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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Developing World Cities and Population Density

Developing World Cities and Population Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Without a question, we are living in an urban era. More people now live in cities than anywhere else on the planet and I’ve repeatedly argued that cities are our most important economic engine. As a result of these shifts, we’re seeing megacities at a scale the world has never seen before.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As our cities have massively expanded in the last 70 years, so has the ecological footprint of these metropolitan areas.  This article discusses some of the challenges confronting megacities and their functions within the global urban network. 


Tags: sustainabilitydensity, megacities, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Mr Steven Newman's curator insight, June 26, 2:25 PM

Just a few years ago there were only  20 cities with a pop over 10 million.  I'll use this with my  10 geography class to compare Australia's population and size with these cities and  look at debates around policies.  I,ll try and get the students to debate around ecological sustainability.

Fathie Kundie's curator insight, June 27, 9:05 AM
المدن الأعلى كثافة بالسكان على مستوى العالم
Sally Egan's curator insight, June 29, 6:31 PM

Mega cities and the challenges they face for the future is focus in this article. Great statistics on populations and urban densities are also included.

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The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010

The U.S. Cities That Sprawled the Most (and Least) Between 2000 and 2010 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Two maps and six charts take sprawl rankings to another level.
Seth Dixon's insight:

One of the great results of the decennial census is that geographers, demographers, sociologists, urbanists and countless others, can track the same population or spatial pattern and note historical changes over a 10 year span.  This series of maps and charts highlights some of the major changes.  You shouldn't be surprised that Atlanta is the United States' most sprawling major city and that San Francisco is the most compact, but this article dives beneath surface in a way that is still very accessible.   


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, sprawlneighborhoodplanning, densityplanning

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François Arnal's curator insight, June 6, 11:18 PM

L'étalement urbain aux Etats Unis.

 

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Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World

Comparing Urban Footprints Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In the above poster the cities are arranged (roughly, in order to maximize space) by population. Clearly, size and population are not directly correlated. Some cities take up a lot more space for a smaller population. The relationship between the two, of course, is known as density (population density, urban density)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I shared this a while back, but the creator has since revised the data and updated the layout for the main infographic. The entire set of infographics are tremendous visual tools to compare urbanization patterns around the world. 

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, May 14, 1:38 PM

    Ce qui suit est une série d'infographies comparant les empreintes physiques de 56 villes à travers le monde. Ils sont présentés côte à côte à la même échelle, ce qui permet au spectateur de comparer ces villes. Parmi celles-ci 56 sont quelques-unes des principales villes du monde...

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 22, 9:21 AM

Urban sprawl is a rising problem in the world due to the lack of control and its massive impact on the surrounding environment. These footprints show how unique each city's sprawl is. The surrounding environment is playing a huge role in where and how far each city extends. Chicago, for example, is limited on its eastern side due to Lake Erie's close proximity, and Cleveland is in a similar situation but on its north side where Lake Erie is. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:35 AM

The cities are organized (approximately) to population and shows the size of cities accordingly. The different sizes of cities and their correlating populations is thus revealed from urban places around the world. 

Urban regions stay rather functional and could be seem similar across the board, focusing on major economic activity and transportation.

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How architectural innovations migrate across borders

"As the world's cities undergo explosive growth, inequality is intensifying. Wealthy neighborhoods and impoverished slums grow side by side, the gap between them widening. In this eye-opening talk, architect Teddy Cruz asks us to rethink urban development from the bottom up. Sharing lessons from the slums of Tijuana, Cruz explores the creative intelligence of the city's residents and offers a fresh perspective on what we can learn from places of scarcity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As a geographer native to the San Diego region with family on both sides of the border, I found this TED talk very compelling personally, but also rich in geographic themes (city planning, diffusion, governance of space, socioeconomic differences in land use patterns, etc.).  Relations across the border are economic, cultural and political in nature, and the merger of those varied interests have led to an uneven history of both cooperation and separation.  San Diego and Tijuana have more to offer each other than economic markets--the ideas born out of distinct socioeconomic and political contexts can be just what is needed on the other side of the border.


Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, sprawlneighborhood, borders. planning, urban ecology, densityplanning, TED

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The World's Most Densely Populated Cities

The World's Most Densely Populated Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The growth of these cities will create a host of environmental and health problems.


By 2210, the global population is expected to grow from just more than 7 billion to 11.3 billion — with 87 percent of the population living in urban areas, according to a new working paper by researchers from NYU’s Marron Institute.

Most of these individuals will be in what’s now the developing world — creating a host of environmental and health problems.

If projections are correct, these new urban dwellers will require the world’s existing cities to expand six-fold to accommodate triple the residents, Richard Florida wrote in The Atlantic. Plus, the world will need 500 new “megacities” of 10 million or more, he wrote.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Lola Ripollés's curator insight, March 25, 3:42 PM

Pointed out in the latest report on Construction Industry 

Trends by Accenture, the rise of the Megacities will empower construction whilst raising many environmental and health problems.

Valerie Bauwens's curator insight, March 28, 1:46 AM

Or will there be a natural come back to the country side?

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 2:42 PM

 Cairo, Egypt has a population density of 9,400 residents per square kilometer. THese numbers are crazy think about it compared to MA or RI and our major cities.

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Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty

Concentrations of Wealth and Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

In this map, all Zip codes with more than 500 people are ranked from 0 to 99 based on household income and education.  The 'Super Zips' rank 95 or higher. The map at the top shows the highest concentration of the nation’s 650 Super Zips. The typical household income in a Super Zip is $120,272, and 68 percent of adults hold college degrees. That compares with $53,962 and 27 percent in the other zips mapped.  Washington D.C. shows a powerful bifurcation: One-third of Zip codes in the D.C. area are considered ‘Super Zips’ for wealth and education and large swaths of the metropolitan area are considered food deserts.


This weekend I had the privilege of flying essentially from Boston to Washington DC at night and was mesmerized by the vast urban expanse beneath me.  It was the greatest concentration of wealth in the United States as well as the some of the most blighted regions of the country.  What explains the spatial patterns of highly concentrated wealth and poverty in the biggest cities?  Are cities a causal factor in wealth and poverty creation?  What does this zip code data tell us? What accounts for the spatial patterns in your region?    


Tags: Washington DC, urban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, December 18, 2013 6:59 AM

See where the wealth and poverty are in America using this great map.

Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 9, 7:44 PM

wonderful

 

Ishwer Singh's curator insight, January 20, 3:56 AM

This picture shows the cocentrations of poverty and affluence.  The areas hilighted in yellow show the areas which are wealthy and the dark blue showing the poor. This coincides with the amout of pay and the education levels in these countries. Areas such as Boston, New York and Washington show high cocentrations of affluence. These areas also have much higher education systems and more well -paid jobs. Countries which are highlighted in dark blue are countries with lesser education and lesser paid jobs. This shows the  extent at which poverty can affect a country.

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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of infographics  is a tremendous visual tool to compare urbanization patterns around the world. 


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities. 

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, December 29, 2013 6:45 AM

Interesting comparison of cities and their urban footprints

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:41 AM

useful for both Year 8 and Year 11 Geography.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, May 20, 9:15 AM

This a conglomeration of maps that represent the physical layout and land use of some of the major cities in the world, color coded by region. 

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How Chicago’s Housing Crisis Ignited a New Form of Activism

How Chicago’s Housing Crisis Ignited a New Form of Activism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An innovative campaign to move “home-less people into people-less homes.”
Seth Dixon's insight:

Chicago's poorer neighborhoods have experienced a severe decline as homes are being foreclosed at an alarming rate (62,000 vacant properties in Chicago and 40% of the homes underwater on the South and West Sides).  When sections of a neighborhood are left vacant or in disrepair, it can have a lead to negative impacts on the community.  To combat both the homelessness issue and the vacant home problem at the same time, "Cook County now plans to form what will become the nation’s largest land bank, an entity that will acquire thousands of vacant residences, demolishing some, turning others into much-needed rentals and holding onto others until they can be released, strategically, back into the market."   


Tags: Chicagohousing, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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fabio sousa's comment, June 3, 2013 6:00 AM
coisa mais linda :)
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The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth?

The Big Squeeze: Can Cities Save The Earth? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What if you put all 7 billion humans into one city, a city as dense as New York, with its towers and skyscrapers? How big would that 7 billion-sized city be? As big as New Jersey? Texas? Bigger? Are cities protecting wild spaces on the planet?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This NPR article pulls together some great images of dense urban housing as well is some stellar infographics to show the importance of cities to a growing global population. 


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:12 AM

Its been known that Americans have lavish lifestyles compared to outher populous countries. In this article they show a represntation if the entire world lived like (had as much space) americans and it was astoudning. It would take 4 earths to fit the world if everyone had this lavish lifestyle. So we obviously need to change our ways. Cities ae very helpful to sharing this earth. They serve as a main hub so youll only have to ship to a few places. This with the shortening of distances would save tons of gas and othe rescources. But as the article states everyone living in a Main city wouldnt be possible because people need to produce outside the city. So in my opinion for this city world to work it would need to be a few megacities preferably one on each continent and for them to the city be surronded by production methods.

Bryan Chung's curator insight, May 8, 4:40 PM

cool

Peter Hillman's curator insight, July 22, 8:42 PM

An interactive site for comparisons of city sizes

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Ultra-Dense Housing

Ultra-Dense Housing | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hong Kong is one of the most densely populated areas in the world. Seven million people living in 423 square miles (1,096 sq km).
Seth Dixon's insight:

These apartments are so small that they can only be photographed from the ceiling.  Massive urbanization with limited space means that real estate is at a premium and many laborers will not be able to afford large living spaces.  Hong Kong is an extreme example of this and it brings new meaning to the term "high-density housing." 


Tagshousing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, April 14, 2:55 PM

With Hong Kong being one of the most densely populated areas in the world, it is no surprise that living quarters are tight with not much space to move. In the photos shown, apartments were so small that they could only be photographed from the ceiling. There is no place to relax and residents are lucky to have whatever they can fit besides their beds. Families with children have to have bunk-beds in order to accommodate. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 15, 2:57 PM

Wow, I cannot imagine living in these conditions. It looks smaller than a prison cell; only people pay to live there. These extreme living conditions are a result of over population in an area. It seems the city of Hong Kong is running out of places to build and house the abundance of people living there. It appears the average person in Hong Kong lives in these conditions due to the high price tags on larger apartments. This is a sad reality.   

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 8:06 AM

Living in such close quarters must be incredibly hard to do for those people who are new to Hong Kong and know something different. For Chinese residents, this is normal. Living in such small areas is a part of the Chinese daily life and culture. China is so population dense that this is the result of living there, tiny living spaces.

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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are many types of housing development patterns throughout the world.  This article provides a summary of approximately 20 different housing patterns common in the United States with a visual example demonstrate the impact on the urban footprint (Pictured above is an example of new urbanism in Boulder, CO).  Each neighborhood has distinct cultural amenities and attracts particular socioeconomic market segments. 


Questions to Ponder: What housing patterns are you drawn to?  How come?  What are the advantages for the residents to live in that type of community?  What are the impacts that the housing pattern has on the physical environment and the urban system?  What systems are most profitable for developers?  How does the layout of the neighborhood alter the sense of place?  

   

Tagshousing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 1:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 5:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:57 PM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A professor criticizes the "culture of quantification," (in the journal cultural geographies) arguing that we don't do enough with the data we collect.  If all we do is count (or attempt to count the homeless), does that help them in any way or change the realities that lead to homelessness?  Are we counting them just to give us the numbers to receive credit that may help other programs but not help the homeless?  Is data for data's sake of any value?


UPDATE: Another geographer noted some other issues of homelessness on the website facebook page, specifically in regard to this map of homelessness: "A problem associated with this map is that while the numbers get smaller, it raises the question: where did they go? (answer: Hollywood, after an emphasis on policing pushed them out)...this could be tied in to a discussion about map scale."


Tags: statistics, class, census, socioeconomic, housing, poverty.


Via Allison Anthony
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The Geography of Underwater Homes

The Geography of Underwater Homes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New data from Zillow shows fewer homeowners underwater, but the pattern varies widely by geography.

 

The Sunbelt (especially California and Florida) have the highest percentage of homeowners that are 'underwater' and owe more than the home is worth.  Also hit hard are declining metro areas area of the rust belt. 

Question to ponder: Why would these places be hit the hardest?  

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The Rise of Innovative Districts

"Today, innovation is taking place where people can come together, not in isolated spaces. Innovation districts are this century's productive geography, they are both competitive places and 'cool spaces' and they will transform your city and metropolis."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As described by the Brookings Institution in their exploration regarding innovation districts, they are geographic areas where leading-edge companies, research institutions, start-ups, and business incubators are located in dense proximity. These districts are created to facilitate new connections and ideas, speed up the commercialization of those ideas, and support urban economies by growing jobs in ways that leverage their distinct economic position.


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities, labor.

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Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico

Aerial housing photographs show stark division between rich and poor in Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new advertising campaign is seeking to draw attention to the gap between the wealthy and the poverty-stricken in Mexico by showing how they co-exist in disturbingly close proximity.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a wide economic gap between the rich and the poor and in the spatial layout of urban settlements. Often an accompanying  tangible separation exists between the communities where these groups live.  These images (captured by a helicopter pilot with a keen eye for iconic and cultural landscapes in Mexico City) show neighborhoods in Mexico where this separation does not exist.   Collectively they are reminiscent of this famous photograph in Brazil that shows the uneasy juxtaposition of favelas and luxurious housing. 


Questions to Ponder: What are these neighborhoods like?  How are these two communities linked and separated?  Compare and contrast life on both sides of the fence.    


Tags:  housingeconomic, socioeconomicBrazil, urban, squatter, neighborhood, Mexico

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Clarissa Rangel's curator insight, May 28, 5:49 PM

Interesting look at the social mobility of a super-urban area. 

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 9:26 AM

An advertising campaign hopes to show the differences of income and living standards between neighborhoods in Mexico.

The place of these areas are so vastly different as well as there interactions as the lower class makes shanty architecture and the upper class develops large condos and buildings just for residence.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, June 17, 5:35 AM

And again in Brazil

http://civitasinclusive.wordpress.com/2013/03/16/paraisopolis-brazil-by-tuca-vieira-2004/

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What you’d need to make in every county in America to afford a decent one-bedroom

What you’d need to make in every county in America to afford a decent one-bedroom | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The National Low Income Housing Coalition took those fair market rents and calculated how much a worker would have to earn per hour to cover such modest housing, if we assume a 40-hour work week and a 52-week year. They call this rate a "housing wage," and it is, unsurprisingly, much higher than the minimum wage in much of the country."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article on the economic geography of housing is supplemented by this interactive map with county-level data. There are a lot of conversations that could stem from an analysis of this data.  Where are the housing prices highest?  How come?  This is a resource that could allow students to explore the economic geography of their own region and apply that local knowledge to understand processes throughout the United States.   


Tags:  housingeconomic, socioeconomic.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, April 26, 7:05 PM

Geography Education & Economics...!

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 7:38 AM

unit 6-7

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The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America

The Most And Least Sprawling Cities In America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Tracking changes in the shape of American cities over 10 years reveals which cities pack the most into a small space, but don't worry, sprawlers: Los Angeles shows you can change your fate."


Today’s nearly 314 million U.S. residents will expand to 401 million in less than 40 years. Wherever you fall on the cultural spectrum between country and city mouse, the fact remains that we simply won’t be able to use up resources the way we do now in sprawling suburbs shaped by car culture.  See also this infographic depicting those with the worst sprawl. and CNN Money's list of the worst sprawl and a discussion of it's impacts.  


Tags: density, sustainability, housing, urban, planning, unit 7 cities

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 10:35 AM

Ruimtelijk ordening, stedelijke gebieden

VS

L.Long's curator insight, April 15, 3:57 PM

Urban  Dynamics

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Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings

Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The high-tech project would help officials decide which abandoned buildings can be demolished.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This crowd-sourced mapping project is an great example of how a community can work together (using geospatial technologies and geographic thinking) to mitigate some of the more pressing issues confronting the local neighborhoods.  Many optimists have argued that Detroit has "good bones" to rebuild the city, but it needs to built on as smaller scale.  This project helps to assess what is being used by residents and should stay, and what needs to go.  Want to explore some of the data yourself?  See Data Driven Detroit.      

 

Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhoodmapping, GIS, geospatial.


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Fair Housing

Fair Housing | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Where you live is important. It can dictate quality of schools and hospitals, as well as things like cancer rates, unemployment, or whether the city repairs roads in your neighborhood. On this week's show, stories about destiny by address.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This hour-long podcast addresses some has key issues in urban geography by exploring the history of redlining, the Fair Housing Act and other fair housing initiatives.  The urban cultural mosaic of the United States and the neighborhoods of our cities have been greatly shaped by these issues.   Currently gentrification is reshaping many U.S. cities and fits into the wider scope of the issues raised in the podcast.


Tags: housingracism, urban, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhood, ethnicity, race, podcast.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 12:54 AM

this podcast can gives us insight into other peoples experiences and decision making processes in choosing were to live and how that effects life for them. Depending on where we live rent may be cheaper but also living conditions and employment may not be all that great. Gentrification or community improvement also shows us, this renovating process helps change our old neighborhoods and tries to create better places for people to life, it speaks about fair housing and the various experiences that people have in the American way of living.

Mrs. B's curator insight, December 3, 2013 5:44 PM

PODCAST FOR URBAN UNIT

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Crack Shack or Mansion?

Crack Shack or Mansion? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you tell a Vancouver mansion from a crack shack?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Which homes were once being used to sell illegal drugs and which homes could be sold for over $1 million?  It is not as easy to distinguish between the two as you might think.  What constitutes affordable housing can change dramatically from neighborhood to neighborhood.  Want more?  Try Crack Shack or Mansion II.


Tags: housing, narcotics, urban, economic, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:31 PM


In this world any house can be held as a drug location. in the neighbor I live there was a house that broken into by the cops in which they found hundreds of pounds of drugs and none of the neighbors knew. We thought it was an abandoned home. a crack shack or mansion it is difficult to determine if it is or not.

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 7:58 AM

This I found to be very interesting. To me it was very sterotypical and much harder than I thought it would be. I figured it would be easy to depict a Mansion from a Crack Shack, but I guess I was wrong. Different areas different lifestyles.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 6:55 AM

A fairly funny game that makes fun of the astronomical real estate prices in Vancouver, BC. I actually wasn't incredibly surprised as I've watched some HGTV. Since many of the shows are Canadian imports the extremely high priced homes in Vancouver and Toronto are often featured.

 

I guessed 10/16. The game should branch out to Toronto, we might've caught a glimpse of Rob Ford.

 

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American Homes Through the Decades

American Homes Through the Decades | Geography Education | Scoop.it

New homes dominate the market across the Sunbelt, but you can also find older homes with historical features and distinct architectural styles in most major metros -- from stained glass windows in homes built before the 1900s to snail showers found in homes from the 2000s.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive feature shows some intriguing historical insight into the United States metropolitan housing markets and this article associated with the interactive analyzes the growth trends in particular cities.

 

Questions to Ponder: how is this real estate interactive a portal into the historical economic geography of U.S. cities?  What explains the regional patterns?  New England?  Texas?  


Tagshousing, urban, unit 7 cities.

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Meridith Hembree Berry's curator insight, May 7, 2013 7:41 AM

This interactive map is quite fascinating to view the settlement patterns. Drop in the rivers. Consider the movement to the Sunbelt. This would make for a really interesting essay to speculate (and support) the reasons people move to specific areas.  

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Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions

Photos of Children From Around the World With Their Most Prized Possessions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Chiwa - Mchinji, Malawi Shot over a period of 18 months, Italian photographer Gabriele Galimberti's project Toy Stories compiles photos of children from around the world with their prized possesions—their toys.
Seth Dixon's insight:

How are the lives of these children different from those in your neighborhood?  How are their lives the same? 

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John Slifko's curator insight, March 22, 2013 10:53 PM

geography and history were two of Dewey's most important tools in pedagogy in strengthening the imagination of the child 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 3:40 PM

This is horrifying and really puts things in perspective.  Their toys are not what they need.  None of these kids had anything creative except for the building blocks... I would have liked to have seen some paints and paintings, because I hugely believe that schools suck the creativity out of people's lives.  Toys can be... 'imaginative,' but not really.  Toys get put away when a kid turns 10.  Then they're in school.  Then they're at work... it was interesting to see the farmer girl with farm toys, but seriously, again, creativity should be encouraged at that age.  If people are not creative, they become creatures that absorb the habits and things that they are taught, with no ability to deal with new situations, or adapt their environment in a positive manner to better suit themselves or others.  I hate the stagnancy of the world today.  I used to play guitar in Providence on the streets, I have publically painted at URI, I have given paintings away to friends, and I love sharing ART, which can change the world, if only by one mind at a time.  I believe in the butterfly effect and that these kids should have something artsy as their most prized possession, because to not have that is to reflect the corporate importance in society on buying manufactured goods.  As for the kid with toy guns, it really isn't my business to speak ill of him, but seriously! He will end up with a TV show like Duck Dynasty one day or something... hope it works out for him.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 9:01 AM

This shows us how kids from different regions in the world value certain items that to others may seem almost trivial. Around the world everything is seen differently because situations are different.

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City Life Changes How Our Brains Deal With Distractions

City Life Changes How Our Brains Deal With Distractions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new study finds that urban minds don't pay as much attention to their surroundings unless they're highly engaging.
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's often noted that people from smaller towns prefer a slower pace of life and people from large cities enjoy the hustle and bustle more.  So does the urban environment change how we handle the vast quantity of information in major metropolitan areas?  This article points to data that says it does.  


Tags: rural, housing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

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nancercize's curator insight, May 31, 2013 7:03 AM

This helps explain why we are exhausted at the end of the day, and why a walk in the park is so refreshing. We need to make sure city folk have parks nearby.

Suggested by Don Brown Jr
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Jodhpur - India's Blue City

Jodhpur - India's Blue City | Geography Education | Scoop.it

DB: The aesthetics of architecture within a society not only reveal the communities interpretation of what is considered beautiful or pleasing in appearance but also differentiates between what is considered sacred or important. The symbolic significance of aesthetics in colors, designs and a place of residence can be indicative of socioeconomic standing is within society and what the community values.  Jodhpur, India is well known for the beautiful wave of blue houses that dominate the landscape of a rather dry region. However, it is believed that these blue houses originally were the result of ancient caste traditions. 


Brahmins (who were at the very top of the caste system) housed themselves in these “Brahmin Blue” homes to distinguish themselves from the members of other castes. Now that the Indian government officially prohibits the caste system, the use of the color blue has become more widespread. Yet Jodhpur is one of the only cities in India that stands steadfast to its widespread aesthetics obsession with the color blue which is making it increasingly unique, creating a new sense of communal solidarity among its residence.

 

Questions to Consider: How has color influenced the cultural geography of this area?  How are the aesthetics of this community symbolic of India’s traditional past, present and possible future?


Tags: South Asia, culture, housing, landscape, unit 3 culture.

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ctoler geo 152's curator insight, July 21, 11:10 PM

never knew this city existed. Blue City!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Infographic: Palestinian homes demolished

Infographic: Palestinian homes demolished | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Report by an Israeli non-governmental organisation says 2011 was a record year for Palestinian displacement.

 

This infographic comes from the group Visualizing Palestine. This corresponds with the UN's recent statement that Gaza 'will not be liveable by 2020' given Israeli policies.

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Nic Hardisty's comment, September 4, 2012 9:16 AM
What a powerful infographic. To think that the international community (in large part) has idly watched 160,000 Palestinians become homeless, with little more than a few harsh words, is staggering. While these displacement policies are not exclusive to Israel, Israel does stand as the most public modern example of this. This problem transcends race, ethnicity, culture, or religion- it is simply one group dominating and subjugating another, and these actions should be recognized and condemned by global community.