Geography Education
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Volcanic ash covers Costa Rica towns

Volcanic ash covers Costa Rica towns | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A volcano erupts in central Costa Rica, belching smoke and ash up to 3,000m (9,840ft) into the air and choking nearby communities.

 

Tags: Costa Rica, disasters, physical, volcano.

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The Chernobyl Disaster: How It Happened

On April 26, 1986, a routine safety test at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in Ukraine spiraled out of control. Follow the dramatic events that led to the world's worst civilian nuclear disaster.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Today marks 30 years since the worst nuclear accident in history.  The disaster reshaped Ukraine and Belarus as radioactive material spread throughout Europe; liquidators went in to clean up, putting themselves at great personal risk while the Soviet media reports tried to act as if things were under control.  Learn more by reading these articles from the BBC, Global News, and the Washington Post; you can also view videos of an extended academic talk and documentary about the Chernobyl disaster.  Today the wildlife in the regions is surging forward as people are staying out of the region.   

 

Tagsdisasters, environmentUkraineRussia.  

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Carlos Fosca's curator insight, April 26, 11:14 PM

Hoy se cumplen 30 años de la tragedia de Chernobil. Este video explica de manera muy sencilla y bastante resumida la causa principal del desastre: un terrible error humano. Paradójicamente lo que debió ser una prueba para mejorar la seguridad del reactor #4 terminó convirtiéndose en una explosión radioactiva equivalente a 400 bombas de Hiroshima. Que no se vuelva a repetir.

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Volcán Popocatépetl 27 de marzo 2016

"The Popocatépetl volcano, situated in Puebla, Mexico, erupted between March 28 and 29, spewing hot ash and gas into the atmosphere. According to reports, a 7-mile exclusion zone was put in place around the volcano." Credit: www.webcamdemexico.com

Seth Dixon's insight:

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   UPDATE: This nighttime eruption on the 30th of March with the magna is worth watching as well.  

 

Tags: disastersMexico, physical, volcano.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 1, 7:56 PM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, April 3, 6:42 AM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

Ivan Ius's curator insight, April 3, 12:01 PM

This visually spectacular (but in terms of damage, fairly harmless) eruption is a sight to behold...especially knowing that Puebla and Mexico City aren't too far from the smoldering giant.   If your students have ever asked, "What does a volcanic eruption look like?" then you've got something ready to go.   

 

Tags: disasters, Mexico, physical, volcano.

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Tsunami Animation

"The largest earthquake ever recorded by instruments struck southern Chile on May 22, 1960. This 9.5 magnitude earthquake generated a tsunami that crossed the Pacific Ocean, killing as many as 2000 people in Chile and Peru, 61 people in Hilo, Hawaii, and 142 people in Japan as well as causing damage in the Marquesas Islands (Fr. Polynesia), Samoa, New Zealand, Australia, the Philippines, and in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.  To see how this tsunami compares with two recent tsunamis from Chile, please watch http://youtu.be/qoxTC3vIF1U "


Tags: physical, geomorphologywater, tectonics, disasters, video.

Seth Dixon's insight:

In 1700, Japan was hit by a tsunami; they knew that tsunamis were caused by earthquakes, but there was no earthquake of that magnitude in Japan that could have caused it.  They called it the Orphan Tsunami, and it puzzled everyone.  Centuries later, data confirmed that a massive earthquake in the Pacific Northwest occurred in 1700 and it's tsunami traveled across the ocean much like the this computer simulation of the 1960 Chile earthquake.   

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, September 24, 2015 9:23 PM

Tsunami ocurrido en Chile el 22 de Mayo de 1960 donde murieron 2000 personas en Chile y Perú, 61 en Hilo Hawaii, 142 en Japón causando daños en Islas Marquesas Polinesia , Samoa, Nueva Zelanda, Australia, Filipinas, Alaska's Islas Aleutianas.....enlace para ver la comparación con el Tsunamis recientes en Chile (2015)

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Large Flash Flood

"A nice flood rolled down Johnson Canyon (southern Utah) on July 6th, 2015."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The raw power of Earth's natural forces can be truly amazing. 


Tags: physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms, Utah, water, disasters.

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Sinkholes: Can we forecast a catastrophic collapse?

Sinkholes: Can we forecast a catastrophic collapse? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Sometimes the ground suddenly opens, consuming cars, homes and people. We may have a way to see these sinkholes coming – so why would anyone resist the idea?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Via the American Geographical Society: "Sinkholes - formed where groundwater dissolves soluble bedrock to form underground cavities. Sometimes, when the ceiling of a cavity can no longer support the weight of the overlying sediments, it can suddenly collapse, with catastrophic results."


Tags physical, disasters, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal

Why Earthquakes Are Devastating Nepal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The May 12 7.3 magnitude aftershock was one of many that followed the April 25 earthquake that shook Nepal. Why is this part of the world such a hotbed of tectonic activity?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is in a series by National Geographic designed to show the geography behind the current events--especially geared towards understanding the physical geography.  Check out more videos in the '101 videos' series here.   

 

Tags physicalNational Geographic, tectonics, disasters, video.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 21, 2015 9:44 AM

Summer reading, tectonic plates

Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 9:16 AM

Geography determines human activity, and not the other way around; that has been the theme of this course, and it holds true as we look at the devastating impacts of earthquakes in the nation of Nepal. Sitting right over one of the most active plate boundaries in the world, with the Indian subcontinent being violently forced under the rest of Asia, Nepal is therefore the home of both the infamous Himalayan Mountains and numerous earthquakes, varying in severity and frequency. As violent and as costly as they are, violent earthquakes are just another part of life in Nepal, as are other natural events in other parts of the globe, and the people who call it home adjust their lives accordingly, through a variety of means. However, nothing can prepare anyone for the extremes of earth's power, and the violent earthquake that shook the nation to its very core in May has left behind a great deal of human suffering and destruction. I hope that those who lost their homes and businesses are already well along on their path to recovery, although I don't think it's possible to every truly heal from such a traumatic experience, at least not completely.

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How 'crisis mapping' is helping relief efforts in Nepal

How 'crisis mapping' is helping relief efforts in Nepal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A team of Nepalis, backed by groups around the world, are helping guide what aid is needed where by "crisis mapping" Nepal, reports Saira Asher.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, May 8, 2015 10:16 AM

Crisis are a symptom that something underneath the surface of normalcy is terribly wrong ... especially when we come to realize that everything is interconnected, even politics—worldwide.

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Help the Nepal Aid Effort By Making a Map

Help the Nepal Aid Effort By Making a Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Become one of the citizen cartographers around the globe tracing and checking roads, buildings, and open spaces to assist people on the ground.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you want to help Nepal, you can donate time and geospatial abilities by helping provide workers with better maps.  This is probably one of the easier on-ramps to collaborative mapping, and the help is desperately needed.  You can also have students explore the Nepal earthquake in ArcGIS online; this has become a 'teachable moment' and  IRIS provides powerpoint slides for teachers to this example in the classroom.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 4:05 PM

This is a great effort.  You do have to take the tutorial to learn how to map for them.  Some of the images aren't very clear either.  It would seem to me that the government should provide high quality images from satellites.  I'm sure they have better images.  Also, many of the highly populated areas were completed.  The periphery seemed like it could use more help.  

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Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped

Nepal earthquake: Hundreds die, many feared trapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At least 970 people have died as Nepal suffered its worst earthquake for more than 80 years, with deaths also reported in India, Tibet and Bangladesh.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 12:48 PM

We have learned that the Himalayas are growing everyday while our Appalachians in the united states are shrinking. What does this all mean? In the platonic spectrum it means in Nepal, earthquakes.

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Volcanic Eruption

"WebCams de Mexico archives the best of webcam videos in Mexico."

Seth Dixon's insight:

What does a volcanic eruption look like?  Just like this. 


Tags: disastersMexico, physical, volcano.

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Mr Inniss's curator insight, March 20, 2015 9:28 AM

watch an eruption in action

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 12:43 PM

It almost reminds me of a blemish that needs to be tended to on the face of the earth and it just couldn't handle the pressure anymore. My fascination with the way the earth does things blows my mind. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 8:20 AM

Their is nothing on earth more amazing and terrifying than a volcanic eruption. As mentioned in class, Mexico has a number of active volcanos. The most troubling one is the volcano near Mexico City. An Eruption of that volcano would spell doom for portions of Mexico City, and a wider doom for the whole nation. As a primate city, destruction in Mexico City would be devastating to the overall health of the Mexican economy. We can only hope that Mexico will be prepared to deal with the ramifications of such an eruption.

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Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics

Town Slowly deformed by Plate Tectonics | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The signs that something’s wrong are not immediately obvious, but, once you see them, it’s hard to tune them out. Curbs at nearly the exact same spot on opposite sides of the street are popped out of alignment. Houses too young to show this kind of wear stand oddly warped, torqued out of sync with their own foundations, their once-strong frames off-kilter. This is Hollister, California, a town being broken in two slowly, relentlessly, and in real time by an effect known as 'fault creep.' A slow, surreal tide of deformation has appeared throughout the city."


Tags: disasters, geomorphologyCalifornia, physical.

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Changing The World, One Map At A Time

Maps have always been a source of fascination and intrigue. Today's maps, however, can also help to save lives during disasters, document human rights abuses and monitor elections in countries under repressive rule. This presentation will explain how today's live maps can combine crowds and clouds to drive social change.
Seth Dixon's insight:

On this day of giving thanks, I want to remind this community that geospatial skills can be used to help othersWant to see geographic knowledge and geospatial skills in action?  Crowd-sourced mapping is increasingly an important resource during an emergency.  Poorer places are often not as well mapped out by the commercial cartographic organizations and these are oftentimes the places that are hardest hit by natural disasters.  Relief agencies depend on mapping platforms to handle the logistics of administering aid and assessing the extent of the damage and rely on these crowd-sourced data sets made by people like you and me. 


Tagsdisasters, mapping, cartographyTED201, video.

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Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster

Animals Rule Chernobyl 30 Years After Nuclear Disaster | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Three decades later, it’s not certain how radiation is affecting wildlife—but it’s clear that animals abound.

 

It may seem strange that Chernobyl, an area known for the deadliest nuclear accident in history, could become a refuge for all kinds of animals—from moose, deer, beaver, and owls to more exotic species like brown bear, lynx, and wolves—but that is exactly what Shkvyria and some other scientists think has happened. Without people hunting them or ruining their habitat, the thinking goes, wildlife is thriving despite high radiation levels.

 

TagsNational Geographic, physicalbiogeography, environment, ecology, environment modify, disasters.

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Look Inside The Doomsday Vault That Protects Seeds Of The World

Scientists set up a vault in the Norwegian Arctic to keep as many varieties of seeds as possible in case of a catastrophe.
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's nice to know that if there is a cataclysmic disaster, that Norway has the world's back...you know, just in case.  I really hope that the asteroid of the future doesn't hit the island of Svalbard now.   

 

Tags: sustainabilitydisasters, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture. Norway.

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Thousands of Earthquakes Recorded in Puget Sound in Just Two Weeks

Thousands of Earthquakes Recorded in Puget Sound in Just Two Weeks | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Residents can't feel most of them, but there have been a lot of earthquakes in Puget Sound lately.

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle

The Earthquake That Will Devastate Seattle | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When the giant fault line along the Pacific Northwest ruptures, it could be our worst natural disaster ever.


The Cascadia subduction zone remained hidden from us for so long because we could not see deep enough into the past. It poses a danger to us today because we have not thought deeply enough about the future. The Cascadia situation, a calamity in its own right, is also a parable for this age of ecological reckoning, and the questions it raises are ones that we all now face. How should a society respond to a looming crisis of uncertain timing but of catastrophic proportions? How can it begin to right itself when its entire infrastructure and culture developed in a way that leaves it profoundly vulnerable to natural disaster?

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, July 30, 2015 10:33 PM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    


Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

aitouaddaC's curator insight, August 3, 2015 8:42 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

geographynerd's curator insight, August 9, 2015 2:20 AM

This is a long read but well worth the time. "The really big one," an earthquake in the Pacific Northwest over 8.0, last happened in 1700, but seismologists know that the geological pressure on the fault lines have been building since then.  This in not a panic-inducing article, but one reminding people that the most potent natural disasters operate on cycles much longer than our lifetimes.    

 

Tags: disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Ring of Fire

Ring of Fire | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Ring of Fire is a string of volcanoes and sites of seismic activity, or earthquakes, around the edges of the Pacific Ocean.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

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Loreto Vargas's curator insight, July 2, 2015 10:07 AM

“El Anillo de Fuego” es una cadena de volcanes y lugares de actividad sísmica, o temblores, alrededor de los límites del Océano Pacífico.

“L’Anneau de Feu” c’est une chaine de volcans et de sites d’activité sismique, ou tremblements de terre, autour de limites de l’Océan Pacifique.

Lindley Amarantos's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:54 PM

The Ring of Fire is a series of plate boundaries where earthquakes and volcanic activity are commonplace.  Surrounding the edge of the Pacific Ocean, the Ring of Fire consists of a string of 452 volcanoes.

 

Tags: physical, tectonics, disasters, K12.

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Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake

Visualized: How the insane amount of rain in Texas could turn Rhode Island into a lake | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"It's difficult to comprehend the ridiculous amounts of water that have fallen in such a short time in a state that, until recently, had been in the grip of a historic drought. But one place to start would be to look at reservoir levels in the state. In the past 30 days, Texas reservoirs have gone from being 73 percent full to 82 percent full, according to data maintained by the Texas Water Development board. All told, about 8 million acre-feet of water have flowed into the state's reservoirs."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Just how much of water is 8 million acre-feet?  It's almost impossible for most people to visualize that, but this series of graphics is designed to put the scale of the recent flooding in Texas into perspective (and yes, I love that Rhode Island is almost a unit of measurement).

  

Tags: water, fluvial, perspective, scale, Rhode Island.

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Motion of Tectonic Plates

"This video is from the BBC documentary film Earth: The Power Of The Planet.  The clip is also embedded in this story map that tells the tale of Earth’s tectonic plates, their secret conspiracies, awe-inspiring exhibitions and subtle impacts on the maps and geospatial information we so often take for granted as unambiguous."


Tags physical, tectonics, disasters, mapping, geospatialmapping, video, ESRI.

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How to Donate Time to Help in Nepal

How to Donate Time to Help in Nepal | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How 'crisis mappers' activate after a catastrophe...and how you can join them."


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics, mapping, geospatial.

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Yunus Khan's comment, May 7, 2015 2:10 AM
God save nepal people
Katie's curator insight, May 22, 2015 12:37 PM

In Nepal, there was recently an earthquake. Crisis mappers have been working on better mapping data. Better mapping data increases the quality of imagery. Better mapping data greatly helps reduce suffering and saves lives. This is an example of how to use maps and geospatial data.  

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An earthquake felt across South Asia

An earthquake felt across South Asia | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The magnitude-7.8 earthquake that struck Nepal on Saturday morning destroyed parts of Kathmandu, trapped many people under rubble and killed more than 2,500 people. It was the worst to hit the country since a massive 1934 temblor killed more than 8,000."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Even though we know that with the plate tectonic boundaries where these disasters are more likely to occur, it never fully is expected.  These before and after pictures are heart-rending and full the extent of the damage is hard to comprehend (explore in ArcGIS online or view the USGS data).  IRIS provides powerpoint slides for teachers to use this earthquake as a 'teachable moment.'

Geographer Jon Kedrowski has a blog about his mountaineering and expeditions. He is up on Everest now, and his blog has a description of the earthquake and the resulting avalanche. The pictures and descriptions are both sobering and fascinating.  If you want to help, you can donate money or your geospatial abilities (open-source mapping).

*This post was prepared in collaboration with Dr. Deborah Hann of the Texas Alliance for Geographic Education.


Tags: Nepal, disasters, physical, tectonics.

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Joshua Mason's curator insight, April 29, 2015 11:04 AM

It's absolutely devastating what happened to Nepal. Any loss of life is a tragedy but loss of this scale is unimaginable. It's going to be a difficult rebuilding process for the Nepalese whether that's coping with the loss or physically rebuilding the nation.

 

Watching footage of shakes, what struck me the most was hundreds of year old temples crumbling. Those just aren't something you can easily rebuild. The building can eventually be replaced but the significance of it is almost lost. 

 

Those temples, like the homes in the area, were most likely not built up to a standard that could withstand earthquakes or at least earthquakes of this magnitude. It's easy to see how destruction on this scale can occur in large urban populations that were not designed to stand against such a dramatic event.

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 1, 2015 3:59 PM

I've experienced earthquakes more times than I've ever felt the need.  We used to get them all the time it seemed in Japan.  My bed would role across the room.  It got to the point where I just slept through them.  If I had even felt a shake half as violent as what Nepal went through I could not even imagine the fright.  I wonder how long the India and Eurasia tectonic plates will stay on top of each other?  Or if a few more earth quakes will split the area?  

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 1, 2015 1:52 AM

Australian Curriculum

The causes, impacts and responses to a geomorphological hazard (ACHGK053)


GeoWorld 8

Chapter 4: Hazards: causes, impacts and responses

(4.5 - 4.6 Earthquakes)

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When disaster strikes, FEMA turns to Waffle House

When disaster strikes, FEMA turns to Waffle House | Geography Education | Scoop.it
FEMA has coined a "Waffle House Index" to indicate the severity of a disaster.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A proxy variable is an easily measurable variable that is used in place of a variable that cannot be measured or is difficult to measure. The proxy variable can be something that is not of any great interest itself, but has a close correlation with the variable of interest.  So if you can't order waffles after a big storm at Waffle House might not matter in the big scheme of things, but as this podcast demonstrates, it is a good indicator that the region has been serious impacted by a natural disaster--they are the canary in the coal mine that FEMA is using to help plan their relief efforts.  This is in part because Waffle House's core area is in the South and is has a wide spatial network.

   

Tags: disastersstatistics, the South, regions, podcast.

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Katie's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:15 PM

This article is about how reliable and customer friendly the restaurant Waffle House is. After natural disasters like, an ice storm the Waffle House is always open to serve food to the community. This is an example of the amount of accessibility to food stores in a community. 

Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 24, 2015 8:55 PM

Unit 6

If you can't order waffles after a big storm at Waffle House might not matter in the big scheme of things, but as this podcast demonstrates, it is a good indicator that the region has been serious impacted by a natural disaster--they are the canary in the coal mine that FEMA is using to help plan their relief efforts.  This is in part because Waffle House is in the South and is has a wide spatial network.

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Images of Human/Environmental Interactions

Images of Human/Environmental Interactions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The blizzard of 2015 blasted the region with wind-whipped snow that piled nearly 3-feet high in some places.


As of 1 p.m. Monday, Boston set a new record for snowiest seven-day period in the city's history with 34.2 inches.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Weather is one of the most tangible ways in which the physical environment impacts society.  We depend on sunlight and rainfall, we adapt our behaviors to harsh conditions and we are constantly modifying the our environments by heating and cooling our buildings.  This Henry David Thoreau quote reminds us to acknowledge the powerful influence of the environment and to recognize that technological fixes have their limitations.  “Live in each season as it passes...and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.” --Henry David Thoreau


Question to Ponder: In what ways does the weather shape and influence culture and spatial patterns in your region?  How can we make our communities more handicap accessible during winter storms and other extreme conditions?


Tags: environmentweather and climateenvironment depend, environment adapt, environment modify, disasters.

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Paul Farias's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:16 PM

Not to mention the snow drifts up to 10-12 feet!

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 21, 2015 6:39 PM

Human/Environment Interaction is one of the principles of Geography. Weather is about the simplest form of Human/Environment action there is. Weather and climate effect humans in may ways. Both of these have direct impact on agriculture and because of this the rise of civilization in the fertile crescent. But weather doesn't just dictate the rise of agriculture and civilization it effects us everyday. The picture shows Boston covered in record breaking snow fall. This altered many peoples schedules, closed businesses, canceled sporting events, forced people to spend time shoveling snow, gave work for snow plowers, and all in all effected the entirety of Boston.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:18 PM

Weather is one of the most tangible ways in which the physical environment impacts society.  We depend on sunlight and rainfall, we adapt our behaviors to harsh conditions and we are constantly modifying the our environments by heating and cooling our buildings.  This Henry David Thoreau quote reminds us to acknowledge the powerful influence of the environment and to recognize that technological fixes have their limitations.  “Live in each season as it passes...and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.” --Henry David Thoreau


Question to Ponder: In what ways does the weather shape and influence culture and spatial patterns in your region?  How can we make our communities more handicap accessible during winter storms and other extreme conditions?


Tags: environment, weather and climate, environment depend, environment adapt, environment modify, disasters.

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Mapping the Way to a More Equal World

Mapping the Way to a More Equal World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Inequality isn't just about money. It's also about information. The lack of reliable data about developing countries makes things like development work and disaster relief much harder.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is 'mapping inequality' throughout the world; poorer countries often don't have comprehensive census information and geospatial data.  Crowd-sourced mapping is seeking to change and improve geographic awareness, especially in moments of crisis.  For example the maps of Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea were essentially blank at the beginning of the Ebola outbreak but that glaring need meant volunteers were using geographic tools to improve developmental situations by providing more information.


Tagspodcast, disasters, mapping, cartography.

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