Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath

Brexit: Reaction and the Aftermath | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The reactions to the Brexit have come in from all corners.  Since this was so shocking, newspapers articles that are insightful are using hyperbole in their titles to get our attention (Britain just killed globalization as we know it–Washington Post; Will Brexit mark the end of the age of globalization?–LA Times).  There have also been some excellent political cartoons and memes, so I wanted to archive a few of them here."  

 

Tags: Europe, supranationalismglobalization, economic, political, images.

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MsPerry's curator insight, June 29, 11:29 AM
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Bad Earth: the human cost of pollution in China – in pictures

Bad Earth: the human cost of pollution in China – in pictures | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This series of images shows the extent of China’s pollution problems and the human toll of exponential growth on local communities in China’s vast and severely damaged northern region

 

Ghazlan Mandukai, 52, left, looks out over the vast, toxic tailings lake beyond the industrial city of Baotou, Inner Mongolia. He farmed in this area for 40 years until the influx of steel and rare earth metal factories rendered local lands infertile. Poisonous waste that results from refining rare earths is continually dumped into the Weikuang Dam, as seen here.

 

Tags: pollutionChina, East Asia, industry, sustainability, images, art, landscape.

 

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Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 10:21 PM
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These Stunning Satellite Images Turn Earth Into Art

These Stunning Satellite Images Turn Earth Into Art | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled some of the more stunning examples into a traveling art exhibition called Earth as Art 4, the fourth in a series of shows since 2002. The collection, which can be viewed in full online, debuted at USGS headquarters in Reston, Virginia."

 

Tags: remote sensing, land use, environment, geospatial, images, art, landscape.

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amahendru's curator insight, April 20, 9:41 PM

Candid Photographer In Lucknow , Candid Photographer In Kanpur http://amitmahendruphotography.com

Dennis Swender's curator insight, April 21, 10:34 PM
The heights of multicultural art
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 24, 1:02 AM
Imágenes satelitales que convierten la Tierra en Arte
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11 incredible wilderness photographs from the 1800s

11 incredible wilderness photographs from the 1800s | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Early American wilderness photographers were snapping gorgeous vignettes of mountain peaks and sunrises before Instagram's 1977 filter was even a thing. But, aside from their timeless appeal, the true value of these nineteenth-century photographs is derived from their role in the American conservation movement."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many National Parks (especially Yellowstone and Yosemite) are special to me because my grandparents took me there--these trips inspired in me a deep awe for the wonders of this Earth.    We owe a great debt of gratitude to these early photographers whose work captivated a nation to start a conservation ethos to protect wilderness.

 

Tags: place, images, art, landscape, California 

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Dam Collapse

Dam Collapse | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"On November 5, 2015, two dams collapsed at an iron ore mine in southeastern Brazil. The dam is owned by Samarco, a joint-venture between the mining companies Vale and BHP Billiton. News outlets estimate that more than 62 million cubic meters of wastewater have been unleashed so far with catastrophic consequences. The immediate release of sludge wiped out numerous villages including Bento Rodrigues (shown in greater detail above), causing the death of twelve people. Eleven others are still missing. Because of this pollution, more than half a million people do not have access to clean water for drinking or irrigating their crops. By November 23, the contaminated waters covered a 400 mile stretch of the Rio Doce River and entered into the sea, killing significant amounts of planet and animal life along the way. Officials are concerned that the toxins will threaten the Comboios Nature Reserve, a protected area for the endangered leatherback turtle."

 

Tags: dam, environment, land use, sustainability, landscape, images, environment modify, pollution.

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Photographing mega-cities from 12,000 feet

Photographing mega-cities from 12,000 feet | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Photographer Vincent Laforet spent the early stages of 2015 photographing the likes of New York, Las Vegas, London, Sydney and Barcelona from a helicopter.


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities, images.

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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, December 6, 2015 10:19 PM

Great photo of city ... 

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The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"After historic rains, Atacama, Chile is exploding with vibrant wildflowers.  Here's a softer side to the disruptive weather phenomenon known as El Nino: an enormous blanket of colorful flowers has carpeted Chile's Atacama desert, the most arid in the world. The cyclical warming of the central Pacific may be causing droughts and floods in various parts of the world, but in the vast desert of northern Chile it has also caused a vibrant explosion of thousands of species of flowers with an intensity not seen in decades."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The driest place on Earth, the Atacama Desert in South America, has spectacular vistas and biogeography ... especially when it rains.  To read more (and see some stunning images) check out the links from the Washington Post, Yahoo, and the Smithsonian Magazine.   It is amazing that life can flourish in even some of the harshest of physical environments. 


Tags: physicalweather and climate, ChileSouth America, biogeography, environmentecology.

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Pierre Ratcliffe's comment, October 31, 2015 2:56 AM
How life forms have been dormant for decades or centuries or more. The DNA of these plants were there ready when conditions were favourable.
Leonardo Wild's curator insight, October 31, 2015 9:44 AM

Amazing Nature!

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 2, 2015 12:32 PM

Wow! This is such an amazing thing to see happened in the driest place on Earth. The disruptive weather phenomenon, El Nino really made this place come to life by bringing rainfall and floods. A spectacular site to see, that in the most harshest physical environment, life can flourished.

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The Dramatic Landscape of China's Gansu Province

The Dramatic Landscape of China's Gansu Province | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Gansu Province, in northwestern China, is about the same size as California, with a population of about 26 million people. Gansu’s diverse landscapes include parts of the Gobi Desert, the Yellow River, numerous mountain formations, and remnants of the Silk Road and the Great Wall of China.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This photo gallery is filled with dozens of great teaching images, displaying the dramatic human and physical landscapes of the Gansu Province of China. 


Tagsimageslandscape, China.

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Jane Ellingson's curator insight, October 22, 2015 9:03 AM

Cultural Landscape

Tony Hall's curator insight, October 30, 2015 2:34 AM

Some truly amazing images in this collection from The Atlantic.

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Fuzzy Borders

TagsCanadalanguage, social media, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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The Orange Globe

The Orange Globe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Creative Clever Objects by Martin Roler
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have used an "apple globe" is the past to symbolize geography education and enjoy this play playful artistic work.  Oranges have been used to help students understand map distortion and well as map projections, so I thought this artistic rendering would be a nice fun addition to the set.   


Tagsfunart.

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Emilycanfield's comment, July 4, 2015 2:10 AM
Amazing
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High Def Earth

NASA Commentator Dan Huot talks with David Hornyak, the project manager of the High Definition Earth Viewing experiment, about the first year of the project’s operation and screens some of its memorable scenes. From a perch on the nadir side of the International Space Station’s Columbus module, HDEV’s four high definition off-the-shelf video cameras have been transmitting clear, sharp views of Earth from an altitude of 250 miles, providing impressive views while testing how the hardware holds up in the harsh environment of Earth orbit.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you are impatient, the 'highlight reel' of this high definition video begins at 3:50 in this clip (but understanding the 'behind-the-scenes' context helps to understand how we get these videos of our planet). 


Tags: mapping, perspective, images, remote sensing, geospatial, unit 1 Geoprinciples.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 28, 2015 9:12 AM

No matter how High Def these images are, how many geopolitical frontier lines can be viewed? The ones that stand out, are where political and economic practices have visible degraded the environment in one country, and not in the other. Otherwise, it's all still one planet for all.

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Over population, over consumption - in pictures

Over population, over consumption - in pictures | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How do you raise awareness about population explosion? One group thought that the simplest way would be to show people in pictures the impact of population, pollution and consumption."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This gallery is filled with excellent "teaching images" on human and environmental interactions and all aspects of geography--the one picture above shows how Mexico City has enveloped even the rolling hills as a part of its urban expansion.  


Tags: environmentlandscape, images, environment depend, environment adapt, environment modify, pollution, resourcessustainability.

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 7:56 PM

Unit 6

These eye opening photos paint a perfect picture of what the world will be like in years to come if we keep living the way we do. There are pictures of trash waves, extreme deforestation, hill-side slums, thousands of fields of oil wells, and overwhelming crowds of people.  

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:18 PM

This gallery is filled with excellent "teaching images" on human and environmental interactions and all aspects of geography--the one picture above shows how Mexico City has enveloped even the rolling hills as a part of its urban expansion.  


Tags: environment, landscape, images, environment depend, environment adapt, environment modify, pollution, resources, sustainability.

Angela Muster's curator insight, February 21, 12:02 PM

It is important to see pictures like this one to help visualize just how much population, pollution, and consumption are effecting our world. Awareness is vital for change.

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Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers

Aerial Photos of Iceland Volcanic Rivers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

On occasion, we are reminded of how utterly captivating and gorgeous nature is, its visual poetry surrounds us. It just takes a step back, a shift in perspective, to realize how amazing the constructs of this planet are; it’s a beautiful constant balance between order and entropy. Case in point, what appears to be well-crafted, intricate abstract paintings, or works of art, are in reality, mindblowing aerial images of Iceland."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Andre Ermolaev, through his photography has captured the beauty of Iceland's geomorphology.  Being on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has abundant volcanic ash which adds rich color to the fluvial systems.  

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.

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The Science & Education team's curator insight, May 11, 6:15 PM
Having lots of volcanoes, ash, lava, snow, rain and hills gives great potential for dramatic geography for Iceland
Joaquín del Val's curator insight, May 27, 1:20 PM
Espectaculares imágenes de canales fluviales en Islandia
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The Himalayas from 20,000 ft.

"Have you ever dreamed of seeing Mount Everest or fantasized about hiking through the peaks and valleys of the Himalayas? This video, by Teton Gravity Research, might be even better."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Simply stunning.  Sometimes an earth-bound perspective and it's inherent limitations make me want to be able to soar overhead.  Until I get wings, this virtual tour will have to do.  These mountains and the communites that live so close to their heights both invoke a great sense of awe and wonder in me about the beauties of this world.   

 

Tags: Nepal, physicalvideo, landscapeimages.

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amahendru's curator insight, April 22, 9:53 PM

www.amitmahendruphotography.com

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 23, 6:17 PM

brilliant for studies of mountain landscapes and landforms 

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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

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Geographic Profiling Has Revealed Banksy's True Identity

Geographic Profiling Has Revealed Banksy's True Identity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Art meets science in a new geographical profiling study from Queen Mary University of London, which probably just revealed the identity of the art world's most and least iconic figure."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: placespatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class

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Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 9, 9:12 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 9:38 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, March 9, 10:06 AM

I'm deeply ambivalent about this.  The spatial analyst in me loves see that mapping patterns can uncover truths but the cultural geographer in me feels sad that anonymity has been removed since that lead to a greater mystique to his subverse, place-based art installations.  You can read the article to find out who he is, but I prefer the Banksy of my mind's eye. 

 

Tags: place, spatial, images, art, landscape, socioeconomic, class. 

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Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds?

Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you guess where we are taking you today? Here's a clue: This city's name translates to "where the river narrows."
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a delightfully simple premise to National Geographic video's newest series: after seeing scenes from the cultural and physical landscapes of a place can you guess where in the world it is?  You can find more resources about this unnamed country (no cheating) here.   


Tags: images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Place and Self

"We are Dangerdust. We love chalk. We started this project at the beginning of our senior year in college. It all began because we wanted to share a quote that had inspired us, in the hope that it would inspire others. We sneaked into school that weekend to illustrate the quote on an abandoned chalkboard. After that one time we were hooked, and Dangerdust was created."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We are sometimes so obsessively focused on the self in our society, that we discount the communal and the spatial impacts in describing who we are.  So much of our 'selves' that we prize as so highly individualized and unique are a beautiful product of all the places and people who have influenced and shaped our lives. 


Tagsregions, images, art

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The World’s Largest Urban Area Grew Overnight

The World’s Largest Urban Area Grew Overnight | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rapid growth in several cities along the Pearl River Delta has made a Chinese megacity larger and more populous than any other urban area in the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What was a rural landscape dominated by rice paddy fields just a few decades ago is now home to the largest Metropolitan region in the world (depending on who is counting and what areas they are including).  The "slider" comparison of these two satellite images taken of the same area in 1988 and 2014 is staggering (click here for an animated GIF of the same imagery).   


Tags: urbanremote sensing, megacities, China, urban ecology.

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Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 16, 2015 8:50 PM

Already this image is showing a clear impact that the massive increase in population is having on the landscape. The delata has narrowed and so has the major rivers. As population grows in mega cities like this so doesnt the increase for resources such as water, also when it increases this quickly sanitation practices decrease. One can only imagine the inpact on water quality this is also having.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 7:46 AM

It is amazing how fast a modern city can come about when there is no historical city to base the subsequent growth on.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 3:39 PM

It is astounding the amount of growth this one city has had in one decade and reminds me of some of the rapid development within the Middle East since the 70s which transformed cities like Dubai. Ecologically like most of what China does it is a disaster but fascinating from a development  one. Unfortunately the article doesn't offer a population so that it could be compared to Tokyo's since a size comparison was done in terms of land use. Hopefully China will find a sustainable method of growth because if city continue to grow like this it will be surprising if they could maintain stability. I personally thing this rapid growth is dangerous and like India they likely won't be able to keep up. Additionally since China's economy is very reliant on this type of growth it is concerning to think of what may happen to many of these cities when the growth they rely on stops.

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How People Around the World Take Exams

How People Around the World Take Exams | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Examinations, tests, assessments—whatever the nomenclature, it’s hard to imagine schooling without them. Testing is the most popular method of quantifying individuals’ knowledge, often with the intention of objectively measuring aptitude and ability. Test-taking is a dreaded experience that the country’s kids and young adults share with their counterparts across the globe. The ritual at its core doesn’t vary much: Students sit at a table or a computer desk (or sometimes, as shown below, on the floor), pencil and/or mouse in hand, the clock ticking away mercilessly."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I am torn on how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

  1. People and cultures are different all over the world.
  2. People and cultures are the same all over the world.

Cultural practices are often so similar, are done in slight different fashion.  This photo gallery can create opportunities for our students to 'see' themselves in other cultures while at the same time seeing the richness of global cultural practices. 


TagseducationK12, worldwide.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:58 AM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:59 AM

unit 3

careerpath12's curator insight, March 11, 1:10 AM

I am torn on how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

People and cultures are different all over the world.People and cultures are the same all over the world.

Cultural practices are often so similar, are done in slight different fashion.  This photo gallery can create opportunities for our students to 'see' themselves in other cultures while at the same time seeing the richness of global cultural practices. 


Tags: education, K12, worldwide.

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Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It

Even When You Go Off the Grid, You Might Still Be On It | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The images here, taken from the Instagram account @the.jefferson.grid show just a few of the landscapes that can be squeezed into the one-mile squares. The idea behind this sprawling checkerboard emerged after the Revolutionary War. As the United States expanded westward, the country needed a systematic way to divide its newly acquired lands. The original colonies were surveyed using the British system of 'metes and bounds,' with parcels delineated using local geography.  


That approach doesn’t scale very well, and Jefferson proposed to slice the young United States into gridded plots of land.  Jefferson's idea became a reality in 1785 when it was enacted as the Public Land Survey System. Today his grid covers much of the country, and it is still used to survey federal lands — an idea that shaped the physical landscape of half a continent."


Tags: images, land use, landscape, social media, planningspatial, scale, historical.

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Dyna-e International's curator insight, September 1, 2015 12:32 PM

No such thing as being off the grid really. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 8, 2015 1:05 PM

unit 1 and 4

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Expanding the Panama Canal

Expanding the Panama Canal | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In 2006, Panamanians approved a referendum to expand the Panama Canal, doubling its capacity and allowing far larger ships to transit the 100-year-old waterway between the Atlantic and Pacific. Work began in 2007 to raise the capacity of Gatun Lake and build two new sets of locks, which would accommodate ships carrying up to 14,000 containers of freight, tripling the size limit. Sixteen massive steel gates, weighing an average of 3,100 tons each, were built in Italy and shipped to Panama to be installed in the new locks. Eight years and $5.2 billion later, the expansion project is nearing completion. The initial stages of flooding the canals have begun and the projected opening date has been set for April of 2016."


Tag: Panamaimages, transportation, globalization, diffusion, industry, economic.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, September 23, 2015 2:00 PM

I think that much of Central America is presented in Western media as an extremely violent, backwards region, where narcotics and other "hidden" markets dominate the nation's social, cultural, and political structures. Although there is some truth to this, this rendition not only exaggerates the problems these nations face, but help to reinforce negative stereotypes of the region commonly held by many Americans. A story of progress- such as this story of the Panama canal- is widely ignored, which is a shame. The Panama Canal is one of the most crucial waterways in the world, and expanding it will undoubtedly help the Panamanian economy. Although it initially served as the ultimate symbol of colonialism- the United States caused a war and unrecognizably altered the geography of the region to complete the project- it today serves as a symbol of progress in a region of the world widely ignored. It will be interesting to see the impacts this expansion has on trade in the region, as well as the local geography.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:31 AM

the expanding of the panama canal is a major event, as everything from flow of trade to the maximum size of ships will be impacted by this improvement. the Iowa class of us battleship was two feet then the canal, specifically so they could go through if they needed to.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:11 AM

This gallery of 29 images is filled with great teaching images.

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22+ International Borders Around The World

22+ International Borders Around The World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
History (and sometimes, unfortunately, current events) shows us just how easily national borders can change, but we still like to think that they are permanent fixtures. These photos of different national borders around the world show you how both friendly and hostile nations like to fence off their turf.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Borders can make for some striking manifestations of power on the landscape.  On the other hand as seen in this picture of Slovakia, Austria and Hungary, friendship and cooperation can also be inscribed into the landscape.  There are some great teaching images in this gallery. 



Tags: border, political, territoriality, sovereignty,  images, land use, landscape.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:38 AM

Unit 4

Level343's curator insight, June 1, 2015 3:00 PM

Now that's cool!!

Dwane Burke's curator insight, June 3, 2015 6:16 PM

What do these say about the world?

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The Chinese Art of the Crowd

The Chinese Art of the Crowd | Geography Education | Scoop.it
After viewing news photographs from China for years, one of my favorite visual themes is "large crowd formations." Whether the subject is military parades or world-record attempts, mass exercises or enormous performances, the images are frequently remarkable. The masses of people can look beautiful or intimidating, projecting a sense of strength and abundance. Individuals can become pixels in a huge painting, or points on a grid, or echoes of each other in identical uniforms or costumes.


Tags: China, East Asia, cultureart, landscape.

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Nidhal Bk's curator insight, May 20, 2015 8:34 AM

http://serrurier-pontoise.lartisanpscher.com

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 24, 2015 7:19 AM

These photos invoke both a sense of beauty and intimidation. The photos themselves are majestic. They are almost perfect creations of art. The photos also invoke a sense of intimidation and dread. The Chinese have mastered the art of propaganda. They know how to put on a display that invokes both power and fear. Many of their photos involve military parades. The entire point of parading your military is to show both power and intimidation. It is both a threat and honor at the same time.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:30 PM

there were two things i learned from this. first, the Chinese are an insanely regimented society. the government can instill in soldiers the discipline to march in such an exact manner that it looks like a lineup of mirrors. second, the Chinese will beat you at any numbers based world record that catches their attention.