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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Gendered Cultural Narratives

Gendered Cultural Narratives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As a Muslim woman who chooses to wear hijab,I'd like to apologize for this poster, to my non-hijab wearing cohorts. http://pic.twitter.com/IoLfDPEGx7

Seth Dixon's insight:

The hijab is an incredibly complex cultural artifact full of social meanings all over the political spectrum.  This poster shows some of the social pressures exerted on women in Iran to wear the hijab.  This poster comes from Iran where the government is using this platform to encourage traditional values and gendered norms using a chocolate bar/candy analogy.  This poster struck a nerve on social media throughout the Middle East in part because blends some modern cultural diffusion elements with some older folk traditions.  Many hijab-wearing women don't want other women to be shamed into conforming, and many women wear it the hijab in public, but privately subvert the cultural norms on social media.  What stereotypes and perspectives are embodied in this poster?  Why do you think this poster was seen as inflammatory or culturally insensitive by many?  This image would be a great discussion starter for cultural  patterns and process as well as the geography of the Middle East. 


TagsIran, gender, MiddleEast, Islamreligion, culture, social media.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:18 AM

unit 3 and 6 Why is this viewed as inflammatory by some?

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Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed

Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of Mohammed | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the Islamic Prophet Muhammed, who was born in Mecca, Saudi Arabia in 570 AD. His birthday is marked in way ways is different Muslim countries."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great photo gallery, but I wanted to make a special note of this image.  The caption for this picture says, "Egyptians watch as Muslims march on the street to mark the birthday of the Prophet Muhammed in Cairo, Jan 13, 2014."  Is this a representative group of Egyptians?  What demographic group would we expect to see in the second story balcony?  What does the architecture tell us about the cultural norms of the society?

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 26, 2:50 PM

Muslims rejoice, celebrate and honor Mohammed around the world on his birthday. These photos not only represent the celebrations of Mohammed but mark his lasting legacy and influence as an Islamic Prophet.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2:53 PM

It is nice to see a depiction of the celebrations and happiness of Muslims instead of just violence by radicals. Muslims are frequently misrepresented by the heavy news coverage of the tiny amount of evildoers. It would be like depicting all of the US as Klan members.

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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes

Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?  

 

Tags India, borders, political, Pakistanmedia, gender, popular culture.

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Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:46 PM

I watched this short commercial with my geography class. While watching, you could almost forget that it was only a commercial. The commercial brings up that the internet can be a great tool in finding information. It also shows that the internet breaks down boundaries that had been impossible to get over physically.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 11, 3:59 AM

These ads reflect the changing culture of India. There is a more progressive culture taking hold which is quite possibly caused by the effects of globalization. Along with India's industrialization, technology is a factor in the culture change. Taboo topics, like remarriage and the partition with Pakistan, are being used by advertisers be provocative without being offensive to most people.

 

The culture of India will undoubtedly be affected by its media representing more progressive ideas as well. Repeated exposure to these ideas will create new generations of Indians more comfortable with remarriage, much like newer generations in the United States are more comfortable with gay marriage.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:21 PM

Commercials work even when they don't. When its an annoying commercial, everyone still remembers exactly what the commercial is for. What Google does here is brilliant. This is very powerful and the reunited states could be an idea to get used to.

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Burka Avenger

"Burka Avenger is a new Pakistani kids' show about a mild-mannered teacher who moonlights as a burka-clad superhero."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I first learned of the Pakistan's new animated TV series the Burka Avenger last week from an NPR podcast and eagerly wanted to know more.  Some are hailing the Burka Avenger to be Pakistan's answer to Wonder Woman, fighting for the rights of the oppressed.  There has also been a lot of criticism concerning the role of the burka juxtaposed with this heroine.  For many, they see the burka solely as a symbol of female oppression and feel that a heroine shouldn't be donning the clothing of the oppressed (my opinion?--C'mon, it's the logical masked outfit for a female superhero trying to be incognito in the tribal villages of Pakistan).  I find this pairing of traditional gender norms and clothing coupled with pop culture's superhero motifs to be a fantastic demonstration of how cultures mesh together.  Globalization doesn't mean all cultures are the same; we often see highly localized and distinct regional twists on global themes.


Tags: Pakistangender, popular culture, SouthAsiaglobalization, culture, Islam.

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:13 AM

This short introduction to the television show is comical and seems interesting to many different age groups. It highlights a teacher in a burka helping the children and trying to stop bad people. It shows that gender has nothing to do with the ability to defend and help someone. If this woman can do it in a burka, anyone could. I think it will show a positive message in Pakistan where gender equality isn't fully understood. While many people will treat it as just another crime-fighting television show, hopefully some children will take some positive messages away. 

Marissa Roy's curator insight, December 2, 2013 4:40 PM

My geography class watched this. It is an interesting example of how different cultures can mesh together, such as the Burka Avenger and Wonder Woman. It is really interesting that the Burka Avenger is a school teacher by day, which shows how highly educators are thought of in the society.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 9:27 AM

This is great!  It is a cute animated trailer to the cartoon series the Burka Avenger!  She wears a burka to hide her identity which it certainly does, and then she kicks the bad guy’s butts!  A great gender reversal in this area, showing women can be a hero and stand up to men.  And she cleverly uses the restrictive clothing to keep her identity concealed. 

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Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'?

Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"American tragedies occur where middle America frequents every day: airplanes, business offices, marathons. Where there persists a tangible fear that this could happen to any of us. And rightfully so. Deaths and mayhem anywhere are tragic. That should always be the case. The story here is where American tragedies don't occur. American tragedies don't occur on the southside of Chicago or the New Orleans 9th Ward."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a controversial Op-Ed article that discusses how place and the major axes of identity (race, class and gender) shape and intersect with the the national memory of violence and the media portrayal of violence.  According the David Dennis, "The media seems to forget about New Orleans and any place that the middle class can't easily relate to." 


Tags: race, class, gender, place.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 7:09 PM

It is truly amazing how much location has an impact on society and the way we view things. When we experienced such tragedy's as the Boston Marathon bombing or Columbine it was national news. The city was in an uproar and no matter what radio station you had on or what tv channel you were watching you were hearing about it. Everyone was mourning for those families and people effected by the tragedies. When you think about it, those sort of things are not expected to happen in those places which is what makes it so upsetting to people. Because it is not expected to happen there it becomes national news. However what does that mean about places like compton, New Orleans, and etc? Since people expect violent things to happen there it doesn't make national news because it is of no surpise to anyone that something like that were to happen there. Even if it is expected that doesn't make it right. The shooting at the mother's day parade should be treated like any other tragedy. Unfortunately the location of the tragedy makes it "less" of a tragedy in the eyes on the public because "those sort of things always happen there". It is amazing how much our perception of location can taint the way we see tragedy. It shouldn't be that way, but unfortunetly it's what happens in the world today. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:44 AM
New Orleans has been struggling even through Katrina to get some recognition that even though their society is not necessarily rich they deserve the same respect as anyone else would. To think especially after what New England endured with the Marathon Bombing to see something like this happen and not even really be recognized nationally is sad. These are people just like everyone else and they deserve to be treated the same as everyone else.
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For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price'

For Chinese Women, Marriage Depends On Right 'Bride Price' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China's one-child only policy and historic preference for boys has led to a surplus of marriageable Chinese men. Young women are holding out for better apartments, cars and the like from potential spouses...30 to 48 percent of the real estate appreciation in 35 major Chinese cities is directly linked to a man's need to acquire wealth — in the form of property — to attract a wife."


Tags: gender, folk culture, China, podcast, culture, population.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 10:54 AM

With the new gender imbalance, it is interesting that Chinese families now see boys as the gender that will cost them more money in the long run, it used to be the girl that was a finical burden.  This is a big change in thinking from just a generation ago, it will be interesting to see how this plays out in china over time.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 12, 11:11 AM

This article shows how the One Child Policy has skewed the gender balance in China. There is a shortage of young women and, in order to attract a wife, young Chinese men feel the need to acquire more wealth to gain a competitive advantage in a China with a surplus of men. This wealth grab is possibly fueling the housing market in China, but Chinese women are not seeing many benefits for themselves. The wealth of their husbands tends to be left in the husband's name, leaving women out of the growing economy of China.

 

There is another potential issue as well. The Chinese men are taking out loans to pay for inflated housing prices. If the housing market crashes, these marriage seeking men are left with significant debt for apartments which were overvalued to begin with.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:34 PM

This article is recent too which is scary. Men should be able to pick their own brides and money shouldn't be involved. Women shouldn't have to marry someone for the sake of her family but if thats what she wants to do then fine. Different countries operate different ways and in China, this is how they work.

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Public Space, Gender and Religion

Seth Dixon's insight:

Recently, Five women activists have been arrested for wearing prayer shawls at the Western Wall in Jerusalem.  Israeli policewomen detained members of the religious group Women of the Wall for breaching orthodox rules governing prayers at the site, which only allow men to dress this way. This is Judaism's most holy site and orthodox traditions govern the legal code over who is permitted to be in this place and what they may do; this fight represents a struggle to redefine the meaning and usage of public space in Jerusalem (among other complex issues).


Tags: perspectiveIsrael, culture, gender. religion, culture,
Middle East.

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Ryan Randomname's curator insight, January 16, 12:27 PM

Khanh Fleshman's insight: This article relates to Key Issue #1 becuase it shows how religion affect different demographics. It also brings other components into play in the long-standing discussion about religion.

 

Vinay Penmetsa; This is related to the section because it relates religion and gender inequality in the world.

 

Graham Shroyer's insight: This relates to this section because it talks about religion and it also talks about how it conflicts with other issues like gender inequality.

 

Rishi Suresh: This relates to Half the Sky because it shows the relationship between religion and gender equality. 

 

Zahida Ashroff's Insight: This is relevant to Key Issue # 1 because this article shows the relationship between gender equality and religion. Gender Inequality can be influenced by religion.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 12:20 PM

This article is about a Jewish women's group and its desire to have equal rights when it comes to prayer at the holy site of the Western Wall. This battle touches on a number of political issues including equal rights, religious freedom (in how one worships), and restrictions which may be placed in public spaces. While this issue seems trivial to me, the traditionally male practices being used by women may be considered an insult to their religion, or this could just be another instance of overbearing patriarchy in the Middle East.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:33 PM

Women's rights are a huge issue in the past and in society today. Whether or not religion has anything to do with it, women's rights have been stripped for even the most absurd reasons. Religious reasons among others do trump women's rights. Its sad that women can be treated this way but its true.

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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women and the security of nation-states. We comb the extant literature and conduct expert interviews to find qualitative and quantitative information on over 310 indicators of women's status in 174 countries. Our Database expands daily, and access to it is free of charge.  Click here if you are a new to the project."

Seth Dixon's insight:
I have linked to the WomanStats Project in the past because their global datasets and maps are perfect for get students to explore a potential topic that might be of interest to them.  I'm resharing this now because they have recently updated their maps page to include 28 statistical measures to indicate the status of women around the world (including this one on the gendered discrepancy of access to secondary education).  The WomanStats Project provides important data and maps regarding issues of gender, access and equity with a spatial perspective.

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Mary Rack's curator insight, March 31, 2013 7:44 AM

Amazing and thought-provoking. 

Daniel Landi's curator insight, April 1, 2013 2:08 AM

Topic link: Population and Change: Gender

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Mother's Day Dates around the world

Mother's Day Dates around the world | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This map show Mother's Day celebration dates around the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While most of the world celebrates Mother's day in May, March 21st (the vernal equinox) is day most countries in the Middle East celebrate Mother's Day.  So, why might the first day of spring be the day used to honor mothers?  Hint: think about agricultural cycles and fertility symbols.  Happy Mother's Day!

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Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:34 PM

Mothers Day is a holiday to celebrate mom. It doesn't matter when it is as long as its being celebrated. Though its a "made-up" holiday, its still a special one to all those moms out there.

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Women's Political Rights

Women's Political Rights | Geography Education | Scoop.it
International Women's Day: political rights around the world mapped
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is late for International Women's Day, but it is never a wrong time to analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of the expansion of women's political rights.  This interactive map is excellent for seeing these few metrics, but a more expanded dataset with maps concerning gender (in)equality in the world and the status of women is WomanStats.  


Tags: gender, mapping, statistics, political.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:19 PM

The UN Millenium Goals include gender equity and gender empowerment. The  goals are set to be achieved by 2015.

Rishi Suresh's curator insight, December 5, 2013 9:04 PM

This map is interesting because it shows several rights that were historically denied women except in modern times. Based on the information on the map, most countries only gave women these rights in the 20th century, usually within the last 50 years. This is shocking because it shows just how recently women were granted rights that men have had for millenia. In fact, Saudi Arabia and the UAE still don't grant women the right to vote in the 21st century.  In the last century, we have gone to the moon, we have created weapons that can level countries, and we have planned to go to Mars, but some people still do not have the right to choose their leaders. 

Dandavikranth Reddy's curator insight, December 5, 2013 11:02 PM

This article is about women having their political and personal rights such as freedom from oppression, abuse, and other things. Also, this article is about how people are trying to spread women's political rights throughout the world but it is just too hard. This article is on this page because it relates to how women are struggling to get their freedom while some countries have gotten it easily. This article benefits people who are motivated to help those in dire need or support, people who will continue to stand uo for these women, and people who can start a movement to end this madness once and for all. This article is related to the book Half the sky because most of the developed countries around the world have freedom for their women, but some countries are still fighting the horrors of rape, genital mutilation, prostitution, bridal and honor killings, and many more. 

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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural preferences for boys in China has led to a gender imbalance which has some unintended consequences, especially for the those seeking to have families with limited financial resources.


Tags: gender, China, population

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Cassie Frazier's comment, May 4, 2013 8:45 PM
Today in China, love has become more about wealth than romance. Because of the gender imbalance created by the one child policy, there are many more men than women, as boys are the preferred sex. This has shifted the task of choosing a spouse to the women, and they want fancy things. Therefore, they tend to choose the rich to marry. The problem is that there are at least 40-50 million poor men in China, and the majority are alone. When men reach 30 and are still unmarried, they are called "leftovers". These men are much more likely to get into trouble. This is so sad because they are so lonely. By preferring males, China has created a huge group of men who may have to live forever alone.
Taylor Anderson's comment, May 6, 2013 1:43 PM
There is a huge gender imbalance making people choose between love and money
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....
Seth Dixon's insight:

France is famous for trying to slow the linguistic diffusion of globalization's most powerful online language (which also happens to belong to their age-old cultural and political rival).  France has a commission dedicated to removing new words that have English origins since 1996 with the goal of introducing words with have linguistic roots in French. Recently then have done away with the Twitter term #hashtag to #mot-dièses.  This video criticizes this cultural practice and it is also derided in this NPR article.   However this does not mean that France is immune to cultural pressure to change linguistic traditions.  There was been a movement to alter the term Mademoiselle on official documents with a new title that allows women the freedom to choose the form of address that they prefer (and not to force them to reveal their marital status--think Ms. vs Miss).


Questions to Ponder: Why (and how) do languages change over time?  Is it possible to keep a language 'pure?'


Tags: language, culture, globalization, unit 3 culture, France, gender.

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Jess Pitrone's comment, May 5, 2013 5:16 PM
A war on banning American-English phrases? Obviously France didn’t get the memo about the growing global community, either that, or they are choosing to fight it tooth and nail (Whoa. Too many puns). The world today is more united then ever, whether it be economically, politically, or socially; everyone is connected somehow. We share everything; the whole world is sitting around eating sushi, wearing Northface jackets made in Bangladesh, watching their country’s version of The Voice (a show of Dutch origin), and i-chatting someone across the world. Needless to say, the world has become a very small place.
France has become known as a country that is steeped in tradition. The French are very sensitive about every part of their culture, and try very hard to preserve it. But why would they reject words that, yes, have American-English origins, but have distinct meanings across the world? I’d say that it’s just another attempt at the French to combat outside influence, and most notably, deter its society away from all things American. Let’s see how they feel the next time we change our language to include freedom fries! Ha-ha
Sylvain Rotillon's comment, May 5, 2013 5:44 PM
It's not so simple ! You can't say "the French" as if everybody rejects english words. It's a national policy but in fact it's mainly a rearguard action denied everyday in the street.
Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:39 PM

I think that language chances as culture changes, as time passed things get more modern. For example the past summer I went back to Dominican Republic, I haven’t been there for almost eight years. Even though I kept in contact with my family over there, I was very shock to find how much the Spanish that I knew in Dominican Republic have change so much. I don’t think is possible to keep a language pure, society is not the same as 100 years ago, I bet that certain words that were correct in the English dictionary don’t even exist anymore.

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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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7 Steps You Can Take To Address Street Harassment

7 Steps You Can Take To Address Street Harassment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
I used to think that street harassment was so entrenched in our culture and unchangeable. All I could do to address it was to cope - walk fast; avoid eye contact; pretend to be on the phone. But I got tired of feeling powerless and decided to respond to it and change the culture that allows it to continue.
Seth Dixon's insight:

People experience place and public spaces in very distinct ways--gender plays a crucial role in how we socially navigate in and through space.  This article about how women can address street harassment goes well with this additional article that tackles the problems with a society that normalizes street harassment


Tagsspace, gender, place.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 12:52 AM

Like how this can relate to the popular hashtag that started a few days ago: #YesAllWomen, which stands up for women and brings attention to the problems involving rape culture and how women should change their appearance and actions in order to feel safer in a society. Women shouldnt have to live in fear every day. I like that the hashtag doesnt target every man because of course not every man is a rapist but it does target rapists and focuses on the fact that all women have or will feel harrassed by a man sometime in their life and that the reason behind the hashtag.

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Missing Girls...

"In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called 'gendercide' or femicide."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Part of me hates to bring up this issue since it is so disturbing, but silence itself is a part of the problem.  Just know that I don't bring this up lightly and I wouldn't share this with students of all ages.  Read more on in the this topic in the accompanying article here.  The filmmaker has explained why he was motivated to produce this, but not everyone thinks the message of the full documentary is fair and balanced.


Questions to Ponder (with a heavy heart): what cultural, political and demographic factors create the conditions where a situation like this can occur?  What should and can be done?


Tags: gender, development, India, China,

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Evelyn's curator insight, January 14, 8:37 AM

Girls should not be gone just because they're girls. Boys and girls are equal, girls shouldnt be treated different than boys because we are both equal. if girls were gone completly then they wont be able to have kids and family. imagine if your mom was abandoned just because she is a girl. how would that make you feel? 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 7, 10:30 PM

The way the people of China and India treat baby girls is upsetting. India and China eliminate more girls than the number of girls born every year in America; that is disturbing to think about. When a couple decides to have a child they should own up to the responsibility and take care of the baby despite the gender. I know of several people who adopted Chinese female children, luckily they had a chance at life, unfortunately, not many baby girls in China or India have that chance.  

                                                                                 

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:10 PM

Females might be the underdogs of men forever. Hopefully this is not the case but it just seems like it will be sometimes, doesn't it? Women have had issues with rights and equality from the beginning of time. Things need to change on a global scale for horrible situations like this to stop occurring so frequently.

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Gender Gap Index

Gender Gap Index | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

According to the World Economic Forum (WEF), Scandinavia is the place to be.  This interactive map uses data that was compiled from an index to measure gender equality in health, access to education, economic participation and political engagement.  The four highest ranked countries in the world, Iceland, Finland, Norway and Sweden) are all in Scandinavia.  Thanks to the Guardian Datablog, you can download all of the data in a spreadsheet to map on your own.  This interactive map is excellent, but a more expanded series of maps concerning gender (in)equality in the world regarding the status of women can be found on the WomanStats project page. 


Tags: gender, mapping, statistics, development.

 

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Linda Denty's curator insight, October 28, 2013 6:06 PM

Interesting data!

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:35 PM

No surprise here that the countries that are more well off generally have less of a gender gap. One thing that i like to point out about this article is that the united states came in 23rd which i think is pretty humerous since we pride outselfs on our rights and equality but were not even in the top 20 countries in the world when it comes down to equality between genders. The biggest surprise of this article though has to be nicaragua coming in 10th even though every country around it scored poorly. hopefully the nicaraguans can teach their fellow costa ricans and houndurans how to close the gap.

xavia's comment, April 10, 12:38 AM
gender gap chloropleth
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The Complete Global Map of Abortion and Birth Control Laws

The Complete Global Map of Abortion and Birth Control Laws | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The complete global map of laws governing abortion and birth control.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This series of maps shows the cultural and legal differences around the world that impact access to abortion and birth control.

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:18 PM

Another example of how the United States allows their citizens freedom to make a choice. Americans are allowed to choose contraception types, take birth control and get an abortion if they want to. Some countries only allow abortions if a child is conceived by rape. And then there are countries like El Salvador where an abortion is illegal and no one is permitted to get one under any circumstance. It is interesting to see all the different countries and their legal beliefs on these matters, and how it varies from state to state in the U.S. It gives the reader a little insight into the cultual and legal beliefs of the countries shown. 

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 1:00 AM

i noticed Africa is really against abortion and thats probably do to the lack of medical care that can be provided by the country. Most contries are ok with birth control. I also learned from these maps that condoms are actually free in some countries and in others not even available for purchase.

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In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports

In historic shift, Saudis to allow some girls' sports | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Private girls' schools are now allowed to hold sports activities in accordance with the rules of Shariah, or Islamic law. Students must adhere to 'decent dress' codes and Saudi women teachers will be given priority in supervising the activities, according to the Education Ministry's requirements.  The decision makes sports once again a stage for the push to improve women's rights, nearly a year after two Saudi female athletes made an unprecedented appearance at the Olympics."  This news comes at a time when Saudi Arabia has allowed women to ride bikes (sort of).


TagsSaudi Arabia, culture, gender, religion, Middle East.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 2, 9:53 PM

The article displays the constant battle the women of Saudi Arabia face on a daily basis. However, this is a small sign of women in this area slowly getting more rights. This is an important right granted to women. Being allowed to participate in sporting activities or other types of physical exercise is very important in order to maintain a healthy lifestyle. 

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 2:49 PM

This is a push in the struggle for women's rights in Saudi Arabian. For the first time girls will be allowed to play sports in private schools. The ultraconservative kingdom still requires that the girls were descent and  decent dress and and Saudi women teachers are going to have priority in supervising the activities.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:23 PM

Female rights in countries like Saudi Arabia are nothing like in the U.S. Much like in other Middle Eastern countries, Saudi Arabia allows little to no extra curricular activities for girls and women. Allowing them to play some specific sports is a huge deal!

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Normative Gendered Messages

Normative Gendered Messages | Geography Education | Scoop.it


Here are two shirts are from the Avengers.  Both are designed for their children apparel production line, but I don't have to tell you which one is marketed for boys and which one is marketed for girls.


Questions to ponder: How (and why) do companies use cultural ideas and values to market their products?  How do companies shape cultural ideas and values?  What impact do messages like this have on a society's culture?  Do seemingly subtle differences is pop cultural products like this matter?  

 

Tags: perspective, culture, genderpopular culture.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:14 PM

Commercials don't always try to sell you stuff, they try to appeal to you.  Heroism appeals to people, but people are trying to sell you shirts that advertise comicbooks in a trinity of marketing efforts.  Social appeal, by referring to heros, sales by selling the shirt, and advertising comics.  I like comics, but I would rather spend money on comic books, or go into the world and make a difference and BE a hero (or eat a hero at a hoagie hut) than buy one of those shirts.  My spiritual beliefs are open to allowing the sales of these shirts, but my preference does not incline me to actually purchase one.  I am 'free' in this country to buy or not to buy a shirt.  I'm a long-time supporter of art, and I like the idea the shirt puts forward- supporting heroism and comic books, belief in scifi/fantasy art and concepts, and I agree that someone should buy that shirt... but I feel that I could do more by actually being a hero than telling people to be heros.  By using comic book heros, the advertisers say that nobody on this world is a hero, because they 'aren't real,' but also that anybody can be a hero by striving towards virtue of the pure ideal idols in the comics.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:15 PM

Companies before they put any product in the market they do research first for example; what people are buying, they take in consideration gender and culture. And why is that? Because they are not going to create a product that no one is going to buy. The impact that this type of messages like this have on a society’s culture. No matter how many laws are make in favor woman equality are created we are being  perceived as the weak sex, that we need the help of a man to do anything. Sadly but true this type of campaign it was sales

Michele Baker's curator insight, March 12, 11:39 AM

This is a really depressing trend, and one that, as the parent of a daughter, I am all too aware of. It's way past time we start rethinking the way we dictate gender roles in children.

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China's one-child policy creates massive gender imbalance

The Chinese government says its so-called "one-child policy" has succeeded in reining in its population. But more than three decades after the policy's imple...

Via Natalie K Jensen
Seth Dixon's insight:

This short video is an excellent summary of some of the societal consequences of China's one-child policy in a culture that prefers male offspring.  


Tags: gender, China, population.

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Christina Dadaian's comment, July 5, 2013 4:13 PM
They'll have to balance out eventually. Either that or have the entire population suffer. It may take time but I imagine that things will correct themselves before it's too late.
Brooklyn McKenzie's comment, August 2, 2013 12:14 PM
It's kind of sad. I hope that those four brothers will some day find the love of their life. It must be pretty sad to see happy couples when you're single. Maybe one day things will even out.
Shelby Porter's curator insight, September 21, 2013 5:28 PM

This video gives a summary of the extreme consequences the "one-child policy" China has set in place. There are so many more men than women now, many are left to be bachelors for life. Many Chinese women are moving into the city looking for a rich and powerful man, and they succeed because there men are eager to marry. The Chinese have always had a preference for male children over female children. Now that the difference in population in so high, the government has made it illegal for doctors to tell parents the sex of their child before birth. This is a great example of the different kinds of culture that exist on the other side of the world. 

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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."


Seth Dixon's insight:

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.

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European women marry, give hope to Samaritans

European women marry, give hope to Samaritans | Geography Education | Scoop.it
MOUNT GERIZIM, West Bank (AP) — The Samaritans, a rapidly dwindling sect dating to biblical times, have opened their insular community to brides imported from eastern Europe in a desperate quest to preserve their ancient culture.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Some folk cultures, such as the Samaritans, have historically intermarried and have been plagued by genetic diseases.  Recently, they have turned to global solutions to their local demographic woes.  "Five young women from Russia and Ukraine have moved to this hilltop village in recent years to marry local men, breathing new life into the community."  


Tagsfolk culture, gender, population, Russia, religion, culture,
Middle East


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:21 PM

I know a man who is Indian, and his grandparents came from India.  He tells me that their people do not formally or very much at all approve of interbreeding between their people and other cultures.  He says Indians stick with Indians, and that's how it's supposed to be.  I think in the future that the genetic diseases will be abolished by selective characteristic modification through reproductive alteration using technology- I think DNA modification will become a popular trick in both reproduction and everyday life that will allow for the end of illness.  This would allow people to marry into other cultures without fear of genetic complications, but they would still have that cultural barrier my Indian acquaintence referred to.  That same dude has some funny insight about Italians and other cultures, and noted that Italian-Americans are not really Italian at all.  We had a couple of interesting discussions regarding different cultures, and he told me that he is 100% Indian.  I don't mean to seem degrading AT ALL but the first thing that popped into my head was how people breed dogs to be purebreds, which are coveted and expensive, as well as pure.  I'm a blend of many different nationalities, and I'm proud of it... The universe is a blend of many nationalities, and I ever-ponder my connection with the Universe, and it's nice to know that I have a commonality with the Universe!

Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 12:00 PM

It's a very interesting and sad phenomenon when groups that thrived in the past begin to dwindle to a point where the acts of individuals can decide the entire future of the demographic. It brings in questions of tradition and if those people have a duty to propagate their genes to keep their group alive. I can only imagine how tense the environment could be when single accidents or deaths could mean the end of your people.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 12:14 PM

This article describes a how the small religious group, the Samaritans, have seen their numbers shrink to unsustainable levels and have been forced to turn outside to find wives. These men are importing brides from places like Ukraine because of a significant gender imbalance and heightened risk of birth defects due to genetic homogenization over the centuries. These circumstances present an fairly unique case of migration, one which should it become a standard practice, could have an effect on the culture of the Samaritan communities.

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Cultural Perspectives

Cultural Perspectives | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I imagine I could tell you what I think about this image, but my opinion is just one man's opinion.  I'm sharing this to provoke you to have your own thoughts, feelings, perspectives and reactions to this political cartoon.  In what way(s) is your perspective a product of your cultural, historical and geographic setting?  


Tags: perspective, culture, gender

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:12 AM

This political cartoon is just another great example of how different cultures are across the globe. Here in America, we are told that the appropriate swimwear to wear to the beach only covers about a third of our body. Where as in the Middle East, wearing a burka is what they are told is the right type of clothing to wear. Whether it be for religious, cultural, or fashionable reasons, women wear all types of clothing and I don't believe it is directly due to male influence. There are many things that could cause this influence such as the church, family, or the media. Yet as the cartoon says, each woman thinks the men in that country are forcing them into wearing clothes like that and their culture is dominated by men. I guess it just shows the different perspectives each culture can have. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:51 AM
This cartoon depicts the cultural differences between two different cultures. On the right you have a woman in a traditional burka that covers all but her eyes. On the left you have a woman in a bikini which is what is apropriate to wear on the beach or to bed. Two totally different societies and beliefs and they both look at one another and see the other person as inapropriate. This is not the first time another country has looked at the USA and turned their nose up to something that we do differently.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:31 PM

when I look at this the first thought that comes to mind is it is easy for other people to judge. just by there comments they have no idea what the others beliefs are,. This is a classic judging a book by it's cover. The are both assuming it has to do with a male dominating world. I think it has to do with what you are comfortable with. 

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Super Bowl Is Largest Human Trafficking Incident In U.S.

Super Bowl Is Largest Human Trafficking Incident In U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When it came time for the Super Bowl, Clemmie Greenlee was expected to sleep with anywhere from 25 to 50 men a day.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There certainly is a dark side to large sporting events as this article on human trafficking makes perfectly clear.  The 'event economy' based on tourism (even without trafficking) also has some negative impacts.

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Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:03 PM

This a very sad situation, I can only imagine, the torture and abuse this girls endure. This video should be play as super ball commercial, every year to bring awareness of what is going on behind closed doors. I bet they won’t play it, because we don’t like to hear about unhappy stories. Every year we get so caught up on the excitement and in our everyday life that we forget how bad other people are having it.

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A Mysterious Patch Of Light

A Mysterious Patch Of Light | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you are up in space looking down on America west of the Mississippi, one of the brightest patches of light at night is on the Great Plains in North Dakota. It's not a city, not a town, not a military installation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This patch of light is baffled me since clusters of light on this image almost always are connected to high levels of urbanization and North Dakota has no major population center of that magnitude.  This is the Bakken formation, a new oil and gas field that is producing over 600,000 barrels a day.  The lights are oil rigs that are lit up at night, but even more because many gas flares are burning leading locals to call the area "Kuwait on the Prairie."  Oil men from far and wide are flocking to the rural, lightly populated area raising rents sky-high.  This has caused a huge localized gender imbalance, changing the demographic and cultural character of the region because of the drastic the economic and environmental shifts in the area (see the national gender balance here).  This is a great reminder that the physical and human geographies of a region are fully intermeshed one with another. 


Tags: resources, gender, environment, economic, migration.

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Heidi Zumbrun Bjerke's comment, February 12, 2013 9:52 PM
Use google earth and you can compare the two images.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's comment, February 12, 2013 11:55 PM
that's an excellent idea, especially to have students suggest what the light might be in the photo. The question is , is the bright light a one time occurrence or does it continue?J
Mary Rack's comment, February 13, 2013 6:08 AM
I'm having trouble installing GoogleEarth on my iMac. Looking forward to the comparison. Big adjustment after years in the PC world.