Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Haiti: From Recovery to Sustainable Development

"Since the 2010 earthquake, Haiti has successfully pulled through the humanitarian recovery phase and seen significant socioeconomic gains. Yet as Haiti moves toward long-term, sustainable development, the country faces significant challenges. The political system remains fragile, sustainable jobs are scarce, and the environment is still as vulnerable now as it was then."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is primarily a promotional campaign for the UNDP's efforts in Haiti, it nicely contextualizes the problems that Haiti faces before discussing how to improve the situation.  Some keys for the future include: 

  • Governance and Rule of Law
  • Recovery and Poverty Reduction
  • Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Environmental Management
  • Medical Outbreak Management  

 

Tagsdisasters, Haiti, NGOspoverty, development, video.

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Closing the gap between men and women in agriculture

http://www.fao.org/sofa/gender "The world cannot eliminate hunger without closing the gap between men and women in agriculture. With equal access to productive resources and services, such as land, water and credit, women farmers can produce 20 to 30 percent more food, enough to lift 150 million people out of hunger."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Gender inequality, especially in rural, less developed part of the world, would lead to some of the fastest developmental improvements for the lives of women, men, children, and families.  Women are the backbone of the rural economy, and this single change would lead to countless benefits.   

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, developmentgender, agriculture, labor.

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Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 11, 1:35 AM
A great resource to show geography students! 
Linda White's curator insight, May 13, 10:40 PM
A reason why we need to review all the women that are incarcerated in our society.  The society is loosing so much.
Pascal Corbé's curator insight, May 26, 8:53 AM
While closing the gender gap is both righteous as economically advantageous, I find the claim that the world could not be fed without it totally unfounded and not true. Even the worst dictator could just redistribute the produce currently wasted and the issue would be solved with gender issues left touched. The intention of this message is great but I think from a communications point of view these kinds of exaggerated messages undermine the basis of campaigns and ultimately wear off the attention of your target groups.
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The Ever-Expanding Slums

"Slums lack:

  • Permanent housing
  • Sufficient space
  • Clean water
  • Sanitation
  • Personal safety
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is a slum?  Why do so many people around the world live in slums?  What are the largest slums in the world?  These are the questions that this video seeks to answer as the TestTube team tackles one of the more pressing issues of confronting urban areas in the developing world.   

 

Tagspoverty, squatter settlements, development.

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Dustin Fowler's curator insight, May 5, 8:16 AM
Share your insight
L.Long's curator insight, May 5, 5:59 PM
World's Largest Slums
Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:29 AM
Another GREAT resource to show to Geography students! 
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These cities will be very rich in 10 years

These cities will be very rich in 10 years | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Forget New York, London or Hong Kong. Here are seven cities that are racing up the rankings of the world's richest, and will be among the top 10 by 2025, according to researchers from McKinsey.
Seth Dixon's insight:
  1. Doha, Qatar
  2. Bergen, Norway
  3. Trondheim, Norway
  4. Hwaseong, South Korea
  5. Asan, South Korea
  6. Rhine Ruhr, Germany
  7. Macau, China

Tagsurbandevelopment, economic, planninglaborglobalization, technology.   

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Rostow Model

The Rostow Model
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Rostow Model is an important and influential way of thinking about industry and economic geography (and a part of the AP and IB geography curricula).  This slideshare for gives a solid overview of the 5 stages of the model and also provides examples and critiques of the model. 

 

Tags: industry, development, economic, APHG, unit 6 industry.

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If The World Were 100 People

If the population of the world was only 100 people, what would society look like? How many people would have shelter? Clean water? Education?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tagsstatisticsdevelopment, perspective.

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Ella Price's curator insight, March 28, 9:19 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:57 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

Denise Klaves Stewardson's curator insight, April 1, 4:06 PM

Reminicent of the picture book, "If the World were a Village" by David Smith, this video attempts to make large statistics more meaningful to to a broader audience. The concept is simple, but the impact is profound.

 

Tags: statistics, development, perspective.

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The Role of Rural Women in Agriculture

The Role of Rural Women in Agriculture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Women are the backbone of the development of rural and national economies. They comprise 43% of the world’s agricultural labor force, which rises to 70% in some countries. In Africa, 80% of the agricultural production comes from small farmers, who are mostly rural women. Women comprise the largest percentage of the workforce in the agricultural sector, but do not have access and control over all land and productive resources. Realizing the importance of rural women in agriculture is an important aspect of gender relations. In many countries, the role of women in agriculture is considered just to be a 'help' and not an important economic contribution to agricultural production. Giving support to rural women is a way of breaking the vicious cycle that leads to rural poverty and to the expansion of slums in the cities, where the poor get poorer. Development strategies should consider rural women as the epicenter, paying special attention to their social skills both within and without agriculture sector."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, developmentgender, agriculture, labor. 

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Mrs. B's curator insight, March 23, 6:02 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 7:34 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, April 1, 7:34 AM

While rural women play a substantial role in agriculture around the world, it is often not in positions of ownership, regional influence, and agency.  This is an article discussing how empowering rural women in the agricultural sector by changed the cultural and economic institutions that shape their work can truly change the world we live in.  

 

Tags: gender in agriculture, development, gender, agriculture, labor. 

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Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid

Uneven Developement and Corporate Aid | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"All Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg wants to do is make the world a better place for his new daughter. While he’s technically on paternity leave, he couldn’t sit idly by as India attempts to halt Internet.org, Facebook’s initiative to provide free but limited internet to the developing world."

Seth Dixon's insight:

India is a country with amazing economic potential, but hampered but uneven levels of social development.  The so-called 'digital divide' can exacebate problems for the poor and their ability to join the emerging industries.  In this situation Facebook is offering free (partial) internet access to India's poor and the discussions about net neutrality and the potential ulterior motives are underway.

 

Questions to Ponder: Do you favor Zuckerberg's proposal or do you think that India should reject this offer?  

 

Tagsdevelopment, India, South Asia, infrastructuretechnology.

   

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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, January 2, 4:56 AM

Education access in  ALL  countries  has effects when not provided, equally!

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China's one-child policy and the lessons for America

China's one-child policy and the lessons for America | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Let's review exactly what population has to do with economic growth
Seth Dixon's insight:

The repeal of China's one-child policy has many exploring the linkages between population statistics and economic development.  This is a good article that tries to show the lessons learned in China with the one-child policy and apply them to the United States economic context.  Additionally, this animated map shows the rise in urbanization in China.    

 

TagsChina, population, industry, development, statistics, economic.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 25, 2015 3:00 PM

I found this article absolutely fascinating. In the 2016 presidential race, Democratic candidate (and, arguably, frontrunner) Bernie Sanders has pledged to raise corporate taxes in order to provide for social programs, better education, and universal healthcare for all its citizens. Critics have pointed to the failure of such a plan when he attempted to implement it in his home state of Vermont, where the working class was simply not large enough to support the retirement system Sanders attempted to put in place. Defenders of Bernie have argued that what's true of Vermont's demographic- the second least populated state in the country- will not hold true for the nation as a whole, and this article suggests that these defenders have a point. While economic growth may not be as fast for younger American workers, by 2040 these welfare programs will still be running under any additional strain. The same cannot be said for the Chinese, where the disproportionate number of males being born- 119 for every 100 female children- means that a huge population gap will emerge between younger and older Chinese. Without being able to father a new generation, this group of mostly-male Chinese will age and be an enormous burden on the Chinese economy, to an extent that's almost unfathomable here in the US. China has since revered its One Child Policy that put itself in its current predicament, but it may well be a case of too little, too late.

Sarah Nobles's curator insight, November 27, 2015 7:57 AM

Unit 2

Claudia Patricia Parra's curator insight, December 3, 2015 8:03 AM

añada su visión ...

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Are you ignorant about the world?

Are you ignorant about the world? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The world is spinning so fast that it can be hard to keep track of everything going on. And most of us aren't doing a good job of it, writes Hans Rosling.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Our preconceived notions of places, as well as some of the dominant narratives about regions, can cloud our understanding about the world today.  This article (with the embedded video) is a good introduction to the Ignorance Project which shows how personal bias, outdated world views and news bias makes combating global ignorance difficult. 


Tags: media, models, gapminderdevelopment, perspective.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 7, 2015 9:47 AM

perception of place units 1 &3

John Puchein's curator insight, November 9, 2015 8:42 AM

Hans Rosling is a very important influence on Geography. He created Gapminder and continuously makes great Ted Talks.

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, November 25, 2015 9:18 AM

I believe that there are many people in the U.S. who do not pay attention to the news. Some are too poor to own a phone or television to keep up with what is going on in the world (although they can read the news paper, but you get my point). Others are too rich to care. And some base there opinions off of other peoples views and don't have an opinion of their own. Am I ignorant about the world? No, because I like to know what's happening world wide, especially if there are issues going on that can affect the survival of the human race, survival of the environment, and survival of my country.

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The Atlas of Economic Complexity

"The Atlas is a powerful interactive tool enabling policy makers, entrepreneurs, academics, students and the general public to map the path of diversification and prosperity for 128 countries.  The tool will allow users to explore growth opportunities by country and industry, with the potential to provide input into economic policy and private investment decisions. The analysis may also be used to inform the agendas of development banks in policy recommendations and loan programming; an entrepreneur developing a market plan; an investment promotion agency pitching a new factory, as well as guide other choices we have yet to imagine." http://wp.me/P2dv5Z-21a

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is an introduction to the Atlas of Economic Complexity; in it they use the visualization tool to analyze the Netherlands' economy and the cut flower industry.  The Atlas of Economic Complexity is hosted by the Center for International Development at Harvard University (MIT also worked on this project and on their site it is called the Observatory of Economic Complexity).


Tags: developmentindustry, visualization, statistics, economicNetherlandsvideo.

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The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica

The Atlas of Economic Complexity: the Case of Costa Rica | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Understanding global trade and economic data can feel overwhelming, but fortunately there are online tools that help us to visualize complex economic data. The data in these charts was incredibly easy to gather, thanks to the Atlas of Economic Complexity."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tagsindustry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

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Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 12:10 PM

Before these tools existed, my first observations of economic geography and industrial development came when I left the US and was living in Central America.  I wrote this article to use the example of the shifts in the Costa Rican economy to demonstrate how to use the Atlas of Economic Complexity (which uses complicated data, but super easy to use).  


Tags: industry, development, statistics, economic, Costa Rica.

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Internal Migration in Mexico

Internal Migration in Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Mexico’s cities are ballooning in population while rural and indigenous communities, where there are still over 60 indigenous languages other than Spanish spoken, are disappearing. For many indigenous families, illiteracy and the powerful forces of racism and discrimination can often offset the lures that brought them to migrate to urban centers.


The northern border with the United States is not the only destination for Mexican migrants. For millions, the bustling cities, which offer hopes of better jobs and education lure many from their traditional rural, and often indigenous communities. What they find in the cities is a mix of hope and hardship.


TagsMexico, indigenous, economic, development, migration.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive with over 20 video vignettes paints a powerful personal narrative of the lives of indigenous Mexicans who migrate to the larger cities of Mexico.  

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Landon Conner's curator insight, November 3, 2015 8:51 PM

Many of these Mexicans go through tough times moving from place to place and job to job. Many that lived in rural areas are now in more civilized metro areas with more people and technology. I great deal of Mexicans move and are adapting to these new environments with cause problems and hardships in the process. LDC

London Kassab's curator insight, November 3, 2015 9:35 PM

Mexico is having a lot of internal migration within cities. Many different languages are disappearing and for a lot of the people literacy, racism, and other forces can often bring them to urban areas. Also the border isn't the only hope for migrants, bustling cities offer hopes of better lifestyle as well.    L.K.

Clayton Nelson's curator insight, December 16, 2015 11:14 AM

I believe migrants should be allowed to migrate to their destination. But there should of course be policies as to how many people come to one area at a time and such. In my opinion the main problem lies with those who exploit the border and migrate illegally as well as those who don't belong such as terrorists. Once this is resolved migration from Mexico to the United States or to anywhere will be much smoother. CN

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Where Ships Go to Die, Workers Risk Everything

In Bangladesh, men desperate for work perform one of the world's most dangerous jobs. They demolish huge ships in grueling conditions, braving disease
Seth Dixon's insight:

What happens to massive cargo vessels after they are outdated?  There are tons of scrap metal on these ships, but they aren't designed to be taken apart.  The ship-breakers of South Asia (Bangladesh, India and Pakistan are 3 of the 4 global leaders in recycling ships) risk much to mine this resource.  This is an economic function that is a part of a globalized economy, but one than was never intended.  There are major health risks to the workers and pollutants to the local community that are endemic in this industry that manages to survive on the scraps of the global economy.

 

Tags: BangladeshNational Geographic, South Asia, poverty, development, economic, globalization, industry, labor.

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Vultures, Environment, and Mapping Trash

"For generations we vultures, armed with our senses, have fought in silence. We’ve waged a battle against garbage, but now we’re losing that battle. We want to help humans, so we’ve launched a movement to help you detect piles of garbage so that you can take action to eliminate them. Join us in this fight. Vultures Warn, you take action!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is an introduction to a fascinating (Spanish language) website and project that uses GPS-tagged vultures to map out the urban trash hot-spots in Lima, Peru.  We look at vultures as the dregs of the food chain and ascribe moral filthiness to the species (just think of any number of movie, literary, and cultural references), but they are simply filling an ecological niche.  This mapping project is a way to use vultures nature in a way that allows for humanity to fix our trash production/disposal problems.    

 

Tagspollution, PerudevelopmentmappingGPSbiogeography, environment, environment modify, South America, land use, megacities, urban ecology, consumption.

 

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Edible Cutlery

"India is one of the world's largest consumers of disposable plastic cutlery, which has the makings of a huge health and environmental crisis written all over it."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Plastics clog our landfills and single-use plastic consumption is one of the most wasteful elements of our consumer-based, disposable society.  This product is a reaction against the waste of disposable cutlery, but it is also an intriguing developmental strategy (see company kickstarter page or website). 

 

Tags: developmentfood, gender, agricultureconsumption, South Asia, pollution

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Rebecca Geevarghese's curator insight, May 8, 6:27 AM
How innovative!! Will definitely being showing this to my Geography students. 
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Global Peace Index

"The 2015 Global Peace Index reveals a divided world, with the most peaceful countries enjoying increasing levels of peace and prosperity, while the least peaceful countries spiral into violence and conflict. Explore the state of world peace on the interactive Global Peace Index map. www.visionofhumanity.org "

Seth Dixon's insight:

The Middle East and North Africa is now the world’s least peaceful region for the first time since the Index began, due to an increase in civil unrest and terrorist activity while Europe, the world’s most peaceful region, has reached historically high levels of peace.  This might not seem shocking, but there is a great richness to this dataset that can provide detailed regional information as well as answer some big questions about global security.  Explore the data on your own with this interactive map of Global Peace or also of the states within the United States

 

Tags: political, terrorism, conflict, development, statistics, visualization, mapping, governance.

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This map should change the way you think about foreign aid

This map should change the way you think about foreign aid | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As you can see, the biggest recipient by a long way is Israel (this is fiscal year 2014 data, but nothing's changing), and two other big ones are Egypt and Jordan, which both have aid packages that are tied up with their peace treaties with Israel. None of these are poor countries (indeed, Israel is downright rich), and the point of the money is to advance an American foreign policy agenda — not to help the poor. Pakistan and Afghanistan, which round out the top five, actually are pretty poor, but, again, the main American interest in them is clearly foreign policy rather than poverty.

 

Tags: political, geopolitics, development, economic.

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lpatteson's curator insight, March 23, 1:01 PM
I wonder what this would look like if it were a map of the US's federal aid to the 50 states.
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Human impact has pushed Earth into the Anthropocene, scientists say

Human impact has pushed Earth into the Anthropocene, scientists say | Geography Education | Scoop.it
New study provides one of the strongest cases yet that the planet has entered a new geological epoch

 

Tags: Anthropocenedevelopment,  land use, environment, environment modify.  

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, February 21, 4:05 PM

Un nuevo estudio dice que el planeta está entrando en una nueva era geológica.

El impacto humano ha empujado a la Tierra hacia el Antropoceno, dicen los científicos.

Sally Egan's curator insight, February 21, 4:30 PM

Good discussion for syllabus dotpoint Human impacts on ecosystems within the HSC topic Ecosystems at Risk.

Andrea J Galan's curator insight, February 22, 6:58 PM

I chose to add this article into my folder because it talks about earth entering a new geological epoch. This is exciting yet scary news because it's mostly pollution that justifies /proves the new epoch. The news is exciting because it's something that we are currently experiencing. The evidence that proves the geological epoch on the other hand is terrifying. It just goes to show how awful we have been treating our planet like if the next generation is going to be finding fossils in plastic bags that is a problem.

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These are the world’s best countries. (Sorry, America — you’re No. 4.)

These are the world’s best countries. (Sorry, America — you’re No. 4.) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new project from U.S. News & World Report has an ambitious goal: Ranking the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm not endorsing the ratings or the methodology behind the ratings, but they are certainly fodder for discussion. 

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Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 25, 12:39 PM

I'm not endorsing the ratings or the methodology behind the ratings, but they are certainly fodder for discussion. 

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China pollution: First ever red alert in effect in Beijing

China pollution: First ever red alert in effect in Beijing | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Schools in Beijing are closed and outdoor construction halted as the Chinese capital's first ever pollution "red alert" comes into effect over smog levels."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A large part of China's rapid economic growth has been dependent on cutting corners in labor and environmental standards.  This is one reason why I don't think that the Chinese economy can continue this growth indefinitely.

 

Tags: pollutionChina, development, economic, megacities, East Asia, industry, sustainability, urban ecology.

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batuhan's curator insight, December 16, 2015 2:30 AM

Recently on top of continuing pollution increase in and around china, they have issued a 'red alert'. This red alert has officaly been the first ever making an effect in Bejing.stats show that the air is not healthy to breath and is 49% unhealthy to breath.Although the alert is to come to an end on Thursday the aftershock will felt for a long time in Bejing. Bbc claiming that China's air quality is a key factor in its push for a new global deal on climate change.

Nicholas A. Whitmore's curator insight, December 16, 2015 11:03 AM

It is a real shame that China has let pollution go this far in its country. It really goes to show the sacrifices they are willing to make in order to be a major global economic power. Unfortunately for them this kind of action and rapid growth by cutting corners is what will likely stop them from becoming a major power (due to fast resource exhaustion and loss of environmental resources due to pollutants over time as well as species). The issue will likely remain unsolved due to the Chinese governments lack of concern. Hopefully China's slow shift to a consumer market will provide pollution relief as the factories leave for elsewhere (likely Africa).

Sarah Cannon's curator insight, December 16, 2015 6:39 PM

It's horrible to see China come to this. Soon, air pollution will be just as bad everywhere else if it is not stopped. We, everyone, has to do something to stop air pollution. This world is polluted enough. Stop air pollution so future generations can have a chance to have a good life and not have to worry about PM levels are in the air on a daily basis.

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The Fastest Growing Economies

The Fastest Growing Economies | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See how the world's largest and fastest growing economies change over time.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive is simple but conveys some very powerful data.  Above is a still shot of 2014's fastest growing economies (you can also view the largest overall economies).  Another telling statistical ranking is the UN's Human Development Index; explore more global data on Google's Public Data


Tags: economic, visualizationstatisticsdevelopment, google.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 6:01 AM

growing

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:49 PM

the most surprising thing about this is how india has one of the worlds largest economies but is far behind both the united states and china as well as many european countries in economic growth. also how china can have the worlds number one economy but the united states is so far ahead in economic growth numbers, i suppose that china will not be on top for very long.

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The Trans-Pacific Partnership Explained

"Stratfor Vice President of East Asia Analysis Rodger Baker talks about the economic and political aspects of the Trans-Pacific Partnership agreement." http://arcg.is/1IeK3dT 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a very politically contentious partnership and would reshape economic geographies and even regions of the world.  From the 1500's to the 1980's, the Atlantic trade had the greatest volume of world trade, but the Pacific has surged past, and is showing no signs of being supplanted any time soon.  This Stratfor video is a quick introduction to the economics and politics of the TPP. 


Tagsindustry, development, economic.

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Marc Meynardi's comment, November 3, 2015 12:37 PM
Thank you for your comments, which insist on the mean that the TPP is not just a way to free business. The treaty negotiated with EU, just arrive when EU politician are very critisized. Population is on a way back to conservatism and populism. Such treaty does'nt appear to be a good solution and for sure, does'nt come at the right time.
Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, November 4, 2015 5:35 AM

TPP

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:02 AM

This is a very politically contentious partnership and would reshape economic geographies and even regions of the world.  From the 1500's to the 1980's, the Atlantic trade had the greatest volume of world trade, but the Pacific has surged past, and is showing no signs of being supplanted any time soon.  This Stratfor video is a quick introduction to the economics and politics of the TPP. 


Tags: industry, development, economic.

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Changes in Three Gorges Dam

NASA's animation of China's Three Gorges Dam construction over the years.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The world’s largest dam was created to generate more energy for China’s ever-expanding economy and to increase the interior economic development by increasing the navigability of the river.  The dam also can control downstream flooding and protect important industrial centers such as Shanghai.  This ambitious hydroelectric dam produces the same amount of energy as 18 nuclear power plants.  This dam also displaced over 1 million people as the reservoir flooded properties upstream.  The Three Gorges Dam prevents the nutrient-rich sediments from being deposited downstream; this heightens Chinese farmers’ need for fertilizers, this has led to drought downstream and limits residents’ water access. The dam also disrupted the local ecology (part of the reason the Yangtze River Dolphin went extinct), preventing fish to migrate to upstream breeding grounds. 

For good and ill, the dam has profoundly modified the environment and this video animation from NASA is a powerful demonstration of the changes.       


Tags: remote sensing, geospatial, video, land use, environment, environment modify, water, economic, development, China, East Asia, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, October 19, 2015 6:32 PM

Inland water - environmental change 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 5:40 PM

The impact of the Three Gorges Dam on the residents upstream is amazing. I cannot imagine anything like this happening in the US, mostly because of the impact on the people both upstream and downstream. Ecological damage from this dam may not phase the Chinese government, but I think any North American or European government would shudder at the thought of the backlash among their citizens this would create.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:27 PM

Three Gorges damn in China is the largest dam ever constructed. This was created to save on power by creating hydroelectric power for the people of the land. One of the issues with this was the the flooding of the land up streams displacing millions of people. It created a larger up stream area and very small down stream. A lot of the people that lived up stream had to be relocated further inland and faced changing climatif weather. The banks of the river are carved out between what seems like mountainous regions so as you move more uphill the weather and temperature will be a whole new category of life (Depending on how far you relocated).

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30 charts and maps that explain China today

30 charts and maps that explain China today | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"China's mind-boggling size, economy and history, visualized.""

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 13, 2015 8:06 AM

These charts are fantastic at explaining the impact that china is having on the world. their economy is massive, and they tend to use a massive amount of global resources. it also amazes me how big their population is.

Colleen Blankenship's curator insight, March 30, 12:10 PM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:05 AM

This article is an enjoyable hodge-podge of maps, charts and graphs that collectively attempt to explain China's role the world today.  This is similar to, and complements this article which answers 7 question about China and the United States.  


Tags: economic, China, development.