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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Modern Slavery

Modern Slavery | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I recently saw this map in a Washington Post article about modern day slavery and was immediately was struck by the spatial extent and amount of slaves in today’s global economy.  As stated in that article, “This is not some softened, by-modern-standards definition of slavery. These 30 million people are living as forced laborers, forced prostitutes, child soldiers, child brides in forced marriages and, in all ways that matter, as pieces of property, chattel in the servitude of absolute ownership.”  This map shows some important spatial patterns that seem to correlate to economic and cultural factors."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This Washington Post article got me thinking about the geographies of supply chains.  The growing spread of the informal economy (a.k.a.-illicit trade, black market, etc.) has created opportunities for exploitation.  Many argue that free trade was created this power differential between the laborers who create these mass-manufactured products and the global consumers.  These critics argue that fair-trade, not free trade, with lead to sustainable economic growth and minimize social injustice.  Here is a NY Times article about how Mauritania is now confronting it's slavery past and present


Questions to Ponder:  What economic and cultural forces are needed for slavery to thrive?  What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today? How are your spending habits part of the system?


Additionally, this TED video (archived on scoop.it here) is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the global labor system. 


Tags: labor, economic, class, poverty.

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Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 9:36 PM

For slavery to thrive you need a big business to produce goods for and a large amount of people to actually do the work for little or no pay. We can try to eliminate by having machines produce goods or paying the workers more and giving them better working conditions. Our spending habits are some what responsible because these slaves our producing our products for us for very cheap. 

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 16, 2013 8:15 AM

In my opinion slavery is the worst possible living situation. id rather be be free but have no food suply than to be a slave. its dishearting to look at these numbers and see that 30 million people have to deal with the worst quality of live possible. but what sickens me the most is the lack of information we have been given about this though primary schools. In school we were taught about Lincoln freeing the slaves ans american slavery almost every year. But not a single time did they connect or even touch on that it is a massive problem in the world today. It was to the extend that for a few years i was mislead to thinking that Lincoln made this a slave free world, boy was i wrong. Slavery is revesable though, it can be countered by harser punishments and more restrictions on the slave owners. We could also do our best to make it so they bring in as little money as possible so they are forced to find a different occupation. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2:04 PM

MOdern Slavery is a huge problem throughtout the world and especially in Africa and surrounding sister countries. For example, in Africa this map shows us that the slave rate is more than .75 this indicates that there is a small percentage of the country that is not enslaved in some way. This is outrageous for the modern society to think of in todays world especially because as Americans we think of the slave trade and slavery being something that happened many years ago and then slavery was abloished and now nothing bad happens anymore well we couldn't be more WRONG! AMericans are mostly ingornat to the fact that although slavery is not announced in surronding counintents and countries does not mean that it doesn't exist. Another example of this is the Somali blood diamonds and how the children become toy-soldiers and are turned into rebels because if they dont they will be killed so this is the type of society where it is kill or me killed. These CHILDREN are trained to kill anyone and everyone who gets in their way; taken away from their families at a young age and then brainwashed into using their ignorance as bliss.

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In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters

In Climbing Income Ladder, Location Matters | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The odds of rising to another income level are notably low in certain cities, like Atlanta and Charlotte, and much higher in New York and Boston.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive map let's you explore the data of a recent study that is being talked about all over the country right now (NY Times, NPR article, Seattle Times, NPR podcast, etc.) because of it implications. 


Questions to Ponder: Why does place matter for creating opportunities for social mobility?  What geographic obstacles to  economic improvement do you see for the poorest America


Tags: classpoverty, place, USA.

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Ryane Williams's curator insight, July 22, 2013 5:47 PM

Facilities management entails a broad array of disciplines including, but not limited to, planning, designing, leasing, space planning, product management, capital management, construction management, property management, and real estate acquisition, planning and disposal.

Jordan Anderson- www.havefunandprofit.com's curator insight, July 22, 2013 5:58 PM

Location is very important to have more income!

Charles Henderson's comment, August 13, 2013 9:37 PM
Would have been nice for them to include cost of living comparisons. You might be in the top 20% of the country making $107,000 in NYC, but that's only $48,000 in Atlanta. Median income in Atlanta is $30,000 which would be $67,000 in NYC (about $21000 higher than NYC's current median salary). Where you live makes a difference, but HOW you live is just as important.
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Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'?

Why isn't New Orleans Mother's Day parade shooting a 'national tragedy'? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"American tragedies occur where middle America frequents every day: airplanes, business offices, marathons. Where there persists a tangible fear that this could happen to any of us. And rightfully so. Deaths and mayhem anywhere are tragic. That should always be the case. The story here is where American tragedies don't occur. American tragedies don't occur on the southside of Chicago or the New Orleans 9th Ward."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a controversial Op-Ed article that discusses how place and the major axes of identity (race, class and gender) shape and intersect with the the national memory of violence and the media portrayal of violence.  According the David Dennis, "The media seems to forget about New Orleans and any place that the middle class can't easily relate to." 


Tags: race, class, gender, place.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 24, 2013 4:09 PM

It is truly amazing how much location has an impact on society and the way we view things. When we experienced such tragedy's as the Boston Marathon bombing or Columbine it was national news. The city was in an uproar and no matter what radio station you had on or what tv channel you were watching you were hearing about it. Everyone was mourning for those families and people effected by the tragedies. When you think about it, those sort of things are not expected to happen in those places which is what makes it so upsetting to people. Because it is not expected to happen there it becomes national news. However what does that mean about places like compton, New Orleans, and etc? Since people expect violent things to happen there it doesn't make national news because it is of no surpise to anyone that something like that were to happen there. Even if it is expected that doesn't make it right. The shooting at the mother's day parade should be treated like any other tragedy. Unfortunately the location of the tragedy makes it "less" of a tragedy in the eyes on the public because "those sort of things always happen there". It is amazing how much our perception of location can taint the way we see tragedy. It shouldn't be that way, but unfortunetly it's what happens in the world today. 

megan b clement's comment, December 15, 2013 9:44 PM
New Orleans has been struggling even through Katrina to get some recognition that even though their society is not necessarily rich they deserve the same respect as anyone else would. To think especially after what New England endured with the Marathon Bombing to see something like this happen and not even really be recognized nationally is sad. These are people just like everyone else and they deserve to be treated the same as everyone else.
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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural preferences for boys in China has led to a gender imbalance which has some unintended consequences, especially for the those seeking to have families with limited financial resources.


Tags: gender, China, population

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Cassie Frazier's comment, May 4, 2013 5:45 PM
Today in China, love has become more about wealth than romance. Because of the gender imbalance created by the one child policy, there are many more men than women, as boys are the preferred sex. This has shifted the task of choosing a spouse to the women, and they want fancy things. Therefore, they tend to choose the rich to marry. The problem is that there are at least 40-50 million poor men in China, and the majority are alone. When men reach 30 and are still unmarried, they are called "leftovers". These men are much more likely to get into trouble. This is so sad because they are so lonely. By preferring males, China has created a huge group of men who may have to live forever alone.
Taylor Anderson's comment, May 6, 2013 10:43 AM
There is a huge gender imbalance making people choose between love and money
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 8:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

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Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

TED Talks For the past two years, photographer Lisa Kristine has traveled the world, documenting the unbearably harsh realities of modern-day slavery.



Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a chilling glimpse into the worst and darkest side of the economic systems of geography and labor in the world. It is estimated that there are more than 25 million people who today live in state that can be described as modern-day slavery. We should not discuss slavery only in the past tense, and yet it conflicts with how most people conceptualize the world today.


Questions to Ponder: How can this even be happening in the 21st century? What geographic and economic forces lead to these situations portrayed in this TED talk? What realistically could be done to lessen the amount of slavery in the world today?


Tags: TED, labor, economic, class, poverty, South Asia, Africa, video.

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Kyle Toner's comment, November 6, 2012 9:17 AM
This video truly opened eyes into the conflict of modern day slavery. I had no idea just how prevalent, global and horrible this situation is.
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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...


This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 


  1. Technology-Phones mean freedom
  2. Health-Healthy communities prosper
  3. Economy-Green energy equals good business
  4. Equality-Women rule
  5. Justice-The fight for the future is now


Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   

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Women and Land Infographic

Women and Land Infographic | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Landesa partners with governments and local NGOs to ensure the world's poorest families have secure land rights, which develops sustainable economic growth and improves education, nutrition, and conservation...

 

Globally speaking, women are the primary agricultural workers yet rarely own land. 

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Michael Crumpton's comment, March 20, 2013 5:38 PM
I'm not quite sure i understand why the woman aren't allowed time saving technalogy if it is they who till the fields. Why is that?
dilaycock's comment, March 20, 2013 10:30 PM
I think the answer lies in the patriarchal nature of many societies in the developing world. Women provide the labour, but are not in a position to make decisions about management of the land. This situation is exacerbated by gender inequities regarding access to education.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 9, 2:27 PM

New portion of the AP HUG Outline regarding Women in Agriculture

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Water Equity in Tourism

Water Equity in Tourism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tourism Concern fights exploitation in the global tourism industry. We are an independent, non-industry based, UK charity.

 

This is another way to conceptualize the geographic impacts of tourism.  Wealthy tourists from developed countries spend their money in less developed countries, creating a power imbalance within the local community between locals and tourists.  Local absolutely need the tourists dollars but these funds come and a social and environmental cost.  Tourists use far more local resources per capita than the local residents, one reason why some refer to tourism as an 'irritant industry.'  What other forms of social friction can arise from tourism?   For a more detailed response to this situation see this news article in the Guardian: http://www.guardian.co.uk/global-development/2012/jul/08/fresh-water-tourist-developing

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Income Distribution: Poor, Rich, And Richest

Income Distribution: Poor, Rich, And Richest | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One of the focal points of the protests raging in Zuccotti Park and around the world is the sizable gap between the rich and everyone else. Yet as the below graphic shows, there are many different levels of wealth among even the richest of the rich.
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What Percent Are You?

What Percent Are You? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See how your household income ranks in 344 zones across the country.

 

It isn't always about how much you make, but purchasing power, cost of living and local economic situations show us that one number doesn't tell the story of the national economy.  This interactive feature compares household incomes with how they would compare with other regions of the country.  

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India’s Boom Creates Openings for Untouchables

India’s Boom Creates Openings for Untouchables | Geography Education | Scoop.it
India’s era of economic growth has created something unthinkable a generation ago: business opportunities for members of India’s untouchable caste, the Dalits.

 

Critics of globalization often site that globalization has changed indigenous cultures around the world and mourn the 'impurities' in these societies.  Is all cultural change a bad thing?  This article shows one way that global capitalism has been helping (some of) the poorest of the poor within India.  How is globalization connected to cultural changes within any given society?  How is capitalism changing a formerly 'immobile' social structure?    

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Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt

Map of the Day: America's Poverty Belt | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The poor in the U.S.are disproportionately clustered in a handful of southern states...

 

This image is worth an entire class period of economic geography...

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How Economic Inequality Harms Societies

"http://www.ted.com We feel instinctively that societies with huge income gaps are somehow going wrong. Richard Wilkinson charts the hard data on economic inequality, and shows what gets worse when rich and poor are too far apart..."

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Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan

Bootlegging in Tribal Pakistan | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Pakistan's tribal areas, alcohol bootleggers, lured by enormous profits, have created clandestine delivery services to evade recent crackdowns by the Taliban and the police.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 2010 New York Times video shows in a poignant way how the past and the present, the global and the local comibine to create underground cultural practices among the wealthy in Pakistan. 


Tags: Pakistan, popular culture, SouthAsiaglobalization, culture, Islam.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 6:21 AM

The video showed an interesting report on bootlegging in Pakistan.  The comment at the end was the most interesting to me.  A person interviewed said that the society used to be more open and free but now they are not.  The rich can do as they like but the people cannot.  The dangers of bootlegging is such that if the police catch you then you will be arrested or have to pay a bribe but if the Taliban catch you then you will be killed.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 3, 3:47 PM

Other than the actual product, there is no difference between these bootleggers and the illegal drug trade in the US. Even when they said that people that drink the alcohol get arrested, there is no difference. In the US we put heroin addicts in jail every day. Also, in the US the illegal drug trade is very lucrative, but also very dangerous.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 5:48 PM

Alcohol bootleggers have been getting shutdown by the police force. Without this service, the bootleggers would be out of business and probably in jail. This is like prohibition in the U.S. and those who sold alcohol were fined and also arrested. The same thing is happening here where the bootleggers are trying to make huge money by selling something thats outlawed.

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Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations

Brazil: Protests & Demonstrations | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Protests are ongoing in Brazil as people took to demonstrating against high World Cup spending....the unrest is the worst the nation has seen in two decades."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The origins of the protests were based on hikes in public transit fares, but a movement of general discontent began, with many voices and multiple perspectives.  While the World Cup is a rallying point, many argue that it isn't the World Cup they are angry about, but corruption and social inequality.  FIFA is starting to think of contingency plans if protests continue and threaten the World Cup.  The lack of clear leadership some feel is the reason why the protest have lost some steam in July as stated in this NPR podcast.  This photo essay of the protest movement with a gallery of 39 photos is quite intriguing.  


Tags: sport, Brazil, images, South America.

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James Parker's comment, July 4, 2013 4:27 AM
That's really something eye catchy !
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 28, 7:18 PM

These pictures show some of large scale protesting that occurred last year due to public transport fare and tax increases. The people are angry how little the government is helping with public education, healthcare, security, and transportation. The apparent cause of the tax increases was to help Brazil host the World Cup soccer games this year, which has caused the people to believe that their government cares more about soccer than them.

 

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Wealth Inequality in America

Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actua...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This video does have a political bent that may or may not reflect your views, but it nicely lays out data that graphically represents the economic differences that we see in the United States today.  Our perception is as skewed as what is and what we think it should be.  

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, March 6, 2013 11:36 AM

Des Amériques: les Etats Unis. 

Jennifer S. Hong's curator insight, December 27, 2013 12:39 PM

"In a country well governed, poverty is somehing to be ashamed of. In a country badly governed, wealth is something to be ashamed of." -Confucius.

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The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man

The No Good, Very Bad Outlook for the Working-Class American Man | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The U.S. economy once worked like a finely meshed machine. That is not true anymore. The U.S. economy is still a powerful engine, but workers aren’t seeing the benefits, less-educated men are struggling, and the rich have disconnected from everyone else.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The problems with the economy are not universally spread throughout society.  Certain segments are impacted more than others by the current struggles, especially when with look at axes of identity, such as class, gender and ethnicity.  While planning on a blue-collar job in the 1950s could have been a solid career plan for a young man in the United States, not so in the 21st century.     


Tags: labor, gender, class, industry, education.

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The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A professor criticizes the "culture of quantification," (in the journal cultural geographies) arguing that we don't do enough with the data we collect.  If all we do is count (or attempt to count the homeless), does that help them in any way or change the realities that lead to homelessness?  Are we counting them just to give us the numbers to receive credit that may help other programs but not help the homeless?  Is data for data's sake of any value?


UPDATE: Another geographer noted some other issues of homelessness on the website facebook page, specifically in regard to this map of homelessness: "A problem associated with this map is that while the numbers get smaller, it raises the question: where did they go? (answer: Hollywood, after an emphasis on policing pushed them out)...this could be tied in to a discussion about map scale."


Tags: statistics, class, census, socioeconomic, housing, poverty.


Via Allison Anthony
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Linguistic Geography: My Fair Lady

This is a most decidedly dated reference for pop culture, but a great movie for making explicit the idea that the way we speak is connected to where we've lived (also a good clip to show class differences as well as gender norms). The clip highlights many principles and patterns for understanding the geography of languages.


Tags: Language, class, gender, culture, historical, London, unit 3 culture and place.

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João Carreira's comment, September 4, 2012 10:24 AM
...Even as portuguese, I apreceated it very much. Thank you.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 6, 2012 6:30 AM
This movie clip does demonstrate how language is connected not only to space and location but individual or group experiences as well. The languages used by the upper and lower orders in addressing each other or an “outsider” are very distinct within this film. Therefore if you’re socioeconomic status effects the way you speak then perhaps the type of langue you use can indicate what different social groups within a society consider comical or entertaining such as dance and music?
Jess Pitrone's comment, April 29, 2013 6:18 PM
My Fair Lady has always been one of my favorite movies, and it really sparked my interest in linguistics and accents. Not only does your accent define where you’re from physically, but it defines where you’re from socially, as well. While Eliza Doolittle is from the same country, region, and city as Prof Higgins and the people coming out of the theater, she sounds completely different. Right away, her speech gives away what kind of social background she comes from.
Similarly to the “When did Americans lose their British accents?” article, this article helps relay how accents can help define a physical area, and it also shows a connection between accent and economics. Accent is both a cultural and an economic part of geography.
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Rise of Residential Segregation by Income

Rise of Residential Segregation by Income | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Residential segregation by income has increased during the past three decades across the United States and in 27 of the nation’s 30 largest major metropolitan area, according to a new analysis of census tract and household income data by the Pew Research Center.  The analysis finds that 28% of lower-income households in 2010 were located in a majority lower-income census tract, up from 23% in 1980, and that 18% of upper- income households were located in a majority upper-income census tract, up from 9% in 1980."  This interactive map allows the user to explore the 10 largest metropolitan areas in the U.S. Read the article associated with this map.

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Why there's an alarming rash of suicides among Dalit students

Why there's an alarming rash of suicides among Dalit students | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Despite the country’s claims to be a sleek 21st-century meritocracy, the habits of centuries of discrimination and social exclusion are not so easily shaken.

 

India is modernizing at a rapid pace, but some old class problems rooted in the caste system are still visible.  This is part of a large series called "Breaking Caste" with some excellent videos, articles and personal vignettes to humanize the struggles of those at the bottom of the social hierarchy.   

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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 5:34 PM

This was a very sad story to read. It's a shame that many Dalit students feel ostracized at elite Indian institutions, so much so some go as far as to commit suicide. This is a terrible personal loss for the families and neighbors of the students. But it also is unfortunate news for the country as a whole. India's economic and social growth likely depends on moving beyond old views on class and cate.

Cam E's curator insight, April 1, 8:20 AM

This is interesting in that it's not some silent discrimination, but an extremely overt one where many of these people are being told to their faces that they will not be allowed to pass. My greatest respect goes out to those who fight the hardest for what they want and they must keep trying to achieve it, but sadly those in a position of power in the society were direct barriers to their progress, causing their hope to be lost and the Dalit students to commit suicide.

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Apple, America and a Squeezed Middle Class

Apple, America and a Squeezed Middle Class | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Apple once bragged that its products were made in America. But it has since shifted its immense manufacturing work overseas, posing questions about what corporate America owes Americans.

 

The economics of globalization are at the core of this article, Apple just happens to be the case-study.  Why are iPhones not produced in the United States?  While it would be easy to simply cite cheap labor, it is more complicated than that.  Unfortunately for those hoping to rekindle American industry, the problems run deeper than that.  The ability to recruit sufficient highly-trained engineers, flexibility and speed in production are all factors that are decisively in China's corner at the moment.  Big picture, how are these economic factors reshaping the world we live in? 

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The distribution of wealth in America

The distribution of wealth in America | Geography Education | Scoop.it

More than 50 percent of ZIP Codes in the United States have an above average percentage of households living at or below the poverty line.  What are the spatial factors that lead to a concentration of wealth in particular places?  What economic, political and cultural factors play a role in the process of places amassing more wealth or of creating persistant poverty? 


Via Nicholas Goubert
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Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 7:33 PM

The maps in this article indicate where the wealth is and is staying through out the United States. In some regions or areas of the United States have more wealth than others. The States or areas that are at the poverty level or sub par to the rich areas are higher in percentage. this occurs for many reasons, but one reason is evident that the wealth of a nation tends to stay in one area until another area becomes more wealthy.

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The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education

The Unaddressed Link Between Poverty and Education | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Federal education policy seems blind to the relationship between poverty and student performance.

 

An interesting op-ed that focuses on the educational performance in the United States and poverty.  The authors feel that class is an obvious factor in educational performance, but that educational policies do not reflect the geographic factors that lead to uneven results. 

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Mindy Tan's curator insight, February 22, 6:44 AM

From this article, I can see that children that are poorer actually get lower results as compared to those that are well fed. I think it is because they dont have a good environment to study in, do not have well-educated parents to guide them along and teach them and most importantly, they are not well-fed and they do not have enough nutritions to help them think or concentrate better. I wonder why they would  put the 'rich' and 'poor' kids together? Putting them together will only result in the richer kids looking down on the poorer kids.

rlavinya's curator insight, February 23, 5:26 AM

It saddens be that children can't be educated just cause of their lack of money.Poverty an educations plays a huge role in a child's life.WIthout education how are they gona lead in life?Why can't the poor be edcuated for free?

rlavinya's curator insight, February 24, 5:02 AM

Education and poverty.In simple terms mostly if a child does not have enough money it'll affect their education. It saddens be that children can't be educated just cause of their lack of money.Poverty an educations plays a huge role in a child's life.WIthout education how are they gona lead in life?Why can't the poor be edcuated for free?What puzzles be the most is why isn't it free for those who cant afford it?

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Dangerous work

Dangerous work | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Guatemala City, a place called "The Mine" can deliver both a means of survival and a grisly death. Every day, dozens of residents salvage a living by scouring the massive dump for scrap metal.

 

This thanksgiving I'd like to discuss one of my goals in teaching a geography course in the developed world. I hope to cultivate a sense of thanksgiving and gratitude for the many good things that are easy to take for granted. Balanced with that, I try to teach that economic disparities are NOT a function of moral, mental or physical superiority.  Therefore I try to instill a sense of thankfulness that does not become boastfulness or entitlement--hopefully that ethos will infuse this day's festivities. Happy Thanksgiving!

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sdion's comment, January 30, 2012 11:23 AM
makes me thankful for the jobs i have. i also wonder what the health side effects are of working in these locations. are the workers experiencing shorter life spans or anything like that?
Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 9:28 AM

As someone who has scoured dumps for things before, this sounds like no fun at all! You can find a lot of cool things that are left at dumps, but this doesn't even begin to compare to what they're facing at "The Mine". The smell and possible injuries must be overwhelming. If left untreated, a cut from anything in one of these places could prove fatal.