Geography Education
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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Google Maps Smarty Pins

Google Maps Smarty Pins | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Smarty Pins is a Google Maps based geography and trivia game.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As stated in a review of Smarty Pins on Mashable, "Google unveiled a fun new game this week that tests players' geography and trivia skills.  Called 'Smarty Pins' the game starts players off with 1,000 miles (or 1,609 kilometers if they're not based in the United States), and asks them to drop a pin on the city that corresponds with the correct answer to a given question." 


This game is wonderfully addictive...I haven't enjoyed a mapping trivia platform this much since I discovered GeoGuessr.  I answered 38 questions before I ran out of miles...how far did you get?  


Tagsgoogle, fun, mapping, place, trivia.

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, July 7, 4:52 AM

Un gioco lanciato da Google che mette alla prova la conoscenza della geografia. 

Viene posta una domanda, che ha come risposta una località. Google più o meno fa vedere una porzione di mappa che comprende anche la città/risposta. Per rispondere si prende il PIN e lo si posiziona nel luogo corretto. 

Molto divertente, ma ci sono due difetti che spero vengano presto corretti. Innanzitutto ci sono un po' troppe domande sulle vicende inglesi. Ma che cavolo ne so io, di quale città era Duca un certo ceffo dell'inizio del '900? Suvvia... 

E poi, anche google, maledetti, posizionano la mappa in modo che la città/risposta si trovi in un raggio di 1000 miglia (o 1600 km e rotti). Ma si può? Ragazzi (dico a Google) guardate che il sistema metrico internazionale è quello decimale basato sul metro, mica su miglia, pietre, piedi, pertiche, pollici e pezzoloni!

flea palmer's curator insight, July 7, 10:33 AM

This is really good fun - I got gold (14/15) not sure how many miles though!

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 10, 9:54 AM

An interesting way to get anyone interacting with Google Maps...

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The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the nuts and bolts behind Google Earth might be difficult to replicate in the computer lab, but it is critical to conceptually understand how geospatial data is used today.  This series of images shows how important remote sensing is for our modern digital mapping platforms.  


Tags: cartography, visualization, mappingremote sensing, google.

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Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

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137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art

137 World Landmarks and Other Crazy Google Maps Art | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Bay Area's Jenny Odell creates maddeningly complex sets of similar structures, like stadiums, nuclear plants and cargo ships.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love geographically inspired art.  How many of the 137 icon features (as portrayed in Google Maps but removed from their context) can you identify?  For a higher-resolution, image and more of her art, click here


Tags: mapping, art, google, trivia.

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Sean de Basti's curator insight, August 27, 2013 10:31 AM

do you know where everything is located?

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Finding the Hidden Faces in Google Maps

Finding the Hidden Faces in Google Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"And they've found many more faces, too – because they've actually built a computer program that sifts through Google Maps with facial-recognition technology to find..."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: google, mapping, geospatial.

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Geography Bee Video

What is a border? What is a peninsula? A look into why geography is important to understand as students around the country prepare for the 2013 National Geog...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I loved participating at the Rhode Island Geography Bee this weekend.  This video was shared with all the parents, teachers and students to help them understand that while the Bee may focus on specific bits of knowledge/trivia, it is the beginning and a foundation for spatial thinking to understand patterns and processes. 


Tags: geo-inspiration, geography education.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, April 8, 2013 6:58 PM

This is a short video about why Geography is an important subject inhelping to understand the world in which we live.

Samuel Yeats's curator insight, May 8, 2013 12:37 AM

Q1) Based on the information in this video, would you consider Geography as a broad subject and why?

Q2) Why do you believe that Geography is important? (Using examples from the video and your own opinion)

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geteach.com

geteach.com | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Free site dedicated to help teachers educate and engage students using Google Earth
Seth Dixon's insight:

GE Teach is a phenomenal site, designed by an AP teacher to bring geospatial technologies into the classroom in a way that is incredibly user-friendly. This site allows you to use Google Earth with clickable layers. With multiple data layers of physical and human geography variables, this interactive globe puts spatial information in powerful, yet fun, student-inspired platform.  Click here for a video tutorial.


Tags:  google, virtual tours, geospatial, edtech.


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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, March 29, 2013 9:54 AM

Use Google Earth in the classroom with clickable layering of maps.  Great for bringing Geography into your classroom!

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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love this time-lapse animation of all the county and state-level boundary changes in United States history.  Would you like to see this in greater detail?  Would you want to download the data and create your own visualization of this?  The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries has all of this data as GIS shapefiles, Google Earth KMZ files and PDFs for the whole country as well as for each individual state.  This project sponsored by The Newberry and the National Endowment for the Humanities has tremendous potential for use in the classroom for history and geography teachers alike.  


Tags: historical, USA, borders, time lapse, mapping, edtech.

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Emma Lafleur's curator insight, January 29, 2013 6:53 PM

I am interested in US History and watching the creation of the boundaries with the year that they were created gives a lot of insight into the people and population of that time. Also the rate of change in size from year to year gives insight into the economic and political status of the country at that time. This is a great clip to watch even if just to see how much the country has physically changed over time.

Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

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Discover Ancient Rome in Google Earth

"See Rome as it looked in 320 AD and fly down to see famous buildings and monuments in 3D. Select the 'Ancient Rome 3D' layer under Gallery in Google Earth."

Seth Dixon's insight:

What happens whe you teach ancient historical geography using modern geospatial technologies?  Great things can happen and new perspectives on the world can open up for students and teachers alike. 


Tags: historical, google, virtual tours, Italy, geospatial, edtech.

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Giuseppe Corsaro's curator insight, August 13, 2013 8:32 AM

Guardare l'antica Roma così come appariva nel 320 d.C. e volare giù per vedere edifici famosi in 3D. Seleziona 'Ancient Rome 3D'  nella Gallery di Google Earth.

Neville R Langit's curator insight, January 13, 9:56 PM

got to love google earth

Keith Mielke's curator insight, January 17, 4:10 PM

It's astounding how modern technology can really take us back to ancient times to see how others not only lived but prospered.

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Trekking the Grand Canyon for Google Maps

Trekking the Grand Canyon for Google Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The term "street view" in Google Maps is continually getting stretched as the world's oceans, canyons, mountains and even cemeteries are being added to this ever-expanding database. 


Tags: Google, mapping, cartography, geospatial, cemetery

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WORLDWIDE CARPETS : David Hanauer design

WORLDWIDE CARPETS : David Hanauer design | Geography Education | Scoop.it

David Hanauer has created sumptuous rugs that are inspired by Google Earth images.  These images in a repeating patterns create a stunning visual effect.  Paired with Persian styling to create unique, geography inspired carpets, this gallery has 6 different pieces in this art gallery.


Tags: art, google.

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Map Envelope

Map Envelope | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Print your own customized, place-based envelopes using Google Maps imagery. 


UPDATE: Noted UK geography blogger Alan Parkinson has created lesson plans that follow a similar trajectory, getting student to work with Digimaps.  The lesson plan is available here in PDF format.  


Tags: art, google, mapping

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30 Shocking and Unexpected Google Street View Photos

30 Shocking and Unexpected Google Street View Photos | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Canadian artist Jon Rafman is an unusual photographer - he explores Google Street Views and takes screenshots of the most incredible sights here.

 For more, see: http://9-eyes.com

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Dania's comment, August 30, 2012 12:29 AM
incredible images... I always love looking at pictures because a photo speaks or says thousands words... Plus now is connecting images with physical geography, it gives a more clear view of the region and its' people. good job for Jon Rafman... I love his work
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Strange Things in Google Maps

Strange Things in Google Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This site "Map of Strange" is dedicated to showing strange things that can be seen in Google Maps. Displayed here is a beach that I loved to go to growing up in San Diego.  Coronado is written in large stones on this part of the beach right next to the red roof of the famous Hotel Del Corondo (this tab is labeled 'writing of the beach').

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Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"America and its allies have refused to accept the region's separatist move to join Russia.  A look at the maps available on two Google Maps Web addresses — one ending in .com and another in .ru — shows the disparity. In Russia, Web visitors see a solid line dividing Crimea from neighboring Ukraine. In the U.S., a dotted line separates the two, implying a disputed status within the country."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this podcast we learn that this isn't the only international border dispute that is displayed differently in Google Maps.  Google uses over 30 distinct versions of international borders because their is an underlying geopolitical dimension to cartography.  This brings up more questions than it answers--How is the Kashmir displayed in India?  Pakistan?  The West Bank in Israel or Egypt?  If you haven't explored Google Maps in other languages, consider this your invitation to read maps as you would a text and to think about the political implications of making a map.   


Tags: google, mapping, borders, political.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 1, 12:33 PM

unit 1 map bias!!!

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When Google Earth Goes Awry

When Google Earth Goes Awry | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"These jarring moments expose how Google Earth works, focusing our attention on the software. They reveal a new model of representation: not through indexical photographs but through automated data collection from a myriad of different sources constantly updated and endlessly combined to create a seamless illusion; Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation. These uncanny images focus our attention on that process itself, and the network of algorithms, computers, storage systems, automated cameras, maps, pilots, engineers, photographers, surveyors and map-makers that generate them.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

The quote above from Clement Valla shows some of the problems with trusting too completely in a form of technology if you are not sure how it works or what its limitations are.  What does he mean when he says "Google Earth is a database disguised as a photographic representation?"  What does this have to do with the term metadata?   


Tags: cartography, visualization, mapping, art, google.

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Mary Rack's curator insight, August 26, 2013 10:10 AM

This post represents a "sub-issue" which underlies many of today's  decisions: How much "information" is really a composite of items that may or may not be related? And how many of our decisions are based on those constructs? As a result, are we liviing in a "house of cards", a fantasy world that is sure to collapse around us one day? It's a scary thought. 

Gregory S Sankey Jr.'s curator insight, September 12, 2013 9:55 AM

I understand that this article mostly depicts the inherent limitations with our current technology within GIS systems but I mostly just found these images to be eerily and awkwardly beautiful. Art made accidentely. Thank-you flawed technology.

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Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world

Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Placing Literature maps book scenes in the real world."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article reviews a great new site, Placing Literature.  Much like Google Lit Trips, this site's goal is to make geography come alive in literature.  Given that this site is still in its infancy, there are few novels and places in the system, but I don't see that as a drawback.  I see this as a fantastic platform for a student project where they could make a significant online contribution.

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Yael BOUBLIL's curator insight, June 29, 2013 5:18 AM

Une piste intéressante...

MelissaRossman's curator insight, August 30, 2013 10:48 AM

wonderful

 

MelissaRossman's comment, August 30, 2013 10:48 AM
wonderful
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Google Maps Engine

Google Maps Engine | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Google Maps Engine makes it easy for you to create beautiful maps, share them with others, and reach your audience no matter where they are. It's built on the same platform that provides Google services to millions of people worldwide, so your users have a consistent and familiar experience wherever they are."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Google has become more and more involved with geospatial technologies and platforms.  This new Maps Engine (still in beta testing) appears to be Google entry into the world of GIS.  Maps Engine is not nearly as robust as ArcGIS Online or even Google Earth and it has many limitations (can't upload a CSV file with more than 100 data points, can't use KML or shapefiles, no archive of ready-made layers, etc). 


It's redeeming value lies in the simplicity of the platform; if all you want to do is draw your own points, lines and polygons on top of a map and be able to get started within 30 seconds, then this is worth exploring.  Those features are incredibly intuitive and user-friendly and I foresee various educational possibilities using this in the classroom, but am still 'test-driving' the platform.      


Tags googleGIS, geospatial, edtech, K12.

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Johani Karonen's curator insight, May 8, 2013 4:08 AM

I love maps! Let's se what this little darling can do.

JoseMªRiveros's comment, May 8, 2013 10:06 AM
useful!
Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:51 PM

Google Maps Engine | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

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Google Says "Ungoogleable" Can't Be A Swedish Word

Google Says "Ungoogleable" Can't Be A Swedish Word | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Ogooglebar. That's Swedish, and means "something you can't find with the use of a search engine." At least, that's what the Language Council of Sweden wanted Ogooglebar to mean--until Google stepped in, fearing that the word had negative connotations for the firm."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I am used to the French trying to slow the flow of English words into French, but shocked that Google would join in the fray to slow linguistic change.  Words evolve based on cultural shifts and technological changes and the computer industry has especially created new words to describe emerging, new social interactions.  I'm certain that the company Google is thrilled that "to google" is the verb of choice to describe the action of searching for online for content.  I would have guessed that Google was savvy enough to understand that this "ungoogleable" term is not an indictment on the company, but a new way to define that elusive, mysterious, indefinable quality for a generation that sometimes acts as if everything can be found of Google. 


Tags: language, culture, technology, google, diffusion.

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Google Lit Trips


Seth Dixon's insight:

Google Earth is a great teaching tool for geographers, but it is also a way to bring geography and spatial thinking to other disciplines.  Google Lit Trips makes the journeys that take place in literature (both fiction and non-fiction) all the more real by mapping out the movements as a KML file that can be viewed in Google Earth.  By embedding pictures, websites, videos and text into the path, this becomes an incredibly interactive resource for teachers of all levels. 


Tags: google, virtual tours, English, edtech.

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 17, 2013 7:51 AM

Utiliser Google Earth pour cartographier l'itinéraire de personnages de fiction, afin de mêler géographie et littérature. 

GoogleLitTrips Reading List's comment, March 19, 2013 10:30 PM
I'm very appreciative. Thanks! Jerome, GoogleLitTrips.com
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Emergency and Disaster Information Service

Emergency and Disaster Information Service | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Map of the World, in real time with natural disaster information.

"This is a Emergency and Disasters Information and monitoring services. Hosted by National Association of Radio-distress signalling and Infocommunications.

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Island shown in Google Maps doesn’t actually exist

Island shown in Google Maps doesn’t actually exist | Geography Education | Scoop.it

There’s a South Pacific island positioned midway between Australia and New Caledonia featured on various marine charts, world maps, and has appeared in publications since at least the year 2000. It’s listed as Sandy Island on Google Maps and Google Earth, and yet Australian scientists have just discovered it doesn’t exist.


As part of a 25-day voyage, the group went to the area, only to find  a 1,400m (4,620ft) deep section of the Coral Sea. The team collected 197 different rock samples, more than 6800km of marine geophysical data, and mapped over 14,000 square kilometers of the ocean floor.  This is just a reminder that a map is only as reliable as the information used to compile that map (see BBC article as well).   For another reminder of this same idea see "The Republic of Null Island." 

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 10:36 AM

Typical. How many times do we see information on the internet thats not totally accurate? Although maps such as Google Maps should be accurate enough for people to trust them this wasn't the case. Who knows why there is this random island that doesn't actually exist on the map?

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Street View goes underwater

Street View goes underwater | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...


I wasn't planning on an ocean mapping portion of my class today, but this new development changes that. 


Tags: water, biogeography, mapping, google.

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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 26, 2012 10:31 AM
This new wave of technology that is being used and introduced to society is amazing! I never thought that they could expand into the sea but it is definetly something that could be to the benefit of those who work in the field. Also, it is a great way to create lessons for children and adults on how to protect our oceans from waste. They get a glimpse as to what lies beneath the surface. Raising the bar everyday. Thank you for this article!
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 8:51 AM
Thanks. The mere sight of this turtle creates a lot of ideas,and hopes for a better future. We have to open up the eyes of our youth to take care of all things alive.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 8:51 AM
Thanks. The mere sight of this turtle creates a lot of ideas,and hopes for a better future. We have to open up the eyes of our youth to take care of all things alive.
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Google Earth Fractals

Google Earth Fractals | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Who says you can't integrate geography and real world applications into the math curriculum?  Paul Bouke has scoured the Earth searching for fractals in the natural environment and created this amazingly artistic remote sensing gallery (with KMZ files for viewing in Google Earth as well).  


Tags: Remote sensing, art, math, google, physical, landforms, geomorphology

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Seth Dixon's comment, September 9, 2012 8:40 PM
Thanks for sharing so many great link on FB and have been able to use several. I'm glad that the sharing can go in both directions.
Ann Kissinger Wurst's comment, September 9, 2012 8:44 PM
Seth - I am hardly worthy of YOUR currating! Hope to meet you in person at NCGE and get a picture of us for Facebook. :-)
Paige T's comment, September 10, 2012 11:21 AM
This is so beautiful. Fractals are an amazing phenomenon, whether you are an artist, geographer, or mathematician. I love being able to see fractals in plants or feel them as air travels through my lungs.
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Stratocam: Google Earth Imagery

Stratocam: Google Earth Imagery | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Much like sites that you can rate items up or down, Stratocam let's you can rate the best aerial photography via Google Earth screen shots. There are some beautiful images and places to be discovered through this site. The physical and human landscapes are both intermingled in this fantastic collection of images…be careful, it can be amazingly addictive.   On this blog post I've added 13 of my favorite cultural and physical landscapes. 

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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 12:56 PM
These satellite images are truly spectacular! They are beautiful and, yes, addicting to look at! I found it interesting that the images of manmade cities/landscapes had similar design and curvature to the images of Mother Nature's oceans and forestry.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 3, 2012 10:51 PM
Visually on a ground level it is hard to conceptualize the significance of the surrounding landscape. How people alter our surroundings can reveal a lot about the history and culture of a particular society. Although the architecture at Vlagtwedde in the Netherlands is quite stunning from an aerial view, this fortress was designed to repel invaders and control the area. Even if you don’t know much about this country’s history, this image reveals that it was most likely not a peaceful place in the 16th and 17th century.
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Google Maps: 10 Handy Tricks You Should Know

Google Maps: 10 Handy Tricks You Should Know | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Google Maps is a fantastic free tool, but we’re guessing you don’t have much spare time to play around with the service. Let us help.

 

Even if you use Google Maps just for personal use, these are basic enough of tips that all users should be able to use. 

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