Geography Education
1.3M views | +565 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Closing the gap between men and women in agriculture

http://www.fao.org/sofa/gender "The world cannot eliminate hunger without closing the gap between men and women in agriculture. With equal access to productive resources and services, such as land, water and credit, women farmers can produce 20 to 30 percent more food, enough to lift 150 million people out of hunger."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Gender inequality, especially in rural, less developed part of the world, would lead to some of the fastest developmental improvements for the lives of women, men, children, and families.  Women are the backbone of the rural economy, and this single change would lead to countless benefits.   

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, developmentgender, agriculture, labor.

more...
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 11, 1:35 AM
A great resource to show geography students! 
Linda White's curator insight, May 13, 10:40 PM
A reason why we need to review all the women that are incarcerated in our society.  The society is loosing so much.
Pascal Corbé's curator insight, May 26, 8:53 AM
While closing the gender gap is both righteous as economically advantageous, I find the claim that the world could not be fed without it totally unfounded and not true. Even the worst dictator could just redistribute the produce currently wasted and the issue would be solved with gender issues left touched. The intention of this message is great but I think from a communications point of view these kinds of exaggerated messages undermine the basis of campaigns and ultimately wear off the attention of your target groups.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Role of Rural Women in Agriculture

The Role of Rural Women in Agriculture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Women are the backbone of the development of rural and national economies. They comprise 43% of the world’s agricultural labor force, which rises to 70% in some countries. In Africa, 80% of the agricultural production comes from small farmers, who are mostly rural women. Women comprise the largest percentage of the workforce in the agricultural sector, but do not have access and control over all land and productive resources. Realizing the importance of rural women in agriculture is an important aspect of gender relations. In many countries, the role of women in agriculture is considered just to be a 'help' and not an important economic contribution to agricultural production. Giving support to rural women is a way of breaking the vicious cycle that leads to rural poverty and to the expansion of slums in the cities, where the poor get poorer. Development strategies should consider rural women as the epicenter, paying special attention to their social skills both within and without agriculture sector."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, developmentgender, agriculture, labor. 

more...
Mrs. B's curator insight, March 23, 6:02 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 7:34 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 7:34 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Women expand their home on the range

Women expand their home on the range | Geography Education | Scoop.it
According to the U.S. Agriculture Department, the number of women-operated farms increased from 5 percent to 14 percent between 1978 and 2007. Today, counting principal operators and secondary operators, women account for 30 percent of all farmers in the United States, or just under 1 million.Some women regard themselves less as entrepreneurs and more as gentle stewards of the land, or bulwarks against corporations overtaking family farms and developers sweeping in with seductive offers. Others are drawn to the farm-to-fork movement, where locally grown produce and meat hold much greater appeal. Also, more women are inheriting farms and ranches.
Seth Dixon's insight:

When we discusss gender in an agricultural context, it is usually to point out that around the world, women are approximately half of the agricultural workforce, and in less developed countries they often comprise the majority of the the agricultural sector.  U.S. students find this shocking, given that traditional cultural norms often perceive farm work as a very masculine domain.  However, that has slowing been changing in the last 30 years as more women in the U.S. are owning and operating farms.  There isn't one simple reason to explain this shift, but it is indicative of broader social changes.

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, cultural norms, gender, agriculture, labor.

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, February 4, 10:04 AM

unit 5

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 14, 8:49 AM
Share your insight
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Saudi women allowed to vote for first time

Saudi women allowed to vote for first time | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"On Saturday 12 December people in Saudi Arabia go to the polls. This is a rare event in itself, but on this occasion women in the country will be voting and standing for office for the first time in history. Voting for the municipal elections take place across Saudi Arabia, but we managed to speak to the first women to register to vote in the capital Riyadh."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tomorrow, Saudi women will have their first opportunity to vote.  Voting power in this kingdom is limited but time will tell if this was merely a symbolic gesture of appeasement or the beginning of greater social changes. 

 

TagsSaudi Arabia, genderMiddle East.

more...
John Peterson's comment, December 19, 2015 1:38 PM
Very interesting story.
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 4, 4:35 AM

Saudi women allowed to vote for first time

Patty B's curator insight, March 11, 12:24 PM
It's definitely good that women were recently granted the right to vote in Saudi Arabia. I think it speaks to the current global climate surrounding the issue of women's rights. As democratic nations are focusing on equal pay rights, Saudi Arabia (among other countries in the region) is realizing that in order to continue to compete in the global marketplace, it must adhere to the ways of the larger global community, regardless of how much further behind they are than Western democracies. But it also shows that there must be significant pressure upon countries that have not adopted women's suffrage if one of the Middle East's most dominant countries is changing policies that assimilate them further into Western society. It also demonstrates a greater global shift toward equal treatment of men and women. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

China to end one-child policy

China to end one-child policy | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"All couples will now be allowed to have two children, the state-run news agency said, citing a statement from the Communist Party. The controversial policy was introduced nationally in 1979, to reduce the country's birth rate and slow the population growth rate. However, concerns at China's aging population led to pressure for change."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The most extensive and controversial anti-natalist program in the world was China's one-child policy (see also BBC's '5 numbers that sum up China's one child policy' and NPR's 'unintended consequences of the one child policy').  Experts have been concerned with how fast China is aging and that the population was shrinking faster than would be healthy for the economy (not to mention the gender-imbalance that it creates). Today that policy was been relegated to the history books, but the impacts of the policy will continue to have far-reaching impacts (for more see this Population Reference Bureau article, CNN video, Guardian article, Bloomberg Business article, and BBC video/article).


TagsChina, populationdeclining populations, unit 2 population, gender.

more...
Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:37 PM

Lets not forget the expansion of china also with its economic strength and its military strength which is a threat to other countries in the area because china can take control and with Chinese moving into Africa and United states as residents china is going to need to populate its own country.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:55 PM

First implemented in 1979 and diminished in 2013 It is good to hear something like this has finally come to an end. Although it deemed successful by stopping the birth of an estimated 400 million babies, there were some places that allowed two children in rural areas if the first was a girl. It is assumed though that even though this is no longer a required policy, many couples may only have one child since it is accepted as a social norm. 

Patty B's curator insight, April 29, 12:31 PM
This was, of course, massive news coming out of China. It is something that needed to be done, at least from the Chinese's standpoint. But this is also an important issue to the entire world. First and foremost, this article ties into the fact that the world's population reached 7 billion within the past couple of years and is continuing to rise. It ties into the fact that the human population is quickly approaching its maximum capacity. While China's new policy may or may not speed up the world population by any amount that will truly matter, any news related to global population at this point in time is a hot topic. But this policy was implemented to reverse some serious issues that have arisen in China as a result of its one-child policy. It's population is made up with a majority of retirement aged folk. China needs to ensure it has enough qualified working-aged people in the future and believe a two-child limit will aid in this happening. So of course China had many economic reasons for ending its one-child policy, but there are also certain social reasons for doing so I think. In a world where many human rights and civil rights issues have found their ways to the forefront of political and social discussions, China must have felt obligated to do something about the one-child policy to keep up with the wave of political correctness sweeping the globe. A one-child policy seemed extremely restrictive in a world that is becoming increasingly more apt to let people make decisions for themselves. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why)

See where women outnumber men around the world (and why) | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A new study maps the population gaps between men and women around the world."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map is a great way to show how the 3 questions of geography make statistical analysis become more meaningful (where, why there and why care?). There are plenty of reason to care about these spatial patterns and their far-reaching implications.  


Tags: genderpopulation, mapping, regions.

more...
Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Laura Lee Smith's comment, September 7, 2015 7:19 PM
This is actually something I discussed a while back with a friend of mine who is from Russia, how there is such a huge lack of marriageable men that women there consider being a mail order bride a good alternative to spinsterhood.
Cohen Adkins's curator insight, September 8, 2015 4:59 PM

Its amazing how well balanced some countries are with the ratio of men to women how ever some of the 3rd world countries are off balance but not to an extreme.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Gender equity in sports

Gender equity in sports | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Yesterday the United States Women’s Soccer Team defeated Japan 5-2 in the FIFA Women’s World Cup Final in Vancouver, claiming their third world title. The event was watched by soccer fans around the country, and was called a “ratings knockout” but couldn't come close to those drawn by men’s soccer in Brazil last summer...while some states have made great strides in reducing this gender gap, others still have great inequity that needs to be addressed to effectively celebrate and give potential American female athletes the opportunities they deserve to succeed."


Tags: sport, gender, popular culture, mapping, regions, the South, culture.

more...
Alexander Yakovlev's comment, July 8, 2015 10:08 AM
This article talks about how not many men are interested in watching women’s sport. I think gender inequity is a major problem in general, not only in sports. Police officers are mostly men as well, as well as many high ranked jobs. We just need to keep working on it as a nation and think that the women who are being discriminated are women of our nation.
Rob Duke's comment, July 9, 2015 1:42 AM
Alex, I worked for a Chief that allowed job sharing, so that women officers who wanted to do so could share a job with both getting benefits, but only working part-time in order to have more time with family. It was a great way to improve the ratio of male to female officers.
Cultural Infusion's curator insight, August 24, 2015 10:13 PM

An important issue of our time is the gap between women and men not only in pay and workplace equality but sports and athletics also. With such a huge presence of many strong, dominate female sporting teams, the question needs to be asked, what more can we do to give these women the recognition and respect of which they deserve?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Americans truly are exceptional — at least when it comes to circumcision

Americans truly are exceptional — at least when it comes to circumcision | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There's no question that among the world's wealthy nations, the U.S. stands out when it comes to circumcision. The WHO estimates that the overall male circumcision rate in the states is somewhere between 76 and 92 percent. Most Western European countries, by contrast, have rates less than 20 percent.  But even these numbers mask considerable regional variation within countries."


Tags: perspective, cultural norms, culture, genderregions

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

A City For Abandoned Mothers In India

Thousands of widows have been making their way to the holy city of Vrindavan in northern India to spend the rest of their lonely lives. Cast out by their families, or simply alone in the world, some travel hundreds of miles to get there.


Tags: genderIndia, SouthAsia culture.

more...
Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 5:10 PM

There are 15,000 widows living in the city of Vrindavan and most of them come from over 1300 km away; West Bengal. After their husbands death, these women have been beaten and tortured by their own children for money they don't have and have had to escape to this holy city for safety where, even though they are away from the beatings, they much beg and sing for money. Many wish for death over this humiliation. 

A woman, capable of bringing life into the world, should never be treated like this and especially by her own family. 

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:32 AM

It is crazy to think Indian families would abuse these widows, but what questions me is the reason to flee for spiritual fulfillment. I understand why one would leave because their family betrayed them but why spiritual fulfillment?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.


Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.

more...
Mrs. B's curator insight, May 2, 2015 9:03 PM

LOVE this clip! #Unit 3

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers

WWII ‘Mapping Maidens’ Chart Course for Today’s Mapmakers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As the demand for its products escalated early in World War II, the Army Map Service, a heritage organization of the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, was losing much of its largely male workforce to the armed forces. A solution to the urgent need for replacements emerged when the University of Chicago’s Geography Department developed a course in military map making and began offering it to women’s colleges in the East and Midwest."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Women in science are awesome and we need to encourage girls in STEM disciplines, especially geospatial technologies...hearing this story of women in the past might help to inspire a future generation. 


Tags: mapping, cartographywar, gender, STEM, geospatial.

more...
Ricardo Cabeza de Vaca's curator insight, March 24, 2015 2:19 AM

I believe this article is very empowering for women around the world. It showed how in this time of trouble in America we took into account the women's workforce and started using it. This article shows how much women helped by making the maps for the male army that was off at war. This story should empower women int their fight for equality and inspire them.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

A liter of acid can destroy someone's life

A liter of acid can destroy someone's life | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Almost 10 years ago, a young Pakistani woman was held down by her mother-in-law while her husband and father-in-law threw acid on her. Some 150 operations later, Bushra Shafi is working as a beautician in a hair salon in Lahore, started by a hairdresser who was moved to help victims of acid attacks when one of them came into her salon and asked simply: "Can you make me beautiful again?"
Seth Dixon's insight:

Like any form of violence against women, this is not entirely representative of the region in which this found.  But this type of crime is much more prevalent in South Asia than in any other region. 


TagsSouth Asia, development, Pakistangender, culturepodcast.

more...
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, April 24, 2015 11:19 AM

It is absolutely mind-boggling how any human being could do something like this to a fellow human.  What is even more sad is how the Pakistani government essentially treats it as a non-issue with very few prosecutions of the perpetrators.  But luckily this sad story has a silver-lining.  A salon owner has opened her doors to acid-victims, not only to try and fix their scars, but also by employing them as beauticians.  It's a sad and evil story that has spawned a very positive and beautiful situation.  We need more people like the salon owner in this world.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 12:57 PM

Does this have to do with the Dowry? Is this the area where the brides family pays the grooms family so the brides family gets rid of her and the grooms family gets her so the brides family pays installments and if the installments are not fulfilled then there are accidental fires. This was not accidental though but I wonder if the installments were met.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, November 20, 2015 4:43 PM

The BBC's Shaimaa Khalil thought she knew the "typical" victim of an acid attack in Pakistan. "I think before I spoke to women who were victims of acid attacks, it was easy for me to generalize and assume they were from poorer backgrounds and largely uneducated," she says.....

It so easy to paint a whole culture with a broad brush but once again these attacks do not define their culture. This article with all its sadness had such a positive message of hope and survivial.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Gender Empowerment and Education

"In this exclusive, unedited interview, 'I Am Malala' author Malala Yousafzai remembers the Taliban's rise to power in her Pakistani hometown and discusses her efforts to campaign for equal access to education for girls. Malala Yousafzai also offers suggestions for people looking to help out overseas and stresses the importance of education."

Seth Dixon's insight:

For younger audiences, hearing someone their own age discuss educational opportunities (or the lack thereof) based on gender can leave a profound impression. Today, Malala is a Nobel Peace Prize winner (deservedly so), as she's become an icon in her own right as she champions developmental opportunities for girls in cultures that historically have not had equal offerings for young women.  Watch this documentary to see who she was before she was thrust into the international spotlight, and hear her father's perspective.  Some, however, only see this as Western hypocrisy.    


Tags: developmentpoverty, gender, Pakistanmedia.

more...
analise moreno's curator insight, October 14, 2014 8:01 PM

This was one of our focuses last chapter. I totally agree with this because woman and as well as men deserve education they need education to have a successful life. I like how she describes this so well and thoroughly she talks about what she wants and needs in her life.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:10 PM

unit 3 or 6

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, May 25, 2015 8:42 PM

Summary: In this interview, Jon Stewart talks with Malala Yousafzai, a girl who outwardly fought for women's education, and in doing so, was shot by the Taliban. Even now, she continues to fight for women's equality and their right to education, after she won her Nobel Peace Prize. 

 

Insight: In this interview, the main topic is gender equality, and how it can lead to better education for women, which, in turn, gives women more power. Although developed countries, especially in Western Europe, already display high gender equality, more developing countries, especially in the Middle East, have hardly anything close to gender equality. Even with low amounts of gender equality, people like Malala and advocates in Western countries are striving towards this goal of gender equality.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Edible Cutlery

"India is one of the world's largest consumers of disposable plastic cutlery, which has the makings of a huge health and environmental crisis written all over it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Plastics clog our landfills and single-use plastic consumption is one of the most wasteful elements of our consumer-based, disposable society.  This product is a reaction against the waste of disposable cutlery, but it is also an intriguing developmental strategy (see company kickstarter page or website). 

 

Tags: developmentfood, gender, agricultureconsumption, South Asia, pollution

more...
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:27 AM
How innovative!! Will definitely being showing this to my Geography students. 
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Israel to create a new egalitarian prayer plaza at Western Wall

Israel to create a new egalitarian prayer plaza at Western Wall | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The government approved a plan to allow pluralistic, and mixed-gender prayer, at Judaism’s holy site.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past, Israeli policewomen have detained members of the religious group Women of the Wall for breaching orthodox rules governing prayers at the site. This is Judaism's most holy site and orthodox traditions have legally prevailed here, defining who could be there and who could perform which religious rites (often on gender lines).  This fight represents a struggle to redefine the meaning and usage of public space in Jerusalem (among other complex issues).  The article states that "this marks an unprecedented move by the Israeli government to officially recognize the rights of Conservative, Reform and other Jewish denominations to hold organized prayer at the site."

 

Tags: Israel, culture, genderspace, religion, Judaism,
Middle East.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Gender Equality Activists in the Muslim World

In a time where interfaith and cultural and religious diversity are scrutinized and need support, Raheel Raza is a force to be reckoned with. Her outspoken and strong opinions on Muslim society and Islamic beliefs have been groundbreaking and inspiring; however others consider them to be a source of criticism and condemnation. Yet Raza remains undeterred in her fight against gender prejudices and her mission to improve the female position in Islamic society continues.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Islamophobia is a real problem today and I teach to reduce geographic ignorance and fears about an unknown ‘other.’ That has also created an environment where many--myself included--are hesitant to shine the light on issues of gender equity and other cultural problems in the Muslim world for fear of it entrenching students with bigoted viewpoints to cling to them all the more firmly.   Also, many are worried that critiques will also be perceived as Islamophobia.  Recently the Swedish foreign minister called out Saudi Arabia's legal restraints on women--some called this Islamophobic, Saudi Arabia removed its Swedish ambassador and stop issuing visas to relative silence from the global media and no support from the international community.

 

We cannot lay the blame on an entire society/religion based on the actions of a few, but it would be disingenuous to pretend there were no problems. As Raheel Raza says, “culture is no excuse for abuse.” The linked videos are one Muslim woman’s critique on some cultural aspects within some Muslim societies. This is not to say that these problems are only in the Muslim world, nor does it means that the all Muslims live in or want to create oppressive societies--far from it. There is great, rich diversity of thought, opinions, and interpretations among Muslims.

 

TagsgenderIslam, TED.

more...
Abbey Reddig's curator insight, March 29, 1:59 PM

Islamophobia is a real problem today and I teach to reduce geographic ignorance and fears about an unknown ‘other.’ That has also created an environment where many--myself included--are hesitant to shine the light on issues of gender equity and other cultural problems in the Muslim world for fear of it entrenching students with bigoted viewpoints to cling to them all the more firmly.   Also, many are worried that critiques will also be perceived as Islamophobia.  Recently the Swedish foreign minister called out Saudi Arabia's legal restraints on women--some called this Islamophobic, Saudi Arabia removed its Swedish ambassador and stop issuing visas to relative silence from the global media and no support from the international community.

 

We cannot lay the blame on an entire society/religion based on the actions of a few, but it would be disingenuous to pretend there were no problems. As Raheel Raza says, “culture is no excuse for abuse.” The linked videos are one Muslim woman’s critique on some cultural aspects within some Muslim societies. This is not to say that these problems are only in the Muslim world, nor does it means that the all Muslims live in or want to create oppressive societies--far from it. There is great, rich diversity of thought, opinions, and interpretations among Muslims.

 

TagsgenderIslam, TED.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Mapping the Sexism of Street Names in Major Cities

Mapping the Sexism of Street Names in Major Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a study of seven world metros, only a little more than a quarter of the streets were named for women.


Tags: gendermapping, urbantoponyms.

more...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Surreal Reasons Girls Are Disappearing In El Salvador

The Surreal Reasons Girls Are Disappearing In El Salvador | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Refuse to share a pencil, reject a boy, say no to your imprisoned dad — all of these can get a teen girl killed in El Salvador's gang war.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Central America has the highest homicide rates in the Western Hemisphere, with violence being embedded into political and social institutions and norms (see this map to analyze the spatial patterns--see crime rate tabs).  Navigating this cultural status quo leads to incredibly difficult situations for young people, and especially girls, trying to gain stable employment and plan for a safe, secure future.  This is a very sobering article/podcast, with some graphic materials.  This podcast is the first in the new series, #15Girls, exploring global health issues for teenage girls.       


Tags: podcast, gender, place, cultural norms, culture.

more...
Patty B's curator insight, October 18, 2015 9:59 AM

Where poor economic conditions are present, crime is usually following close behind. People need money to eat, to survive. People who live in crime and gang infested areas must live their lives in a constant state of fear. Really, this article can be boiled down to economics. The conditions in El Salvador are vastly different than in the U.S. because there is more money in the U.S. As we have learned, economic disparities manifest themselves within cities, throughout regions, and across countries and the globe. Some have it better than others for a myriad of reasons. When facing serious economic challenges on a daily basis, one can't necessarily blame those who turn to crime as a last resort. I believe that if the economic gap throughout the entire world was shrunk just a bit, that crime would drastically fall (at least violent crimes). If people living in favelas, for example, did not have  to look at a booming metropolis (that they aren't a part of) right in their backyards, maybe those residing in the slums wouldn't feel the need to commit crimes, maybe they'd be more confident in who they are and what they are doing with their lives. Maybe the comforts of the 21st century need to be distributed just a bit more evenly in order to deter people from committing crimes. Maybe it would give those who turn to crime something legitimate to lose if they get caught by law enforcement. There wouldn't be a need for the creation of makeshift governments that we refer to as 'gangs.' These gangs do for its members what the government fails to. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 20, 2015 3:40 PM

unit 3

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 21, 2015 10:38 AM

This article was very stunning and graphical to read. The rate of murder and homicide is so abnormal that it makes one question who doesn't want to leave there. I can definitely see why girls are the main targets because they are stuck in between these so called gangs because a person they know is usually affiliated with one. Their hardship of escaping was very touching and getting to experience and seeing a first hand perspective of these young girls really opened my eyes. We should not see people seeking asylum in other countries as a bad thing ,but rather sympathize for their well being that they have escaped the horrible life they had back home.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it

America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Why is the US the only industrialized nation with a rising rate of maternal mortality? Supermodel-turned-maternal health advocate Christy Turlington Burns talks about her latest mission to raise awareness about maternal deaths.


99% of deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth occur in the developing world. The good news is that in most countries the rate of maternal mortality has been going down. The bad news is that in eight countries the rate is going up. The shocking news is that the United States is among them. It is the only industrialized country to have that dubious distinction. The rate has in fact been doubling in recent years.


Tag: mortality, developmentgender, statistics, USA.

more...
Danielle Kedward's curator insight, September 12, 2015 7:34 AM
Excellent article for population geography challenges for the future
Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:17 PM

Good question, Why is the US rate of maternal mortality so high. We pay three times higher the average cost for medical care, then any other industrialized nation of earth? Fred Issa,

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Navigating and Occupying Gendered Space

Navigating and Occupying Gendered Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How we occupy and move through space is based on many cultural norms and many of those norms and assumptions are based on gender." 


Tagsspace, gender, place, cultural norms, culture, perspective.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Early men and women were equal, say scientists

Early men and women were equal, say scientists | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There is still this wider perception that hunter-gatherers are more macho or male-dominated. We’d argue it was only with the emergence of agriculture, when people could start to accumulate resources, that inequality emerged.


Tags: gender in agriculture, developmentgender, agriculture, labor.

more...
pdeppisch's comment, June 6, 2015 11:13 AM
That was my assumption that early hunter-gatherers societies were more equal.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Women's Restroom Sign Breaks Stereotypes

Women's Restroom Sign Breaks Stereotypes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The It Was Never a Dress campaign is not only taking social media by storm, it is also changing the way we view the traditional women's bathroom sign. We see that the men's figure wears pants and the women's symbol wears a dress, but what if it was never meant to be a dress in the first place?  Tania Katan launched the popular #ItWasNeverADress campaign at last week's 'Girls in Tech' conference with the idea that the female figure is instead wearing a cape, asserting that women can be superheroes or anything else they choose to be."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These restroom signs are so ubiquitous that we might fail to realize how they are a part of the gendered landscape in which we live.  This takes that well-known icon that was designed to generically represents women and makes us see the sign (and women maybe?) in a new light.  It's delightfully playful and yet powerfully subversive; it challenges us to see beyond what we've been told to see and what society tells us what we should see.  The designers called this "an invitation to shift perceptions and assumptions about women and the audacious, sensitive, and powerful gestures they make every single day."


Questions to Ponder: what other elements of the cultural landscape convey gendered messages? What impact do these message have? 


Tags: perspective, cultural norms, culture, gender, popular culture.

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 10:30 AM

I love this! Unit 3: Cultural landscape and norms.

Katie's curator insight, May 22, 2015 12:19 PM

In this article it suggest that the stereotypical dress for the the women bathroom sign is not a dress, but a cape. This hows that women can be superheroes or whatever they want to be. Still today there is a lack of women in he workforce compared to men. For every 4 men working working for Google there is 1 women and half of them quit because of the poor work environment. I think this helps represent that women are capable of anything. This is an example of women in the workforce and gender equity.  

Seth Forman's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:08 PM

Summary: This article basically explains the story of the recently emerged #ItWasNeverADress campaign. This is a pretty cool article because I never really payed attention to how even a restroom sign could be considered gender inequality. 

 

Insight: This article is relevant to unit 6 because gender inequality is an important measure of development.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Burka Avenger is the Muslim Female Superhero We've All Been Waiting For

Burka Avenger is the Muslim Female Superhero We've All Been Waiting For | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Muslim world doesn't have the best reputation when it comes to female empowerment. With a lack of of strong, independent female role models, young women in the region have few places to look in popular culture for guidance. Until now.

Meet Burka Avenger, the game-changing Pakistani cartoon that, for the first time, has flipped the status quo on its head with its female superhero protagonist, who fights crime in her magical burka."


Tags: Pakistangender, popular culture, SouthAsiaglobalization, culture, Islam.

more...
Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:05 AM

This superhero is more than just something to bring joy to children in Pakistan. This hero empowers women to think they can be strong like the Burka Avenger.

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:51 AM

This is an awesome, heartwarming story, and I highly recommend people to watch the trailer for the show offered on the website- it seems very cool, and like something kids will actually want to watch (unlike a great deal of educational television). For a nation that is plagued by such a great deal of bigotry and gender inequality- with female infant mortality rates contributing to a gender distribution of 108 men to 100 women- it is so good to see a program such as this being released from Pakistan. Young Muslim women are so deprived of positive and powerful female role models, allowing for the continued systematic abuse and mistreatment of women in many parts of the Middle East, including Pakistan. This show looks promising, from both a critical and humanitarian perspective, although I fear for the lives of its creators and that its showing will be suppressed in the very nations that need it the most. Terrorist organizations and religious extremists fear education and empowerment more than any army, as only those two factors can truly combat these movements effectively, and they will show no mercy should they ever be given the chance to cease the production of this program. I applaud its creators for their bravery, and hope that they are able to get their message across.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Women & Agriculture

"In this Feed the Future video, narrator Matt Damon discusses the importance of increasing food production around the world and notes the importance of equipping women with the right tools, training, and  technology to see as much as a 30 percent increase in food production. To feed our growing population we need to increase food production by 70 percent before 2050. Women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce in many areas of the world."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A colleague mine thought that the ideas in this video were so obvious and non-controversial, he said, "Why does this even need to be stated? Why would we exclude women from agriculture?"  The simple answer is that it wouldn't need to be stated if women around the world did have equal access to resources.  For many of the world's poor, this is where the rubber meets the road. 


Tags: developmentgender, agriculture, food production, labor.

more...
AckerbauHalle's curator insight, December 23, 2014 12:37 AM

Für die zukünftige Ernährung der Welt gibt es einen oft übersehenen Faktor: Gleichberechtigung von Frauen. Frauen sind in vielen Ländern für die Arbeit auf den Feldern verantwortlich. Gleichzeitig haben sie keine Rechte am Land und sind schlecht ausgebildet und - wenn überhaupt - schlecht bezahlt. 

Lauren Quincy's curator insight, March 19, 2015 4:50 PM

Unit 5: Agriculture, Food Production and Rural Land Use 

 

This video is about how women make up the majority of the agricultural workforce and that giving them access to land, water, markets, and technology could increase food production by 30%. This in return would help boost the economy. Places such as Kenya have given women the same resources as men and have seen a 22% increase in crop production. In Brazil, programs targeting women in agriculture have helped cut the population in extreme poverty by half and malnutrition by 73%. This video encourages people around the world to help give women the resources they need in order to increase the food production and economy. 

 

This relates to unit 5 because it deals with agriculture and particularly women's roles in agriculture. This video explains how increased resources can help end world hunger. Women are not given as much opportunity as men and this video expresses need to invest in women's rights. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Greatest Invention?

"What was the greatest invention of the industrial revolution? Hans Rosling makes the case for the washing machine. With newly designed graphics from Gapminder, Rosling shows us the magic that pops up when economic growth and electricity turn a boring wash day into an intellectual day of reading."

Seth Dixon's insight:

What one invention has made the greatest difference in the lives of people all around the world?  The case can be made for the washing machine; it has been a major tool in transforming the lives of women and restructuring gender roles in industrialized societies. 


Tags: gapminder, poverty gendertechnology, industry, development, TED.

more...
Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:05 PM

unit 6

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:06 PM

unit 6 key concepts: industrialization, development, technology  

Ryan Tibari's curator insight, May 27, 2015 10:23 AM

Washing machine, the greatest invention of the industrial revolution. Hans Rosling further proves this point, highlighting many aspects of how industrialization not only changed the economy, but the people.