Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Raster vs. Vector

Raster vs. Vector | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For all you fellow GIS geeks, this is for you!  I drew this comic sketch a few years ago after a student told me that they were confused for an entire lecture because they swore the professor was talking about 'raptors' and they weren’t sure what dinosaurs had to do with GIS."

Seth Dixon's insight:

What you think you are teaching isn't always what they are learning. 

 

Tagsfunart, GIS, edtech.

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Australia to Zimbabwe

Australia to Zimbabwe | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A Romp Around the World to 24 Countries.  The perfect gift for adventurers young and old - this book is a whirlwind exploration of world cultures!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've received an advance copy of Australia to Zimbabwe and it is a delightful book that appeals to all ages (everyone in my house ate it up). Carefully layered so that readers can customize the experience to fit their interests, time, and goals, this treasure trove just begs the reader to keep exploring as they flip through its pages. Australia to Zimbabwe presents facts in a context that enlivens learning about the people and places of the world and heightens the reader’s curiosity. With the online supplemental materials, this book brings to life the sights, sounds, and smells of far-away places.  Teachers, librarians, and parents alike should all be excited to get their hands on this book when it comes out November 17th.


Tagseducation, K12geography education, book reviews.

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www.cheapassignmenthelp.com's curator insight, November 6, 2015 5:36 AM

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Mariana Trench Once Again Named Worst Place To Raise Child

Mariana Trench Once Again Named Worst Place To Raise Child | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Parenting magazine released its annual list of the best and worst places to raise a child this week, once again naming the Mariana Trench—an undersea chasm located 36,000 feet beneath the western Pacific Ocean—as the least desirable location for rearing children. The periodical’s staff reportedly selected amongst thousands of locations, weighing a diverse range of criteria such living costs, air quality, and local amenities, categories for which the pitch-black, silt-covered abyss unanimously received an 'F' rating."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Now this is funny.  True to form, the Onion is mocking how obsessed our society is about ranking neighborhoods and valuing social prestige.  Underlying this satirical humor are some real, social and spatial issues.  Buying a house or renting a place is in part an analysis of the structure itself, but value is ascribed to the geographic context of the home (as real estate agents say the three most import factors are: location, location, location).  Many parents are especially concerned about choosing the ‘right’ neighborhood and that drives the housing market.  Local amenities, schools, shopping, demographic profiles, income, crime rates, land use mix…a play a role in shaping the context in how people perceive the neighborhood’s desirability.   


Tags: housingneighborhood, cultural norms, culture.


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Scott Langston's curator insight, October 21, 2015 8:49 PM

Read Prof. Dixon's insight....

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How People Around the World Take Exams

How People Around the World Take Exams | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Examinations, tests, assessments—whatever the nomenclature, it’s hard to imagine schooling without them. Testing is the most popular method of quantifying individuals’ knowledge, often with the intention of objectively measuring aptitude and ability. Test-taking is a dreaded experience that the country’s kids and young adults share with their counterparts across the globe. The ritual at its core doesn’t vary much: Students sit at a table or a computer desk (or sometimes, as shown below, on the floor), pencil and/or mouse in hand, the clock ticking away mercilessly."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I am torn on how to teach these two ideas about cultures and societies all around the world:

  1. People and cultures are different all over the world.
  2. People and cultures are the same all over the world.

Cultural practices are often so similar, are done in slight different fashion.  This photo gallery can create opportunities for our students to 'see' themselves in other cultures while at the same time seeing the richness of global cultural practices. 


TagseducationK12, worldwide.

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 7:34 AM

So we can see similarities in testing all over the world....but now we can see how we have to take a test in different fashion! Imagine taking an APHG test in these different ways! 

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:58 AM

unit 3

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:59 AM

unit 3

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Geography just keeps getting more popular – so what's the subject's secret?

Geography just keeps getting more popular – so what's the subject's secret? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As geography teachers return to school they will see their subject continuing to expand at all stages of education. For the fifth year running, GCSE entries have risen. At A-level, geography had the largest percentage increase of all the major subjects in 2015, with candidate numbers rising sharply by 13 per cent, following on from the 19 per cent increase in GCSE in 2013. Enrolment on undergraduate courses is running higher than national averages, and graduating geographers experience some of the lowest unemployment levels of any degree subject. Such positive news is welcome and provides a firm foundation for the introduction of the new GCSE and A-levels from September 2016.

So, what has happened to boost geography over the past 10 years? In short, it's a powerful mix of sustained advocacy, support from successive governments, independent evaluation and the slow trickle of messages getting through.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Good news about the state of geography in the United Kingdom.  This can serve as a a strategic plan and a vision for revitalizing geography in the United States. 

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Geography's curator insight, September 1, 2015 1:56 PM

Geography is surely experiencing a growth spurt.  The addition of AP Human Geography has certainly helped, with growth rates of over 20% the past two years.  More and more schools in Wisconsin are now offering the course and we look for this trend to continue. #wiscocst

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 3, 2015 10:31 AM

popularity

David lyon's curator insight, September 23, 2015 6:04 PM
What can we learn from this in Australia?
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The GA: A Different View

"This video forms a lively introduction to A Different View and the themes within it.  A Different View is a manifesto from the Geographical Association. It makes a compelling case for geography's place in the curriculum. But the world changes, and so does the curriculum. A Different View, and the supporting materials on this website, are designed to be used in any context where geography is taught, explained, encouraged or promoted."


Tagseducation, K12geography education.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, August 9, 2015 9:04 PM

We talk about places in the world every day, but we don't study geography. It is important to understand why geography should have a place in the curriculum.

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World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above

World Literacy Map: Literacy Rate Adult Total of People Ages 15 and Above | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Percentage of a country's population that can read and write. Country's define literacy age between 7 and 20 years old. The standard age for literacy most countries is 15 years of age.


TagseducationK12, developmentmap, worldwide.

Seth Dixon's insight:

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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Annenkov's curator insight, August 5, 2015 4:29 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:53 PM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:21 AM

My 10 year-old daughter was looking in our atlas a while back (yes, she is my daughter) and in the encyclopedic entry of each country she started noticing that literacy rates were included.  She started asking about which regions had higher and lower literacy rates. This became a teaching moment about the power of the map--I explained that all this data can be more easily accessed and seen on a map and this interactive map is what we discovered.  We need to help student find the maps and data to answer their questions (and we need to make sure that they are curious enough to ask questions about the way the world works).  

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How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place

How learning to love geography can help make the world a better place | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It’s a good time to reflect on what truly inspires us. What gives us, as individuals, our own sense of independence? And how can we apply that sense of joyful independence to help us engage more actively and participate more readily in the world—to make it a better place, even? Cultivating a better geographical and cultural appreciation for the world, in the next generation as well as in our own, is a pretty good place to start."


TagseducationK12geography educationperspective, worldwide.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, July 18, 2015 7:50 AM

This is awesome !!!

Luigi Cappel's comment, July 18, 2015 4:08 PM
Great story, perhaps a Montestory. I made the pun because I had a terrible geography teacher. He wasn't interested in his subject and he was there as a job. Consequently whilst I scored high in most subjects, I failed this one. Despite that I have traveled the world many times for business an pleasure, learned many languages, which have seen me learn and appreciate countries and cultures. There are those of us who naturally have high IQ, but I believe all children have a brain that says "feed me and I will flourish". We must have teachers that elicit that.
Kenneth Peterson's curator insight, July 19, 2015 12:59 PM

Montessori shines once again!

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Why everyone should be able to read a map

Why everyone should be able to read a map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New research suggests that map reading is a dying skill in the age of the smartphone. Perish the thought, says Rob Cowen
Seth Dixon's insight:

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tagsmappingspatial, technology, education.

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Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, September 5, 2014 9:17 AM

this can explain why it is important to NOT always rely on technology. It is good to keep your brain active and the spatial awareness that comes with reading a map is invaluable

Dolors Cantacorps's curator insight, September 5, 2014 3:13 PM

Practiquem-ho a classe doncs!

Richard Thomas's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:52 PM

Despite the gendered overtones of the article (that it's important for men to learn to read a map), this is some good advice, regardless of gender.  The vocabulary and concepts of maps can strengthen spatial cognition and geography awareness.  While GPS technology can help us in a pinch, relying primarily on a system that does not engage our navigation skills will weaken our ability to perform these functions.  While it intuitively makes sense, that the 'mental muscles' would atrophy when not used, it is a reminder that an overuse of geospatial technologies can be intellectually counterproductive.  So break out a trusty ol' map, but more importantly, be a part of the spatial decision-making process. 


Tags: mapping, spatial, technology, education.

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High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places

High-School Dropouts and College Grads Are Moving to Very Different Places | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Cities like Washington and San Francisco are gaining the highly skilled but losing their less-educated workforce.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article, with its charts and interactive maps, is worth exploring to show some of the important spatial patterns of internal migration.  It's not hard to realize that larger, cosmopolitan metro areas will have an advantage in attracting and keeping prospective college graduates; the question that we should be asking our students is how will this impact neighborhoods, cities and regions?    


Tags: migration, USA, mappingcensus, education.

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 19, 2014 8:47 AM

Good charts/grafts - worth looking at and using with the concept of migration.   

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Geo-Literacy

Geo-Literacy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

I enjoy the sentiment of this quote; it embraces creative pedagogy while empowering students to be creative agents that can reshape the world.  I love the idea of geography enabling young minds to be inspired to imagine a better world and giving them the tools to so.  While I love the ethos that is embedded in this quote, I feel that it also underestimates our students and their ability to see past some of the limitations of the educational process.  It also doesn't appreciate the importance of understanding the current state of affairs before being able transforms them.  However, if we can create an environment that promotes and encourages higher-order thinking, we can help our students see their role in shaping a new world–that is our goal in promoting geo-literacy.

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Matt Richardson's comment, February 28, 2014 7:00 AM
I also appreciate the sentiment here, but as a geography teacher in high school I also find that students are missing very basic information about the world as it is right now. For example, many of my students can't identify more than about three countries in Africa, and I've had students in the past who could not even find the U.S. on a map. Now I force them to take the dreaded 'blank map' quizzes of the world. Its distressing, but it needs to be done. Interestingly, many of my lower level students like these types of tests because there are online games that teach them the locations in a fun way, and also because it is a very literal task. The ones who struggle with higher level material can at least succeed at this if they study.
PIRatE Lab's comment, February 28, 2014 11:16 AM
Yes, as Seth and several commenters have said, we need both. And too often my students don't seem to know the basic facts/history of a particular situation. You must know where you are coming from if you ever want to get to somewhere new.
SFDSLibrary's curator insight, May 13, 2014 8:11 AM

Excellent resource about the importance of Geography in understanding the world of the 21st Century.

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Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably)

Is Your State's Highest-Paid Employee A Coach? (Probably) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
You may have heard that the highest-paid employee in each state is usually the football coach at the largest state school. This is actually a gross mischaracterization: Sometimes it is the basketball coach.
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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:58 AM

By looking at this map you can see that almost 75% of the United States highest paying public workers are basketball or football coaches. In my opinion this seems a little crazy to think about. I figured it would be maybe the school deans or plastic surgeons like the blue color shows in some states. 

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Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning

Struggle For Smarts? How Eastern And Western Cultures Tackle Learning | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the most part in American culture, intellectual struggle in school children is seen as an indicator of weakness, while in Eastern cultures it is not only tolerated, it is often used to measure emotional strength.
Seth Dixon's insight:

How we approach the educational process itself is inherently cultural.  What sociological impacts are their for either of these paradigms?  How might these differences affect other aspects of human geography?     

Tagspodcast, education, cultureEast AsiaUSA, unit 3 culture.

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 25, 2015 6:54 AM

This video lays out them main difference between educational theory in the west, and educational theory in the east. In the west, we place value on a student achieving the right answer. Right Answers eventually lead to high grades. All classes eventually boil down to the grade given. In reality, it is all that most parents, teachers and students care about. In the east knowledge is measured through the work that goes in to getting the correct answer. Mistakes are seen as a natural outcome of hard work. They are not discouraged as they are in western education.

Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, December 10, 2015 10:57 PM

It's interesting to see the differences between learning here, and in Eastern cultures. There is more of an acceptance of struggling in school there, and more encouragement to keep trying to get things right, rather than just being told that you are wrong.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 15, 2015 2:16 PM

the difference in mentality is amazing as described in this article the difference in perception of struggling students in america and Asian countries is staggering and i think that our country has been so concerned for so long with only the best succeeding that it needs to be fixed, i know that we have taken steps int he right direction with different government programs which is promising and hopefully this development will continue

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Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't

Traveling Teaches Students in a Way Schools Can't | Geography Education | Scoop.it
American education is largely limited to lessons about the West.


When I turned 15, my parents sent me alone on a one-month trip to Ecuador, the country where my father was born. This was tradition in our family—for my parents to send their first-generation American kids to the country of their heritage, where we would meet our extended family, immerse ourselves in a different culture, and learn some lessons on gratefulness.

My family’s plan worked. That month in Ecuador did more for my character, education, and sense of identity than any other experience in my early life.


Tags: place, tourism, education, geo-inspiration.

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Tony Hall's curator insight, December 3, 2015 11:59 PM

This is a great article. I think it applies to people who live in all developed countries (not just the USA), as well as the privileged people from the less developed places. It touches on a lot of things I care about - seeing, feeling, smelling how other people live. Learning that we are not all the same. Knowing that it is ok to not engage with the "American/Australian/Western Dream". Knowing that it is ok to have your own dreams that are different to other people. 

Tina Little-Coltrane's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 AM

An Absolute #TRUTH !!

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 7:15 PM

Being able to travel is a great gift. There is nothing more rewarding than seeing new places and learning about cultures. Unfortunately, the last time that I could afford to travel far from home was when I was young and I didn't understand the amazing opportunity that I had at the time. I traveled to Aruba, and to New Brunswick, Canada. Both amazing places. If I could go anywhere, I'd go to Germany, London, and Ireland as soon as possible. My great grandmother was from England, and my great grandfather was from Canada, I'd like to visit their home towns. Traveling places would definitely be a better learning experience than leaning about a place in school. You get to experience the real thing. Interact with the locals and maybe even get involved with the local traditions. Traveling to learn is definitely an experience worth wild.

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Australia to Zimbabwe

Australia to Zimbabwe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The perfect gift for adventurers young and old - this book is a whirlwind exploration of world cultures!
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've received an advance copy of Australia to Zimbabwe and it is a delightful book that appeals to all ages (everyone in my house ate it up). Carefully layered so that readers can customize the experience to fit their interests, time, and goals, this treasure trove just begs the reader to keep exploring as they flip through its pages. Australia to Zimbabwe presents facts in a context that enlivens learning about the people and places of the world and heightens the reader’s curiosity. With the online supplemental materials, this book brings to life the sights, sounds, and smells of far-away places.  Teachers, librarians, and parents alike should all be excited to get their hands on this book when it comes out November 17th.


Tagseducation, K12geography education, book reviews.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, October 21, 2015 7:31 AM

Gotta get my own copy!!

Scott Langston's curator insight, October 22, 2015 7:49 PM

A wonderful read!

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Most 8th Graders Are Not Proficient in Geography

Most 8th Graders Are Not Proficient in Geography | Geography Education | Scoop.it
About three-quarters of eighth grade students—the only grade for which trend data are available—were not “proficient” in geography in 2014, according to GAO's analysis of nationally representative data from the Department of Education (Education). Specifically, these students had not demonstrated solid competence in the subject, and the proficiency levels of eighth grade students have shown no improvement since 1994 (see figure). Geography is generally taught as part of social studies, but data show that more than half of eighth grade teachers reported spending a small portion (10 percent or less) of their social studies instruction time on geography. Further, according to a study by an academic organization, a majority of states do not require geography courses in middle school or high school.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A basic understanding of geography is a prerequisite for any informed citizen, and globalization means that is even more important than ever.  This report is not a 'pick-me-up' but a sobering reminder of the task that lays before us.  There has been some improvement, but so much more is needed.   


TagseducationK12geography education.

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Vermont Social Studies's curator insight, October 19, 2015 9:07 AM

Geography is a critically important discipline, and combines science, technology, economics, cultural understanding, and current events. How much geography is taught in your K-12 curriculum?

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:44 PM

It is disappointing to hear that the average students understanding of Geography is declining, especially as interaction between nations becomes more and more common in a multitude of careers. Knowledge of something as simple and necessary as where in the world different countries are or if Africa is a country  or a continent is not only necessary for a fully rounded education, it is vital for anyone who wishes to be considered well versed in their knowledge of the world.

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Why everyone should take a geography class, especially now

Why everyone should take a geography class, especially now | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geographical literacy remains vital—particularly for those of us who live in (for the time being at least) the world’s preeminent military and economic superpower. Geography is necessary for understanding why the overthrow of a government in Libya contributed to an unprecedented surge of migrants into Europe, why Ukraine has been split between East and West amid its conflict with Russia, and why China’s neighbors are alarmed at the new islands under construction in the South China Sea. And as we learned during last year’s Ebola panic, an understanding of African geography could have helped explain why an outbreak in West Africa should not lead to the quarantining of people from Kenya or Tanzania. In the years to come, as the effects of climate change on everything from sea level rise to deforestation to drought quite literally reshape the world we live in, an understanding of geography will be necessary for mitigating and adapting to the consequences.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A basic understanding of geography is a prerequisite for any informed citizen, and globalization means that is even more important than ever.  

TagseducationK12geography education.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, October 7, 2015 7:39 AM

Geographical literacy

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Why Geography Should Make a Comeback in K-12

Why Geography Should Make a Comeback in K-12 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some educators believe that geography is subject that should go hand in hand with the STEM push.


Geography used to be a subject that was taught throughout the nation but somewhere along the line it got put on the back burner. Now, in California, educators are finding ways to bring the subject back and their methods may be of interest to parents and teachers beyond the West Coast.


TagseducationK12geography education, STEM.

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Nicholas Widaman's curator insight, August 31, 2015 12:45 PM

Geography is not taken as seriously in schools as it should be, but here are some reasons why it should be.

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Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care?

Defining Geography: What is Where, Why There, and Why Care? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One reason why geography has languished in the curricula of many American schools is that so few people understand the nature of the discipline or its relevance to our everyday lives. What is geography? What is its unique perspective? What do geographers do? Why is geography important? Why should we teach (and learn) geography in the schools? These are questions that have gone largely unanswered in American education. This brief essay presents an easily taught, understood, and remembered definition of geography.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.


Tagseducation, K12geography education.

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Yolanta Krawiecki's curator insight, August 7, 2015 5:29 PM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Jade ten Kate's curator insight, August 7, 2015 11:01 PM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.

 

Tags: education, K12, geography education.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, August 8, 2015 12:14 AM

This poster nicely summarizes this classic essay on what geography is and what geographers do...it's a perfect article for student to read.


Tagseducation, K12geography education.

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My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either

My daughter can’t read a map. And your kid probably can’t either | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ask any teenager for directions and he can pull up Google Maps quicker than you can recite an address. Pretty awesome, right? And I’ll be the first to admit that having a map in my phone that not only tells me where to turn but how long it will take me to get there is pretty amazing. I use it all the time, honestly. But even when I’m zoning out and listening to that soothing voice telling me where to turn, I have a mental picture in my head of her directions. And I never realized that my teenage daughter doesn’t have a map in her head, because she’s never really had to use one. Ever.


Tagseducation, K12geography educationspatial, mapping.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the more fortunate students (access to portable electronic devices, multi-car families with parents who drive them around, etc.) are actually worse off in map reading skills in part because they have never needed to develop a mental map and are not adept at navigating their neighborhoods (in the last few generations most and the range that part).  When these children become drivers, they are unable to navigate without GPS devices, but they still need to learn map reading skills. They are convinced that their apps can do all the work and that an old fashioned paper map is outdated technology, but their spatial thinking skills become atrophied. Spatial skills are crucial for understanding the world as a global citizen, to understand your local environs and for making scientific discoveries.  So teach a kid how to read a map...the sooner the better. 

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Cade Johns's curator insight, August 16, 2015 9:26 PM

I think maps on your phone is great but what about if you get lost and you don't have service on your phone then what are you gonna do?Most young people have never had to read an actual map so most likely they won't be able to find their way back to civilization. CJ

Ethan Conner's curator insight, August 17, 2015 8:56 AM

Many people cannot read maps because of technolagy. This new form of maps are keeping children from the traditional way. Also keeping them from education.

Aaron Burnette's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:50 AM

Although cell phone and technology is helpful, other people still believe in the prideful way. Reading paper maps.

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52 Places to Go in 2015

52 Places to Go in 2015 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Untrammeled oases beckon, once-avoided destinations become must-sees, and familiar cities offer new reasons to visit.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  Maybe we don't all have the pocketbook for it, but so many people have the desire to explore, travel and see parts of the world that feel as if they are mythical.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

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Aki Puustinen's curator insight, April 19, 2015 9:51 AM
Yes Sir - June to Milan !
Norka McAlister's curator insight, April 25, 2015 5:16 PM

There are a variety of places to choose from when it comes to vacationing, but one of these places may be in your next trip in 2015. All countries have their own attractions. You will find from old cities to modern suburbs to sky-scraping metropolitan cities establishing their place global tourism market. But one thing that shocks me is how the country of Cuba has been open to the tourism business, where for so many years their communist system has been failing and now they seem to be attracted to the tourism business. In many of these countries, building development has stopped for long time but in other places, modern infrastructure brings more tourists to the city. Urbanism plays a big role in how to distribute the cities. Furthermore, cultures, cities, variety of natural landscape, natural beaches, and tradition are some of few points that attract tourism business in the area. However, in some of these places religion, political, and security needs to be addressed and policies must be implemented in order to market these areas as tourist zones. Islamic countries, communist countries, old and modern cities, and even poor countries are all becoming good places to visit in 2015.

Annabelle Damasco's curator insight, August 7, 2015 6:48 AM

Most geographers have more than a little bit of wanderlust.  Maybe we don't all have the pocketbook for it, but so many people have the desire to explore, travel and see parts of the world that feel as if they are mythical.  For students that have the curiosity, it our mission as educators to cultivate that and help them frame the world into a geographic perspective.  I've always felt that window-seat flyers are have the seed of a geographer embedded within them...let's make sure those seeds can grow. 


Tags: place, tourism.

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The First Day of School Around the World

The First Day of School Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Take a look at the first day of school celebrations around the world!
Seth Dixon's insight:

Access to education is one of the great indicators of development and political stability--educators wish nothing but the best education possible for the next generation, but the experience is quite variable across the globe.  As many places have recently started school again, this article is a reminder that this practice is experienced differently around the world. 


TagseducationK12, developmentperspective, worldwide.

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News Literacy: Critical-Thinking Skills for the 21st Century

News Literacy: Critical-Thinking Skills for the 21st Century | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every teacher I've worked with over the last five years recalls two kinds of digital experiences with students.The first I think of as digital native moments, when a student uses a piece of technology with almost eerie intuitiveness. The second I call digital naiveté moments, when a student trusts a source of information that is obviously unreliable. How can these coexist? How can students be so technologically savvy while also displaying their lack of basic skills for navigating the digital world?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a nice article with some practical advice but it also can that helps us conceptualize the thinking skills that our students are going to need in the future (with a classic photo that embodies 20th century news literacy).  Previously, I've written on this same topic, with some strategies to how to help students assess the validity of online information with geographic content (with a series of maps and images).  I know I've been duped before, and it's okay to admit that to your students; but we need to teach students how to be critical readers as they are swimming in an ocean of digital information of variable quality.  This is why I see content curation as an important part of modern education; it is a way to teach student the tools to assess the quality of information for themselves.  They will be gathering, organizing and synthesizing digital information for rest of their lives.        

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Linda Dougherty's curator insight, August 12, 2014 12:41 AM
3 ideas to incorporate News Literacy into the classroom while guiding students into evaluating news articles and media.
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Geographic Ignorance

Geographic Ignorance | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:
The Comedy Troupe 'The Mighty Boosh' doesn't need to work too hard when Chelsea Handler makes it so easy. 
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Sabrina Conroy's curator insight, July 15, 2013 11:33 AM

Just another prime example of American ignorance. We're all guilty! But to what extent is this our fault and to what extent is it what we're taught at a young age in school. 

David Madrid's curator insight, July 25, 2013 8:27 PM

Existe la ignorancia geofrafica en personajes publicos.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:44 PM

Oh wow...

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10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World

10 of the Most Dangerous Journeys to Schools Around the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Many of us have heard the stories of how our parents or grandparents had to walk miles in the snow to get to school. Perhaps some of these tales were a tad embellished, but we got the point. A lot of American kids have the luxury of being driven in a warm car or bus to a good school nearby. This is not the case for the children in this gallery.

The photos you are about to see are snapshots of the treacherous trips kids around the world take each day to get an education. Considering there are currently 61 million children worldwide who are not receiving an education—the majority of which are girls—these walks are seen as being well worth the risk.

In the above photo, students in Indonesia hold tight while crossing a collapsed bridge to get to school in Banten village on January 19, 2012. Flooding from the Ciberang river broke a pillar supporting the suspension bridge, which was built in 2001."

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:52 PM

It is sad what so many children must endure and go through in order to get an education.  I wonder if these bridges and structures have been fixed.  61 million children not receiving an education is 61 million too many.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 1, 2014 2:45 PM

unit 6 economic development

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 13, 2015 2:55 PM

This is really hard to see. Children shouldn't have a hard journey getting to school to get an education and better their lives. These photos are from ten places around the world with the most dangerous journeys to school. This isn't a topic that even comes to mind because many of us living in the United States have had the luxury of being driven to school or riding a bus and we take that simple drive for granted. One of the photos is from Indonesia where students have to cross a collapsing bridge to get to school. The image shows them hanging on for dear life while trying not to fall in the water underneath them. There was a flood that broke the pillar holding this bridge up and it was never fixed after that. What happens when that bridge fully collapses? There needs to be a better way to get these kids to school. These children shouldn't have to suffer with getting their education for situations that are out of their control.