Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Glaciology in Greenland

Glaciology in Greenland | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Sharyn Alfonsi goes to the top of the world to report on scientists trying to get to the bottom of climate change and sea level rise by studying one of the largest glaciers in the Arctic Circle."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The 13 minute video clip from the show "60 Minutes" is a good introduction to the importance and difficulty of studying glacial melt, climate change, and the impacts of a receding ice sheet.  

 

Tags: physical, erosion, climate change, Greenland.

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What are Lavakas?

What are Lavakas? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The word lavaka means 'hole' or 'gully' in Malagasy, and it has become the accepted international term for the spectacular erosional features that characterize the highlands of Madagscar. Lavakas are gullies formed by groundwater flow, with steep or vertical sides and flat floors."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Lavakas are often seen as an ecological catastrophe since rapid deforestion leads to young, active lavakas that can silt up rice fields.  While obviously not desirable, these scars on a deforested landscape do offer a glimmer of hope as well. Some National Geographic explorers are finding that older, stabilized lavakas can become great agricultural pockets for rebuilding in these denuded communities.

 

Tags: Madagascar, erosion, environment adapt,  environmentecology, political ecology, Africa, National Geographic.

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Patty B's curator insight, February 11, 4:09 PM

This article from williams.edu, titled What are Lavaka’s, focuses on just that. It describes that a lakava, meaning “hole or “gully” in Malagasy, are gullies found in Madagascar that are caused by erosion. They are found on slopes and generally at an altitude of roughly 1,000 feet. Lakavas form where there is a concentration of softer material that is susceptible to erosion and frequent earthquake activity. For communities near lakavas there can be severe consequences to be alongside these geographic features. The article explains that lakava erosion can “damage infrastructure, remove hillslope pasturage, and causes debris flows that devastates agricultural land in the valleys.” Lakavas and the destruction they can potentially cause reveal an important fact of class distinction: the rich get the good land and the poor get the infertile, uninhabitable, dangerous territories. 

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Sinkholes: Can we forecast a catastrophic collapse?

Sinkholes: Can we forecast a catastrophic collapse? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Sometimes the ground suddenly opens, consuming cars, homes and people. We may have a way to see these sinkholes coming – so why would anyone resist the idea?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Via the American Geographical Society: "Sinkholes - formed where groundwater dissolves soluble bedrock to form underground cavities. Sometimes, when the ceiling of a cavity can no longer support the weight of the overlying sediments, it can suddenly collapse, with catastrophic results."


Tags physical, disasters, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Simulation of the Oso Landslide

Simulation of the Oso Landslide | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The large landslide that occurred in March near Oso, Washington was unusually mobile and destructive."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There are several reasons for landslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  The landslide in Washington state last year was a combination of the two (see on map) and it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough).  Watch a simulation of the landslide here.  

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this landslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 27, 2015 4:50 PM

This seems like a useful tool to a degree.  But if we could actually simulate every destructive event then we would be miracle workers.  This was a sad event.  We have left such an imprint on the earth that it's starting to fight back.  We need to be more aware and careful with the one planet we have.  Climate changes are in the news more and more.  We can't ignore climate changes anymore.  

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Meandering Stream Time Lapse

The most viral images on the internet, curated in real time by a dedicated community through commenting, voting and sharing.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fantastic way to visualize physical geographic processes. 


Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 1:24 PM

El Sire Reserve in Peru is a river that has been monitored over the last 28 years. Every time I watch this short 6 second clip, I learn something different about how this river has changed. On the bottom of the screen, just past half way, the river just takes a huge short cut and cuts over and connects to a different part of the same river. This happens on the whole river too. there are 8 or 9 huge bends and curves in the river but by the end in 2012 there are only about 3 to 4 bends and curves. For some reason the water is taking short cuts and just leaving the spaces where the water used to run through and leaving it dry.  

Mathijs Booden's curator insight, January 20, 8:35 AM

This is such a tangible way of showing things that seem abstract on a static map.

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 6:28 AM

Een natuurlijk meanderende rivier

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Louisiana Loses Its Boot

Louisiana Loses Its Boot | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The boot-shaped state isn’t shaped like that anymore. So, we revised its iconic outline to reflect the truth about a sin…
Seth Dixon's insight:

Maps shape how we think about places.  In mapping, we can reveal or conceal important pieces of information but sometimes the phenomena don't fit the easy binaries.  In most places there is land, a coastline and then water (simple enough), but Louisiana's coastline is much more complicated with large regions being more of a coastal zone than a neat line.  That accounts for some of the inaccuracies mapping Louisiana, but some lies are so convenient, that many people want the fiction to continue.  It is comforting to think about places as permanent, and admitting that it isn't is acknowledging that there might be a problem.  As stated in this article, "the boot is at best an inaccurate approximation of Louisiana’s true shape and, at worst, an irresponsible lie."  To explore the issue yourself, this gorgeous interactive map pulls together some high quality source materials on a wide range of issues to look at this environmental issues of this region in a holistic manner.


Tagsmappingcoastalenvironment, erosion, landscape., physical, fluvial.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 18, 2014 10:52 AM

(North America topic 7)
Just like geography and history textbooks become obsolete the day they're published (thanks to Professors Dixon and Bonin for the phrase!), the same can be said for maps and icons.

This article uses the example of Louisiana's state highway signs, which show the outline of the state... well, according to data from the 1930s. While an updated sign isn't as pretty, it does bring about the truth that the landscape is changing, and on a larger scale this is true for the entire world, especially with influence from development and climate change.
However, I can relate to the other side of the argument too. Tossing the old LA symbol would toss a historical reminder of what once was. The same can be said for New Hampshire's Old Man of the Mountain road signs and license plates. I'd hate to see the profile removed, especially since what is symbolizes still lives on in the hearts of many residents and visitors, including myself.

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Mystery of Death Valley's 'Sailing' Stones Solved

Mystery of Death Valley's 'Sailing' Stones Solved | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There's a place in Death Valley National Park where a mystery that has puzzled scientists and park visitors for decades finally has been solved.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The video in this article (weather.com) nicely explains how the non-aerodynamic rocks of Death Valley's Racetrack Playa move, leaving behind their trail in the hot desert.  Numerous attempts using GPS receivers (NatGeo.com) and good ol' fashioned observations have been made, but observing ice in Death Valley is so rare that no one had ever seen it until now (phys.org).  On very rare occasions, when it rains in the region, water will accumulate in the playa (discovermagazine.com).  If the wind is powerful and consistent enough, the wind will push the panels of ice against these rocks and over time, the ice floes will push these rocks, leaving behind distinctive trails (latimes.com). This perfect combination of water, wind, ice and heat creates a remarkable signature on the landscape (livescience.com).


Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, deserterosion, weather and climate, landscape.

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Riaz Ahmad Baboojee's curator insight, August 29, 2014 12:59 AM

Think

Greg Russak's curator insight, August 29, 2014 9:30 AM

It's probably not what you think. It wasn't what I thought.....then again, I had no idea what was happening.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, October 29, 2014 1:46 PM

It's amazing to see that even though we have been on this planet for so long, there are stilll mysteries such as this. Tjis could have taken year s to solve but looking at the picture in the slides at the bottom of the article, it seems like this group of scientists knew exactly how to figure this out. this all happens becasue of geography and where these rocks are in the world that make them move around. Iis in a dried up lake pond that freezes over at night to create a layer of ice strong enough to help the rocks move around at night. This discovery took 2 whole years to figure out, but was vey much worth it in the end. 

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Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore

Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A block-long sinkhole opened up in a residential neighborhood in rain-soaked Baltimore on Wednesday, devouring cars and forcing the evacuation of several houses."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We like to think that the Earth beneath our feet is solid and that the configuration of the landforms in our neighborhood will be unchanging.  This a dramatic reminder that Earth's physical processes don't ever stop--even if we've built a city in that spot.  Watch this retaining wall collapse in this video.


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landformsweather and climateurban ecology.

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Jim Doyle's curator insight, May 9, 2014 10:57 PM
Block-Long Sinkhole Swallows Cars in Baltimore
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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 


View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:39 PM

Mijnbouw en aardverschuivingen, een goede combinatie ...... 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 2014 11:48 AM

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 

 

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.

 

Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   

El Futuro deWaukesha's curator insight, April 18, 2014 12:03 AM

Working on an Inquiry of recent natural disasters with first grader.  

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Rivers from Above

Rivers from Above | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Get a unique view of these rivers beyond the banks.Photo editing by Lia Pepe
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a fantastic photo gallery, filled with great images to show the processes of fluvial geomorphology. 


Tags: physical, water, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Woodstock School's curator insight, February 25, 2014 5:01 AM

The Art of Geography

Mark Burgess's curator insight, February 26, 2014 6:26 AM

Awesome rivers. i love a good river.

ok's curator insight, September 23, 2014 5:45 AM

esrdcfvtgbhyjnkmstgyb weiweeee

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an absolutely gripping video, that is equally amazing and horrifying.  In Kesennuma, Japan, the 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami caused catastrophic damage, although many were able to survive on the high-rise rooftop (like the videographer).  Much like a tsunami, the video starts out slow with only alarm bells, but at around the 2:20 minute mark the first sign of the small wave makes its way up the river, with onlookers unsure of the magnitude of the impending damage.  The riverbanks are breached at 7:43.  By 14 minutes, the debris and wreckage is massive, and the quantity of water flooding in is still growing.  The last 6 minutes shows the waters receding, but the impact of the tsunami still spreads as fires spread through town. For a full documentary on the tsunami, click here.  I surely hope that no one reading ever gets a closer look at what a tsunami looks like in person.  This time lapse is an audiovisual representation of global seismic activity puts the Japanese tsunami into it proper context (wait for the dramatic event at the 1:45 mark).


Tags: Japan, East Asia, disasters, geomorphology, erosion.

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Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 2014 7:17 PM

Most people do not realize the sheer power of a tsunami. It has the force of the entire ocean depth behind each wave. It also pours onto land for hours until it stops then pours back into the ocean for another hour or so. Most people killed are killed by objects such as cars and buildings crushing them. Seeing videos such as these can help people get a better idea of the forces actually involved and maybe save lives.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:33 PM

I hope something like this never happens again. Tsunamis are unreal. They are literally horrifying and to see something like this captured on camera is actually really scary. Damn plate tectonics and people living on the water front.

Lora Tortolani's curator insight, April 20, 2015 1:52 PM

So, I will never forget this morning because my brother was living in Japan at the time and I remember getting a text from him saying "we are ok."  My brother is a bit of a jokester so I figured he had something up his sleeve, however, when I woke up and heard of the destruction, I was so relieved to know he and his family were safe.  For the next month my brother flew rescue missions and brought water and food to the survivors.  He had taken hundred of pictures, and I was able to witness first hand how devastating the tsunami had been.  My heart still goes out to those people, and I am forever grateful that my brother is alive and well.

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Can We Save Venice?

Can We Save Venice? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Venice is sinking--no news there.  Some of the sinking is natural based on the geomorphological processes on being in a lagoon and some is based on how people have modified the physical landscape.  The GREEN on the map represents restoration efforts to stabilize the city while the RED indicates that human-caused activities have produced sinking.  Additionally in this new study, researchers have used remote sensing data to differentiate between the anthropogenic sinking (human-caused sinking) and the natural sinking in Venice.  This city is a perfect example of the three major types of human and environmental interactions [we 1) depend on the environment, 2) adapt to the environment and 3) modify the environment] and shows the issues associated with these interactions.  Click here for a hi-res image of Venice and to see why I love the city. 


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, physical, environment, geomorphology, erosion, environment modify.

 

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, October 7, 2013 12:42 PM

This detailed account of the problems faced by the people, and city, of Venice is a great account of the idea of Human Environment Interaction that is central to Human Geography. Human actions are causing the city to sink while more human actions are attempting to raise the city out of the water.

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 28, 2013 3:24 PM

It is no surprise to anyone that one day the beautiful city of Venice will one day be completely submerged under water. However looking at this map makes it hopeful that the process may be slowed down or even stopped! Looking at the map the green boxes represent the parts of Venice that have been uplifted, while the red boxes represent the parts that are sinking. What was surprising was that there appeared to be more green boxes on the map than red. Most of the boxes, both green and red, are along the coastline. I would think since most of the damage is along the coast line it would be a little easier to try and uplift. Hopefully the green boxes can make up for the red boxes in order to keep Venice from continually sinking. With these advances who knows where we will be in even another twenty years. We may be able to continue to uplift Venice to prevent it from submerging under water. It appears that the city is making progress in this process from the data given in the map. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 3:53 AM

As we all know Venice is known for its lack of streets because the city is navigated by canals. This map shows where humans are actually causing the city to sink (in red) and where through restoration and consideration are helping the city stay afloat (Green). These little acts of restoration can become increasinly important in the future with growing population density. Lets hope that Venice doesnt get to populated though so the next generation dosent have to refer to it as the lost underwater city of venice.

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Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D

Yosemite’s Iconic El Capitan Mapped in High-Resolution 3D | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New geologic map helps scientists understand ancient volcano’s roots and contemporary rock falls.
Seth Dixon's insight:

On a personal note, my very first globe and National Geographic magazines were given to me by my grandparents who noticed I had an affinity for all things geographic.  They lived just outside Yosemite Park and they made sure I explored it frequently while I was growing up so I have a soft spot for this particular national park.  My grandmother informed me that El Capitan was the largest single piece of granite on Earth and my skeptical 3rd grade mind replied, "Is that a fact or an opinion?"  Informal geographic education had a greater impact on my educational path than the formal K-12 curriculum.  Without those simple nudges, I doubt I would be a geographer today.  


Tags: Californiaphysical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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The memory of a river

The memory of a river | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If you measure the contours of a river valley with Lidar (like radar with lasers), you get a beautiful map of all the historical river channels."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Here's a meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

 

Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 19, 4:58 PM

Very impressive.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 22, 12:04 PM

This particular image is fantastic for teaching about geomorphology and river systems.  Students can 'see' the historical layers of a meandering stream winding it's way across the landscape.  Here's a meandering stream image (Willamette River, Oregon) that shows the dynamism of fluvial processes quite nicely.

 

Tags:  physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

Sylvain Rotillon's curator insight, January 29, 3:42 AM

For the beauty of this picture. Follow the link to see the ancient courses of Mississippi River, I had once the idea to draw maps of the lower course of the Loue River in France not in a scientific purpose, but just for a kind of fractal art.

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Large Flash Flood

"A nice flood rolled down Johnson Canyon (southern Utah) on July 6th, 2015."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The raw power of Earth's natural forces can be truly amazing. 


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah, water, disasters.

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Floods might have doomed prehistoric American city

Floods might have doomed prehistoric American city | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Cahokia settlement's decline began in 1200, around time of major Mississippi River surge.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In a flat landscape, what represents power more than a towering mound?  My family loved our excursion to this site and it show so many geographic issues. 


Tagsfluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape, environment depend, environment adapthistorical.

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Why Do Rivers Curve?

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this Minute Earth video might make geomorphology experts cringe at some of the vocabulary in this, it still is a good introduction to the absolute basics of fluvial geomorphology, or how and why rivers reshape the Earth.   Fun fact: Albert Einstein pondered some of the great mysteries of the Earth, and in 1926 wrote an article on this very subject (actual paper can be read here).  


Tagsphysical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.


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YEC Geo's curator insight, December 7, 2014 8:15 PM

Actually a very good video.  My one quibble is with the introduction, when the narrator talks about mountain streams "carving" their gorges.  The puzzle of how small streams could possibly carve out deep bedrock canyons is an ongoing research problem, and is difficult to resolve from a gradualistic perspective.

Jason Schneider's curator insight, January 27, 2015 12:15 AM

So pretty much, the water controls rivers rather than particles controlling the river. Also, it appears that the motion and strength of the water causes rivers to bend and form in different curves. I'd like to think of it as a ball bouncing from side to side and every time it touches the border land of a river, it expands to the opposite side. However, when the water flow is hitting the side of a river, the opposite side is not getting any force from the water flow. In that case, the side that is not getting hit by the water flow slowly moves to the side that is being by the water flow causing river curves.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 2:07 AM

Australian curriculum


The geomorphic processes that produce landforms, including a case study of at least one landform (ACHGK050)


GeoWorld

Chapter 1: Distinctive landform features

Chapter 3: Restless Earth: geomorphic processes 

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Eerie Landforms

Eerie Landforms | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Utah's Fantasy Canyon features mudstone eroded into bizarre shapes. This one's called "Flying Witch". #Halloween


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.

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This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years

This is what Louisiana stands to lose in the next 50 years | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The USGS says sea-level rise and sinking could claim up to 4,677 square miles of land along the coast if the state doesn’t implement major restoration plans.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a gorgeous interactive map which pulls together some high  high quality source materials on a wide range of issues to look at this environmental issues of this region in a holistic manner. 


Tagsmappingcoastal, environment, erosion, landscape.

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James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 9:23 AM

(North America topic 2)
This interactive map is an excellent tool for researching how low-lying delta areas such as southern Mississippi have changed over recent years, and for what underlying reasons. Although human activity has been largely responsible for the loss of valuable marshland (land development, canals, levees), it's nice to know that in some cases human activity has actually helped to promote it, even if it was not originally intended to do so.

It makes you think: what other unintended consequences human actions are having on the environment in other places and on other scales?

Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, September 28, 2014 9:24 PM

Is very crazy that soon these land will be gone. What really makes me worry is that in a few years all these land in Louisiana will be gone, what is going to happen to all these people who is living right know in these areas? What action government will take? This is a very worrying situation.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 13, 2014 11:04 AM

If I lived in Louisiana, I wouldn’t settle down near the coast. 2,000 square miles will be lost in about 80 years. The water will have risen to 4.3 feet, and Louisiana has an average height of 3 feet. That leaves everything outside of the protective levees underwater in due time. Many pipelines that serve 90% of the nation’s offshore energy production and 30% of its gas and oil supply that goes to 31 different states and over 2 million people will all need to find a new place to live if this continues. Once home to 700 people south of New Orleans is now home to nearly 15 residents. The water level has already been ruining homes for people in Louisiana.  

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Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline

Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Beaches are dynamic, living landscapes. The coast off of Chatham, Massachusetts, provides a prime example of beach evolution.
Seth Dixon's insight:

To quote coastal geologist Robert Oldale, "Many people view coastal erosion as a problem that needs to be addressed and, if possible, prevented.  However, storm and wave erosion along the shore of Cape Cod has been going on for thousands of years and will likely continue for thousands of years more. It is a natural process that allows the Cape to adjust to rising sea level. Erosion is only a peril to property. If we build on the shore, we must accept the fact that sooner or later coastal erosion will take the property away.”


Tagscoastal, remote sensing, mappingerosion, landscape.

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Sam Burden's curator insight, June 16, 2014 7:40 AM

The NASA Earth Observatory is a teaching tool used to assist educators in teaching students about the environmental, including natural hazards with visualizations depicting the date and time these vast changes in the climate occurs. There are multiple global maps which  depict data over a period of time which can be used as a tool to see the effects of global warming it’s the implications on the environment on a global scale. Animations, videos and side by side images are also available to teachers to show how sustainable choices or designs can influence our environment. I really enjoyed looking at all of the real-world images on this site and it opened my eyes to how creating a more sustainable environment could influence our world on a global scale. 

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Largest glacier calving ever filmed

"On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland. The calving event lasted for 75 minutes and the glacier retreated a full mile across a calving face three miles wide. The height of the ice is about 3,000 feet, 300-400 feet above water and the rest below water."


Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland.

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Flaviu Fesnic's comment, April 12, 2014 3:31 PM
impressive !
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 13, 2014 10:37 AM

More information at www.chasingice.com

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 13, 2014 2:15 PM

Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland

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Angels Landing

"Since 2004, six people have died falling from the cliffs on this route." is what the sign says. Only one step from a 1400 foot fall.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Angel's Landing in Utah's Zion National Park (map) is one of my favorite hikes with an amazing view.The geomorphology of 'red rock' country is stunning and it's sheer cliffs are bound to captivate the imagination.  If you want something like this but with a more European flavor, watch National Geographic's Andrew Evans climb Preikestolen in Norway.   


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah.

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Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, March 25, 2014 7:22 PM

Thank you @APHumanGeog beautiful video of #Utah to remind us it is spring! Get your students outside and enjoy our beautiful home, teaching students outside can be very rewarding in teaching them about the world we live in.  

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Gravity...

Gravity... | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The video clip shows the cliff where the fall initiated, near the ledge close to the skyline.  Then, below the ledge, you can see the talus cone, which are rocky bits along the slope. The really large boulders that fell down and ruined the house have carved out soil ruts as the boulders rolled downhill." http://geographyeducation.org/2014/01/30/gravity/

Seth Dixon's insight:

On January 21, 2014 in Termeno, Italy (South Tyrol) a massive rockfall disrupted the agricultural landscape that sits in the shadow of the Alps.  The video that shows the impact of this rockfall powerfully highlights that natural forces are always in motion.  

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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 31, 2014 1:42 PM

Gravity-induced erosion in action.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, February 3, 2014 2:04 PM

Gravity

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:13 PM

There are some things that just cannot be avoided like this rock that gouged its way down a hill, destroying part of a home and the landscape. Will we ever be in time to predict their coming and avoid such disasters from happening?

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Submarine Canyons

Submarine Canyons | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Submarine canyons were identified by the pre-SONAR mappers, but it wasn’t until this technological advancement that we realized how common a feature they are. We now know that there are hundreds (perhaps thousands depending on your definition) of submarine canyons incising into continental shelves and slopes all over Earth."


Tags: physical, environment, water, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, October 13, 2013 2:56 AM

submarine canyons are a natural underwater phenomenon with no clear explainable cause. They are located in parts of the world sush as New Zealand and off the coast of Santa Monica california. These canyons at the bottom of the ocean may have been ancient rivers from before prehistoric times, and the erosion and subduction of the tectonic plates over millions of years leave the remains of channels of rivers from the past. Another theory is that they are caused by water forces that caused the sea bed to erode and make way for an actuall canyon. With the use of Sonar technology we are still discovering phenomons of the submarine world as sciene progresses. These canyons are common and are found all over the Earth and give is an understanding of what the world may have looked like long ago.

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Geography Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This photo gallery would be stunningly gorgeous if it weren't horrifically terrifying.  When the landscape changes this dramatically in a short time span, watch out.  See another photo gallery here, but this gallery from the Boston Globe, shows a more humanistic side of the story. 


Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, geomorphology, erosion, images.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:29 AM

Looking at these photos reminded me of the video that we watched in class where water was rushing under a road and within minutes the road started to fall apart and eventually ended up completely divided in half. It is amazing how quickly the water can erode what is underneath and cause such damage to the road and area around it. Looking through the pictures it almost makes you nervous to drive on such a rode again because it all happens so quickly. It goes to show you just how powerful that water is to cause destruction like that. It is not easy to destroy a road like that. Again it goes back to the goegraphy. This type of thing doesn't just happen everywhere. Having a river like this presents the possibilities of something like this happening. Once is starts eroding it happens quick. A road that may look driveable one minute may be completely eroded 5 minutes later. It is amazing how a rush of water can cause such damage. Even if there are set systems to get the water through, sometimes the water rush is too powerful and breaks through and erodes the earth underneath anyway like we saw in the video in class. I have never seen anything like these picture before, and it really is amazing to see what can happen. 

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.