Geography Education
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The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally

The Great Barrier Reef was not bleached naturally | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"This year, we’ve seen alarming bleaching of the Great Barrier Reef, caused by warm sea temperatures. A recently completed aerial survey of the reef found that 93 percent of the smaller reefs that comprise it showed at least some bleaching, and in the northern sector of the reef, the large majority of reefs saw bleaching that was severe — meaning many of these corals could die.  There was already considerable murmuring that this event, which damages a famous World Heritage site and could deal a blow to a highly valuable tourism industry, did not simply happen by chance. And now, a near real-time analysis by a group of Australian climate and coral reef researchers has affirmed that the extremely warm March sea temperatures in the Coral Sea, which are responsible for the event, were hardly natural."

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Australia, Oceania.

Seth Dixon's insight:

UPDATE: An infographic from NOAA answering the question, What is coral bleaching?

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easyaccentor's comment, May 5, 3:11 AM
Interesting...!!
Verturner's curator insight, Today, 6:01 AM
Not good for our reef
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It's official: a global mass extinction is under way

It's official: a global mass extinction is under way | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tagsphysical, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, February 28, 7:03 PM

Geographic Thinking Concepts: Patterns and Trends; Interrelationships;

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Galapagos Islands and Biodiversity

Galapagos Islands and Biodiversity | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Radiolab wraps 2015 with a series of special episodes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Galapagos Islands (as are most islands) filled with remarkably distinct species from the mainland--one of the key reasons that the island were so instrumental in shaping Charles Darwin's thinking about evolution.  This environmental Radiolab podcast is mainly about the Galapagos wildlife and it's conservation and covers many important biogeographic concepts (with time in the episode): 

  • Traveling to the Galapagos (5:25)
  • Who will fight to protect the environment? (10:00)
  • Tortoises and their role in habitats (13:30)
  • Invasive Species and goats (16:30)
  • Removal of Invasive species (19:00)
  • The return of the original habitat (25:40)
  • Local anger against conservation (26:30)
  • 'Restoring' extinct tortoise species (30:00)
  • How do we best protect nature? (37:00)
  • Genetically engineering extinct species (41:00)
  • Tourism and ecological change (46:45)
  • Darwin and finches (50:00)
  • Endangered finches and flies (55:00)
  • Hybrid species (1:02:00)

 

Tags: Ecuador, biogeography, environmentecology, historical.

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Marianne Naughton's curator insight, January 14, 1:33 PM

Wildlife & Conservation

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The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom

The World’s Driest Desert Is in Breathtaking Bloom | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"After historic rains, Atacama, Chile is exploding with vibrant wildflowers.  Here's a softer side to the disruptive weather phenomenon known as El Nino: an enormous blanket of colorful flowers has carpeted Chile's Atacama desert, the most arid in the world. The cyclical warming of the central Pacific may be causing droughts and floods in various parts of the world, but in the vast desert of northern Chile it has also caused a vibrant explosion of thousands of species of flowers with an intensity not seen in decades."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The driest place on Earth, the Atacama Desert in South America, has spectacular vistas and biogeography ... especially when it rains.  To read more (and see some stunning images) check out the links from the Washington Post, Yahoo, and the Smithsonian Magazine.   It is amazing that life can flourish in even some of the harshest of physical environments. 


Tags: physicalweather and climate, ChileSouth America, biogeography, environmentecology.

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Pierre Ratcliffe's comment, October 31, 2015 2:56 AM
How life forms have been dormant for decades or centuries or more. The DNA of these plants were there ready when conditions were favourable.
Leonardo Wild's curator insight, October 31, 2015 9:44 AM

Amazing Nature!

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, November 2, 2015 12:32 PM

Wow! This is such an amazing thing to see happened in the driest place on Earth. The disruptive weather phenomenon, El Nino really made this place come to life by bringing rainfall and floods. A spectacular site to see, that in the most harshest physical environment, life can flourished.

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China Fences In Its Nomads, and an Ancient Life Withers

China Fences In Its Nomads, and an Ancient Life Withers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Chinese government is in the final stages of a 15-year-old effort to transform millions of pastoralists who once roamed China’s vast borderlands.


TagsCentral Asia, culturefolk culturesecology, China.

Seth Dixon's insight:

The Chinese government claims that this project is ecological in nature and that pastoralism will degrade the grasslands; however, this is stamping out cultural groups that have been resistant to assimilation. 

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:26 PM

Discrimination exists in every industrialized society in every part of the globe, the result of poverty, ignorance, and hatred. The US is guilty of it just as much as any other nation, evident by the continued existence of income gaps between whites and blacks in the US, as well as the policy of the US in its handling of our native populations. Chinese discrimination against ethnic Tibetans has long been documented and observed within the West, meeting the condemnation of much of the Western world, and such cultural discrimination has continued in other provinces within China. As the coast has exploded in wealth per capita, and the culture there becomes increasingly westernized, these other cultures and peoples are in danger of inevitably being wiped out. This is the result of Chinese policy, which has actively worked to suppress and kill of these resistant cultures, for the sake of national identity and unity. Is America in a position to judge others for how they treat their ethnic minorities? Not at all- just look at the demographics of our prison system and our families who fall below the poverty line. Such racism has long been a facet of human civilization, and it is up to us to make it a thing of our past and not of our future. For these cultures in China, I fear the worst will inevitably pass, and the world will sit passively by as they are lost forever. It saddens me, and I hope that I am proven wrong.

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Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel

Population growth far outpaces food supply in conflict-ravaged Sahel | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Sahel’s ability to produce food is not keeping pace with its growing population, and global warming will only exacerbate the imbalance, according to a new study.  Among the 22 countries making up the arid region in northern Africa, the population grew to 471 million in 2010 from 367 million in 2000, a jump of nearly 30%. As the population grew rapidly, the production of crops remained essentially unchanged.  Using satellite images to calculate annual crop production in the conflict-ridden Sahel belt, south of the Sahara desert, the researchers then compared output with population growth and food and fuel consumption."

 

Tags: Africa, Sahelpopulation, environment, water, ecology, environment depend, weather and climate, sustainability, agriculture, food production.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 5:59 PM

with the strife in this region it is hardly surprising that it is hard to maintain food supplies in the face of large scale immigration. in a region where it is hard to survive, immigration would be a massive threat, straining already thinly spread resources.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:22 AM

If a country has a big population growth, the resources that it has if they are already scarce may become devastating. As the population of Sahel does increase, the amount of food resources will not have the proper time to react to the growth. Granted it may take a while for agricultural crops to grow and many citizens may face hard times facing finding food, but their hardships will be overcome by farmers trying to produce more crops to help ease that hardship.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 2:38 PM

this seems like an alarmingly common problem in the world today with population growth happening at an alarming rate in many parts of the world. most notably india and china. as well as in sahel, if your population grows by 100 million in 10 years it will be impossible to keep up and be able to provide for that many people in such a reletively short time.

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Natural gas leaking from faulty wells, not fracked shale

Natural gas leaking from faulty wells, not fracked shale | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A new study adds to growing evidence that the risk of fracking contaminating drinking water wells is to due to problems with the lining of the gas wells, not the high-pressure fracturing of deep shale to release natural gas. In a new study, scientists examined isotopes of helium and two other noble gases to identify the source of methane found in drinking water wells in the Marcellus Shale of Pennsylvania and the Barnett Shale of Texas, areas where a lot of fracking has taken place. The pattern of isotopes suggested that the stray gas had leaked out of the well casing near the surface, rather than escaping from the fracked deep shale, according to a story in The Dallas Morning News. The findings will be published online this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences."


Tagsenergypollution, resources, environment, environment modify, ecology.

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YEC Geo's curator insight, September 30, 2014 8:43 AM

Interesting to see if this is a one-off, or if other researchers can duplicate the work elsewhere.  It will also be interesting to see what the reaction will be from those opposed to fracking.

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The World's Largest Trees

"The world's second-largest known tree, the President, in Sequoia National Park is photographed by National Geographic magazine photographer Michael 'Nick' Nichols for the December 2012 issue."

Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a beauty and magnificent in nature, both is the microscopic and delicate as well as the grand and powerful.  The biosphere's diversity is a great part of it's allure that keeps geographers exploring for to understand the mysteries on our planet.  The incredible image at the end of this project really is truly stunning.  


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, California.

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Hemant Galviya's curator insight, April 17, 2014 2:55 AM

hiiiiiiiiiiii

Basant Kerketta's curator insight, April 21, 2014 4:26 AM

Magnificent !!!

These kind must be saved.

Wish I could plant and replicate this size and height here in my home town.

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Island Biogeography

Part I, island biogeography in a World Regional context...click here to watch part II, why island biogeography matters in places that aren't on islands.  All links archived at: http://geographyeducation.org/2013/12/06/island-biogeography/

Seth Dixon's insight:

Island biogeography operates on different principles than we see on the continents.  Soem extraordinary creatures such as the komodo dragon and thylacine can be found in isolated places removed interactions with more generalist species.  Alfred Russel Wallace made some extraordinary discoveries combining biology and spatial thinking. 

 

Island biogeography is pertinent today since habitat fragmentation (from urbanization and argicultural land uses) has rendered 'islands' out of the wilderness that isn't being used by humanity.  Some animals such as the cougar are locally extinct from their historic ranges (extirpation).


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Australia, Oceania.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:35 PM

There are times where I wish certain species don't spread.  Other times I understand the migration and think it's great.  If humans died out then I believe all species would flourish just as Sir Ken Robinson says.  

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:19 PM

Island biogeography operates on different principles than we see on the continents.  Soem extraordinary creatures such as the komodo dragon and thylacine can be found in isolated places removed interactions with more generalist species.  Alfred Russel Wallace made some extraordinary discoveries combining biology and spatial thinking. 

 

Island biogeography is pertinent today since habitat fragmentation (from urbanization and argicultural land uses) has rendered 'islands' out of the wilderness that isn't being used by humanity.  Some animals such as the cougar are locally extinct from their historic ranges (extirpation).


Tags: biogeography, environment, ecology, Australia, Oceania.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:06 PM
Island Biogeography is the theoretical explanations as to why species occurs, it also studies the species composition and species richness on an island.. it is not specific to land masses around water. Isolation gives species a strong place in their environment. The fact that new species and things show up are amazing, but sometimes new species are not properly adapted because there is no other general force against them and they do not ever learn to defend themselves.
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Hydraulic Fracking

Hydraulic Fracking | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Hydraulic fracturing, or 'fracking', is the process of drilling and injecting fluid into the ground at a high pressure in order to fracture shale rocks to release natural gas inside."


Seth Dixon's insight:

This website, Dangers of Fracking, is clearly not produced by the oil industry.  What I enjoy about this resource is that as you scroll down, it adds more context to the environmental issues and geographic factors.  This type of website promotes holistic thinking and an interdisciplinary approach to complex problems.  Why am I leery of the fracking companies and what they say?  This is why


Tagsenergy, resources, environment, environment modify, ecology.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:37 PM

Hydrographic Turing puts people in  safety and health risks. Because the water is contaminated and because of the oil spills, blow outs, and fires. They put chemicals into the ground in order to make cracks in the earth to collect natural oil, but they use people's land in order to collect the oil. People are complaining about these industries because they now have to buy water every month instead of getting it from their sinks or wells. Not to mention some houses have already blew up or caught on favor thanks to hydro fracturing. They need to put a stop to this, at least do it on land that is not being used and far away from people.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:07 PM

The development of gas is important for energy but there are health and safety risks with cracking in neighborhoods. Quality of air and water is important for survival. Nature matters and people matter, they need to find a middle ground. 

Kuzi's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:42 AM

The visual example explained the procses

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Aral Sea Basin

Aral Sea Basin | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Dust blows from what was once the Aral Sea floor. Tragic mismanagement of a natural resource."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The collapse of the Aral Sea ecosystem is (arguably) the worst man-made environmental disaster of the 20th century and 21st century has seen the continuation of the desertification set in motion.  Soviet mismanagement, water-intensive cotton production and population growth have all contributed the overtaxing of water resources in the Aral Sea basin, which has resulted in a the shrinking of the Aral Sea--it has lost more of the sea to an expanding desert than the territories of the Netherlands, Belgium and Luxembourg combined.  The health problems arising from this issues are large for the entire Aral Sea basin, which encompasses 5 Central Asian countries and it has profoundly changed (for the worse) the local climates.  Compare the differences with some historical images of the Aral Sea on Google Earth or on ArcGIS Online (also see this article from GeoCurrents


Tags: environment, Central Asia, environment modify.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 30, 2014 8:36 PM

The Aral Sea Basin has been a topic of conversation throughout geography for many reasons. What used to be filled with water is now blowing dust because its that dry? This basin is no longer a natural resource.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:30 PM

Here is a question. Do you think perhaps in the future this could happen to lake Mead in Nevada/Arizona? With all the non-stop building and no rain perhaps one day could it run dry or do we have a way to stop it.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 1, 2015 7:17 PM

Once there is less water in a lake there is less water in the air therefore less rain. The long term consequences is that the fishing industry is destroyed where once upon a time there were 61000 workers and now there are under 2000. The water is more saltier. The lands are now ill suited and unbuildable. Also the people there are prone to health problems.

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Ecology of Plastic Bags

Ecology of Plastic Bags | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: pollution, infographic, ecology.

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Mariela Guzmán's curator insight, April 17, 2013 2:07 PM

What do you think about these images?Do you you agree?or not?

Caroline Sara Chateau's curator insight, August 24, 2013 11:08 AM

really interesting infograph please have a look on it, will warn and make you think about the pollution that plastic bags cause.

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Boundary conditions

Boundary conditions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
PULL a spring, let it go, and it will snap back into shape. Pull it further and yet further and it will go on springing back until, quite suddenly, it won't....

Via Joel Barker
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting article discussing the limits that the Earth's physical systems have and the importance not exceeding any tipping point that could destabilize the planet if we "overstrech the springs."

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Joel Barker's curator insight, February 10, 2013 11:56 AM

A useful discussion on limits of the planet

Angus Henderson's curator insight, February 11, 2013 11:49 AM

An interesting counter-balance to the work of the Planetary Boundaries group. 

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In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid?

In The World's 'Sixth Extinction,' Are Humans The Asteroid? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Scientists think an asteroid killed the dinosaurs. In today's extinction, humans are the culprit.  [In this podcast] our guest is Elizabeth Kolbert, author of the book The Sixth Extinction.  The book begins with a history of the big five extinctions of the past and goes on to explain how human behavior is creating this sixth, including our use of fossil fuels which has led to climate change."

Seth Dixon's insight:

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tagsphysicalpodcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 20, 8:22 AM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, podcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 20, 2:41 PM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tagsphysicalpodcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

Tania Gammage's curator insight, March 20, 9:26 PM

As stated in a JSTOR daily article, "New research confirms that the next mass extinction is in progress, and we’re the cause. There’s been little doubt that humans have been severely altering the planet and reducing biodiversity, but it has been unclear how many species go extinct under normal circumstances, without human influence.

This new research clarifies the rate of 'background extinction' (the rate of extinction during the point before humans became a primary contributor to extinction). The research confirms that human activity is driving species extinct at a rate far higher than the background rate. A look at previous events suggests cause for concern. Geologists recognize five previous mass extinction events— the end of the Ordovician, Devonian, Permian, Triassic, and Cretaceous periods, meaning that we’re now in the 6th."

 

Tags: physical, podcast, biogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, sustainability, geology.

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Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate

Mesmerizing Migration: Watch 118 Bird Species Migrate | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For the first time, scientists at the Cornell Lab of Ornithology have documented migratory movements of bird populations spanning the entire year for 118 species throughout the Western Hemisphere. The study finds broad similarity in the routes used by specific groups of species—vividly demonstrated by animated maps showing patterns of movement across the annual cycle. The results of these analyses were published today in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This still image above doesn't do justice to this animated map of bird migrations (species key here).  While modern humans by and large are tied to particular plots of land, not all species have that same approach to gathering and using resources.  On #DarwinDay, it is important to consider the connections between biology and geography; many of the greatest biological discoveries were spatial and geographic in nature.   

 

Tagsphysicalecology, biogeography, environment, mapping, scale, location.

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What are Lavakas?

What are Lavakas? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The word lavaka means 'hole' or 'gully' in Malagasy, and it has become the accepted international term for the spectacular erosional features that characterize the highlands of Madagscar. Lavakas are gullies formed by groundwater flow, with steep or vertical sides and flat floors."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Lavakas are often seen as an ecological catastrophe since rapid deforestion leads to young, active lavakas that can silt up rice fields.  While obviously not desirable, these scars on a deforested landscape do offer a glimmer of hope as well. Some National Geographic explorers are finding that older, stabilized lavakas can become great agricultural pockets for rebuilding in these denuded communities.

 

Tags: Madagascar, erosion, environment adapt,  environmentecology, political ecology, Africa, National Geographic.

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Patty B's curator insight, February 11, 4:09 PM

This article from williams.edu, titled What are Lavaka’s, focuses on just that. It describes that a lakava, meaning “hole or “gully” in Malagasy, are gullies found in Madagascar that are caused by erosion. They are found on slopes and generally at an altitude of roughly 1,000 feet. Lakavas form where there is a concentration of softer material that is susceptible to erosion and frequent earthquake activity. For communities near lakavas there can be severe consequences to be alongside these geographic features. The article explains that lakava erosion can “damage infrastructure, remove hillslope pasturage, and causes debris flows that devastates agricultural land in the valleys.” Lakavas and the destruction they can potentially cause reveal an important fact of class distinction: the rich get the good land and the poor get the infertile, uninhabitable, dangerous territories. 

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The Great Barrier Reef

"Australia urged the UN's World Heritage Committee to keep the Great Barrier Reef off the 'in danger' list to protect their tourism industry. But that doesn't mean the ecological treasure is not in danger."


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Australia, Oceania.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the most beautiful things in the world can be the most susceptible to sweeping environmental transformations.

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Danielle Kedward's curator insight, September 12, 2015 7:38 AM
World Heritage for Year 7
Sally Egan's curator insight, November 23, 2015 6:29 PM

Great article for the GBR as an ecosystem at risk.

Chris Costa's curator insight, December 1, 2015 4:27 PM

I have enjoyed the emphasis on the human aspect of geography in this course, and how geography impacts us. However, as much as the world influences us, we do have a substantial amount of influence on the composition of the planet, oftentimes for the worse. The Great Barrier Reef is one of the greatest wonders of the world, home to some of the most spectacular sights one can see; as someone who has been scuba diving a handful of times, I can only imagine what it must be like to explore such a world below the surface, seeing all the life that surrounds me. I would love to be able to at some point in my life, but there is a great probability that I might never get the opportunity, as the reef is dying- fast. 50% of the reef has been lost over the past 3 decades, and while Australia has pledged to reserve over a billion dollars to fund conservation efforts, it might be a case of too little, too late. Man-made climate change as a whole is taking a toll on one of nature's greatest treasures, and it might be out of the hands of the Australian damage to reverse the damage that has already been done. I would love to have the opportunity to see this one day, and I hope I get to, but I don't know if I ever will if current rates of reef loss continue. Here's to hoping humanity gets it act together and tries to save the geography we often take for granted; we won't like the ugly landscapes that will follow if we don't.

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How Wolves Change Rivers

"When wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in the United States after being absent nearly 70 years, the most remarkable 'trophic cascade' occurred. What is a trophic cascade and how exactly do wolves change rivers?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

When a complex system gets one aspect of it changed, there are many other changes that occur, some of which are nearly impossible to envision beforehand.  Here is some Oregon State research on the changes in Yellowstone's ecosystems and physical environments since the introduction of wolves. 


Tagsecology, biogeography, environment, environment adapt, physical, fluvial.

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What would happen if humans became extinct?

Seth Dixon's insight:

What would Earth be like if all humans suddenly disappeared? This question posed on the YouTube series Earth Unplugged, has many intriguing ecological and biogeographic ramifications that are worth considering to explore how systems are interconnected. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, video.

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 27, 2014 10:29 AM

I find this youtube video interesting but for sure, the planet has become very interconnected with humans but that has not been a postiive effect. Humans have done nothing but manipulate the natural order of the ecosystem. If humans went extinct I would assume the earth would balance its self out.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, January 27, 2015 7:50 PM

It is funny because this video just made me think about TV shows such as The Walking Dead and Z-Nation.  Of course, not for the zombies, but what if some disease might wipe out the human race, and also how the earth will looks like after human extinction. The impact on earth when human life is gone will be catastrophic for domestic animals left behind. The wild animals will become dominant. Many species will also become extinct and a lot of chemicals will poison grounds and infrastructure will collapse with the force of the weather after few years. Although, it is fascinating how humans can preamble the fact that satellite can be worked forever after humans are gone from Earth. It is not only about humans, but also about the Earth that we need to come up with more reasons to be green on the planet. 

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Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos

Colombia's Herd of Hungry Hippos | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A herd of hippopotamuses once owned by the late Colombian drug baron Pablo Escobar has been taking over the countryside near his former ranch - and no-one quite knows what to do with them."

Seth Dixon's insight:

An important idea in biogeography is the concept of invasive species. An invasive species is an organism that is not indigenous to an area but causes great economic or environmental harm to the new area as it quickly adapts and alters the ecosystem.   Colombia's hippopotamus herd certainly qualifies as an interesting example to share with students of unintended ecological consequences that occur through human and environmental interactions.  For further explorations into invasive species, see this National Geographic lesson plan.   

 

Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, Colombia, National Geographic.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 1, 2014 6:30 PM

Ecosystem imbalance

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The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?
Seth Dixon's insight:

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

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Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 2014 3:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 2014 7:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

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A. R. Wallace: The Other Guy to Discover Natural Selection

This paper-puppet animation celebrates the life of Alfred Russel Wallace, who is co-credited with Charles Darwin for the theory of natural selection.  Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1fhBbGw

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the greatest discoveries in biology began as spatial discoveries.  Alfred Russel Wallace made some amazing advances in biogeography and discovered the appropriately named Wallace Line


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical.

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Kelsey McCartney's curator insight, December 10, 2013 9:40 PM

A sweet animation of the wonderful Alfred Russel Wallace, the oft unaknowledged simualtaneous discoverer of evolutionary mechanisms.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 17, 2014 9:13 PM

Wallace is one person you rarely hear about in the classroom, especially as a person who made a dent in science as a co-founder of natural selection. As someone who did his research in Brazil, Darwin, founder of the Natural Selection theory believed that Wallace may have come across one of his published manuscripts in order to make his claims be known. But one thing Darwin may have missed is how Wallace was reaffirming is scientific claims. 

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Shark Tracker

Shark Tracker | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a project sponsored by OCEARCH (Ocean Reseach) that helps to track the journeys of individual sharks to better understand their migratory patterns.  This data also helps to establish maps of the spatial extend of Shark habitat.  This is in essence another fantastic practical application of GPS technology.


Tags: biogeographymapping, GPS.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 16, 2013 11:51 PM
its just never safe to get back intot he water is it. guess Im just showing my age with that movie reference. Saw Jaws at the Route 44 Drive in the Rustic full the the metal speaker that hung on your window...so much fun
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#deextinction

Seth Dixon's insight:

De-extinction is a new term for to me but this week a TEDx conference hosted by National Geographic focused completely on this concept on the possibility of reviving formerly extinct species. Just because we think we can bring back a lost species, does that mean we should?  What would be the benefits?  Disadvantages? 


I've read enough about passenger pigeons to know that beyond overhunting, the species went extinct as large swaths of North American forests became fragmented and modified.  While we may be able to theoretically bring back a species, we cannot rewind the clock and bring all the essential ingredients to their former ecosystem that allowed them to thrive in the first place.  De-extinction would NOT be repairing the world so that it was as if the extinction never happened, since other species in the ecosystem have adapted to their absence. Given the length of their absence, could these be considered "invasive species?"     


Tags: biogeography, environment, National Geographic, environment modify, ecology, historical, TED.

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App-lifying USGS Earth Science Data

App-lifying USGS Earth Science Data | Geography Education | Scoop.it
App-ly Yourself to Tackle Today's Scientific Challenges
Seth Dixon's insight:

The United States Geologic Survey (USGS) scientists are encouraging app developers and earth scientists to design creative apps that will aid researchers in tackling the important questions. USGS datasets include biogeographical, vegetation and land cover change data. Submissions will be judged on their relevance to today’s scientific challenges, innovative use of the datasets, and overall ease of use of the application. Prizes will be awarded to the best overall app, the best student app, and the people’s choice.  Do you have an idea?  


Tags: physical, ecology, visualization, biogeography, edtech.

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