Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Temporary Transit Map

This map "grays out" the inoperable subway lines in New York City that have been flooded or otherwise damaged during Hurricane Sandy.

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The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy

The Aftermath of Hurricane Sandy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
After cutting a destructive path through the Caribbean, Hurricane Sandy caused extensive damage along the East Coast this week.


While the damage wasn't as bad as many feared it could have been, place and spatial context are especially important in assessing the impacts of a natural disaster.  This is a excellent collection of the many devastating images as a result of Hurricane Sandy.  To see some more local images, Rhode Island Department of Transportation put this collection together.   

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Lisa Fonseca's comment, November 6, 2012 10:18 PM
I am speechless, these images have just torn my heart. Here in Providence, Rhode Island listened to multiple people say "oh this storm was nothing" they apparently need to view these photos, to understand Sandy was a monster of a storm. Mother nature is powerful and she can do just about anything. I am so mind boggled by the images, roads completely torn apart I never knew this could happen from a hurricane. It really made me appreciate how safe I was but now seeing these images really makes me want to get out there and tell more people to look at what happened in NJ,CT,NYC, and other places around the coast. My next step now is to get a donation bin started to send over to those states in major need. This is sure another natural disaster to go down in history.
Jordan Zemanek's comment, October 3, 2013 11:11 PM
Just with the information given, I can see how much damage the storm actually caused. Flooding and high winds obviously don't go together well. Although some communities weren't hit as bad as previously anticipated, some areas were largely damaged and the money needed to rebuild will be tremendous.
Alaina Rahn's comment, October 4, 2013 10:14 AM
I think it is very sad. I didn't know it was that bad. Now that I see those pictures it makes me feel very bad for those people.
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Mammoth Storm Plunges NYC into Darkness

Mammoth Storm Plunges NYC into Darkness | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Subway tunnels and parts of the Financial District have been flooded...


The flooding has been as devastating as expected given the height of the storm surge, but this image of Ground Zero still is chilling. 

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Compare Irene to Sandy

Compare Irene to Sandy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Experts say Hurricane Sandy is wider and stronger than Hurricane Irene, which caused more than $15 billion in damage in 2011, and could rival the worst East Coast storm on record.


This is a quick visual comparison of remote sensing images that lets you slide to compare the superimposed images. 

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Monitoring the Storm Surge

Monitoring the Storm Surge | Geography Education | Scoop.it
National Weather Service Advanced Hydrologic Prediction Service...


When the Pawtuxet River flooded in Rhode Island, I was watching this site to get a sense of how bad the flooding was and to put it in historic context (the National Weather Service has links to live data at many locations).  This particular station in NYC at the Battery is important to keep an eye on with Hurricane Sandy because if the strom surge is over 10 feet, the subway system could flood and the issues confronting New York would be devastating.  As meterologist Andy Lesage noted, "During Irene it got to 9.5ft, 8-12 inches shy of flooding the subway system so if the Battery gets to something like 10.25+ ft, it will indicate massive damage to the cities' infrastructure."  For more see, the Weather Underground and Jeff Masters' analysis.


Tags: disasters,water, physical, NYC, transportation, weather and climate.

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Gary Robertson's comment, November 2, 2012 9:57 AM
This chart shows graphically how time-of-day (high tide), time-of-month (high lunar tide), and time of landfall all coincided to help create this disaster. it just wasn't a wind-driven event, but a coincidental alignment of several factors resulting in a worst-case result.
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Nat'l Geographic Video -- Hurricanes 101

Nat'l Geographic Video -- Hurricanes 101 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Find out how hurricanes can be so destructive.

 

Not only will you learn about hurricanes but you can also watch videos about lighting, tornadoes, volcanoes, and overall everything about the weather. These are great videos to use in class when teaching units about natural disasters. These videos are full of great engaging facts.

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Carly Griffiths's curator insight, May 17, 1:04 AM

I absolutely loved watching these videos. I believe they would be a fantastic resource to show students or for students to use for research when exploring natural disasters. This site provides multiple videos on multiple different disasters. Each video provides great information and facts including, causes, when and where they are most likely to happen, the amount of damage, different sizes and speed and past examples. Each video provides such great visuals and explanation for these natural disasters. Students would be able to gain deep knowledge and understandings to support their research and/or investigation. I am currently in the middle of creating a task for my students using digital technologies such as this and incorporating collaboration through Wikis and blog. I plan to use these videos to further my students knowledge and encourage further exploration on these videos for their research.

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ESRI's Interactive Hurricane Map

ESRI's Interactive Hurricane Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map in MUCH more powerful than the previously post one since it's managed by the GIS pros.  It allows you to view continuously updated hurricane information. You can track specific hurricanes Focused on Irene now) and see their projected path.

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Obama visits storm disaster zone

Obama visits storm disaster zone | Geography Education | Scoop.it

KT: Obama has visited New Jersey to observe the damages sustained from hurricane Sandy. New Jersey got hit harder than most and has been severely flooded and damaged in several regions.

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Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes

Sorting the Real Sandy Photos From the Fakes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A pictorial investigation bureau, at your service.


Social media has fundamentally changed how information is disseminated.  Many photos that are spread on Facebook, Twitter and Pinterest can be 'doctored' or mislabeled since citizen journalists aren't held to the same standard of verifying their sources.  In the abundance of information, sorting out fact from fiction can be quite difficult.  Social media has made me a more of a skeptic, and I try not to post a picture that I it can't find it's original source.     

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Preparations for the Storm

This is a link from the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance which is now on Twitter.   UPDATE: This shows the number of power outages in the state

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Coastal Hazard Threat Map

Coastal Hazard Threat Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map of coastal Massachusetts and Rhode Island shows some basic flooding data including: 1) where are the flood warnings (essential the entire coastline), 2) how high the storm surge is, and 3) how high the waves are.


Tags: Rhode Island, water, disasters, geospatial.

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Hurricane Sandy may be unprecedented in East Coast storm history

Hurricane Sandy may be unprecedented in East Coast storm history | Geography Education | Scoop.it
WEATHER GANG | With computer models locked in on the eventuality of a punishing blow for East Coast from Hurricane Sandy, analyses suggest this storm may be unlike anything the region has ever experienced.


This weekend's storm for the East coast is especially interesting.  I won't pretend to be a meteorologist, so I'll quote one: "The upper-air steering pattern that is part of the puzzle is not all that unheard of. It happens when the atmosphere gets blocked over the Atlantic and the flow over the U.S. doubles back on itself. Sometimes big winter storms are involved.  The freak part is that a hurricane happens to be in the right place in the world to get sucked into this doubled-back channel of air and pulled inland from the coast."  Stay safe everyone on the east coast.   


Tagsweather and climate, physical, disasters

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Irene's Punishing Rains Seen in 3-D

Irene's Punishing Rains Seen in 3-D | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Very cool visualizations...always nice to catch the student's eyes. 


Via Richard Petry
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