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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Satellites Are Now Cleared to Take Photos at Mailbox-Level Detail

Satellites Are Now Cleared to Take Photos at Mailbox-Level Detail | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Department of Commerce just lifted a ban on satellite images that showed features smaller than 20 inches. The nation's largest satellite imaging firm, Digital Globe, asked the government to lift the restrictions and can now sell images showing details as small as a foot. A few inches may seem slight, but this is actually a big deal.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As reported by the BBC, this change in the legal use of geospatial information could have a huge impact on many industries.  Some are fearful that it could represent an invasion of privacy, and others see this as a way to harness new satellite technology to provide higher resolution data and improved data quality for researchers. 


Tagsmappingimages, remote sensing, geospatial.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, July 19, 10:18 AM

Here we go.  I was just at the ESRI conference in San Diego and Digital Globe is pushing this in a big way.

 

We seem to be concerned about "drones," but there are a host of technologies that should be equally concerning.  The cats of which are mostly already out of the bags.

 

Merry Christmas!

Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 25, 7:00 AM

Is this a violation of privacy?

Jacques Lebègue's curator insight, July 25, 10:10 PM

 

Une concurrence redoutable pour les drones d'observation et de guidage. Avec quelques questions sur les dérives potentielles (donc probables) en matière de vie privée...

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NASA and the World Cup

NASA and the World Cup | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"NASA goes to the World Cup! Satellite imagery from each country playing."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Not that we need any extra incentive to view NASA's gorgeous satellite imagery, but now that the World Cup has entered the knockout rounds, it is the perfect opportunity to view selected images from the participating countries.  This gallery of a dozen World Cup StoryMaps are but a few of the thousands of Esri StoryMaps that can serve as motivation to get your K-12 U.S. school an organizational account for ArcGIS online (then your students can make cool maps like these). 


Tags: sport, Brazil, South America, Esri, fun, mapping, remote sensing, geospatial, images, perspective.

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Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet

Stunning Photos Of Earth From Above Will Change Your Outlook Of The Planet | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This daily dose of satellite photos helps you appreciate the beauty and intricacy of the things humans have constructed--as well as the devastating...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Have you ever seen the website, The Daily Overview?  The purpose of the site is to share a compelling/ informative/artistic satellite image every day to get readers to view the world from a different perspective. This article about the site is nice summary of the project.  Click here for another gallery of 30 perspective-changing images

 

Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, images, perspective.

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, June 15, 5:58 AM

Amazing.

Diane Johnson's curator insight, June 15, 8:19 AM

Great images for giving students a global perspective.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 6:33 AM

unit 1

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Portraits of people living on a dollar a day

Portraits of people living on a dollar a day | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"More than a billion people around the world subsist on a dollar a day, or less. The reasons differ but the day-to-day hardship of their lives are very similar. A book by Thomas A Nazario, founder of the International Organisation, documents the circumstances of those living in extreme poverty across the globe, accompanied by photographs from Pulitzer prizewinner Renée C Byer. Living On A Dollar a Day is published by Quantuck Lane."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Extreme poverty is defined by the World Bank living on under $1.25 per day.  The geography of of extreme poverty highly uneven--two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo).  This photogallery seeks to to show the daily life and realities of those living in extreme poverty.  This article from the Guardian argues that development should measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements. 


Tags: poverty, images, development, economic, perspective.

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Joy Kinley's curator insight, June 16, 12:21 PM

Poverty is nothing new but in the last hundred years the gulf between those that have money and those that don't has become almost insurmountable.  The lack of support systems that many in the West take for granted is absent in many developing countries.  

 

Access to education and health care are vital if these situations are to ever improve. 

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 5:33 AM

Extreme poverty is defined by the World Bank living on under $1.25 per day.  The geography of of extreme poverty highly uneven--two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo)   - Seth Dixon

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 4:07 AM

add your insight...

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a wide economic gap between the rich and the poor and in the spatial layout of urban settlements. Often an accompanying  tangible separation exists between the communities where these groups live.  These images (captured by a helicopter pilot with a keen eye for iconic and cultural landscapes in Mexico City) show neighborhoods in Mexico where this separation does not exist.   Collectively they are reminiscent of this famous photograph in Brazil that shows the uneasy juxtaposition of favelas and luxurious housing. 


Questions to Ponder: What are these neighborhoods like?  How are these two communities linked and separated?  Compare and contrast life on both sides of the fence.    


Tags:  housingeconomic, socioeconomicBrazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, Mexico

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Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 5:49 PM

Interesting look at the social mobility of a super-urban area. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:26 AM

An advertising campaign hopes to show the differences of income and living standards between neighborhoods in Mexico.

The place of these areas are so vastly different as well as there interactions as the lower class makes shanty architecture and the upper class develops large condos and buildings just for residence.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 5:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

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Places in their Proper Perspectives

Places in their Proper Perspectives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A fisherman's cottage is described by real estate agents as a 'property not to be missed' but it is also just yards away from two nuclear power stations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A photograph (or landscape, map, etc.) is not an innocent reflection of reality.  They can be carefully crafted to tell a story which might reflect the bigger picture and your ideological framework--but it just as easily might obscure some important contexts and truths.  I use these images at the beginning of the semester to discuss the bias inherent in our own perspectives as I try to infuse my classroom with a variety of lenses with which to view different regions (images found here).


Tags: images, landscape, perspective, regions.

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, January 31, 3:19 PM

Versões...

Fern Torres's curator insight, February 3, 1:11 PM

Perception is everything!

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 16, 10:35 AM

This house is 100% misleading. The paper advertised the first picture, which from the looks of it isn't so bad. Then when you get the reverse picture and see the nuclear power plants behind it, its a whole new scene! Whoever is trying to sell this house- good luck to you. Who wants to live next to something that could literally kill god knows what? Not me. 

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Cultural Syncretism

Cultural Syncretism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I found this image on social media from a great geography teacher (link to his site--looking for APHG group activities?  Try this).  This picture taken at the Jewish Community Center (JCC) in Memphis, TN shows an intrguing linguistic combination that I had never imagined before.  This is referred to as cultural syncretism, where two or more cultures or cultural traits combine together to make something new.  Globalization and migration are making more cultural combinations than we've ever seen before in this human mosaic we call home.


Tags: language, culture, the South, APHG, religion, landscape.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, December 10, 2013 9:01 PM

Interesting 


Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 8:02 PM

This was taken in Memphis, TN. I liked how it mixes the religion with the surrounding culture and dialect, really interesting and shows that people can have the same religion and different backgrounds. 

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | Geography Education | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While the casualty counts may have been lowered, that does not lessen the devastation. 

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megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 8:35 PM
Looking upfront at the before and after the typhoon hit the Philipines right on the coast line. The coast was completly wiped out and destructed it looked as though nothing was ever there. Not only were homes and businesses destructed but over 2500 people were killed in this natural disaster.
Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 19, 7:50 PM

By viewing the before and after images, one can see how destructive this typhoon was. Almost every building was absolutely destroyed and the damage looks overwhelming. Disaster's such as this can really set a country back, as the damage appears to be costly. Although sad to look at, these images were informational. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:01 PM

A great set of photos to show the great destructive force of a storm on coastlines. The Philippines are a bunch of small islands made up of primarily coastlines so this typhoon destroyed huge amounts of the country.

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Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale

Macro or Micro? Test Your Sense of Scale | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A geographer and a biologist at Salem State University team up to curate a new exhibition, featuring confounding views from both satellites and microscopes
Seth Dixon's insight:

When I teach why scale is an important concept in geography, I say that depending on the situation a scientist might need a microscope or a telescope to properly understand a phenomenon.  Most images give us enough context clues to help us determine the scale of the image, but this set of 15 images does not.  So is it micro or macro?


Tags: scale, perspective

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Dean Haakenson's curator insight, October 17, 2013 3:15 PM

So cool!

Siri Anderson's curator insight, October 18, 2013 9:46 AM

Gives a whole new meaning to the sense of scale.

Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 3:18 PM

Try your eyes at this!

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An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris

An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Charles Marville photographed Paris' transition from medieval hodgepodge to modern metropolis.  Marville made more than 425 photographs of the narrow streets and crumbling buildings of premodern Paris, including this view from the top of Rue Champlain in 1877-1878."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This NPR podcast adds some great insight into Charles Marville's 19th century photography currently on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.  The urban transformations designed by Haussmann made Paris the global capital of modernity and the many cities around the world copied the principles of Haussmannization.  A photographic glimpse into Paris before and during these changes that brought about social upheaval is a marvelous tool for an historical geographic analysis of urbanization.  

   

Tags: urban, historical, Paris, placeFrancepodcastimages.

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Kevin Barker's comment, October 6, 2013 8:38 AM
Little blurb at the top of the link for the gallery :) "Notice: During the federal government shutdown, the offices and all premises of the National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are closed to the public, and all public programs are canceled. Employees will not have access to their e-mail or voicemail accounts during the shutdown."
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The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island

The 'Underwater Waterfall' Illusion at Mauritius Island | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When viewed from above, a runoff of sand and silt creates the impression of an ‘underwater waterfall’, just off the coast of the island nation of Mauritius in the Indian Ocean."

Seth Dixon's insight:

For another gorgeous gallery, see this list of river confluences

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, September 26, 2013 8:19 AM

this look pretty nice i would like to go see it in person

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 10:36 AM

By looking at this picture you automatically think its a waterfall within the water. This image is actually just showing the mix of sand and silt deposits mixing together. The light to dark colors is what makes it look like a waterfall. 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:24 PM

Another spectacular sight. Of course, you will need a plane or helicopter to venture above it to see it, but this illusion is pretty nifty.

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Above Australia's Northern Territory

Above Australia's Northern Territory | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Over half of Australia lies above the Tropic of Capricorn, but it is home to only five percent of the population. It is a frontier land with little infrastructure, populated by cattle barons, crocodile hunters and aboriginal tribes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Australia's Northern Territory(NT) is region that is climatically inhospitable to large human settlements and is the least population region of the lightly population country.  Uluru (Ayer's Rock) is the Northern Territory's iconic landscape, and the territory is home to approximately 212,000 people according to the 2011 Australian census.  Most of the economic activity centers on resources extraction (mining); aboriginal groups control 1/5th of the NT which many hope to discourage.  This photo gallery provides a excellent glimpse into these remote places.  See also this list of the best places to visit in Australia.   


TagsAustralia.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, September 17, 2013 6:36 PM

Remoteness and liveability

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, October 2, 2013 10:19 AM

This is a huge chunks of Australia but only a little amount of people live there.

Nick and Hayden's curator insight, October 2, 2013 10:21 AM

New territory in Australia!❤️❤️ 

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Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards

Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On July 18, 2013, a fierce wildfire threatened Palm Springs, California.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In a dry climate where urban expansion gets closer to dry brush, wild fires become a major summer hazard.

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 20, 2013 12:58 PM
Alot of fire going on out west. Check out the NASA site http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/fires/main/index.html that shows them from a satellite view of the various fires.
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 21, 2013 12:48 PM

I think this shows that the weather has entered into a world of extremes of very hot or very cold, wet or dry and not to much of regular seasonal changes of the past typical patterns.

It shows that with general warmer ocean temps, has lead to this new type of weather patterns resulting from global warming. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 6:20 PM
When we are liviing in a hot and dry climate we are bound to face more devastating fires accident made or not
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Sustaining Seven Billion People

Sustaining Seven Billion People | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"With seven billion people now living on Earth, the ever growing demand is putting unprecedented pressure on global resources—especially forests, water, and food. How can Earth’s resources be managed best to support so many people? One key is tracking the sum of what is available, and perhaps nothing is better suited to that task than satellites."


Seth Dixon's insight:

Agricultural production is one of the ways in which people modify the environment more than any other.  Global population is expected to top out at around 9 billion around 2050, so will we be able to sustainably feed all of the entire human population?  Satellite imagery can help answer these questions. 


Tagsremote sensing, geospatial, images, sustainability, agriculture, food production, environment modify, unit 5 agriculture

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, July 5, 9:53 PM

Thanks to environmental reporter Wes Thomas and professor Seth Dixon for this incisive analysis of how to provide sustenance to a world population nearing the 7 billion mark.  Dixon says the key is tracking the "sum of what is available...and perhaps nothing is better suited to the task than satellites."  Ever since the launch of "Landsat" and resource imaging satellites, scientists have been collecting data on global resources such as water, land use, forests, and crop production.  Dixon and Thomas say it's time the data were  put into a plan to fight hunger and habitat destruction around the world.  Such a plan may work if we as humans can keep from killing ourselves over religion, politics, and territory.  A tall order , indeed.  Aloha de Russ.

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, July 6, 9:09 AM

Such studies of the agriculture around the world are essential. The way we are doing agriculture to support seven billion people now, peaking at 9-10 billion in another 60 years, it is clear that we are putting severe strains on the environment.  But we have grown lazy, and we are doing it all wrong.

 

We CAN drastically reduce the amount of meat we consume, and thus quickly reduce the amount of arable land we need.  We CAN grow plants in ways that actually sequester more carbon and improve the soil it over time rather than erode and degrade.  And we CAN in fact grow all the food we need in the space we live in, thus enabling us to recycle all the water used as well, which is mostly just lost in evaporation. 

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, July 13, 2:52 AM

Vital debate for the future

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Gallery: What inequality looks like

Gallery: What inequality looks like | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Artists, designers, photographers and activists share one image that encapsulates what inequality means to them.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Photographers are great social observers, often finding the perspective to tell a story.  This gallery of shows a dozen images from all over the world highlighting various forms of inequality.  


Tags: poverty, images, development, economic, perspective.

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Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, June 16, 6:28 AM

Galería de Imágenes acerca de la desigualdad como consecuencia de la pobreza.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 17, 6:32 AM

powerful images that define unit 6!

Rianne Tolsma's curator insight, June 18, 4:07 AM

add your insight...

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Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas

Home clings to collapsing cliff in N. Texas | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The edge of the 4,000 square foot residence on Overlook Court was dangling about 75 feet above the rocky shoreline of Lake Whitney after part it it had already broken off."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just because we build retaining walls, fences, storm drains and other features, it doesn't mean that erosion will stop being a major and consistent force shaping the landscape.   I don't think they got their money's worth on there environmental impact statement, but I'm sure the real estate agent really sold them on the beautiful view.  For more local news on this home, read and watch here, for stunning images, see here.     


Questions to Ponder: Why do we build homes where we do?  How is this different across cultures (hint-Brazil)?


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.


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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 13, 7:00 PM

Natural hazards

YEC Geo's curator insight, June 14, 10:10 AM

In the lower map, the location of the house is marked by a yellow pushpin inside the solid red square.  Some geological background--this poor house has the misfortune to apparently lie directly upon the contact between two carbonate formations (marked by the white dotted line), and to also be on the erosive edge of a bend in the river. Both factors probably contributed to the demise of this particular home, which was eventually set on fire: https://tinyurl.com/nw7mfd2

 

 

One thing to notice is how straight the cliff edge is upon which the house is built.  Knowing that, I'd have to say that if I had a house located on the straight cliff edges within the dotted red squares I've made on the map, I'd be worried.

 

You can read about the geology of Texas here:

https://tinyurl.com/lrcp9yj

 

Image credit here: http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/House-on-Lake-Whitney-Cliff-Falling-Into-Lake-262718721.html?partner=nbcnews

Massimo Di Duca's curator insight, June 15, 9:13 AM

E la prospezione geologica da presentare al Comune? Era prevista nel PRG del comune? Esisteva un VIA?

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Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline

Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Beaches are dynamic, living landscapes. The coast off of Chatham, Massachusetts, provides a prime example of beach evolution.
Seth Dixon's insight:

To quote coastal geologist Robert Oldale, "Many people view coastal erosion as a problem that needs to be addressed and, if possible, prevented.  However, storm and wave erosion along the shore of Cape Cod has been going on for thousands of years and will likely continue for thousands of years more. It is a natural process that allows the Cape to adjust to rising sea level. Erosion is only a peril to property. If we build on the shore, we must accept the fact that sooner or later coastal erosion will take the property away.”


Tagscoastal, remote sensing, mappingerosion, landscape.

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Sam Burden's curator insight, June 16, 4:40 AM

The NASA Earth Observatory is a teaching tool used to assist educators in teaching students about the environmental, including natural hazards with visualizations depicting the date and time these vast changes in the climate occurs. There are multiple global maps which  depict data over a period of time which can be used as a tool to see the effects of global warming it’s the implications on the environment on a global scale. Animations, videos and side by side images are also available to teachers to show how sustainable choices or designs can influence our environment. I really enjoyed looking at all of the real-world images on this site and it opened my eyes to how creating a more sustainable environment could influence our world on a global scale. 

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22 International Borders

22 International Borders | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Brazil (top) and Bolivia (bottom)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This photographic exploration of various borders shows that some are are just administrative lines that show peaceful collaboration; others are fraught with geopolitical tension or demonstrate radically distinct land use management patterns. 


Tagsland use, borders, political.

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 9:52 AM

The concept of a political boundary has been developed over many many years into an unbreakable line between two different sets of people with different ideologies, religions, and government styles. The boundary extends into the ground, into the air, and includes any resources within the boundary. These pictures show the different shapes and various lines between countries, and displays the intricacies of boundaries in the world.  

Kampe Kyle's curator insight, May 28, 7:21 PM

In AP Human Geo., this relates to the concept of land use patterns. As certain countries practice deforestation, slash-and-burn and other land use types, bordering countries may take a completely indifferent approach to the land and thus create a contrast.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 28, 10:11 PM

Photographs show how different countries can be even by just the border. Number 3 really stuck out to me that Haiti doesnt have as many regulation reguarding deforestation as the Dominican Republic and its very noticable.

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great photo gallery, but I wanted to make a special note of this image.  The caption for this picture says, "Egyptians watch as Muslims march on the street to mark the birthday of the Prophet Muhammed in Cairo, Jan 13, 2014."  Is this a representative group of Egyptians?  What demographic group would we expect to see in the second story balcony?  What does the architecture tell us about the cultural norms of the society?

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 11:50 AM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 11:53 AM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

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Top 20 Earth Images

Top 20 Earth Images | Geography Education | Scoop.it
With five satellites scanning the globe, DigitalGlobe has collected impressive imagery of planet Earth this year. Check out their top 20 images here.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Earth itself is the great source of inspiration for art.  Enjoy the gallery.


Tags: images, art, landscape

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Alex Schaerer's curator insight, December 5, 2013 8:50 AM

Incredible images of Mother Earth. It is all of our responsibility to look past our short term existence here to ensure that she flourishes for millenia for our future generations. 

Joy Kinley's curator insight, December 6, 2013 7:49 AM

The views of Earth from Space are fascinating.  Mountains, deserts, volcanoes, islands all seen from above.  My favorite is the city of Aleppo. What is yours?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 8:31 PM
Five satellites have taken some of the most amazing photos of amazing places all over the world. The photos show the beauty of each place some places i never even knew existed.
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Geographically Yours

Geographically Yours | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If an urban population demands the freshest vegetables, they should be produced within a 24-hour field-to-table delivery zone.  What, therefore, should be the highest and best use of agricultural land between Taiwan's two largest cities, Taipei and Kaoshiung, only 200 miles apart?  The Lord of the Rings, a.k.a., Johan Heinrich Von Thünen, has the answer."  [2011]

Seth Dixon's insight:

This image and analysis comes from the blog "Geographically Yours" by Don Zeigler.  He's a well-traveled cultural geographer and has been collecting great teaching images over his career and is now sharing them on this site.  These pictures are great discussion starters and bell ringers to start the day.


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education, APHG, images.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 5, 2013 11:13 PM

This image communicates the importance of agriculture and marketplace relativity. in an area where transportation is minimal and people happen to be more more poorer then need to supply needed resources in a timely manner is very important. Farmers and resource providers need to be close enough geographically. This image shows an outside clothing and food market were people get to shop around and choose in a convientent ways there most needed items. The umbrella suggests rain as the child and other shoppers are being covered. This outdoor market doesnt necessarily suggest poverty but a wide range of population given a convenient location to buy goods quikcly and efficiently. The market may be located in a urban downtown area or also a village central area. Regardless the location, and goods provided shows the valuable commodities need to be provided in a manner, freshest possible for delivery.

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 13, 2013 5:40 AM

It is said that locally grown food can have more nutritional value than organic if the latter comes from thousands of miles away. If you had to choose, which would you rather have, locally grown or organic? 

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Harvest 2013

Harvest 2013 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From grains to grapes to cabbage and many other crops the harvest season has been in full swing in the Northern Hemisphere.
Seth Dixon's insight:


So few of my students have actual experience working on a farm and being part of the food producing process.  This gallery of 38 photos around the world is a great visual to reinforce how important the harvest is for sustaining life on this planet.  The picture above shows the a Hmong hill tribe woman harvesting a rice terrace field at Mu Cang Chai district, northern Vietnamese province of Yen Bai. The World Bank on Oct. 7 lowered its 2013 growth forecast for East Asian developing countries to 7.1 percent and warned that a prolonged US fiscal crisis could be damaging to the region.


Tags: agriculture, food production, landscape, images.

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Scott Langston's curator insight, October 28, 2013 4:48 PM

An image our Grad 11 students can at least have some empthy with....

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 11:47 AM

Well see as how my page is called World Photography, i figurd this would be a good article/gallery to put up. Along with so georgous photos one can really see the imporance of farming on a culture and farming world wide. The gallery of photos is increadible, and with a caption to match each photo you are able to see geographilycly and cultulary where certan foods and plants are produced. This makes me feel  that cultures are all some what connected, the tobbco from your cigretts comes from mexico, and the nice wine that you drink when your out to dinner is from a vineyard in germany. Its a small idea but food is very cultualy influncing 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 11:09 AM

After reading this article it became apparent the back breaking work that these people have to endure just to stay alive and feed their family. Which is insane when you think about our society today, I dont know about you but I do not farm and do this type of work after I'm done with my school work everyday. In some places in the United States like out west they are used to some of this work but most of us do not make all of our meals and kill them in the same spot. It became apparent how much of a lifestyle this type of work is and the true dedication that people go through for themselves, family, land and economy.

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The Great Nature Project

The Great Nature Project | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Join me and National Geographic's Great Nature Project in exploring the great nature all around us!
Seth Dixon's insight:

Join National Geographic in celebrating the great nature all around us! Go outside and snap a photo of plants and animals you find. Upload photos with #GreatNature. Add #animal to animal photos. View photos from around the world at greatnatureproject.org.


Tags: biogeography, National Geographic. images.

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Tracy Klug's curator insight, September 30, 2013 12:07 PM

Join me in submitting pictures to National Geographic's Great Nature Project!  You could submit them to me personally so that I can show the images to my Human Geography students!

Molly Diallo's curator insight, September 30, 2013 2:52 PM

I am requesting you do this and send me a copy of your pictures as well!

 

Janet Price's curator insight, October 1, 2013 3:41 PM

Something for that class set of cameras!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Geography Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This photo gallery would be stunningly gorgeous if it weren't horrifically terrifying.  When the landscape changes this dramatically in a short time span, watch out.  See another photo gallery here, but this gallery from the Boston Globe, shows a more humanistic side of the story. 


Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, geomorphology, erosion, images.

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 5:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:59 AM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 8:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."

Seth Dixon's insight:

How have I not found National Geographic FOUND until now?  The curators post approximately 2 pictures a day that generally have never been published before; the result is an archive that is a wonderfully eclectic treasure trove.  There are simply too many great teaching images to share them individually.  Pictured above is the Sutherland Falls which thunders down a 1,904-foot drop from Lake Quill in New Zealand (January 1972, Photo by James L. Amos).  I consider National Geographic FOUND as a must see and will include it in my list of best scoops (filed under the tag zbestofzbest). 


Tags: perspective, National Geographic. images, zbestofzbest.

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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:27 AM

I think that is a manigficient photo i can't believe that these phoos nev been published and also missing their original location.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 7:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:05 AM

this is amazing!