Geography Education
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Cotton Candy Grapes?!?

Cotton Candy Grapes?!? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

After years of seeing fruit-flavored candy, we are now seeing candy-flavored fruit. The company Grapery is very careful to highlight that these patented fruit varieties are not GMOs, but the cotton candy flavored grapes are cross pollinated by hand (by fruit geneticists). You can watch this 4 minute CBS video about the agricultural production and marketing of this new product. Yes, I've experimented with these at a friend's house, and they really do taste like cotton candy (and no, I'm not planning on purchasing any).     

 

Questions to Ponder: Does this make you leery about eating this or totally excited to try it? How come?  Why is the company so adamant to state that these grapes are non-GMO? According to the video, what are the primary concerns of most grape producers and how does that contrast with this company?  

  

Tagsfood, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, GMOstechnology.

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Why the US government wants Americans to eat more cheese

Why the US government wants Americans to eat more cheese | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The USDA said today that it will buy $20 million worth of cheese to donate to food banks and pantries in an effort to help America's struggling dairy producers.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Do politics, economics, and government policies help to shape agriculture patterns?  Absolutely.  This is an interesting, current example that shows how Chinese and Russian policies are impacting American dairy producers, and how the U.S. government is stepping in. 

 

Questions to Ponder:  Should the U.S. government protect businesses that are in dire straits?  What would happen if the government did not offer agricultural subsidies/bailouts?  What will happen (or not happen) because of these subsidies/bailouts?  Any way you slice it, 11 million tons is a lot of cheddar.     

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, economicfood, agribusiness,

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Robotics in Agriculture

Autonomous robots created at the University of Sydney can count fruit on trees, spray weeds, and even herd cows.
Seth Dixon's insight:

We all know that agriculture is becoming increasingly mechanized.  In addition to large, expensive machinery, this video showcases some robots that are automating work that was previously very labor intensive. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How will robotics impact agriculture and other industries in the future?  Will this impact the spatial dynamics of agricultural land? 

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, scale, agribusiness, technology.       

 

 

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 20, 10:08 AM
Until robots understand holism and acquire a metaphysical connection with Nature, agriculture will probably continue down a path where soon they'll design artificial bees for pollination, and chemical-exuding worms to breakdown the nutrients predigested by bacteria ... if that works, which I doubt.
John Edwards's curator insight, June 2, 4:18 AM
I remember doing my GCSE French oral presentation on exactly this matter - "L'exode rural". Seems we're moving slower than I thought.
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How Orange Juice Is Made

The process of making orange juice on a humongous scale. The Americans drink so much of the stuff I'm surprised they still have any left for export.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you image that your orange juice comes from farmers on ladders picking, then hand-squeezing oranges into orange juice, then you need to see just how mechanized this agribusiness is.  The machinery alone means that a small-scale farmer simply can't compete on the open market.  

 

Questions to Ponder: Why is OJ concentrate cheaper in the store if they have to work hard to extract the water out of the juice?  How would OJ concentrate be an example of either a bulk-gaining product or a bulk-reducing product?  

 

Tagsfood production, agriculture, foodeconomic, industry, economic, scale, agribusiness.

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Antonio Andrade's curator insight, May 4, 5:47 PM
Excelente conocer todo el proceso!

Character Minutes's curator insight, July 1, 7:07 PM
Great resource for FACS teachers.

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This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats

This is how our favorite foods look in their natural habitats | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We know how to harvest potatoes and apples. There are other fruits and vegetables, however, which have natural habitats we can barely imagine. We see these items in the grocery store every day, but often we have no idea how they got there.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of teaching images hammers home how natural items become commodities that are removed from their original context.  The fact that these foods are somewhat difficult to recognize shows just how most consumers have been removed from the full geographies of their food.  

 

Tagsfood production, images, agriculture, foodeconomic.

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PBS Food: Potatoes

PBS Food: Potatoes | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Follow America's favorite vegetable from field to factory — to see how potatoes grow and how they're turned into chips."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This 5 minute video is a good introduction to the potato, it's hearth, diffusion, population impacts, nutritional profile and industrial production.  The geography of food goes far beyond the kitchen and there are more episodes in the "How Does it Grow?" series to show that.

 

Tags: foodeconomic, food production, agribusinessindustry, video, agriculture.

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Ari Galant's curator insight, August 25, 9:53 PM
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Alex Smiga's curator insight, August 30, 2:56 PM
papa.
Sophie Wilson's curator insight, August 31, 10:33 AM
This video shows the process of potatoes moving from farm to factory in America and how they are turned into chips. It shows how the potatoes are planted, grown and turned into chips. 
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26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places

26 Things You Might Not Know Were Named After Places | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From cheddar cheese to the tuxedo.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

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Emma Boyle's curator insight, March 2, 12:31 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

MSTA's curator insight, March 3, 3:35 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 4, 3:34 PM

Many ordinary objects are named for places where they were discovered, invented, or widely used. If you smell a dab of cologne on the man eating a Danish in the bungalow, the way you speak about that incident has a linguistic debt to a town in Germany, and the countries of Denmark and Bangladesh.  Many foods (especially wine and cheese) are named after places and 26 are highlighted in this article and here is a (semi-) exhaustive list of words derived from toponyms. 

 

Tags: food, language, toponyms.

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Americans Try Norwegian Christmas Food

See staff at the U.S. Embassy in Oslo try traditional Norwegian Christmas dishes. Se ansatte på den amerikanske ambassaden i Oslo smake på norsk julemat.

 

Tags: Norway, food, culture, seasonal, perspective.

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Thanksgiving Recipes Across the United States

Thanksgiving Recipes Across the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"We’ve scoured the nation for recipes that evoke each of the 50 states (and D.C. and Puerto Rico). These are our picks for the feast. Dig in, then tell us yours." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR 

Seth Dixon's insight:

In addition to this list of distinctive Thanksgiving recipes from each state (I'd love to try so many on this list), the NY Times has also produced this list of the most 'Googled' Thanksgiving recipes in each state.  These are very late additions to my favorite Thanksgiving day resources. Happy Thanksgiving everyone, and may yours reflect some some regional distinctiveness and cultural context that you appreciate.   


Tags: Thanksgiving, place, food.

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Jana Esposito's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:42 PM

Deep fried turkey is a family tradition! Pumpkin pie and garlic mashed potato's are a must every year. Let's eat!

JebaQpt's comment, November 26, 2015 12:18 AM
Thanksgiving, after all, is a word of action. Thanksgiving day quotes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DPSml4nQ7rA&list=PLK2ccNIJVPpB3TOPAzbivJTp1L8wSrKLH
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Thanksgiving Maps, Posters and Geospatial Data

Thanksgiving Maps, Posters and Geospatial Data | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Thanksgiving resources for geography educators." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR

Seth Dixon's insight:

This great poster (hi-res) with the accompanying data (available in ArcGIS online) is a great addition to my list of favorite Thanksgiving resources for geography teachers. 


Tags: Thanksgiving, food.

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NESTVAL 2015: The Geography of Food

"My 2015 NESTVAL presentation in an APHG session on the geography of food."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this presentation (PPTx file here), I share some of my favorite resources for teaching the content as well as some pedagogical tips.  Some of these resources are found in an article I wrote for National Geographic or have been shared on this site earlier.  Here are some pedagogical tips to APHG students about food systems:  

  • Tip#1: Don’t demonize agribusiness or romanticize the family farm. 
  • Tip #2: Use data and maps.  Here is a map in ArcGIS online on rural land use activities with a handy dandy instruction guide, ready to go (many more APHG GeoInquiries from ESRI set to be released soon). 
  • Tip #3: Connect them personally into the web of food systems and show how it impacts them. 
  • Tip #4: Let this be one of those units that connects to all the themes of the course, especially population, culture, political, and the environment.  


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 10, 2015 6:09 PM

Things to consider when teaching about food production from a geographical perspective - remember to link to Biomes.

asli telli's curator insight, October 15, 2015 1:40 AM

#Food is #geographical and #mobile...

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Food Processing

"Trying to break a whole lamb into steaks and roasts in just a little over three minutes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Where does our food come from?  As the global population becomes more urban, the percentage of our population that is more disconnected from their food sources grows.  Additionally, our economic system works to actively separate consumers from the unseemly parts of the commodity chains, in hopes that our propensity to spend money on more goods won't decline.  All animals killed for human consumption go through some sort of butchering process before they become a meat product that we might recognize in the grocery store. 


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness.

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Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables

Product of Mexico: Hardship on Mexico's farms, a bounty for U.S. tables | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Farm exports to the U.S. from Mexico have tripled to $7.6 billion in the last decade, enriching agribusinesses, distributors and retailers.
American consumers get all the salsa, squash and melons they can eat at affordable prices. And top U.S. brands — Wal-Mart, Whole Foods, Subway and Safeway, among many others — profit from produce they have come to depend on.These corporations say their Mexican suppliers have committed to decent treatment and living conditions for workers.  But a Los Angeles Times investigation found that for thousands of farm laborers south of the border, the export boom is a story of exploitation and extreme hardship."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 


This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    


Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalizationfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

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BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:24 PM

This is a hard read, but it is important to understand that there is a dark underbelly to many of the economic systems that are reshaping the world today.  Sometimes we ask all the wrong questions, like "why is organic, local, or fair trade food so expensive?"  We should really be asking why the other options are so cheap. 

 

This, unfortunately is part of the answer.  This is a 4-part series (I-camps, II-labor, III-Company Stores, IV-Child Labor) from the LA Times that has excellent pictures, videos, and interviews highlighting the working conditions of farm workers in Mexico.  For an audio version, here is an NPR podcast interviewing Richard Marosi, the investigator behind the story.    

 

Tagsfoodeconomic, laborglobalization, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, indigenous.

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Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets

Creamed, Canned And Frozen: How The Great Depression Revamped U.S. Diets | Geography Education | Scoop.it
During the Depression, cheap, nutritious and filling food was prioritized — often at the expense of taste. Jane Ziegelman and Andy Coe, authors of A Square Meal, discuss food trends of the time.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Peanut butter and school lunches became fixtures of American culture during the Depression.  On the flip side, our modern preference for freshness is a reaction against the Depression's obsession to find ways to preserve food for longer amounts of time.  

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood distribution, historical, podcast.

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AgroWorld's curator insight, September 22, 5:06 PM

Food preservation has been historically important, but today the trend is "fresh." Refrigeration, transportation, and access to local "farmers" markets makes this possible. 

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Where our food came from

Where our food came from | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Explore the geographic origins of our food crops – where they were initially domesticated and evolved over time – and discover how important these 'primary regions of diversity' are to our current diets and agricultural production areas."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly rich website with great interactive maps, dynamic charts, and text with rich citations.  This is one of those resources that an entire class could use as a starting point to create 30+ distinct project.  This is definitely one of the most important and best resources that I've shared recently, one that I'm going to use in my class.  Where did a particular crop originally come from?  Where is it produced today?   How do these historic and current agricultural geographies change local diets and economies around the world?  All these issues can be explored with this interactive that includes, but goes beyond the Columbian Exchange

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, APHG, unit 5 agriculture, globalizationbiogeography, ecology, diffusion.

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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 16, 6:43 PM

Great interactive map to illustrate the source regions of the world and foods that originated there. Hover over each region and the foods of that area popup.


Rory McPherson's curator insight, July 3, 5:39 PM

Very informative! It's great to learn where our food comes from. The author is able to communicate this information through simple but effective maps and visualizations.

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Edible Cutlery

"India is one of the world's largest consumers of disposable plastic cutlery, which has the makings of a huge health and environmental crisis written all over it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Plastics clog our landfills and single-use plastic consumption is one of the most wasteful elements of our consumer-based, disposable society.  This product is a reaction against the waste of disposable cutlery, but it is also an intriguing developmental strategy (see company kickstarter page or website). 

 

Tags: developmentfood, gender, agricultureconsumption, South Asia, pollution

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Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:27 AM
How innovative!! Will definitely being showing this to my Geography students. 
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Big Seed: How The Industry Turned From Small-Town Firms To Global Giants

Big Seed: How The Industry Turned From Small-Town Firms To Global Giants | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Most food, if we trace it back far enough, began as a seed. And the business of supplying those seeds to farmers has been transformed over the past half-century. Small-town companies have given way to global giants. A new round of industry consolidation is now underway. Multibillion-dollar mergers are in progress, or under discussion, that could put more than half of global seed sales in the hands of three companies."

 

Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, podcast.

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Zack Zeplin's curator insight, April 24, 5:16 PM
The seed industry, one of the largest industries in modern agribusiness, is quickly being swallowed up by the global giants that lead the seed industry. All over the world small seed businesses are being bought out by larger businesses who seek to mass produce their own genetically modified seeds and strengthen their grip on the global seed market. In American agriculture seed giants rule by providing the highest quality seeds to grow the cereal grains in the U.S. produces. But as a result the consumer benefits, farmers can now run farms that aren’t as capital-intensive because of the biotechnology that goes into these seeds. However it is also important to realize that the number of seed companies is dwindling, and that there are only a few large corporations that control all of the seeds that the world needs to grow enough food to survive. I found this article to be very helpful in shedding some light on how the seeds that go into our food is handled, and the truth on how modern agriculture is run.
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The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools

The Real Irish-American Story Not Taught in Schools | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The crop failure in Ireland affected only the potato—during the worst famine years, other food production was robust. Michael Pollan notes in The Botany of Desire, 'Ireland’s was surely the biggest experiment in monoculture ever attempted and surely the most convincing proof of its folly.' But if only this one variety of potato, the Lumper, failed, and other crops thrived, why did people starve?  Thomas Gallagher points out in Paddy’s Lament, that during the first winter of famine, 1846-47, as perhaps 400,000 Irish peasants starved, landlords exported 17 million pounds sterling worth of grain, cattle, pigs, flour, eggs, and poultry—food that could have prevented those deaths. Throughout the famine, as Gallagher notes, there was an abundance of food produced in Ireland, yet the landlords exported it to markets abroad."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

TagsIreland, foodeconomiccolonialism, poverty.

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Brien Shanahan's curator insight, March 24, 10:04 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 7:32 AM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

Bob Zavitz's curator insight, March 28, 7:05 PM

I teach my students that famines reflect a lack of power (political and economic) more so than they are indicative of an absence of food in that region.  The Irish potato famine exemplifies the three main causes of food insecurity: 

1. Redirection of food

2. Destruction of capacity to grow food

3. neglect of the starving

 

Images 13 and 14 in this blogpost powerfully highlight that the famine was not an accident, but the result of a deliberate British policy. 

 

Tags: Ireland, food, economic, colonialism, poverty.

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How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger

How ‘Ugly’ Fruits and Vegetables Can Help Solve World Hunger | Geography Education | Scoop.it
About a third of the planet’s food goes to waste, often because of its looks. That’s enough to feed two billion people.
Seth Dixon's insight:

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

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Katerina Stojanovski's curator insight, March 10, 6:10 AM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 1:24 PM

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions.  In a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates, food waste needs to made more explicit. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
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The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind?

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Genetically modified foods are often regarded as "unnatural" and approached with distrust. Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers the psychology behind these reactions.

 

Why do so many people oppose genetically modified organisms, or GMOs? According to a new paper forthcoming in the journal Trends in Plant Science, it's because opposition to GMOs taps into deep cognitive biases. These biases conspire to make arguments against GMOs intuitive and compelling, whether or not they're backed by strong evidence.

The authors of the paper — a mix of philosophers and biologists — turn to research in the cognitive sciences to shed light on the mismatch between the public's perception of GMOs (which is fairly negative, especially in Europe) and the state of the evidence about their safety (which is fairly positive).

 

Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture.

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Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off

Why Shanghai's first American Chinese restaurant is taking off | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The BBC's Celia Hatton finds out why one restaurant in Shanghai is serving up American-style Chinese food
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article covers the same topic as this NPR podcast, the success of an American-style Chinese restaurant in China.  Some joked that it was akin to selling snow to Eskimos, but there is a local appetite among the youth that want to experiment with the 'foreign,' but also with American ex-pats that crave a taste of home. This is just one more delicious example of how globalization impacts cultural products and how globalization flows in many unexpected directions.  For more, see this TED talk on the search for the origins of General Tso's chicken, and this podcast of the historical geographies of the fortune cookie.    

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, China, East Asia, podcast.

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A Few Things You (Probably) Don’t Know About Thanksgiving

A Few Things You (Probably) Don’t Know About Thanksgiving | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"President Abraham Lincoln established Thanksgiving as a national holiday during the Civil War, and the feast has since become an American tradition. Yet the story of the Wampanoag and the pilgrims who first broke bread is not commonly known." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-1lR

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good source of information that runs counter the mythologized Thanksgiving story that is seen by so many as central to our heritage and national narrative.  Personally, a nice slice of turkey with cranberry sauce is not ruined by knowing that there is more than one perspective to the story. 


Tags: Thanksgiving, food,perspective, historical.

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Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer.

Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Dear Subway, I really wish you would have talked to a farmer. I really wish you would have done so before your big announcement saying you would, as of 2016, be sourcing all of your turkey and chicken as being raised without antibiotics."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not a typical source, but it captures an important perspective on our food production systems.  Some policies (like this one from Subway) are designed to increase customer confidence in the quality of the product, but they don't reflect some of the practical issues that farmers have to face on the farm.  


Tags: foodeconomicfood production, agribusiness.

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Vicki Bedingfield's curator insight, November 15, 2015 4:58 PM

Food production

Cade Johns's curator insight, January 7, 6:47 PM

Why are they not using antibiotics?Is it to be healthier or for flavor.Either one should attract different crowds.The healthier alternative brings healthier people in there.C.J.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 9:29 PM
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The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie

The Historical Geographies of the Fortune Cookie | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What we call Chinese food (including the fortune-filled cookies) has become an integral part of the American culture and cuisine, with a complex history that dates back to the 19th Century."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This  99 Percent Invisible podcast explores the fascinating story of the Americanization of Chinese food, and the icon of Chinese food in the States, the  fortune cookie (no, that is decidedly NOT from China).  This is yet another podcast from 99 Percent Invisible that is rich in geographic content. 

 

That first podcast is reminiscent of a second podcast from  NPR about an American-style Chinese restaurant that opened in Shanghai to cater to Americans living in China who miss 'Chinese food' as it's made back home.  What's the name of the restaurant?  Fortune Cookie, of course. 

 

Tags: foodglobalization, culture, California, podcast, historical.

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:44 AM

As with some other cultures, the Chinese food we eat is different from it original homeland (Mexican food is another example). Many thing the fortune cookie if from China, but it is an American idea. 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:58 AM

unit 3

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Overpackaged Foods

Tagsfoodeconomicfood production, agribusiness, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture,


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