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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Donut Holes in Law of the Sea

Donut Holes in Law of the Sea | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Sovereignty over land defines nation states since 1648. In contrast, sovereign right over the sea was formalised only in 1982. While land borders are well-known, sea borders escape the limelight."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These maritime borders mark the economic area is defined by its Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ), a 200-nautical mile-wide (370 km) strip of sea along the country’s national coast line.  This regulation, which was installed by the ‘UN Convention on the Law of the Sea’ in 1982, grants a state special rights to exploit natural (such as oil) and marine (for instance fish) resources, including scientific research and energy production (wind-parks, for example).  This interactive map of the EEZs also shows the 'donut holes,' or the seas that are no state can claim that no state can claim.  Given the number of conflicts that are occurring--especially in East Asia--this map becomes a very valuable online resource for teaching political geography. 


Questions to ponder: how does this series of buffer zones around the Earth's land masses impact politics, the environment and local economies?  Where might the EEZs be more important to the success of a country/territory than other regions? 


Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, states, conflict, unit 4 political.

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Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 29, 5:48 PM

Option topic Marine  Environments and management

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Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City

Refugee Camp for Syrians in Jordan Evolves as a Do-It-Yourself City | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As the sprawling Zaatari camp evolves into an informal city — with an economy and even gentrification — aid workers say camps can be potential urban incubators that benefit host countries like Jordan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an intriguing article that explores the difficulties of forced migrations that arise from civil war, but it also looks at city planning as refugee camps are established to make homes for the displaced.  These camps have become into de-facto cities. The maps, videos and photographs embedded in the article show the rapid development of these insta-cities which organically have evolved to fit the needs of incoming refugees.  Size not investing in permanent infrastructure has some serious social, sanitation and financial cost, there are some efforts to add structure to the chaos, to formalize the informal.  Truly this is a fascinating case study of in urban geography as we are increasingly living on what Mike Davis refers to as a "Planet of Slums."  


Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, warsquatter, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities. 

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Enrico De Angelis's curator insight, July 13, 11:06 AM

beautiful intriguing post telling the story of something I - personally - never considered. It pictures a new city growing, with not only basic needs, ...

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China publishes new map

China publishes new map | Geography Education | Scoop.it
China has published a new map of the entire country including the islands in the South China Sea (West Philippine Sea) in order to "better show" its territorial claim over the region.
Seth Dixon's insight:

China is attempting to bolster its geopolitical claims through cartographic validation.  It as if to say, 'it's on a map, who can question that it is legitimately our territory?'  Why is a map such a powerful and convincing document?  Why is the Philippines upset by this map?  I think that explains this rival Filipino map as the Philippines and China engage in the cartographic version of dueling banjos.  (note the uage of the South China Sea or West Philippine Sea to refer to the same body of water) .  But this is more than just a map; it's production has the potential to destabilize regional security.     

For more resources, the Choices Program has put together supplemental materials to investigate China on the world stage.


Tags: borderstoponyms, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.

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Nancy Watson's curator insight, July 6, 10:01 PM

It seems that claims are often made to reinforce political claims. conflicting claims are difficult to resolve 

Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 7, 12:59 PM

Great for geographical discussions on why maps are important, how maps are used, etc.   

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, July 22, 10:27 AM

Completando...

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China's territorial claims

One of the geography videos embedded in this interactive map: http://bit.ly/KDY6C2

Seth Dixon's insight:

Suspicions between the People's Republic of China and its neighbors bedevil its boundaries to the east, south and west as shown in this videographic from the Economist.  This is one of the videos that I've put into my interactive map with over 65 geography videos to share in the classroom


Tags: borders, political, conflict, waterChina, East Asia.


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Iraq's Current Devolution

"A radical fringe Islamic group names ISIS is fighting to establish a extremist Islamic state in Iraq and Syria...and beyond. They control eastern Syria, western Iraq, just took control of Iraq's 2nd largest city of Mosul and are advancing on the capital Baghdad.  In this podcast, the professor John Boyer outlines just a few of the contributing factors to why this significant event is taking place, the geographic/historic background of the state, and the consequences for the future of the region."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you haven't yet discovered John Boyer, a.k.a. the Plaid Avenger,  I recommend exploring his site.  He has numerous resources for world regional geography and current global affairs.  His colorful persona is highly entertaining for college age-students as his class attracts over 3,000 students each semester (you can decide for yourself whether that personality works for you and your classroom).  This particular 'plaidcast' discussion focuses on Iraq's current devolution and possible total collapse. 


Tags: SyriaIraq, MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopoliticsborders, colonialism, devolution.

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Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

Too often we think of political conflicts within the framework of state borders; this mapping project divides the world into watersheds and forces us to look at global politics through a different and enlightening lens (Hi-Res image).  Oil might be the most economically valuable liquid resource, but water is the most critical for human habitation.  This infographic is reminiscent of this one, asking where the next 'water wars' might take place...Foreign Policy says Central Asia.     


Tags: water, political, unit 4 political environment, conflict, infographic

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Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, June 19, 9:44 AM

El bien más preciado.  El recurso agotable más subvalorado del planeta. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

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Conversation: Al Assad Consolidates Power in Syria

Conversation: Al Assad Consolidates Power in Syria | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Stratfor Founder and Chairman George Friedman and Chief Geopolitical Analyst Robert D. Kaplan discuss how Bashar al Assad has legitimized his authority over the course of the Syrian conflict.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Stratfor specializes in global intelligence in key geopolitical regions.  Syria certainly fits that description and in this video, the two most public faces of Stratfor discuss the reasons for the Syrian Civil War from and internal perspective and also impacts from a broader outside lens. 


Tags: SyriaMiddleEast, conflict, political, geopolitics.

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Borderlands: The New Strategic Landscape

Borderlands: The New Strategic Landscape | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Since the Russian annexation of Crimea, the interest in geopolitics has climbed.  Many feel as though the post-Cold War World political paradigm has changed and it has.  John Kerry has even accused Russia of using 19th century tactics to solve a 21st century problem.  This comment highlights how many Americans and American government officials took for granted that the ‘New World Order’ after the fall of the Soviet Union was a permanent condition.  This article from Foreign Policy argues that it is the Americans how are caught in a geopolitical time warp, imagining that the American global hegemony of the 1990s represented the ‘end of history,’ and that geopolitical power will still be a major force in the foreseeable future.  With this in mind old concepts in geopolitics such as borderlands and buffer zones are being revived and analyzed anew.


Tags: geopoliticspolitical, conflict.

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Secretary Kerry Delivers Remarks on Ukraine

"U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry deliver remarks on Ukraine at the U.S. Department of State in Washington, DC on April 24, 2014. A transcript is available here."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you want to understand the U.S. government's official stance and perspective on the escalating geopolitical tensions in the Eastern part of Ukraine (and Crimea), this speech is a good place to start.  These geopolitical tremors have regional impacts; so how might this situation impact Moldova and the Transdniestria region (breakaway section with pro-Russian sentiment)?        


Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict, geopolitics.

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Navigating the East China Sea

Navigating the East China Sea | Geography Education | Scoop.it
How to ease tensions between Beijing and Tokyo over an uninhabited string of islands.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Experts are saying that Chinese-Japanese relations are as bad as they've been since the end of World War II.  Why all the commotion?  The tension has been heightened in the last few months when China claimed control over the airspace in  the East China Sea. Then the Japanese Prime Minister also gave offering to a shrine to honor World War II soldiers (veterans and heroes to some Japanese, war criminals to most of the international community).  China sees this as proof that Japan is becoming more militaristic and willing to exert more power in East Asia.  However, at the root of this issue is that both Japan and China claim certain islands and that is increasingly becoming a sticking point in foreign relations.  See this book review on "Asia' Cauldron" for more context on the East China Sea.      


Tags: borders, political, conflict, China, Japan, East Asia.

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Albert Jordan's curator insight, April 29, 2:12 PM
Because China is becoming a world superpower, they are beginning to flex their muscle. China is wanting more and therefore taking more. By having legal territorial control over a few small islands, they can expand their exclusive economic zones and take advantage of any natural resources that may exist there. Another part of this though is that in order to project a naval force out to sea, they must be able to get large ships out of port which requires very deep water. The further out into the Pacific they control, the deeper the water, and where the water is deeper they can establish naval bases or refueling sites, etc.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 4:58 PM

There doesn't seem to be a resolution anywhere in the future. Both sides are saying that they are retaliating against something the other one did. Unless they both agree to just start over it will be constant back-and-forth.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 9:27 PM

Obviously Chinese and Japanese leaders don't want war. There is no reason for them to argue any longer and these islands may be the answer to their problems.

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The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene

The less Americans know about Ukraine’s location, the more they want U.S. to intervene | Geography Education | Scoop.it
84% of Americans are unable to locate Ukraine on a world map; those that can't are more likely to support military intervention.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As I've said before, a more informed, geo-literate citizenry helps to strengthen U.S. foreign policy and diplomatic efforts because they have a spatial framework within which to organize political, environmental, cultural and economic information.  National Geographic recently also produced a video showing how geo-education is important for business professionals as a part of their geo-education community (if you haven't already, join!).

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David R. Perry's curator insight, April 7, 11:38 PM

Beyond sad.

Rach Brick's curator insight, April 13, 10:45 PM

This says so much about ignorance and aggression... Do they even know that they'd have to come up with a catchy name because the Crimea has already got a war names after it?

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Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia

Crisis in the Crimea: The Showdown Between Ukraine and Russia | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This StoryMap from ESRI is a nice way to explore the current events in Crimea and this set of maps from National Geographic shows the historical geography of the region.   This issue has many inter-regional connections as well.  Many residents of former Soviet Republics are nervous seeing Russia's aggressive political strategy;  Moscow's previously similar foreign policy that aligned with Beijing's interests are now diverging

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Ukraine’s leader urges Putin to pull back troops

Ukraine’s leader urges Putin to pull back troops | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Ukraine's interim prime minister says the country is "on the brink of disaster."
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many observers fear that Russia's military control of the Crimea could lead to more centrifugal forces in the region.  In response, pundits are discussing what the U.S. response should be; clearly this will be a major issue for the Obama administration.

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Linda Alexander's comment, March 3, 9:29 AM
We've been asleep at the wheel while the genocide goes on in Syria and Russia blocks UN action. Well, this is the outcome...Putin acts as though no one will blink. Shameful.
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 9:50 AM

That this could happen at all in this day and age just goes to show that the Cold War may be over but Russia is still flexing its muscles.  As a child of the 1980s, this turn of events frightens me.  I lived my childhood with the fear that there could be a nuclear war at any time always in the back of my mind.  Younger people just don’t understand what it was like living during the cold war and perhaps poo-poo it a bit too much.  But the threat was always there and it was something that was real and did not lesson until the fall of the Soviet Union.  The fact that this event has occurred just brings up the old fears and memories of the tensions between America and the USSR.  I hope that a solution can be found that doesn’t hurt the Ukrainian people.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 4:41 PM

Crimea has been a region whee Russian traditions have been strong throughout the years and will continue t stay strong but if Putin is going to be the President who decides that he wants to isrupt part of Europe by putting the Ukraine and Russia against eachother on a battle field then there are going to be some drastic differences and not just in Crimea.

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The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day

The Toll in Gaza and Israel, Day by Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The daily tally of rocket attacks, airstrikes and deaths in the conflict between Israel and Hamas.
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


Tags: Israel, Palestine, conflict, political, borders.

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Utah Geographical Alliance's curator insight, July 28, 3:17 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

As the violent nature of the Israeli Palestinian conflict has escalated, this NY Times article monitors the major points of the last few weeks.  The possibility of 'Peace in the Middle East' feels so remote, and this Onion article parodies the difficulties of actually achieving this.  On a personal note, Chad Emmett taught the "Geography of the Middle East" course while I was at BYU and I've always appreciated his perspective; here are his thoughts on recent events.  


TagsIsraelPalestineconflictpoliticalborders.

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Chinese Uyghurs defy Ramadan ban

Chinese Uyghurs defy Ramadan ban | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The government's attempt to clamp down on religious expression has backfired among Uyghurs."

Seth Dixon's insight:

China has used various means to eliminate minority groups' cultural identity, and human rights groups argue that this ban on Ramadan is no different (children and government employees are banned from fasting, allegedly for health and safety concerns).  Ethnic Uyghurs speak a Turkic language are more culturally connected to Cental Asia than East Asia.  Predominantly Muslim, the Uyghurs are defying some of the more controversial laws that they feel single them out.   


Tagsethnicityconflict, politicalreligion, China.

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Céline's curator insight, July 11, 2:32 PM
"Seth Dixon's insight:

China has used various means to eliminate minority groups' cultural identity, and human rights groups argue that this ban on Ramadan is no different (children and government employees are banned from fasting, allegedly for health and safety concerns).  Ethnic Uyghurs speak a Turkic language are more culturally connected to Cental Asia than East Asia.  Predominantly Muslim, the Uyghurs are defying some of the more controversial laws that they feel single them out."

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, July 16, 10:50 AM

unit 3 and 4

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Would Turkey accept a Kurdish state?

Would Turkey accept a Kurdish state? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
As the likelihood of an independent Kurdish state on Turkey’s eastern border grows, Ankara is losing its historical resistance to the idea.


Developments in Iraq have left Turkey facing the prospect of an independent Kurdish state on its eastern border. Such an idea would have been abhorrent for Turkey a mere decade ago for fear that its existence would incite separation among its own restive Kurds. The standard Turkish narrative at the time was that an independent Kurdistan was a Western project aimed at destroying Turkey, an age-old ambition. Even the 2003 US invasion of Iraq was viewed in this context by many. The picture is no longer so black and white.

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Five Things To Know on World Refugee Day

Five Things To Know on World Refugee Day | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"There are more people displaced by violence and conflict on the planet right now than at any time since World War II.  The United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR) says the number of people forcibly displaced, including refugees, asylum-seekers, and internally displaced persons has now reached over 51 million." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

From the difference between refugees and internally displaced people, to the gendered impact of refugees, this shines some light on the problems confronting refugees as well as on some of the solutions. 


Tags: refugees, migration, conflict, political, war.

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CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report

CrisisWatch: The Monthly Conflict Situation Report | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Mapping global conflict month by month.
Seth Dixon's insight:

You and your students can browse through this interactive map for an update on conflict situations around the world.  The International Crisis Group is an independent, non-profit, non-governmental organization committed to preventing and resolving deadly conflict; they've created this interactive map to help us stay informed about the most important conflict issues around the world.  I'm placing this on my list of favorite resources as this is one worth returning to on a regular basis.


Tagsconflict, political, geopolitics, best of the best.

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, June 19, 4:15 AM

Questa mappa interattiva vi permette, muovendovi sui singoli paesi, di leggere un aggiornamento sulle situazioni di conflitto in tutto il mondo. 


L' International Crisis Group è una organizzazione indipendente, non governativa e no-profit dedicata alla prevenzione e alla risoluzione dei conflitti. Hanno creato questa mappa interattiva per rendere più semplice e immediato l'aggiornamento sui principali conflitti nel mondo. 

Claudine Provencher's curator insight, June 19, 5:40 AM

This looks like an excellent tool for students of international relations.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 12:26 PM

unit 4 --but really a great overall course resource!

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The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS

The Beginning of a Caliphate: The Spread of ISIS | Geography Education | Scoop.it
With Tuesday's seizure of Mosul, Iraq's second largest city, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria notched a major victory in its campaign to create a new country containing parts of what had part of both Syria and Iraq. On Wednesday, the insurgents continued their march south, taking control of Tikrit, the hometown of Saddam Hussein.


The story of ISIS's spread -- and its influence -- is one that begins in Syria, where the group has been waging a brutal insurgency against the regime of Bashar al-Assad and, increasingly, other more moderate and secular rebel groups. The map above depicts the areas of Syria under its control. The group's influence is bounded by the Free Syrian Army in the west, the Kurds in the north, and pockets of government influence.  Who is the ISIS/ISIL?


Tags: SyriaIraq, MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopolitics.

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Eli Levine's curator insight, June 12, 9:18 PM

These folks are no good.

 

They're as dangerous, mean-spirited, and delusional as the conservatives of our own society.

 

Motivated by religious fervor (doesn't matter which one it is), and an authoritarian desire to impose their vision of how a perfect society ought to be, these people ought to be put into mental health clinics and given actual treatment for being dangers to themselves and dangers to others.

 

We, the United States, cannot, and should not, do anything to stop ISIS initially.  We should let them take over, let their brutality lead to popular insurgency against them.

THEN, we ask the people of the region, collectively, whether or not they want our assistance in removing ISIS from control and influence in their society.  We want them to be turning these folks in, to be reporting those who are seeking to join these conservative movements to authorities.  Then, we can advise the authorities to treat the incoming prisoner like the mentally ill and psychologically disturbed/traumatized individuals that they seem to be.

 

We need a mandate and a request from the people living in their SOCIETIES, before we can go in and fight (if we're going to do such a thing, given our current state of war weariness and spent accounts).  We should not be taking direction just from their governments, and we shouldn't read their governments' requests as the need and will of their general public.

 

When fighting these kinds of conflicts, it's of the utmost importance that you maintain popular legitimacy and the mandate from the people to use force against what would otherwise be a persistent and deep-seated problem.  These conservatives can only be removed from the social scene when the public wants them to be removed AND, you must be as kind, benevolent, and effective as possible at handling the people afterward.  No impositions, no expectations; just let them lead their lives on their own, once you help them remove a tumor from their society that they want to have removed.  Nothing more.  Nothing less.

 

Think about it.

sledderwool's comment, June 13, 1:26 AM
Thats brilliant...
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Territorial Disputes in the Waters Near China

Territorial Disputes in the Waters Near China | Geography Education | Scoop.it
China has recently increased its pursuit of territorial claims in nearby seas, leading to tense exchanges with neighboring countries. A map of some of the most notable disputes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many of the geopolitical conflicts in the East Pacific have their roots in the territorial disputes over islands that at first glance seem as if they wouldn't be worth the trouble.  However, since the the UNCLOS agreement gives countries 200 nautical miles off their coasts to be an Exclusive Economic Zone, that greatly enhanced the strategic value of controlling these islands.  This interactive map briefly highlights some of the details behind the conflicts with links for further readings.  


Questions to Ponder: Why do countries care so much about some minor islands?  Why would other countries not want to accept China's territorial assertions?  Experts are saying that Chinese-Japanese relations are as bad as they've been since the end of World War II--Why all the commotion? 


Tags: borders, political, conflict, China, East Asia.

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Jordan Schemmel's curator insight, May 21, 1:07 PM

Another key article regarding the ongoing disputes of the South China Sea - this article, when paired with our later discussion of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, will help us understand why this issue will be increasing in importance in the coming year.

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Here are three of Russia's military options in Ukraine

Here are three of Russia's military options in Ukraine | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There have been a number of warnings from Kiev and Washington about the possibility of a direct and open Russian military intervention in Ukraine. But what could that look like?
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm not saying any of these 3 scenarios are going to happen nor am I endorsing them either.  That said, this article/podcast provides a geopolitical analysis (with maps) of Russia's potential military options if they are planning on invading Ukraine. 


Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 11:51 AM

Everyone is awaiting Russia's next move in Ukraine.  Because of this, whatever Russia does next will be very important in shaping both local and foreign perceptions of the situation.  Although the first option seems theoretically unlikely, the current situation is spiraling downhill and is resembling full-out war on the surface, even though Russia believes they are completely in the right.

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The Way Forward in Ukraine

The Way Forward in Ukraine | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"During the meeting in Geneva, the participants agreed on initial concrete steps to de-escalate tensions in Ukraine and restore security for all citizens.  In a joint press availability with European Union High Representative Catherine Ashton, Secretary Kerry outlined several of these initial steps."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Geography is never a completed story; the world is in a constant state of becoming.  The geography of a place and region are only glimpses from one historical vantage point as Russia and Ukraine are demonstrating now.  The Head of NATO is saying that Ukraine is not the only part of Putin’s geopolitical ambitions and other experts are describing the current situation as a new Cold War.  Collectively this means that diplomats and government officials everywhere are seeking solutions to stabilize Ukraine and the region.  NATO has expanded into what was once the Soviet Union’s buffer zone as a resurgent Russia is now prepared to exert more regional influence.  As Russia has confirmed moving troops closer to Eastern Europe, many are suggesting a stronger NATO presence on the eastern border of NATO to counter Russia’s moves.    


Question to Ponder: What do you think the United States (or any other country) should or shouldn't do in this region? 


Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict.

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Portraits of Reconciliation

Portraits of Reconciliation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
20 years after the genocide in Rwanda, these perpetrators and survivors are standing for forgiveness.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The idea behind these images is incredibly powerful and heartbreaking.  The horrific genocide turned neighbor against neighbor and tore communities and a country apart.  I can only imagine the pain for the individuals, but also the trauma inflicted on the national psyche. See also the White House's official statement on the 20th anniversary of the genocide. 


Tags: Rwanda, political, conflict, refugees, Africa.

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diana buja's curator insight, April 8, 2:23 AM

Yesterday was a national holiday here in Burundi, commemorating the shooting down of the plane containing the presidents of Burundi and Rwanda, and the beginning of the awful genocide in Rwanda.  I was in Nairobi at the time, and have graphic visions of what took place, which I will blog about this week.

Paige Therien's curator insight, April 11, 1:14 PM

These pictures and the stories behind them are very emotional.  The Rwandan Genocide was made possible by powerful propaganda which further pushed Hutu and Tutsi interests and perceptions of one another to opposite extremes.  As they are all Rwandans who live amongst each other, the genocide spread like wildfire from within and turned the country on its head.  I think the fact that victim/forgivers and perpetrators can stand side by side and be civil is very important. It shows the persistence of humanity to work together in reciprocal relationships and the importance of a "clear conscience" when doing so.  This project of reconciliation fosters support for those who lost so much, as well as unity through communication.  When these people are compared with the United States, I think it is very telling of the United State's moral and ethical character; the lack of political and economic interests in Rwanda was their reasoning behind our country not getting involved.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 3:35 PM

Rwanda is a genocide that many people don't even know about. Regardless of whether someones heard of it, they should still be aware of how people have lived their lives from that time. Some looking to forgive the people who did this, and others looking to gain forgiveness from those they hurt.

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What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine

What the loss of Crimea really means for Ukraine | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In symbolic terms, it's a huge loss. The Crimean Peninsula holds an important place in the region's history, and the inability to prevent the region from joining Russia is a serious test of leadership for the new Ukrainian government in Kiev.

In practical terms, however, what Crimea means for Ukraine is less clear. In an article last week, The Post's Will Englund noted that Crimea may end up costing Russia more than it might like. And what does Ukraine really lose?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

We often view global affairs through our own little prism, considering how it affects us.  So much of the discussion has revolved around Russia and the West in general (and the U.S. specifically), that Ukraine almost gets lost in the shuffle.  All this amid news that the acting Ukrainian Foreign Minister has said that the possibility of war "is growing."

Tag: Ukraine, political, conflict, devolution.

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Europe gas level high as prices rise

Europe gas level high as prices rise | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Gas and oil prices have risen amid fears the Ukraine crisis could have a damaging effect on one of Europe's main energy supply routes.  But analysts say high European gas stocks will limit the turbulence.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Russia is Europe's biggest supplier of natural gas, but Ukraine is the key to their distribution network.  Here is a great analysis of the energy implications.    

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Juan Carlos García Arpín's curator insight, March 4, 3:39 AM

El papel geoestratégico de Ucrania, la razón del conflicto, el control de materias primas fundamentales y sus rutas de distribución.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 5, 4:24 PM

There is a distinct fact that Gas travels into the Ukraine from Russia and Belarus and leaves for Europe. Where as the gas fields are towards the east and they dont venture toward Belarus but more towards Russia and Hungry and Crimea.Gas and oil prices have risen so that it can be distrubuted and taken care of that way where as the transportation costs money. Fears about the Ukraine crisis could have a huge effect on one of Europe's main energy supply routes. But the command will even out the chaos.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 2, 5:50 PM

Gas prices are rising all over the world. The demand for gas is incredibly high as well since most people are driving their own vehicles to work and such. Cutting transportation down to traveling together and on public systems would help immensely with the gas rising problems.