48 PM

History is revealed with the use of high tech scanners known as  LiDAR's. With the use of these scanners, scholars learn that many areas of New England, including forested areas in Connecticut and Rhode Island, once were farming grounds. These "lost" pieces of history now lead scholars in new directions in dicovering the past, and details to its future.

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Cultural Syncretism

Cultural Syncretism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I found this image on social media from a great geography teacher (link to his site--looking for APHG group activities?  Try this).  This picture taken at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Memphis, TN shows an intrguing linguistic combination that I had never imagined before.  This is referred to as cultural syncretism, where two or more cultures or cultural traits combine together to make something new.  Globalization and migration are making more cultural combinations than we've ever seen before in this human mosaic we call home.


Tags: language, culture, the South, APHG, religion, landscape.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 11, 2013 12:01 AM

Interesting 


Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 11:02 PM

This was taken in Memphis, TN. I liked how it mixes the religion with the surrounding culture and dialect, really interesting and shows that people can have the same religion and different backgrounds. 

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Remembering Wilbur Zelinksy

Remembering Wilbur Zelinksy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Later this week, there will be a memorial service on the Penn State campus (Oct 26th-see details here)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This summer I unexpectedly found myself at the estate sale of the great cultural geographer, Wilbur Zelinsky.  I heard earlier through the Penn State geography department that he had passed away, but was startled to find myself discussing his legacy with his children.  This picture (that was being held up by the most amazing magnet ever) on his filing cabinet seems like a perfect tribute to his intellectual legacy.  Read the full article with additional pictures here.

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Gilbert Faure au nom de l'ASSIM's comment, October 21, 2013 4:13 AM
this is a general fact: "This was when I realized that young academics always make a name for themselves by standing on the shoulders of giants; some choose then to look down on their predecessors while others acknowledge that their work is dependent on those who came before. " congratulations for this analysis of human beings attitudes...Scientists are human after all
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Above Australia's Northern Territory

Above Australia's Northern Territory | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over half of Australia lies above the Tropic of Capricorn, but it is home to only five percent of the population. It is a frontier land with little infrastructure, populated by cattle barons, crocodile hunters and aboriginal tribes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Australia's Northern Territory(NT) is region that is climatically inhospitable to large human settlements and is the least population region of the lightly population country.  Uluru (Ayer's Rock) is the Northern Territory's iconic landscape, and the territory is home to approximately 212,000 people according to the 2011 Australian census.  Most of the economic activity centers on resources extraction (mining); aboriginal groups control 1/5th of the NT which many hope to discourage.  This photo gallery provides a excellent glimpse into these remote places.  See also this list of the best places to visit in Australia.   


TagsAustralia.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 2013 9:36 PM

Remoteness and liveability

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:19 PM

This is a huge chunks of Australia but only a little amount of people live there.

Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 1:21 PM

New territory in Australia!❤️❤️ 

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Is This Land Made For You And Me?

"Lyrics to 'This Land Is Your Land' from WoodyGuthrie.org. And if you can't watch the video for some reason, here's a transcript."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video that I originally found on Upworthy shows that even classic songs of Americana that might seem jingoistic may have had a subversive beginning.  I never knew there was a final verse to this Great Depression era song that references iconic cultural landscapes; know that I've heard it I see why it isn't taught to school kids, but I wish it was.   


In the shadow of the steeple I saw my people,
By the relief office I seen my people;
As they stood there hungry, I stood there asking
Is this land made for you and me?

Tags:  poverty, place, USA, landscape, culture, music.

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Geographic Imagination in the English Anthem 'Jerusalem'

Geographic Imagination in the English Anthem 'Jerusalem' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I first learned to appreciate this anthem as a child watching the movie Chariots of Fire with my father.  My father was an avid runner in the early 80's and still continues to run to this day; he also is a devout Christian who seeks to earnestly honor the Sabbath Day.  Clearly the movie Chariots of Fire would resonate deeply with him and become a Dixon family classic to be watched over and over."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I greatly enjoyed writing this article about the geographic imaginations and yearnings that are embedded in the great nationalistic anthem 'Jerusalem.'  The audio, lyrics and analysis are all available here.


Tags: UKlandscape, culturereligion, Christianity, music.

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Mapping Your Trips

Mapping Your Trips | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The following pictures are all embedded in this ArcGIS Online map that I created as a part of the T3G institute in Redlands CA on the ESRI campus."

Seth Dixon's insight:

For me exploring the neighborhoods of Redlands was incredibly nostalgic since it reminds me so much of the part of Burbank that I grew up in, but haven’t had much opportunity to visit since.  I left  Burbank, CA when I 11 and the next year the city’s landscapes became the set for the TV show “The Wonder Years.”  I was 12 just like Kevin Arnold was, and despite a serious lack of Winnie Cooper in my youth, the show still resonates with me as does the Southern California landscape.

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Meandering Stream

Meandering Stream | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I'm used to rivers that know what they're doing."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Even though Chris Hadfield's time on the space station is over, his twitter stream can still be a great source of images displaying the physical and human landscapes (and if you needed any more evidence that he's the coolest astronaut ever, watch his parting video singing David Bowie's Space Oddity).

  

This incredible image clearly demonstrates the fluvial processes that have creating and this and will continue to reshape this landscape.  Meander scars, oxbow lakes, channel cutoffs, floodplains and point bars are all here in this gorgeous teaching image. 


Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

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Hoffman's comment, September 14, 2013 1:32 PM
hmm, looks like some river had a little to much
Peter Phillips's comment, October 5, 2013 7:31 PM
All rivers move. Those that have a wide, flat basin meander most. Those meanders can be even more dramatic than in this image, snaking 10's of kilometres sideways over time. Combine this action with geological upheaval and it gets even more interesting. Check out images of the Murray River in Australia from space.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, December 6, 2013 11:34 AM

Lol... the first words that went through my head were h--- (heck) yeah.  David Bowie... sung by an astronaut... okay, back to Geography. I thought that the rivers reminded me of something I thought of during the talk in class about lava rock being changed into other kinds of rocks over time, and cycling around.  I thought on a larger scale, about this universe, and I have read before that people are studying different areas of space-time fabrics, trying to find origins of the Universe, and answers to other existential questions.  I suppose that if one could trace patterns of rivers, and if one could trace patterns of rocks, to find where they came from, and why/how they came where they came, then by examining the (assumedly tattered and marked) fabrics of space and time, people would be able to determine origins of everything from the beginning of what existed before all universes, and also the origins of life forms.  I enjoyed the movie Prometheus, which was directed by Sir Ridley Scott, and I had to say that I thought that the messages found on rocks in caves, as a catalyst that lead the cast to go visit an alien world that had something to do with human origins, could be very literally taken.  If there are clues in rocks, why wouldn't there be other clues, possibly in celluar components of life forms, or space and time?  Applying the idea of studying rocks and rivers and other physical geographical pursuits to the idea of applying it on a gigantic scale greatly appeals to me.  I believe that humans will find some answers that way, but I hadn't directly realized just that until we mentioned some stuff about physical geography, and glacial forces carrying and spreading out rocks, and deposits and erosion.  After all, the Milky Way has origins, so why believe that we came from the Milky Way, rather than beyond?

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Alluvial Fans

Alluvial Fans | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When streams emerge from mountains, they often spread out and deposit sediment in a distinctive pattern known as an alluvial fan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In dry areas of interior drainage (such as Central Asia and the Great Basin in the U.S.), the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans.  Take time to analyze this image (and this one as well); in alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, we can see some striking geometric and spatial configurations that show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.   


Tags: spatial, remote sensing, geospatial, Kazakhstan, Central Asialandscape.

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Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, May 13, 11:41 PM

Exercise 26 .Use Moodle plattform to send your answers.

 

1. Where is taken this picture?

2. Define alluvial

3. How are used the alluvial? What economical sector?

4. Look at the image and calculate ( use the scala ) the distance between apex and tracks

5. Write a summarize of the article

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 17, 7:08 AM

In dry areas of interior drainage the human settlements are often clustered along the foothills of the mountains near landforms called alluvial fans. 


Alluvial fans and the agricultural patterns that people create on them, show how human settlements are highly dependent of the physical environment.  

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, May 23, 11:29 PM

Inland water year 10 , River landscapes year 8 

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New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts

New York City's Disappearing Mom-and-Pop Storefronts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two photographers set out to see what happened to small family businesses in New York City in a decade
Seth Dixon's insight:

The cultural landscapes of neighborhoods can change quickly as larger global economic forces restructure the places.  This is a great gallery of photos from the Smithsonian to document these changes in New York City.  Many mourn the passing of what once was as the landscape continues to be made and remade but subsequent generations. 


Tags: culture, landscape, NYCeconomic, urban, place, neighborhood.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 12, 7:28 AM

What a decade can do to a cultural landscape.

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 6:55 PM

Changing nature of world cities

Jake Reardon's curator insight, April 21, 5:49 PM

To be honest I am surprised that "Mom and Pop" storefronts lasted this long in New York City. It just seems to me that as a city grows and rent prices go up the smaller store fronts would naturally be pushed out by larger conglomerates who would be more suited to handle the rent prices. Of course it is an old addeage of capitalism that as long as you offer a good product that consumers would be inclined to consume you can stay above water in even the most competitive locations. Although to me that would appear to have its limits. Perhaps the economic tides of the present in New York are that limit.

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Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas

Countries Divided on Future of Ancient Buddhas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Thirteen years after the Bamian Buddhas were blasted into rubble, opinion is split on whether to leave them as is, rebuild them, or make copies of them.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article work together to show a 'behind-the-scenes' glimpse of this heritage site, or the remnants of the old memorial which is an iconic part of the cultural landscape in their own right but for very different reasons.  This is a great example of sequent occupance and some of the difficulties in preserving heritage.  Some argue that by restoring the Buddha it will undo some of the damage done by the Taliban and create a tourist destination; others think that the damaged Buddha is a poignant reminder of problems with 'topocide' and religious intolerance. 


Questions to Ponder: What do you think should become of this place?  How come?    


Tags: Afghanistan, politicalculture, Central Asialandscape, perspective.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, March 28, 5:43 PM

Protecting significant landscapes

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 5:17 PM

This video starts by talking about the issue at hand of who should recieve this specific historical site. The video and article overlap in talking about the division between which country should be entitiled to their ancestors Buddahs. This is an extremely important issue at hand the resolotion is crucial to the countries getting along again.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 3:31 PM

It is sad that the Taliban would destroy such beautiful monuments but I don't think it is possible to rebuild them. It would not be a matter of gluing together pieces laying around, the statues would have to be completely recarved. I do not think that could be considered a reconstruction, more like a completely new item. The history would not be there.

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Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims

Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A slice of rock removed from the mainland near the island of Utoeya is the winning design for a memorial to commemorate the victims of Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Monuments are not just in a place...they can create place and place can infuse added meaning to a memorial.  This is a great example of the interplay between memorials, place, artistic and cultural meanings. 

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, March 7, 3:43 AM

Il 22 luglio 2011 il fanatico cristiano Anders Breivik ha ucciso 69 ragazzi nell'isola di Utøya in Norvegia e procurato la morte di altre 8 persone in un attentato con esplosivo a Oslo. Una tragedia che ha colpito tutto il mondo e ha lasciato impietrita la civilissima Norvegia.

Per ricordare le vittime di questo massacro sarà creato un monumento. Questo il design selezionato. Un monumento che riesce a riprodurre in modo fisico il dolore procurato dall'esperienza di chi ha dovuto provare in prima persona la perdita improvvisa, brutale e permanente di tante persone care.

JoseMªRiveros's curator insight, March 7, 2:36 PM

Espectacular !!!!

Un trozo de roca retirado de la parte continental cerca de la isla de Utoya. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 12, 11:32 AM

This is a creative and beautiful idea for a monument. I have never come across a design similar to this one. This is a great example of taking advantage of the surroundings around you, such as the water, rocks and trees. 

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A photograph (or landscape, map, etc.) is not an innocent reflection of reality.  They can be carefully crafted to tell a story which might reflect the bigger picture and your ideological framework--but it just as easily might obscure some important contexts and truths.  I use these images at the beginning of the semester to discuss the bias inherent in our own perspectives as I try to infuse my classroom with a variety of lenses with which to view different regions (images found here).


Tags: images, landscape, perspective, regions.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 6:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 4:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 1:35 PM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (see a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? Click here for more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees.

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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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Top 20 Earth Images

Top 20 Earth Images | Geography Education | Scoop.it
With five satellites scanning the globe, DigitalGlobe has collected impressive imagery of planet Earth this year. Check out their top 20 images here.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Earth itself is the great source of inspiration for art.  Enjoy the gallery.


Tags: images, art, landscape

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Alex Schaerer's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:50 AM

Incredible images of Mother Earth. It is all of our responsibility to look past our short term existence here to ensure that she flourishes for millenia for our future generations. 

Joy Kinley's curator insight, December 6, 2013 10:49 AM

The views of Earth from Space are fascinating.  Mountains, deserts, volcanoes, islands all seen from above.  My favorite is the city of Aleppo. What is yours?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:31 PM
Five satellites have taken some of the most amazing photos of amazing places all over the world. The photos show the beauty of each place some places i never even knew existed.
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Harvest 2013

Harvest 2013 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From grains to grapes to cabbage and many other crops the harvest season has been in full swing in the Northern Hemisphere.
Seth Dixon's insight:


So few of my students have actual experience working on a farm and being part of the food producing process.  This gallery of 38 photos around the world is a great visual to reinforce how important the harvest is for sustaining life on this planet.  The picture above shows the a Hmong hill tribe woman harvesting a rice terrace field at Mu Cang Chai district, northern Vietnamese province of Yen Bai. The World Bank on Oct. 7 lowered its 2013 growth forecast for East Asian developing countries to 7.1 percent and warned that a prolonged US fiscal crisis could be damaging to the region.


Tags: agriculture, food production, landscape, images.

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Scott Langston's curator insight, October 28, 2013 7:48 PM

An image our Grad 11 students can at least have some empthy with....

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:47 PM

Well see as how my page is called World Photography, i figurd this would be a good article/gallery to put up. Along with so georgous photos one can really see the imporance of farming on a culture and farming world wide. The gallery of photos is increadible, and with a caption to match each photo you are able to see geographilycly and cultulary where certan foods and plants are produced. This makes me feel  that cultures are all some what connected, the tobbco from your cigretts comes from mexico, and the nice wine that you drink when your out to dinner is from a vineyard in germany. Its a small idea but food is very cultualy influncing 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2:09 PM

After reading this article it became apparent the back breaking work that these people have to endure just to stay alive and feed their family. Which is insane when you think about our society today, I dont know about you but I do not farm and do this type of work after I'm done with my school work everyday. In some places in the United States like out west they are used to some of this work but most of us do not make all of our meals and kill them in the same spot. It became apparent how much of a lifestyle this type of work is and the true dedication that people go through for themselves, family, land and economy.

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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a quiz that leaves out the most obvious contenders (London, Paris, NYC etc.) in a gallery of cities around the world – it's harder than you might expect.  Can you recognize the city just from a skyline?


Tagsurban, landscape, place, trivia.

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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 7:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:41 PM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 8:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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Density and Emptiness

Density and Emptiness | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the end of 2012 I travelled to USA to experience something new. And it was something I didn't expect: emptiness and density.  'Merge' is the last part of a project series 'Empty, Dense, Merge' which explores two opposite feelings through the photos of places located in USA.  In this project two opposite places are merged into one: New York City, where, it seems like everyone wants to live there, and Grand Canyon / Death Valley, which are unlivable."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is geographically inspired art at it's finest.  It goes beyond making beautiul jewelry with maps or showing majestic vistas of natural landscapes; the artistic concept that motivated the photographer was geographic in nature.  Population density is highly clustered leaving great spaces of open, empty, unpopulated land and some major cities that are jam-packed with human activity and settlements.  Merging both of these concepts into the same image produced this series of 6 images (as seen in this Atlantic Cities article).


Tags: art, density, NYC, landscape.

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oyndrila's comment, July 21, 2013 3:37 AM
Excellent visual resource to convey the concepts.
John Blunnie's curator insight, July 28, 2013 1:14 PM

Great photo combining the U.S.'s great spaces with its metropolisis'.

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:17 PM
Amazing it almost looks lkike we, in the US, are living in a huge bowl
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Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS

Re-examining the Battle of Gettysburg with GIS | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"GIS has given us the chance to re-examine how the Civil War battle was won and lost." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

July 1-3 mark the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg, and it seems only appropriate to share these rich, interactive resources to commemorate the event (this particular interactive feature uses an ESRI storymap template).  This fantastic example from the Smithsonian Magazine shows how history teaching and research can be benefited by using GIS with the example of Gettysburg.  Many student today visit the sites of the Battle of Gettysburg and get a greater appreciation of battle by getting a sense of the lay of the land and the  challenged confronting both armies.  National Geographic has additionally put together resources to display other Civil War battles.  GIS is not a tool that is just for geographers; any analysis that requires spatial analysis can be mapped. 


Tags: historicalwar, landscape, spatial, GIS, ESRI.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 9, 2013 2:46 PM

Looking for GIS integration into history classes?  Smithsonian has a great page using the Battle of Gettysburg.  

John Slifko's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:17 PM

the rent of the civil war 

Todd Pollard's curator insight, February 4, 10:34 PM

I really like this interactive map application.

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Tips for the Google Maps Guessing Game

Tips for the Google Maps Guessing Game | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

In this interview with Rosemary Wardley (senior GIS cartographer at National Geographic Maps) she offers tips on how to evaluate the landscape to do well on the game, GeoGuessr.  If you haven't played GeoGuessr, you've got to try it out.  It displays 5 locations in GoogleMaps StreetView and you have to guess where the images are located.  You can pan and zoom in the StreetView to explore the landscape and find more context clues as to where that location is.  It's a fantastic exploration exercise.   


Tags: landscape, place, trivia.

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Nicholas Pringle's curator insight, June 3, 2013 7:44 AM

This has great potential for a education geography tool. Very creative!

fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 9:00 AM
hshahda´~
Todd Parsons's curator insight, October 28, 2013 5:41 PM

Say goodbye to getting anything done...