Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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How Islam Created Europe

How Islam Created Europe | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For centuries in early and middle antiquity, Europe meant the world surrounding the Mediterranean. It included North Africa, but the swift advance of Islam across North Africa in the seventh and eighth centuries virtually extinguished Christianity there, thus severing the Mediterranean region into two civilizational halves, with the 'Middle Sea' a hard border between them rather than a unifying force. Islam is now helping to undo what it once helped to create. A classical geography is organically reasserting itself, as the forces of terrorism and human migration reunite the Mediterranean Basin, including North Africa and the Levant, with Europe." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

The title is a bit overstated (aren't they all in this click-bait driven media age?), but the article shows nicely how regions are cultural constructs that change over time. 

 

Tags: op-edregions, Europe, historical, Islamreligionhistorical, culture, Christianity.

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For First Time In 130 Years, More Young Adults Live With Parents Than With Partners

For First Time In 130 Years, More Young Adults Live With Parents Than With Partners | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For the first time in more than 130 years, Americans ages 18-34 are more likely to live with their parents than in any other living situation, according to a new analysis by the Pew Research Center.  Less educated young adults are also more likely to live with their parents than are their college-educated counterparts — no surprise, Pew notes, given the financial prospects in today's economy.  Black and Hispanic young people, compared with white people, are in the same situation.  But the overall trend is the same for every demographic group — living with parents is increasingly common.  Still, young Americans are still less likely to live with their parents than their European counterparts, Pew says.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I find that the best statistics have great explanatory power, make sense when placed in the right context, and STILL manage to leave you amazed.  These stats fit that bill for me and as the school year is ending, it's a milestone that doesn't mean what it did for generations past.  32.1% of young adults in the U.S live with parents, and 48.1% of young adults in the European Union Union live with parents.   

 

Questions to Ponder: What are some contributing factors to this trend in the United States and Europe?  What does this say about housing costs, economic, and cultural conditions? 

 

Tags: socioeconomic, housingstatisticspopulation, cultural norms, culture.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, May 26, 8:06 AM
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Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen?

Top 250 Global Attractions - How many have you seen? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The ultimate list of the greatest wonders in the world."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I have been fortunate enough to have visited 53 of the places on this list (I have gaping holes in my list and the list itself has some gaping holes itself).  All lists are highly subjective; this list, for example, is heay on urban/cultural/European tourism sites and light on physical/Asian/African destinations.  Most geographers already have enough reasons to go traveling, but this list might spark more.  Who wants to map out these places to verify that initial impression? 

 

Questions to Ponder: Which places are on your dream list?  Which places do you think should have been added to this list?  

 

Tags: place, tourismculture, landscape, geo-inspiration.

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Ken Feltman's curator insight, April 19, 8:13 AM
Where in the world have you been?
Michael MacNeil's curator insight, April 19, 4:47 PM
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The Buried Catchphrase of Classic Hollywood

“The phrase 'Free, white, and 21' appeared in dozens of movies in the ‘30s and ‘40s, a proud assertion that positioned white privilege as the ultimate argument-stopper. It was a catchphrase of the decade, as blandly ubiquitous as any modern meme: a way for white America to check its own privilege and feel exhilarated rather than finding fault.  Read more about the history of the phrase here."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I found this glimpse into the American past as startling, even if it shouldn't be.  It jarred me because today many in America bristle or are startled at the notion that 'white privilege' exists today even if there are countless examples that we do not live in a post-racial society.  This glimpse of old-school Hollywood shows how asserting white privilege was common place in the lexicon--equally fascinating is how we've pretended that it never was.  White privilege is no longer flouted in polite company like it once was, but that doesn't mean that it isn't real.    

 

Tags: racecultural normslanguage, racism, culture, unit 3 culture.

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As Sweden Absorbs Refugees, Some Warn The Welcome Won't Last

As Sweden Absorbs Refugees, Some Warn The Welcome Won't Last | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For decades, Sweden has served as a haven for those fleeing war and persecution the world over. But the country's traditionally liberal acceptance of refugees is now being questioned. Some 160,000 asylum seekers arrived in the country last year alone, stretching its resources. Sweden's idealistic culture is starting to show cracks.

 

Tagspodcast, culture, Sweden, refugees.

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Similarities Between Spanish And Arabic

Spanish and Arabic have more in common than you think, and it's not a coincidence.
Seth Dixon's insight:

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tagsdiffusion, languagetoponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

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ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 7:29 AM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, March 28, 10:55 AM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:56 PM

These two languages are not in the same language family yet there are many similiarities (article with more connections that in the video).   I would like to challenge you educators to not just say to your students "these similarities are neat!"  Make the geographic connections to explain the 'why' behind this cultural pattern and the implications of it. 

 

Questions to Ponder: What past political factors led to this cultural convergence?  How were global regions different in the past?  What are the were the impacts of this convergence, both in the past and lingering results today?   

 

Tags: diffusion, language, toponyms, culture, colonialism, regions.

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Doreen Massey on Space

Doreen Massey on Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In honor of the late Doreen Massey, an eminent geographer who died Friday at age 72, we repost her Social Science Bites podcast, which has long been one of our most popular. In this interview, Massey asked us to rethink our assumptions about space -- and explained why.
Seth Dixon's insight:

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tagsspace, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

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Michele Fitts Barnaby's curator insight, March 16, 12:14 PM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond.

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 19, 8:38 PM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 22, 9:40 AM

If you've wanted to see how an academic geographer approaches space, politics, and power, this podcast is a good entry point.  It is also a nice intellectual tribute to a giant social theorist who contribute greatly within the discipline and beyond (see also the AAG's tribute).

 

Tags: space, spatial, political, governance, culture, cultural norms, perspective.

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The Most Aussie Interview Ever

"The 2 Aussie legends that prevented a fast food shop robbery get interviewed!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is hardly common in Australia, and most people don't speak this way, it only makes sense if you know Australian culture well.  There are so many jokes, phrases, and words that don't make sense if you don't understand the cultural context.  Just to help you start to make sense of this: busted pluggers = broken flip-flops.   

 

TagsAustralia, language, placeculture, Oceania.

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bridget rosolanka's curator insight, March 7, 2:16 PM

While this is hardly common in Australia, and most people don't speak this way, it only makes sense if you know Australian culture well.  There are so many jokes, phrases, and words that don't make sense if you don't understand the cultural context.  Just to help you start to make sense of this: busted pluggers = broken flip-flops.   

 

Tags: Australia, language, place, culture, Oceania.

Leonardo Wild's curator insight, March 8, 2:27 PM

While this is hardly common in Australia, and most people don't speak this way, it only makes sense if you know Australian culture well.  There are so many jokes, phrases, and words that don't make sense if you don't understand the cultural context.  Just to help you start to make sense of this: busted pluggers = broken flip-flops.   

 

Tags: Australia, language, place, culture, Oceania.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, March 9, 8:44 AM

While this is hardly common in Australia, and most people don't speak this way, it only makes sense if you know Australian culture well.  There are so many jokes, phrases, and words that don't make sense if you don't understand the cultural context.  Just to help you start to make sense of this: busted pluggers = broken flip-flops.   

 

Tags: Australia, language, place, culture, Oceania.

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How the British (literally) Landscaped the World

How the British (literally) Landscaped the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Did you hear about the Five Pillars of the British Landscaping Empire during your religion classes? To sort them by order of importance within the Holy Book of Grass: First is grass. Second is past...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscape.  Those difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     


Tags: UKlandscape, culture, Canada, land use.

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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 10:31 AM

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscape.  Those difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     

 

Tags: UKlandscape, culture, Canada, land use.

Christian Allié's curator insight, March 5, 3:11 AM

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscape.  Those difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     


Tags: UK, landscape, culture, Canada, land use.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 12, 6:07 AM

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscape.  Those difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     


Tags: UK, landscape, culture, Canada, land use.

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23 Untranslatable Foreign Words That Describe Love Better Than You Ever Thought

23 Untranslatable Foreign Words That Describe Love Better Than You Ever Thought | Geography Education | Scoop.it
We have several words to describe love in English yet still, there are some shades within the spectrum of that emotion we haven't been able to capture in our own language.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The languages we speak shape our ideas, communications, and to some extent, the possibilities open to us.  There are many ideas that I used to be able to express better in Spanish than I could in English (even though English is my first language, some Spanish words seem to capture the essence of my emotions in a more enriching and satistfying way than in English). If you want to try any of these out for Valentine's Day, be my guest, but if it get's you in trouble, it's not my fault!    

 

Tags: language, culture.

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Laura Brown's curator insight, February 14, 2:34 AM

The languages we speak shape our ideas, communications, and to some extent, the possibilities open to us.  There are many ideas that I used to be able to express better in Spanish than I could in English (even though English is my first language, some Spanish words seem to capture the essence of my emotions in a more enriching and satistfying than in English). If you want to try any of these out for Valentine's Day, be my guest, but if it get's you in trouble, it's not my fault!    

 

Tags: language, culture.

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There’s a Philly Sign Language Accent

There’s a Philly Sign Language Accent | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Speech with a drawl, twang, clipped consonants, broad vowels, slurred words or extra diphthongs might give away that the speaker is from the American South, Boston, the Midwest or elsewhere. The spice that a certain region may lend to spoken language can even be strong enough to flavor non-audible language as well. Indeed, American Sign Language (ASL) has its own accents. And like its audible counterpart, one of the strongest regional accents in ASL is that of Philadelphia residents, reports Nina Porzucki for PRI."

 

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Abdulsalam Al-Mukradi's curator insight, February 14, 7:16 PM

Accents are varies but we really have to care about the language itself. Universities play a major role in avoiding accents in languages. They try to use one accent that follow the dictionary phonetics.

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In Russia, Epiphany Comes With A Shockingly Cold Swim

In Russia, Epiphany Comes With A Shockingly Cold Swim | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Thousands of members of the Russian Orthodox Church marked Epiphany in January with a dip in freezing waters blessed by a cleric. Epiphany is a celebration of the baptism of Jesus Christ and the revelation of God as a human being in his form. Much like a baptism, the icy plunge is considered a purifying act of faith."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the photography and photo galleries of this cultural event are breathtaking--literally for those taking the plunge.  Russians cut the ice in the shape of a cross and bath in water that is blessed and considered holy as explained in this NPR podcast.  This religious tradition is particularly well-suited to the environmental conditions of the religious adherents (since the extreme climate plays a critical role in the activity).  Part of the practice involves sacrifice; the colder the swim, the greater the manifestation of religious devotion.    

 

Tags: Russia, religionChristianity, culture

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Tibetans Fight to Salvage Fading Culture in China

Tibetans Fight to Salvage Fading Culture in China | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"When officials forced an informal school run by monks near here to stop offering language classes for laypeople, Tashi Wangchuk looked for a place where his two teenage nieces could continue studying Tibetan.  To his surprise, he could not find one, even though nearly everyone living in this market town on the Tibetan plateau here is Tibetan. Officials had also ordered other monasteries and a private school in the area not to teach the language to laypeople. And public schools had dropped true bilingual education in Chinese and Tibetan, teaching Tibetan only in a single class, like a foreign language, if they taught it at all."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video and article from the NY Times show how many Tibetans are upset by the cultural status of Tibetans within the People's Republic of China. 

 

TagsCentral Asia, culture, China, East Asia.

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Jerry Li's curator insight, March 20, 9:23 AM

 Yes, Tibatan will be very upset.

I think we should preserve every culture, not only chinese culture.

Tibetan is their mother tongue.  As every culture has its own special characteristic.

"And public schools had dropped true bilingual education in Chinese and Tibetan" this quote shows Tibetan cannot learn both language.

  The officials cannot forced them to learn chinese, and should give Tibetan a bilingual education just like Singapore.

This will result that Tibatan's children do not know their mother tongue and lost that culture gradually.

Although this can assimilate Tibetan to become Chinese in future but I think the offcials can give TIbetan some choices to choose.

Patty B's curator insight, April 29, 5:32 PM
This article exemplifies what many are struggling with throughout the world. In such a globalized world, cultural identity seems to be becoming less and less relevant to those in power. Many aspects of daily life across the globe are becoming the same. The story of Tashi Wangchuk and other Tibetans is very similar to that of many Spanish speaking Americans, particularly Latinos. Many Latino parents are pressured to stop speaking Spanish at home in order to help their children develop better English speaking skills. But Latino parents are torn when told to do so because speaking Spanish is reminiscent of where they came from and who they and their children are as people. Many immigrants within the US  hold dearly onto speaking their native language within the home. It is something that is deeply rooted in any culture, so to take that away from any group of people always stirs up much controversy and forces us to deal with the issue of balancing national identity with our developing global identity as a human race together. 
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Break Dancing, NGOs, and Global Lives

Break Dancing, NGOs, and Global Lives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Deported to Cambodia, Former Gang Member Gets A Second Chance. When Tuy Sobil was deported to Cambodia from the U.S., it was the first time he had ever stepped foot in the Southeast Asian country.

Seth Dixon's insight:

My students have enjoyed this video about a break-dancing NGO that was created by a former refugee from the United States who was subsequently deported to Cambodia (this article serves as some added background and a follow-up to the story).  This story shows the influence of urban youth culture and various strands of geography in this young man's global life.

 

Tags: Cambodia, diffusion, cultureNGOs, globalization.

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Latin America Is Losing Its Catholic Identity

Latin America Is Losing Its Catholic Identity | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Roman Catholic Church’s claim on the region is lessening as a younger generation turns to Protestantism, a Pew study found.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Catholic Church was a main governing force in colonial times and was a significant political force in rallying support for independence movements throughout the Americas.  In the early twentieth century over 90% of Latin American were Catholic, but recently polls now show that the Catholic population is under 70%.  The Catholic Church is responding; in addition to a charismatic renewal to mass services appealing to younger audiences, the first non-European pope (Pope Francis) is from Latin America.      

 

Tags: culture, religionChristianityMiddle America, South America.

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Czech Republic poised to change name to 'Czechia'

Czech Republic poised to change name to 'Czechia' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Czech Republic is expected to change its name to "Czechia" to make it easier for companies and sports teams to use it on products and clothing.
Seth Dixon's insight:

That sound you hear is cartographers and database managers gasping at the joy and shock of need to updata all their data and maps.  Old maps still show Czechoslovakia, maybe on date in the future someone will be excited to find "The Czech Republic" on the map as much as I was fascinated to discover Hindustan on a 19th century globe. I also enjoyed this quote from the Czech foreign minister: “It is not good if a country does not have clearly defined symbols or if it even does not clearly say what its name is."  

 

Tag: Czechia, languagetoponyms, culture.

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Laura Brown's curator insight, April 15, 11:22 AM

Marketing and media are the new gods. Can't imagine the power they have in order to cause a country to change it's name. Not so long ago battles and wars were fought over cultural identity, now it's for sale. 

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Photos capture hermits who have escaped society to live peacefully in the wild

Photos capture hermits who have escaped society to live peacefully in the wild | Geography Education | Scoop.it
At certain moments we all feel the desire to escape from it all. Even if it’s only a brief walk or a long drive through the countryside, there is truly no greater companion than ourselves.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past, those that didn't 'fit' the normative regulations of society or didn't want to fit them could withdraw from society to the margins. Modern society (taxation requirements, documentation, increased population density, private land ownership, urbanization, etc.) makes retreat from society much more difficult today. Some retreat while among us; homelessness has a great distance from social networks, even if not a spatial distance from city centers. I’m not trying to romanticize the past, because I am sure that retreating from society hundreds of years ago would certainly be fraught with peril and layered with tremendous difficulties. 

Collectively, we have especially demonized women that pull back for societal connections (the idea of the lone ‘witch’ is loaded with negative cultural connotations). Many of these individuals seek a different human and environmental interaction, and feel a stronger connection to the land and animals than they do human society.  Some with mental health issues find that societal interactions exacerbate their problems while can solitude and a more physical landscape can offer peace of mind and happiness.  I don’t have any answers, but wanted to think about individualistic and isolationist geographies of those that don’t feel at odds in large groups and contemporary society.  

 

Tags: mobility, housing, cultural normsenvironment, culture.

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Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?

Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Reports of bombings tend to get huge numbers of mentions on social media, but that doesn't always mean a similar level of news coverage.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The short answer is obviously "Yes."  Yet, this question brings up other questions about cultural empathy and how 'connected' we might feel to people of other places than our own global neighborhood.  This political cartoon-ish map

has more truth in it than we might like to admit; it is subtitled 'How terrible it is the the Western world when a tragedy happens in...?'

 

Questions to Ponder: Does the 'where' influence if we perceive the event as a true tragedy or not (or maybe just the magnitude or importance of the tradegy)?  How come?  What does this say about us as inidividuals, society, and the media?  How can we teach our students in a way to foster more cultural empathy?

 

Tagssocial mediaplaceculture, political, terrorism, media. 

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jorden harris's curator insight, April 4, 9:52 AM

to me it is mind boggling how we can pay more attention to countries with national threats than others especially with ISIS being so prominent which is a war that is going to take help from not only the united states but the other affected countries

                                                                                                        - J.H

Logan scully's curator insight, April 4, 10:11 AM
It somewhat bothers me how that terrorist attacks outside of Europe and North America is pretty much just ignored by the social media while people are sitting in the hospital for crimes in which terrorists and other religious radicalists have done to their area and country.-L.S.
Brealyn Holley's curator insight, April 7, 10:20 AM
For the question "Do terror attacks in the Western world get more attention than others?" In my opinion the answer would be yes because a lot of the terror attacks in the Western world are bigger and are expected more than terror attacks near  us. ~BH
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How Things Spread

How Things Spread | Geography Education | Scoop.it
What makes an idea, a brand, or a behavior catch fire? This hour, TED speakers explore the mysteries behind the many things we spread: laughter and sadness, imagination, viruses and viral ideas.
Seth Dixon's insight:

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tagspodcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

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Jelel Ezzine's curator insight, March 25, 3:13 AM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

Trish Harris's curator insight, March 31, 7:40 AM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

MsPerry's curator insight, March 31, 12:57 PM

What made the world the way it is?  The spread of people, ideas and goods--Geographers refer to this as diffusion and these 5 podcasts all center on what factors promote the spread of some phenomena, and what obstacles and barriers exist to the diffusion of others. 

 

Tags: podcast, medical, diffusion, culture, popular culture, globalization.

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Mumbai or Bombay? A British newspaper reverts to a colonial-era name.

Mumbai or Bombay? A British newspaper reverts to a colonial-era name. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Independent's concerns over Hindu nationalism led to a change in policy.

 

The city has been officially known as Mumbai since 1995 when it was renamed by the far-right regional party Shiv Sena, an ally of the Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP), which currently holds national office in India. Shiv Sena advocates the use of the Marathi language, which is dominant in the state of Maharashtra, of which Mumbai is the capital. Marathi speakers have long referred to the city as Mumbai, after the Hindu goddess Mumbadevi, the city's patron deity.

Shiv Sena had argued that the previous name, Bombay, was an unwanted relic of British colonial rule in India. That name is believed to be an Anglicized version of the city's name from when it was occupied by the Portuguese — "Bom Bahia," which means "good bay." Both Bombay and Mumbai are now used interchangeably by locals during casual conversation.

 

Tags: culture, India, South Asiacolonialism, placeregions, language, toponyms.

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We Don't Coast

We Don't Coast | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A celebration of who we are, where we are and how we operate. It belongs to the 30+ communities who make Omaha—Greater Omaha.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This website is a great example a city selling it's regional distinctiveness to create a sense of civic pride, promote tourism, and attract more businesses.  Often Omaha's distance for the coasts is portrayed as a major weakness, but in a clever play on words, the weakness is acknowledged and reformed into a strength.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would you promote your own city/region/state?  What would be highlighted on a similar page for your city?  What slogan would you use?

 

Tagsplacetourism, urban, culture, economic

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Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 5, 12:15 AM

This website is a great example a city selling it's regional distinctiveness to create a sense of civic pride, promote tourism, and attract more businesses.  Often Omaha's distance for the coasts is portrayed as a major weakness, but in a clever play on words, the weakness is acknowledged and reformed into a strength.   

 

Questions to Ponder: How would you promote your own city/region/state?  What would be highlighted on a similar page for your city?  What slogan would you use?

 

Tags: place, tourism, urban, culture, economic. 

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FORMER CATALAN MP: Here's why Catalonia should secede from Spain, and why it won't

FORMER CATALAN MP: Here's why Catalonia should secede from Spain, and why it won't | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"What a non-independent people fear most is the possibility of being swallowed up by the dominant alien culture in their midst, and that's the likely outcome for Catalans under the Spanish rule. Don’t be surprised if they increasingly opt out of Spain and choose outright independence instead...there will never ever be a self-defeating Spanish government willing to risk losing Catalonia: 16% of its population, 19% of its G.D.P., 24% of its exports, a net provider of 20 billion euros ($22.3 billion) in siphoned taxes every year."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This op-ed piece is overtly pro-Catalonian independence so there is no attempt to be fair and balanced, but that bias is a strength because it so clearly frames the political and cultural issues from a Catalonian Nationalist perspective. This article is a great way to show students how some members of a particular group that is seeking greater autonomy or independence perceives the relationship between their region and the larger state.


Questions to Ponder: How might a representative of the Spanish government frame the debate differently? What are key reasons that the author does not envision full Catalonian independence soon? How would you frame the issues? What other example do you think is analogous to this political situation?

Tags: op-ed, Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomyEurope, culture.

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Bridgitte's curator insight, March 2, 9:24 AM

This op-ed piece is overtly pro-Catalonian independence so there is no attempt to be fair and balanced, but that bias is a strength because it so clearly frames the political and cultural issues from a Catalonian Nationalist perspective. This article is a great way to show students how some members of a particular group that is seeking greater autonomy or independence perceives the relationship between their region and the larger state.


Questions to Ponder: How might a representative of the Spanish government frame the debate differently? What are key reasons that the author does not envision full Catalonian independence soon? How would you frame the issues? What other example do you think is analogous to this political situation?

Tags: op-ed, Catalonia, Spain, political, devolution, autonomy, Europe, culture.

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Israel to create a new egalitarian prayer plaza at Western Wall

Israel to create a new egalitarian prayer plaza at Western Wall | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The government approved a plan to allow pluralistic, and mixed-gender prayer, at Judaism’s holy site.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the past, Israeli policewomen have detained members of the religious group Women of the Wall for breaching orthodox rules governing prayers at the site. This is Judaism's most holy site and orthodox traditions have legally prevailed here, defining who could be there and who could perform which religious rites (often on gender lines).  This fight represents a struggle to redefine the meaning and usage of public space in Jerusalem (among other complex issues).  The article states that "this marks an unprecedented move by the Israeli government to officially recognize the rights of Conservative, Reform and other Jewish denominations to hold organized prayer at the site."

 

Tags: Israel, culture, genderspace, religion, Judaism,
Middle East.

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Mexican culture...Beyond Sombreros and Tequila

Promotional Video Campaign of "Viva Mexico"
http://vivamexico.aiesec.org.mx
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love Mexico and love celebrating Mexican culture...this video is a reminder to not solely focus on the past, but to see a vibrant modern Mexican culture as well. 

 

TagsMexico, folk cultures, culture, tourism.

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Jose leon's curator insight, February 7, 2:25 AM

Watching this video really made me happy since I am Latino. When people think of Mexico they think of a poor country with corrupt politicians. It's funny because the country of Mexico isn't poor it's just the politicians keep it all to themselves. Many of there children take a private plane to Europe just to eat dinner and come back the very same day. This video shows that it is so much more than that. I had no idea that Mexico was number one automotive industry, and the country is extremely beautiful which is no real surprise to anybody. It has 9 out of the 11 ecosystems. Many of the avocadoes that people eat most likely came from Mexico since it’s number 1 exporter, along with tomatoes, mangoes, and guayabas. The Mexican people also have strong family values along with 1134 traditional festivals. 

Alex Smiga's curator insight, February 7, 7:40 PM

Watch the video guay

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Language Reflects Culture

Language Reflects Culture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Being a fluent speaker of English and Saulteaux, I have to say that I view the world in two different ways. I have two different attitudes and even two different personalities, depending on which language I use...English offers me one way to order information and cope with reality, one set of attitudes and behavioral styles, and Saulteaux offers me a different way. When I switch languages, I also move from one constellation of attitudes and thought patterns to another.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

This passage was written by Margaret Cote, a  member of the Saulteaux people, who are part of the larger Ojibwa or Chippewa Native American tribe. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does language shape cultural attitudes, traits, and customs? How does language shape a speakers world view and personality?  How does language influence how a speaker may feel about place?

 

TagsCanadalanguage, placeculture

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, January 21, 11:35 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This passage was written by Margaret Cote, a  member of the Saulteaux people, who are part of the larger Ojibwa or Chippewa Native American tribe. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does language shape cultural attitudes, traits, and customs? How does language shape a speakers world view and personality?  How does language influence how a speaker may feel about place?