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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Geo-Literacy

Geo-Literacy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I enjoy the sentiment of this quote; it embraces creative pedagogy while empowering students to be creative agents that can reshape the world.  I love the idea of geography enabling young minds to be inspired to imagine a better world and giving them the tools to so.  While I love the ethos that is embedded in this quote, I feel that it also underestimates our students and their ability to see past some of the limitations of the educational process.  It also doesn't appreciate the importance of understanding the current state of affairs before being able transforms them.  However, if we can create an environment that promotes and encourages higher-order thinking, we can help our students see their role in shaping a new world–that is our goal in promoting geo-literacy.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, February 27, 9:24 PM

This is not to discount the knowledge of human history.  This is a wonderful site with quite a few other meaningful learning quotes and an abundance of resources. 

Matt Richardson's comment, February 28, 7:00 AM
I also appreciate the sentiment here, but as a geography teacher in high school I also find that students are missing very basic information about the world as it is right now. For example, many of my students can't identify more than about three countries in Africa, and I've had students in the past who could not even find the U.S. on a map. Now I force them to take the dreaded 'blank map' quizzes of the world. Its distressing, but it needs to be done. Interestingly, many of my lower level students like these types of tests because there are online games that teach them the locations in a fun way, and also because it is a very literal task. The ones who struggle with higher level material can at least succeed at this if they study.
PIRatE Lab's comment, February 28, 11:16 AM
Yes, as Seth and several commenters have said, we need both. And too often my students don't seem to know the basic facts/history of a particular situation. You must know where you are coming from if you ever want to get to somewhere new.
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Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably)

Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
You may have heard that the highest-paid employee in each state is usually the football coach at the largest state school. This is actually a gross mischaracterization: Sometimes it is the basketball coach.
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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:58 AM

By looking at this map you can see that almost 75% of the United States highest paying public workers are basketball or football coaches. In my opinion this seems a little crazy to think about. I figured it would be maybe the school deans or plastic surgeons like the blue color shows in some states. 

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.
Seth Dixon's insight:

How we approach the educational process itself is inherently cultural.  What sociological impacts are their for either of these paradigms?  How might these differences affect other aspects of human geography?     

Tagspodcast, education, cultureEast AsiaUSA, unit 3 culture.

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E. Erny-Newton's comment, March 21, 2013 9:43 AM
For more on that, see : http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html
E. Erny-Newton's curator insight, March 21, 2013 9:46 AM

What is described here is what psychologist Carol Dweck highlights in her research : fixed mindset vs growth mindset ; some people tend to see achievements as based on innate abilities -they have a fixed mindset. Others see them as the fruit of effort and work -they have a growth mindset.Those two groups react very differently to setbacks : fixed minsets will give up, while growth mindsets will see an opportunity to improve.For more on that, see http://news.stanford.edu/news/2007/february7/dweck-020707.html ou en français : http://owni.fr/2011/02/07/apprendre-est-un-etat-d%E2%80%99esprit/

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 11:06 AM

This article has a message about the view of struggling in eastern and western cultures, and how this affects learning.  As an aspiring teacher, I found this very instructive.  The examples used were good and I really find myself wanting to read more on this topic.

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The Geography of Evolution Education

The Geography of Evolution Education | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is taught in biology classes varies considerably in the United States for a host of political and religious reasons that are particular to each state.  What influences the educational decisions being made in your state?

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Tony Hall's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:11 AM

This is a really interesting infographic. It blows my mind everytime I see something like this. The US is such an interesting place to study!

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 6, 2013 1:10 PM

Religion et société aux EU: sur la postérité du procès du singe et l'enseignement du darwinisme aux EU. 

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The Daily Mail Song

mp3 here: http://bit.ly/9zPBDi We're aware this video won't mean an awful lot if you've never heard of The Daily Mail (a British Newspaper), but on the plus side, you've never heard of The Daily Mail.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As more of our students go searching for information online, we need to also teach our students how to assess the quality of a particular media outlet and develop a critical eye.  This great song is a humorous way to approach that topic. 


Questions to Ponder: What makes a source reliable?  Can a source be reliable on some topics but not others?     

    

Here's an article about how an over-reliance on GPS (or Sat-Nav) can lead to the erosion of one's mental map.  And yes, the article is from the Daily Mail (as the images on the side clearly demonstrate).  Does that change how you approach the information? 

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Old-School Library

Old-School Library | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This would be the perfect place to study.  Next time I'm at L'Istituto delle Scienze, Palazzo Poggi, Bologna, I will definitely find this spot.  

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A Photo Essay on School Sprawl

A Photo Essay on School Sprawl | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Schools used to be the heart of a neighborhood or community. Children and not a few teachers could walk to class, or to the playground or ball field on the weekend. This was relatively easy to do, because the schools were placed within, not separated from, their neighborhoods. They were human-scaled and their architecture was not just utilitarian, but signaled their importance in the community. Now it has become hard to tell one from a Walmart or Target."


What better way to demonstrate the concepts of urban sprawl, automobile-dependent city planning and economies of scale than by analyzing the very geographic context of our schools themselves?  This is a very nicely arranged photo essay that most could spark conversation and would foster some discussion on how best to plan neighborhoods and spatially arrange the city.   


Tags: transportation, planning, sprawl, education, scale

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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find


Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.

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Yagmur Pak's comment, April 21, 2013 6:42 AM
The 100 People Foundation is designed to sketch a portrayal of the world in terms of population and wealth distribution by representing the entire global neighborhood through stories and illustrations. This Foundation provides immense opportunities to help students acknowledge the global issues facing our planet and improve their abilities on examining statistics about the world population. As a pre-service teacher, I would use this website to engage my Stage 2 students in learning about the diversity around the world and raising their awareness about the issues that affect the planet we all share. Students can contribute to this world portrait by celebrating someone or something in their community (e.g. interviewing Indigenous people about the diversity within their community) through photography and writing about the specific information about their part of the world. Such an assignment has the prospective to commence a discussion of understanding of who we are and what position we occupy in the world. This HSIE assignment can also be linked to a Mathematics lesson in which students collect data from their local community in small groups where they have a look at the diversity of specific groups between communities. Teachers can provide students with a few variables in order to make the task challenging, but well supported. I believe, the 100 People Foundation is offering captivating and thought-provoking resources to expand children’s view of the world which may provide vast opportunities for students to “develop awareness of similarities and differences of beliefs and practices in various cultures, and learn to detect and avoid cultural stereotypes and prejudices” (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008, p.9).

Reference:
Commonwealth of Australia (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Curriculum Corporation: Carlton South Vic.
ana boa-ventura's curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:31 AM

If you're looking at social media and diversity don't miss this site...In the last couple of years we've seen several sites / videos/ blogs rotating around the question 'if there were only 100 people in the world... ' In this case, children were asked to identify 'representative people' of that group of 100 and use visuals... many visuals.  And visuals of course bring up skin color, living conditions and much more. I don't want to be a spoiler though...Viist the site!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

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20 Classrooms From Around The World

20 Classrooms From Around The World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

We are all different...we are all the same.   This is a set set of images that highlights the essential similarities in people across cultures.

 

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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are officially below the poverty line (That's $23,050/year for a family of four according to the official sources).  That number really caught our eye and as such we decided to do a little more digging to help put some more facts and figures around it.  Above is a nice visualization of the results we came up with."

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Chandrima Roy's curator insight, January 14, 2013 3:36 AM

wow

Ivan Koh's curator insight, February 3, 2013 7:37 AM

This is my insight using See-Think-Wonder.
From this statistic, i can see alot of statistic about the number of people who are poor and the people's opinion related to poverty and welfare. In the article, i can see that 46million american are considered to be poor, and form the authors opinion, to prevent porverty, we should manage our wealth and make sure that we earn more than we spend.

I think that from the statistics, most people are poor mostly due to the fact that  they were uneducated in alot of ways. From the statistics, 1.2 million students drop out from high school every year. Thus, these people were mostly uneducated and cannot find a proper job, leading to drugs and borrowing of money. i also think that most people are poor because they are lazy and do not want to help themselves, as agreed by half of the americans that the poor are not doing enough to help themselves, and by 43% of americans that people who are poor can find a job if they are willing to work.

This article and statistics makes me wonder why american governments are not doing enough to educate students the importance of jobs and studies. Because people who are poor can actually work, but are too lazy to do it, this also makes me wonder why the government are giving money to the poor when they are able to help themselves 

Brandon Lee's curator insight, February 4, 2013 10:36 AM

The insight of this article merely showed that more and more people does not really have  a good financial health, which also has translated into people wer e "invisible poor" especially those living in the western world. Comparison had been made on its poverty line between USA and UK statistics.

In my opinion, managing a country's budget its not an easy task, this is because a country need competitive global presence and to boost the economy. People need to produce more and more services outside its own country.

I have often thought that a country's population does have an impact on a country's economic growth.

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Time to Revisit Food Deserts

Time to Revisit Food Deserts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Research on obesity and food availability in poor areas suggests that access must be considered alongside factors like price, taste and education, too.

 

Access to fresh food is one of the barriers to healthy eating within many poorer neighborhoods in the United States and these areas that lack healthy options are referred to as "food deserts."  At least that was what the conventional wisdom was.  This article looks other factors and issues surrounding healthy food options including poverty, education, transportation and culture.   

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Low-income countries are a cigarette's best friend

Low-income countries are a cigarette's best friend | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Between 1990 and 2009, cigarette consumption in regions of the world like Western Europe dropped by more than 25% - but that is only one side of the coin.  Historically, cigarette consumption has been a privilege to the rich and high-income countries. Now, with those countries understanding the risks of cancer and the dangers of smoking, the number of smokers decline. But in the past twenty years, for example, the use of cigarettes in the Middle East and Africe has increased by 60%: "Among the 14 countries where 50% or more of men smoke all but one country (Greece) are classified as low- or middle-income."

 

"As consumption rates continue to increase in low- and middle-income countries," the ACS report reads, "these countries will experience a disproportionate amount of tobacco-related illness and death."  In 2009, China consumed 40% of the world's cigarettes.

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Pass the Books. Hold the Oil.

Pass the Books. Hold the Oil. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Education is a better economic driver than a country’s natural resources.

 

This NY Times article is compelling fodder for a discussion on economic development.  While having natural resources on the surface sounds like the best valuable asset for a nation economy, why does Friedman argue that an abundance of natural resource can hurt the national economy?  While an educated workforce is obviously an asset, just how important is it compared to other factors? 

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Geographic Ignorance

Geographic Ignorance | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:
The Comedy Troupe 'The Mighty Boosh' doesn't need to work too hard when Chelsea Handler makes it so easy. 
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Sabrina Conroy's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:33 AM

Just another prime example of American ignorance. We're all guilty! But to what extent is this our fault and to what extent is it what we're taught at a young age in school. 

David Madrid's curator insight, July 25, 2013 8:27 PM

Existe la ignorancia geofrafica en personajes publicos.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:44 PM

Oh wow...

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012. Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."

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Kevin Cournoyer's comment, May 1, 2013 12:51 AM
This slideshow makes it painfully clear that the degree to which a country is developed makes for very different experiences when it comes to education and physically getting to a school. Less developed countries clearly present different, in many cases, more dangerous obstacles to arriving at a school than well developed countries present.
The climate and geographic features found in other countries seem to often be what creates the challenges in getting young people to schools. Economically, these countries are clearly disadvantaged, as the lack of a viable infrastructure would indicate. Due to this lack of infrastructure, the journey to school is dangerous and arduous. A certain resilience can be seen in these pictures, however. Those who take these dangerous trips to schools miles away or over dangerous terrain clearly value education, indicating a cultural emphasis on the importance of learning, many times in spite of harsh geographic factors.
Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:52 PM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2:45 PM

unit 6 economic development

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Education Around the World

Education Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A glimpse inside the life of students from Senegal to Vietnam and China."

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, March 11, 2013 3:57 PM

In the United States, we are constantly trying to improve education so that we can help students succeed in the global community. Our education system is often compared to those in other countries to see how American education "measures up." However, there are many differences between schools around the world.

 

BONUS: After looking at the pictures, compare American education and education in other countries. Write a paragraph explaining the similarities and differences that you INFER from the pictures and captions.

Tony Hall's curator insight, March 11, 2013 8:48 PM

Little bit different to my school:)

Nancy Watson's curator insight, March 15, 2013 5:13 PM

What does this do to your ethnocentric beliefs?

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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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Geography and the Common Core

Geography and the Common Core | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In 2010, most states in the United States (including Rhode Island) adopted the Common Core State Standards as the new standards.   The two main portions of the Common Core Standards are the English...


Will geography be permanently pushed out of the curriculum with the adoption of the Common Core?  How can a teacher bolster spatial thinking and geo-literacy within the Common Core framework?  If you've asked yourself these questions, this resource is for you. 

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Olga Varlamov's curator insight, November 23, 2013 8:39 PM

This article is under intellectual/arts in the United States, because it is about education. It talks about how the standards of the common core are spreading and how this will affect geography.

 

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The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan

The limits of freedom for educated girls in Malala's Pakistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In a country this battered, fractured, dysfunctional – how much can she really hope to achieve?


The issue of female education in Pakistan has exploded after Malala Yousafzai was attacked by the Taliban for publicly advocating for girls to receive more schooling.  This attack has lead several media outlets to take a more serious look at the gendered cultural and economic opportunities (or lack thereof) for girls within Pakistan.  This NPR podcast also speaks of the real options in front of so many girls like Malala and the cultural and political contexts within which they navigate their lives.

 

Tags: gender, South Asia, podcast, culture, Islam, development, unit 3 culture, education.

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Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 5:03 AM

Malala surely deserves every accolade she has received from her efforts to improve the education of women in Pakistan.  Not only did she stand up to the powers that kept her down, but she continued to do so even after those powers put a bullet in her head. She's an inspiration for all girls not only in Pakistan, but in every place where this is still an issue. 

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 6:44 PM

These girls are being deprived an education because they are females- crazy. And when Malala was trying to make change she was gunned down on the school bus, in front of other kids. I feel sorry for those children, they are the future, why not have them all educated.  I couldn't imagine leaving in a society that my future would be limited. 

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 9:09 PM

I really love this article because the young girl being interviewed is angry and has had enough of the sexism in Pakistan. Malala Yousafzai has definitely become a role model for girls in her homeland and she has advanced girl's education by a large margin during her fight. The school systems in Pakistan are lacking because of the environments and the materials teachers focus on and Pakistani boys get a very different education in their religious schools but the girls have begun to work harder to equal up to them and make it to universities.  There are still many restrictions on the jobs women can take but girls are beginning to fight that too.  Pakistan has now had female political officials which has shown the generations of schoolgirls that they can truly do anything they set their minds too and Malala has helped prove that the movement can't be stopped by surviving her assassination attempt and continuing to campaign. 

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Election 2012: Teaching Ideas and Resources

Election 2012: Teaching Ideas and Resources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

We suggested ways to teach about Election 2012 and included links to lesson plans and Times features, and we'll be updating the page regularly as the march to the White House proceeds.


The Learning Network has partnered with the NY Times to produce lesson plans for all ages (and all disciplines) on how to teach using the 2012 United States Presidential Election. 


Tags: Political, K12, training, education.

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Social Media in Education

This is a primer on how to use online resources for geography students so they can learn more about the world by participating in global conversations (not just hearing about them).
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Red State Reads, Blue State Reads

Red State Reads, Blue State Reads | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What political books are residents of your state reading? A new interactive map from Amazon shows recent book sales broken down by either "red" or "blue" political leanings.

 

I do not think that "book sales" is a surrogate for "projected votes," but this is revealing about the political landscape and especially the marketing of politically partisan materials. 

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Breaking Caste: Dalit Girls Chance at a Better Life

Breaking Caste: Dalit Girls Chance at a Better Life | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Inside an extraordinary school that gives India's Dalit girls a chance at a better life...

 

Cultural change, especially traditions that are deeply engrained over many generations, are difficult to reverse.  In India, the caste system is changing but not without tremendous efforts by individuals and institutions that are deeply committed to equality and expanding opportunities for the most socially vulnerable population.  There are a variety of videos and articles here that show how one school is making a difference in the lives of 'untouchable' girls to give them a hope for the future. 

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Agriculture is Everywhere

Farmers Fight is a student-led initiative to reconnect American society to the world of agriculture. Beginning with university students, Farmers Fight encour...

 

This video makes several important points about agricultural production within our modernized world, things that often go unnoticed and taken for granted.  Food for thought. 

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luisvivas64@hotmail.'s comment, February 3, 2013 10:24 AM
No hablo inglès, pero nfiero el mensaje:Amemos la rierra como a nuestros ojos, hijos.
luisvivas64@hotmail.'s comment, February 3, 2013 10:24 AM
No hablo inglès, pero nfiero el mensaje:Amemos la rierra como a nuestros ojos, hijos.
Lauren Sellers's curator insight, February 27, 11:58 AM
#agriculture
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Are the Richest Americans Also the Best Educated?

Are the Richest Americans Also the Best Educated? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The latest data from the U.S. Census´s American Community Survey paints a fascinating picture of the United States at the county level. What are the connections between place, education and earning power?  What patterns are what you would imagine? Why?  Any shocking patterns that emerge from this dataset?   

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