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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Earthquakes in the Classroom

"An 8.2-magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of northern Chile, generating a local tsunami.  The USGS reported the earthquake was centered 95 km (59 miles) northwest of Iquique at a depth of 20.1km (12.5 miles).  This video gives the context for this type of earthquake."  

Seth Dixon's insight:

I woke up this morning to news of a large earthquake in Chile (security camera video footage).  IRIS (Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night.  


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Chile.

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dilaycock's curator insight, April 3, 2:02 AM

From Seth Dixon: 

 "IRIS(Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology) creates teaching resources for teachers who want to use the current events such as yesterday's earthquake in Chile as an opportunity to discuss earth's physical systems and how they impact humanity.  They've produces slides, animations and PDFs for classroom use all while you were sleeping last night."  

Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 1:37 PM

Hoe ontstond deze tsunami precies?

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 5, 10:52 AM

http://www.iris.edu/hq/programs/education_and_outreach/resources

 

Lesson Plans from the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology (IRIS)

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Tsunami in Japan 2011

"This video captures some amazing footage of the 2011 tsunami in Japan."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an absolutely gripping video, that is equally amazing and horrifying.  In Kesennuma, Japan, the 2011 earthquake and subsequent tsunami caused catastrophic damage, although many were able to survive on the high-rise rooftop (like the videographer).  Much like a tsunami, the video starts out slow with only alarm bells, but at around the 2:20 minute mark the first sign of the small wave makes its way up the river, with onlookers unsure of the magnitude of the impending damage.  The riverbanks are breached at 7:43.  By 14 minutes, the debris and wreckage is massive, and the quantity of water flooding in is still growing.  The last 6 minutes shows the waters receding, but the impact of the tsunami still spreads as fires spread through town. For a full documentary on the tsunami, click here.  I surely hope that no one reading ever gets a closer look at what a tsunami looks like in person.  This time lapse is an audiovisual representation of global seismic activity puts the Japanese tsunami into it proper context (wait for the dramatic event at the 1:45 mark).


Tags: Japan, East Asia, disasters, geomorphology, erosion.

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megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 10:47 PM
this video blew my mind! i cannot believe that these people saw the whole thing coming and just stayed at their house on the rooftop taping the whole thing. The footage was pretty cool though seeing a first hand account of the horrible devastation that it caused.
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 10:27 PM

Watching this in class, I could feel my heart start racing a little as the river spilled over with such magnificent force when only a few minutes before, it had been completely calm.  This tsunami devasted Japan back in 2011 and this video was taken miles inland from the area of initial impact. The force of the wave swept boats up onto the shore and poured muddy water into the park and building in this video with no mercy.

Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 4:38 AM

useful when studying natural hazards in Year 11 Geography.

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Typhoon Haiyan Before & After

Typhoon Haiyan Before & After | Geography Education | Scoop.it
View interactive before and after images showing the devastation Typhoon Haiyan has caused in Tacloban City, Philippines.
Seth Dixon's insight:

While the casualty counts may have been lowered, that does not lessen the devastation. 

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lyn chatfield's curator insight, November 17, 2013 6:16 PM

A wonderful tool to introduce or use on the topic of typhoons and/or disasters. 

Maegan Connor's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:29 AM

The damage that nature can do is absolutely appalling. I can't imagine living through such a terrifying storm that turns the ocean and winds into something equivalent to a nuclear bomb that flattened an entire city. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:35 PM
Looking upfront at the before and after the typhoon hit the Philipines right on the coast line. The coast was completly wiped out and destructed it looked as though nothing was ever there. Not only were homes and businesses destructed but over 2500 people were killed in this natural disaster.
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Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach

Ruling On NYC Disaster Plans For Disabled May Have Far Reach | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A year after Superstorm Sandy stranded many New Yorkers without power for days, a federal judge has ruled that New York City's emergency plans violate the Americans with Disabilities Act. Those shortcomings, the judge found, leave almost 900,000 residents in danger, and many say the ruling could have implications for local governments across the country."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have many more questions than answers after listening to this podcast.  Presumably, most governmental agencies during emergencies are seeking to assist the greatest number of people with limited time and resources; would this court ruling change that mandate?  How will this impact urban planning in the future?  Just how much can plans in times of emergency account for assisting the disabled?  Do you think the City of New York was negligent? 


Tags: disasters, NYC, transportationurban, planning, podcast.

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:35 PM

I am disabled, and while I am not in a wheelchair, I would implore the politicians to come up with accommodations for those that are, or have other severe forms of disabilities.  I damaged my brain and spinal cord in an accident that cost me some of my psychological functions, as well as a lot of the fine motor skills in my hands and body.  I remember what it was like before my accident, and I know that there was nowhere along the line that I asked to be disabled.  The people in wheelchairs, or the people who cannot evacuate themselves from areas of danger, are people that should in fact be prioritized, not left behind, when it comes to evacuating during emergencies.  In class our group discussed that the average able-body person should be prioritized during evacuation, but I kept thinking- what if something happened to them? What if they broke their leg during a flood evacuation?  Should they be left behind?  I would suggest that rather than answer these James Wan-like instances of moral quandary, we prepare for them and come up with access for the handicapped to be evacuated- in such an instance where NO ONE would have to be prioritized OR left behind.  That is the only fair way to deal with this sort of idea, without leaving anybody behind.  I have had dealings with people with disabilities, and a guy I know that is in fact wheelchair bound, is one of the most productively creative people of his age that I have encountered- wheelchair or not, he has produced, written, and directed two full length feature films before his 22nd birthday, one of which has screened at the Sundance Film Festival.  I had the privilege of working with him during some photoshoots, and I was really quite inspired by what he does, enough to pursue film-making on my own.  I feel that people today don't really care until something affects them.  Negative thoughts against those that prioritize against the disabled in events of emergency do not enter my head; rather, I feel that there must be something we can work out now, in a time of no immediate emergency, that can save us all...

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:34 PM

In my opinion I do not think it was all of New Yorks fault that some handicapp people could not get the help they needed. There are a lot of people in New York and not everyone could make it out even if they were not handicapp. I think these people should have a back up plan as well just incase. You could have a family member, neighbor, or friend come and help you and give you a ride.  

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 11:01 AM

This subject is the definition of a gray area matter. Of course you want to treat everyone equally and have everyone come out of a sotrm unscathed, but to do soo you have to tip the scales so much that it becomes unfair for un handicapped people. Sure New York could of done this better. But also some neglegence has to fall on the citizens. If your and elderly handicap person and know a major storm is comming you should try to evacuate immediatly, you dont need the news to give you the A Ok to go. Yes the City should have gave a heads up atleast 10 hours in advance so people could better prepare better but the citizens have to be away of their own situation. This comes down to an ancient survival theme the survival of the fittest were if you weak and not smart you die off simple ass that.

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Rapid Landscape Change

Rapid Landscape Change | Geography Education | Scoop.it
BOULDER, Colo. -- National Guard helicopters were able to survey parts of Highway 34 along the Big Thompson River Saturday. Here are some images of the destruction along the roadway.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This photo gallery would be stunningly gorgeous if it weren't horrifically terrifying.  When the landscape changes this dramatically in a short time span, watch out.  See another photo gallery here, but this gallery from the Boston Globe, shows a more humanistic side of the story. 


Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, geomorphology, erosion, images.

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Byron Northmore's curator insight, November 29, 2013 8:57 AM

CD 4: The human causes and effects of landscape degradation

Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:59 PM

By looking at these pictures you can see that the water just completely ruined this road. The road sunk in and collapsed as well. Will this road ever be safe to drive on again if it gets fixed?

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 11:24 PM
National helicopters caught these pictures along the Thompson river while the water rages next to a road. The destruction of the water and its erosion had deteriorated the road.
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World's Hurricane Tracks

World's Hurricane Tracks | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"170 Years of the World’s Hurricane Tracks on One Dark and Stormy Map."

Seth Dixon's insight:

What physical forces create hurricanes?  What spatial patterns are evident? How does this map impact settlement patterns or hazard mitigation efforts? 


Tags: physical, disasters, environment.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:18 PM

Hurricanes are most frequent in the late summer early fall season. This is because the air and water are mixing cold and hot temperatures and this is what forms the hurricanes to happen. This map does show that the most often hurricanes are near India and China etc. 

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Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards

Mountain Fire: Natural Hazards | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On July 18, 2013, a fierce wildfire threatened Palm Springs, California.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In a dry climate where urban expansion gets closer to dry brush, wild fires become a major summer hazard.

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography.

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Al Picozzi's comment, July 20, 2013 3:58 PM
Alot of fire going on out west. Check out the NASA site http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/fires/main/index.html that shows them from a satellite view of the various fires.
Louis Culotta's curator insight, July 21, 2013 3:48 PM

I think this shows that the weather has entered into a world of extremes of very hot or very cold, wet or dry and not to much of regular seasonal changes of the past typical patterns.

It shows that with general warmer ocean temps, has lead to this new type of weather patterns resulting from global warming. 

Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 9:20 PM
When we are liviing in a hot and dry climate we are bound to face more devastating fires accident made or not
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Moore, OK: Before and After Imagery

Moore, OK: Before and After Imagery | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive feature includes before and after satellite imagery of Moore, Oklahoma.  With the remarkably desvasting tornado that hit this week, this is an user-friendly way to compare before and after images by using the swipe function.

 

Tags: remote sensing disasters, environment, geospatial, esri.

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Allison Covert's curator insight, May 26, 2013 1:13 AM

This would be great to teach the power of tornadoes for Science!

François Arnal's curator insight, May 27, 2013 2:03 AM

En cas de catatrophe naturelle, les sociétés d'imagerie satellitaire mettent à la disposition du public leurs images. Ici deux images sont superposées et un volet permet de constater l'étendue des dégâts. A remarquer le fait que la tornade suit une trajectoire précise épargnant certains lieux tout proches.

Michael Gaigg's curator insight, June 2, 2013 12:28 AM

Example of the "Swipe" pattern

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NWS - National Mosaic Enhanced Radar Image: Full Resolution Loop

NWS - National Mosaic Enhanced Radar Image: Full Resolution Loop | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Latest weather radar images from the National Weather Service
Seth Dixon's insight:

With all the tornado warnings, damage and concern, this map shows the spatial configuration of the danger zone.  This is the link for the interactive weather map that is continuously updated by NOAA.  Here is the high resolution, static versionThis fantastic wind map is also worth looking at whenever there are tornadoes or hurricanes.    

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Volcanic Forces, Human Impacts

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Rogério Rocha's comment, March 28, 2013 11:30 AM
Thanks for the post.
Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:12 PM
Amazing how the ash spread out over the world
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Smartphones as geospatial tools

The disastrous earthquake in Haiti taught humanitarian groups an unexpected lesson: the power of mobile devices to coordinate, inform, and guide relief efforts.


Tags: technology, disasters, Haiti, TED.

Seth Dixon's insight:

We are only beginning to see the applications of smart phones to improve peoples lives.  In this TED talk, Paul Conneally explores some of the possibilities (citizen mapping, crowd-sourced disaster recovery, etc.) that is just sitting in the palm of our collective hands. 

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Tony Hall's curator insight, February 18, 2013 6:43 AM

This is why ICT is important. No. Vital! Our students need to see things like this so that they understand the positive aspects of technology. They need to see that SMS, Facebook & Twitter are so much more than just a way sharing silly photos of themselves. This technology has the power to affect real, positive change. 

techsavvygirl's curator insight, February 18, 2013 8:21 AM

Augmenting human potential with smartphones

Suggested by Mónica Aza Estébanez
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Emergency and Disaster Information Service

Emergency and Disaster Information Service | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Map of the World, in real time with natural disaster information.

"This is a Emergency and Disasters Information and monitoring services. Hosted by National Association of Radio-distress signalling and Infocommunications.

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What Could Disappear?

What Could Disappear? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded in three levels of higher seas.


This interactive feature is designed to answer a simple, yet profound set of questions.  What areas (in over 20 cities around the U.S.) would be under water if the ocean levels rose 5 feet?  12 feet?  25 feet?  The following set of maps show "coastal and low-lying areas that would be permanently flooded without engineered protection." 

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Mary Rack's comment, November 26, 2012 8:03 AM
especially good!
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Yellowstone National Park rattled by largest earthquake in 34 years

Yellowstone National Park rattled by largest earthquake in 34 years | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world's largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The amazing geothermal activity in Yellowstone National park annually brings thousands of tourists to the region.  The reason why these geysers, hot springs and fumaroles are there is because of the what is just below the surface.  Watch a video (the 2 minute version or a 44 minute version) to see why this natural wonder is also a major geologic threat for earthquake and volcanic activity, which explains the reasons for this weekend's earthquake.   Not to be an alarmist, but this is why some fear another major eruption soon.

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CSINowedu's curator insight, March 31, 9:23 AM

Yellowstone National Park, which sits atop one of the world's largest super-volcanoes, was struck on Sunday by a magnitude 4.8 earthquake, the biggest recorded there since February 1980, but no damage or injuries were immediately reported.

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The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult

The Philippines' Geography Makes Aid Response Difficult | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Typhoon Haiyan was enormous and hit a 400-mile swath on the Philippines.  The Philippines is a single country, but it is composed of over 7,000 islands; hundreds of islands are in need of relief aid, if not more.  The islands are in an archipelago which naturally fragments the land mass and isolates the residents making transportation, utilities and communications logistically difficult even in the best of times.  If the first few days after the typhoon, supply chains were cut off and many desperate people looted the sparse food resources available. The necessities to sustain life—food, water, shelter, medication and basic sanitation—are the all major concerns in the aftermath of the typhoon.      

While the police are saying that order is being restored, the effects of flooding pollute water resources and increase the spread of infectious diseases because of the poor sanitation.  The Philippines is gripping for an impending medical crisis from the spread of diseases in addition to the medical trauma that people suffered during the actual typhoon.  Richard Brennen of the World Health Organization (WHO) believes that these geographic difficulties make the relief efforts in the Philippines more difficult than the 2010 relief efforts to help Haiti after the massive earthquake.   


Tags: water, disasters, Philippines, medical, development, diffusion.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 9:13 AM

Whenever there is a natural disater there is always trouble to get enough resources and aid to help the particular place who was hit with the disaster. Typically places who are hit with such disasters get immediate aid to try and help the victims as well as restore the area effected. However you never think about the geography of a place in means of getting aid there. We think of geography in the sense of it is not surprising such a distaster occured there, but not in a sense of can we get aid there. That is exactly what is being thought of about the Phillipeans. There is a lot of thought going into how aid can get there. People need water, sanitary conditions, food, and medical assistance. Not only do they need it, but they need it fast because the situation is getting worse. However there is no real way of getting it there. There location is making things extremely difficult to get that. Airports a such down, no way to get things there by sea on a good day, and their communication systems are down. The location of where these people live can potential kill them. You tend to think about location as a cultural sense, but location can also effect a person's well being. It is amazing how much location of where you live effects a person. Hopefully there will be things done soon to try and help the people in the phillipeans before things get even worse than they already are. 

Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 29, 2013 9:26 PM

Access to this area is inhibited due to massive devastation, and there was a LOT of damage done.  These people have needs, and it seems that due to the large geographic spread, it would be near impossible to get these people what they need.  I think if our world revolved less around mandated activity- school, work (specifically the low level jobs that we don't NEED in our society), etc.- that more people could be freed up to help proactively come up with solutions to potential devastation, and groups could be formed, equipped, and trained to deal with whatever Nature could throw at people.  If people didn't work at McDonalds, and they DID work at some sort of international rescue agency, doing all the research on all areas of the world ahead of time, the solutions to these problems (and even prevention) could be at hand within a month of a global task force's initiation into the activity.  I know some Americans think that they need workers at McDonalds, but really... They could be working for something larger than the government- the entire human race.  I'm sure people would be willing to fund such an agency (not just some limited range minimal UN task force, but rather a world-wide formally designated occupation), and I'm equally sure that people would rather work there than flipping burgers and changing french fry oil.  I don't think that the current relief programs are enough to help people in such situations of tragedy as those that were relied on to take care of the issue in the Phillipines, and I think a simple restructuring of society (our society) would yield a greater level of concern and involvement in the welfare of others, as well as greater aid to the species.  Who knows, perhaps one of the people that we could save in the Phillipines is a person who goes on to change the world- an inventor of something new, a holy or political leader, or the scientist that cures cancer?  All this could be made to matter to us more if society were tweaked, even slightly, just to allow people to want to help others.

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 30, 2013 10:59 PM

This is a devastating time for the people of the Philippines. All they have to worry about is staying alive and being close to there family members. Help is on the way. Everyone in the world should pitch in and try to help them in anyway they can. But what I would like to find out is why this has happen when it has not before in this country. This country I have not seen in the news before this big devastation had happened. I am also curious to find out how come the help aid is taking so long to arrive when people are dying because they have no food available for them because it has been destroyed or it is trapped under all the debris from all the buildings that have collapsed because they were not structured properly. this situation is a repeat of hurricane Katrina in the united states were all the house were not hurricane proof and were built in places known for disaster.

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How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines

How Online Mapmakers Are Helping the Red Cross Save Lives in the Philippines | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Volunteers across the world are building the digital infrastructure for the organization's Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts
Seth Dixon's insight:

Want to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets.  Can you join in and help?


Tags: disasters, mappingPhilippines, STEM.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, November 13, 2013 3:32 PM

online maps are being used to help locate the best way possible to help transport food and resources to those most in need. They van locate bridges and the world is pulling together with tehcnolgy and accurate maps to help the  American red Cross maximize in time and manpower. It seems that after Hurricane Katrina and the Earthquakes in Haiti and Japan, We have been improving our strategies for how to best help people around the globe come together put our time energy and resources together to best help people whose lives have been devasted and crushed by the forces of mother nature.

 

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'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan

'Absolute Bedlam' In The Philippines After Typhoon Haiyan | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The news from the Philippines, where it's feared that last week’s powerful Typhoon Haiyan killed more than 10,000 people, isn’t getting better as hundreds of thousands of people struggle to survive and authorities struggle to get help to them.


"Its absolute bedlam right now," says Richard Gordon, head of the Philippine Red Cross.  “There's an awful lot of casualties, a lot of people dead all over the place, a lot of destruction.”


According to the BBC, a huge international relief effort is underway, but rescue workers have struggled to reach some towns and villages cut off since the storm.


Tags: physical, environment, water, disasters, Philippines.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:00 PM

Just the remoteness of the area is going to hinder the relief efforts.  Even though the supplies are getting through it is getting through to the areas that need it the most is the problem.  When the infrastructure is not that good to begin with, the damage done by this kind of disaster is multiplied.  Look at New Orleans when Katrina hit.  It still took days for relief and just water to get where it was needed.  Imagine what that would have been like if the infrastructure was like like that of the Philippines.  The country is overwhelmed by this disaster and needs the help.  Its getting it but the problem still exists of how to distrbute it now that it is there.  Makes you wonder if Subic Bay was still open as a US military base if it would have made it easier.  Sometimes having a military base is not a bad thing.

Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, November 14, 2013 8:50 AM

Even though the death toll resulting from Typhoon Haiyan is around 1,000, it is expected to reach 10,000.  International aid will hopefully help cities such as Tacloban City recover from this storm.

Jack Born's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:16 PM

This is insane. It has affected millions of people and and even killed people. Its good that so many people are going to help though.

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Inside the Colorado deluge

Inside the Colorado deluge | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Two things that helped make this rainfall historic are breadth and duration. Colorado can get much higher rainfall rates for brief periods and over small areas."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Our thoughts are with our colleagues and friends in Colorado as they are dealing with the impact of this historic weather event.  The geographic factors that contributed to this flooding are explained in this article from the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR).  Some are calling this a millennial flood, as it is well past the 100-year stage of flooding.  You may view the areas impacted on an ESRI storymap. and in this NASA imagery


Tags: physical, disasters, environment, water, weather and climate.

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 16, 2013 3:40 PM

The devastating flooding in Colorado has impacted so many. The rainfall Colorado has experienced makes it the most on record. The massive amounts of flooding and devestation in areas like Boulder are caused by the highly populated valley areas.  

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 17, 2013 4:13 PM

Almost seems like a perfect storm scenario.  Large amouts of rain over a long perod of time over a large area.  This combined with a late summer/early fall heat wave and tons of moisture in the air, with climate change all contributed to the disater in Colorado.  They also believe the changes made by people to the physical geography over the last hundred years or somade have contributed to teh flooding in the area.  Development can effect the way a place floods.  Where there were once open fields and trees, there are now parking lots and houses which just can't absorb rainfall.  Makes you ask the question, shouldn't there be more study of where we exapnd our cities and what effect this will have in case of a major rainfall, earthquake, blizzard, etc?

Tony Aguilar's curator insight, September 18, 2013 5:27 PM

      What was interesting about this particular deluge was how much rain fell and how it happened in such a short time. Meteroligist high wet density levels of vapor that rose to high altitutdes and was able to condense into water and help in a perfect combination of weather to create a powerfully dangerous flash flood.

    The article recounts a former major colorodo flood that occured in 1978 and had killed over 150 people during a centenial celebration.

   After this occurence warning signs were put up beside the roads to warn travelers of flash flood possiblities and to promote safety. These floods do not happen in Colorado often and are usually a surprise. They do not when the nextmajor flash flood may occur in the boulder region but they know through historical patterns that it will happen again. 

This article stood out to me because I have friends that live in these areas and had to run for safety and move their cars to prevent damage in these same areas. The good thing is that the people that I know from this area are doing ok.

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Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital

Floods cover more than half of Philippine capital | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Flooding caused by some of the Philippines' heaviest rains on record submerged more than half the capital Tuesday, turning roads into rivers and trapping tens of thousands of people in homes and shelters. The government suspended all work except rescues and disaster response for a second day."


Seth Dixon's insight:

See what the Church of Geography says about the monsoons that caused this massive flooding and how the movement of the ITCZ (Intertropical Convergence Zone) put the Philippines right in warms way.

 

Tags: physical, water, disasters, geomorphology, Philippines.

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Lawrence Buck's comment, August 20, 2013 11:25 PM
Teach about poverty, pollution, over population and corruption in this country to understand the effects of the rains!
Christina Boyd's comment, August 21, 2013 12:16 AM
Poverty, Pollution over Population and Corruption spells a 6 letter word CHOICE.
Richard Miles's curator insight, September 5, 2013 7:29 PM

Good case study on flooding in LEDC

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Surging Elbe in Wittenberg

Surging Elbe in Wittenberg | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Rising waters spilled onto flood plains and into cities across Germany. Central Europe has endured its worst flooding since medieval times.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you having been following the news lately, central European countries such as Germany and Poland are experiencing major flooding right now.  Compare this image above to one where the Elbe isn't flooding and you'll quickly be able to visualize extent of the flooding.


Tags: Germany, remote sensing, disasters, environment, geospatial.

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Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma

Before and after: Tornado cuts devastating path through Oklahoma | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the Bing map, or Google map of Moore, Okla. More on the Oklahoma tornado:
Seth Dixon's insight:

Also, see this is a nice interactive map feature that shows all of the deadly tornadoes in the U.S. since 1950.  

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, September 18, 2013 11:29 AM

Seeing the damage done to all of these homes and communities is devastating. You see all the destruction in different areas on TV, but looking at it from a maps perspective is so much different. Seeing how it was and then looking at it after is unreal. The damage that is done to so much land is saddening. Then to look at the map of all the tornadoes since 1950 was eye opening. I never realized that there was so many tornadoes that occurred throughout the U.S since 1950. It was also shocking to see that there had been a huge tornado in the Boston area that took peoples lives. Usually when I think about tornadoes I don't think about them in Boston, Connecticut, or New York. 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, September 18, 2013 9:03 PM

The before and after images in this picture are insane. Living on the east coast it's hard to picture losing your home (your whole life) in a matter of mere seconds or minutes. It is really sad to see pictures such as these, and even more devastating to see the families affected by this with looks of disbelief. However, what is encouraging to see from tragedies such as these, is the community helping each other regardless of whatever background a person may have. Unfortunately it is moments like these that force people to help others without the thought of asking or seeking some sort of favor in return.  

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:37 PM

I look at these pictures and I can't help but feel bad for the people that were apart of this tornado. In minutes your whole life can change. The picture of the corner house there before the tornado and afterwards nothing, your whole life changed. I couldn't imagine the heartbreak these families went through, loosing everything. 

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Erosion in Action

News 8 chief photojournalist Kevyn Fowler captured a road collapsing in Freeport, Maine during a storm.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The forces of erosion are usually slow and gradual, wearing away at landforms over the course of years.  This video show the quick and dynamic factor that erosion can be...this is easily the most compelling 3-minute video about a single patch of road that I've ever seen. 

 

Tags: physical, water, disasters, geomorphology, erosion.

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Francisco Javier 's curator insight, May 12, 2013 8:53 PM

Erosion in Action | @scoopit via @APHumanGeog http://sco.lt/...

Shelby Porter's curator insight, December 11, 2013 10:23 PM

Normally we see erosion on a piece of land over a long period of time. In this short video, we see what erosion can do to in mere minutes. It is scary to think how much the roads we drive on are eroding right underneath our cars. It is amazing how much the environment around us can change due to the weather. 

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:30 AM
This video is crazy! It shows the erosion of a road during a storm. The water was supposed to run under the road and flow through a large pipe. As you can see after watching the video the road eventually erodes and then the pipe begins to bouy up and down. Later the road is completely deteriorated and the pipe ran down the river with the rest of the road.
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2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole

2 Cars Swallowed By Sinkhole | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A 150-yard-long chunk of State Highway 89 collapsed about 5 a.m. roughly 25 miles south of Page
Seth Dixon's insight:

Just a reminder that the Earth beneath our feet (and roads and buildings) are a part of a dynamic system that changes. 

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Louis Culotta's comment, February 21, 2013 2:49 PM
it looks like some of the pictures of the roads I took after the earthquake in new Zealand .
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:28 AM
A 150 yard piece of highway 89 had collapsed at 5 am. Two cars were traveling on the highway at the time. They have called scientists and geologists to the site where it happened so they can explain exactly what happened. The video is crazy of the road collapsed it literally dropped about six+ feet.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:14 PM

I am curious to see what the geologists reasoning for this to happen.  when I drive I assuming the roads I take are safe but this goes to show you you never know what will happen. And the news reporter said it was still going down. Glad everyone involved made it out safe. 

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Boston's unnatural shoreline

Boston's unnatural shoreline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Today's 100-year storm surge could be tomorrow's high tide.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of maps and articles help to explain why sea level rise is such an issue for many major metropolitan areas.  In coastal cities with substantial economic development, much of the current coastal areas where once underwater until landfill projects filled in the bay.  During storm surges (or if and when sea levels rise) these will be the first places to flood.  


Tags: disasters, water, physical, Boston, weather and climate.

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Charlotte Hoarau's curator insight, February 6, 2013 5:57 AM

Surging sea represented on an imagery background layer.

Color ramp should be graduated.

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Visualizing Seismic Waves

Movie showing ground motion of four earthquakes propagating across a high density seismic array in Long Beach, California. Data was recorded by NodalSeismic,...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Seismic activity is to be expected in the Los Angeles region as the major hazard threat in the area.  This area has a great number of sensors which now allows us to visualize seismic waves better than ever before.  This video show 4 earthquakes (starting at 0:45, 2:20, 6:00, and 8:35).  For more information on the science behind this clip, read the adptly named blog, The Trembling Earth.


Tags: visualization, disasters, physical, Los Angeles.

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