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‘Normal America’ Is Not A Small Town Of White People

‘Normal America’ Is Not A Small Town Of White People | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The sense that the normal America is out there somewhere in a hamlet is misplaced: it’s not in a small town at all.  I calculated how demographically similar each U.S. metropolitan area is to the U.S. overall, based on age, educational attainment, and race and ethnicity.1 The index equals 100 if a metro’s demographic mix were identical to that of the U.S. overall."

Seth Dixon's insight:

We often do imagine that your typical American is from the Heartland, and that very term, strengthens that connotation.  100 years ago that was true that your average American was one a farm or a small town, as 72% of Americans lived in rural areas.  Today, that is decidedly not the case but we still sometimes think (and act) as if it were (84% today live in urban areas).  The United States is urban, diverse, and bi-coastal in it's primary demographic composition.   

 

Tag: rural, migration, USA, census.

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$75 a day vs. $75,000 a year: How we lost jobs to Mexico

$75 a day vs. $75,000 a year: How we lost jobs to Mexico | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A college-educated, manufacturing engineer makes $1,500 a month working the production line at a GE plant in Mexico (about $75 a day). A typical manufacturing engineer that works for GE in the United States makes nearly $75,000 a year, (about $312 a day ... or 4X the rate in Mexico).  That wage gap can easily explain why so many manufacturing jobs have left the United States. Since 2000, the U.S. has lost about 5 million manufacturing jobs.  Manufacturing has crossed the Rubicon -- or Rio Grande -- and it's hard to see those jobs returning to the U.S."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industrymanufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexicoglobalization, technology.  

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Leonardo Wild's curator insight, April 4, 9:35 AM

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 4, 3:16 PM

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, April 4, 9:00 PM

A huge wage gap between American and Mexican workers stands center in the debate over how the U.S. has lost so many blue collar jobs.  We can bemoan the loss of manufacturing jobs in the United States, but it is incredibly unlikely that low-skilled manufacturing will become a viable means to achieve a middle class income in the future because of fundamental shifts in economic geography.  

 

Tags: industry, manufacturing, economic, North America, labor, USA, Mexico, globalization, technology.  

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The U.S. Is Pumping All This Oil, So Where Are The Benefits?

The U.S. Is Pumping All This Oil, So Where Are The Benefits? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
America has joined Saudi Arabia and Russia as one of the world's leading oil producers. Forecasters predicted this would usher in a golden age. It hasn't worked out that way.

 

Tags: environment, resources, economic.

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Rural US disappearing? Population share hits low

Rural US disappearing? Population share hits low | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Rural America now accounts for just 16 percent of the nation's population, the lowest ever. The latest 2010 census numbers hint at an emerging America where, by mid-century, city boundaries become indistinct and rural areas grow ever less relevant. Many communities could shrink to virtual ghost towns as they shutter businesses and close down schools, demographers say."

Seth Dixon's insight:

1910: 72% of USA rural

2010: 16% of USA rural

 

This is an old article, but it highlights the stark reversal that has profoundly reshaped our society.  The patterns noted in Peirce Lewis's 1972 classic article "Small Town in Pennsylvania" have just continued and accelerated. 

 

Question to Ponder: What forces are driving the change?  What other parts of society are impacted by this shift?

 

Tag: rural, migration, USA, census.

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L.Long's curator insight, February 19, 10:56 PM

Demise of small towns

 

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How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow

How To Travel While Black During Jim Crow | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A postal worker created a guide for black travelers that was published almost every year from 1936 to 1966."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it (podcast on the Green Book and an additional article).     

Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.   

 

Tagsmobilitytransportationrace, classculture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, December 22, 2015 7:56 AM

Back in the day when one travelled while being black there were restrictions in many places. There also were places where one could not stay , and places where you would not be safe.

The confederate flag was a marker , most of the time to let you know that you were not welcome. Of course there were restrictions on busses, trains, and in some cities you had to take a black cab.

 

Lots of people belonged to social clubs , sororities, fraternities and those memberships encouraged people to invite guests into their homes. Many of us did the relatives map. ie. traveled to where family lived. It was magic to be able to go to places in New York, Philadelphia and Boston.,Still you needed to know little things.

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Every Job in America, Mapped

Every Job in America, Mapped | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Are you one of the millions of Americans opting into "job sprawl" over a short commute?


Before you dig in to “Where are the Jobs?: Employment in America 2010,” it may help to note that each dot represents a single job—and you can tell what kind of job it is because of its color. Manufacturing and trade jobs are red; professional services jobs are blue; healthcare, education, and government jobs are green; and retail, hospitality, and other service jobs are yellow. You won’t find any dots for federal jobs (no available data), and Massachusetts is missing entirely—the only state to opt out of reporting its employment trends. The end result is a highly detailed map that gives viewers a quick summary of how many and what types of jobs are a part of the economy.


Tags: economic, labor, USA, transportation, industry.

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Map quiz: How well do you know the American landscape?

Map quiz: How well do you know the American landscape? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Using data from the USDA, Pecirno has mapped the lower 48 states by picturing just one single subject, and nothing else – no political borders or backgrounds. The project aims to show how richly detailed single-subject maps can give people a new way to understand their landscape, Pecirno says. Can you guess what Pecirno is picturing in the minimalist maps below? To make it easier, we’ve given you a few options to choose from."


Tags: games, USA, mapping.

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Gilbert C FAURE's comment, October 5, 2015 8:17 AM
got 7/7!
John Puchein's curator insight, November 6, 2015 10:47 AM

Fun and short quiz to see how well you can think of the U.S. in a different way. 

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 4:12 PM

It is odd how many of these I had no idea what I was looking at. I never realized how much of the US is classified as shrub land or pine forest.

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America’s national vacation problem

America’s national vacation problem | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"As Americans enjoy an extra day away from the office over the long Labor Day weekend, many will reflect on the end of a summer when, once again, they took far fewer days of vacation than workers in other countries. 40% of Americans do not take all of their vacation days."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Small business can develop a business culture, and the from place to place, diverse norms govern how business operate at the a variety of scales.  There isn't one answer as to why so many Americans leave vacation days on the table, but cultural norms can shape collective behaviors.   


Tagscultural norms, labor, USA.

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, September 10, 2015 9:35 PM

Americans have been said to be the least vacationing people compared to many other countries workers. But, according to the article, 40% choose to do this, and do not take off as many vacation days as they can. Many Americans would like to, but feel pressured to keep up with the American stereotype and keep being 'hard-working' citizens. BBC did a poll on their Facebook page to find this out, and many Americans said that their bosses as well do not make it easy to take time off sometimes, restricting their vacationing days, although at a federal level, they should be able to do so easily. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:07 PM

It is amazing to look at American society and their struggles with taking days out of work on vacation. In this competitive economy, people need to be hard working to keep their jobs and excel in their field of work. Taking days off usually would be wise in order to refresh and rejuvenate from the long working hours. However, people are fearing that their work load will be too overwhelming to take on upon their return if they chose to take time off. One of my managers at work (JCPenney) would stay passed her scheduled time to make sure the men's department would be clean and organized before she leave. She usually does this after she clocked out and will stay for 3-4 hours after. I can definitely relate this situation to the article. The fact that most Americans working at a job that they have tons of responsibilities for will feel stressed and overwhelmed if they take vacation days. 

Tracy Harding's comment, September 22, 2015 10:15 AM
You need to include global impact and personal thoughts.
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The Supreme Court just legalized same-sex marriage across the US

The Supreme Court just legalized same-sex marriage across the US | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Supreme Court's decision means marriage equality is now the law of the land in the US. But whether states allow same-sex couples to marry immediately or days or weeks from now will depend on the actions of local and state officials, who could delay the final effect of the decision for a few days or weeks."


Tags: sexuality, USA, mappolitical.

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Jannell Alino's curator insight, August 27, 2015 7:20 PM

On June 26, 2015 the Supreme Court ruled that same sex marriage would be legal in all fifty states. This was a majority vote that now requires all states to grant marriage licenses to all couples whether they are same sex or not. Before this day Washington D.C. as well as 37 other states allowed same sex marriage. This decision was years in the making and has been long waited for by many. There were many factors that went into deciding if this should be made legal like discrimination. Although it is now legal to have same sex marriage in all states not all states are open to this idea. Many states are still not granting marriage licenses although all citizens have the right to. Some generalizations that can be retrieved from this article is that the Supreme Court is making strides in passing laws that have been needed for many decades. They are finally making progress with addressing our countries current problems. Yes this argument is logical except for the states that are still refusing to grant licenses to same sex couples. This relates because it affects our entire country and shows that we are not as conservative anymore. I am 100% supportive of this decision and believe that it great that after several decades of fighting for the right to marry they finally have it! It is objective and appeals to everyone, not just one group of people.  

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Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms

Do We Talk Funny? 51 American Colloquialisms | Geography Education | Scoop.it
American English has a rich history of regionalisms — which sometimes tell us a lot about where we come from.


Tags: languageculture, English.

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Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:14 PM

I found this article most interesting, having lived in RI, NJ, GA, IN, MD, and TX. After awhile, you will start to pick up certain words, while dropping other similar words that I have used all of my life. The words and phrases both tend to change from one state to another. Read the article, it is enlightening. Fred Issa,

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Utahns, Mainers and Wyomingites: The ultimate guide to what to call people from each state

Utahns, Mainers and Wyomingites: The ultimate guide to what to call people from each state | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"For most states, you’re safe adding an –n, and maybe a few other letters, to the state’s name – a la Coloradans, Nebraskans and Californians. For three states, Wyoming, Wisconsin and New Hampshire, the correct method is to add an –ite. For a handful of states in the northeast, the style is to add an 'r' – New Yorker, Vermonter, Mainer, Marylander, Connecticuter and Rhode Islander."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Having lived in New England for 6 years now, I still haven't found a polite term to refer to people from Massachusetts.

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Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:21 PM

This is a really interesting view on a map projection and shows how many possibilities there are for differences.  

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:17 AM

This map has data allocating what people are called based on their region. What concerns me is that there is no information depicting what one would be called depending on which city you are from. For example I am from Austin, Texas so you would call me an Austinite but since I am from Texas you would call me a Texan.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:31 AM

Intro-Ch 1 Toponyms

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Mapping Migration in the United States

Mapping Migration in the United States | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An interactive map showing nationwide migration patterns in the United States since 1900.
Seth Dixon's insight:

An oldie, but goodie.  This incredible series of interactive charts from the New York Times show where the residents of every U.S. state were born and how that data has changed over time (update: now available as an interactive map).  This graph of Florida shows that around 1900, most people living in Florida were from the South.  Around the middle of the 20th century more people from other parts of the U.S. and from outside the U.S. started moving in.  What changes in U.S. society led to these demographic shifts?  How has demographics of your state changes over the last 114 years? 

   

On the flip side, many people have been leaving California and this article charts the demographic impact of Californians on other states.  


Tags: migration, USAvisualization, census, unit 2 population.

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Megan Becker's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:01 PM

Summary: This interactive map from the New York Times shows where people in each state are born, highlighting the growing internal migration in the United States alone. For example, only a small percentage of people living in Florida were actually born there, while the majority of Louisiana residents were born there.

 

Insight: I think this is an interesting map mostly because of it's interactive feature, in that you can see how internal migration has drastically changed since 1900. It relates to unit 2 in that migration patterns are always changing, whether they be internal or external. 

Mrs. Madeck's curator insight, October 1, 2015 5:55 PM

Migration

Peyton Conner's curator insight, October 30, 2015 10:18 AM

I believe this is a very interesting article that shows just how diverse migration is in the United State today. I especially liked the idea of seeing how migration has changed from 1900 to 2012. This map could easily be used to infer why people migrate in the United States.PC

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220 years of US population changes in one map

Every 10 years, the Census Bureau calculates the exact center of the US population. Here's what that statistic shows about our history.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the video above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to the podcast version of the article or a shorter podcast by NPR

 

Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?

 

Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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U.S. religious groups and their political leanings

U.S. religious groups and their political leanings | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mormons are the most heavily Republican-leaning religious group in the U.S., while a pair of major historically black Protestant denominations – the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church and the National Baptist Convention – are two of the most reliably Democratic groups, according to data from Pew Research Center’s 2014 Religious Landscape Study."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Happy Super Tuesday.  While there are people of all political stripes within any given religious affiliation, the geography of religion really matters in electoral geography as well.    

 

Tags: religionUSA, electoral, political

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Dewayne Goad's curator insight, March 9, 9:40 AM

Happy Super Tuesday.  While there are people of all political stripes within any given religious affiliation, the geography of religion really matters in electoral geography as well.    

 

Tags: religion, USA, electoral, political. 

Danielle Yen's curator insight, March 10, 9:22 AM

Happy Super Tuesday.  While there are people of all political stripes within any given religious affiliation, the geography of religion really matters in electoral geography as well.    

 

Tags: religionUSA, electoral, political

NADINE BURCHI SCORP's curator insight, March 10, 1:22 PM

Happy Super Tuesday.  While there are people of all political stripes within any given religious affiliation, the geography of religion really matters in electoral geography as well.    

 

Tags: religion, USA, electoral, political. 

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The states people really want to move to — and those they don’t

The states people really want to move to — and those they don’t | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A national trend has reversed.

 

When the U.S. economy slowed during the recession, so did one of the major demographic shifts of the last several decades. For a brief respite, the Northeast and Midwest stopped shedding quite so many residents to the burgeoning Sun Belt. That trend, though — which has big consequences for politics, among other things — has been picking back up.  New census data shows the trend accelerating back to its pre-recession pace.

 

Tags: migrationeconomic, USA.

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Donald Trump’s attacks on Muslims fit a pattern of persecution. Just ask Jews, Catholics and Mormons.

Donald Trump’s attacks on Muslims fit a pattern of persecution. Just ask Jews, Catholics and Mormons. | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Persecuting religious minorities that are perceived as a political threat is a time-honored American tradition.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is not intended to be a political post, but one that reflects of the history of religious persecution in the United States.  If you find that to be a controversial political topic, so be it.  In the past, when Americans have suspected that a religious group is undermining it's country’s free, democratic political order, we have demanded—often violently—some radical action against that group.  Let that past stay in the past.  

 

Tags: religionUSA, historical, conflict

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Chelsea Martines's curator insight, December 12, 2015 3:45 PM
The author is the article, Henry Farrell, interviews David T. Smith about Donald Trump's statement about not allowing anymore Muslims to come to the U.S. He says that this is a pattern of persecutions, as many religions have been persecuted through the history of the U.S. He uses examples from Jews, Catholics, and Mormons. They have all been restricted income rights, or attacked by the government in the 19 and 20 centuries. DTS says that what the current president and the old president have done regarding Islamic extremist is controversial. Both president Bush and Obama have said that ISIS and other terrier groups could be considered not even Islamic or religious as to not be labeled as attacking a religion, so it can rather be seen as simply terrorist and then have the peaceful Muslims be kept protected.
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Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides

Jim Crow-Era Travel Guides | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"From 1936 to 1966, the 'Green Book' was a travel guide that provided black motorists with peace of mind while they drove through a country where racial segregation was the norm and sundown towns — where African-Americans had to leave after dark — were not uncommon."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The effects of globalization and technologies are uneven; this is a very clear example of how mobility and access to other places can be limited based on various segments of the population. It is repugnant to think that such a book was ever necessary in this country, but it is heartening to see the evidence of an organized network that worked to lessen the pain of those oppressed by it.    


This year's Geography Awareness Week's theme is "Explore! The Power of Maps."  Geographer Derek Alderman complied these resources for teachers wanting to use the example of the Green Book in their classrooms.  


Tags: mobility, transportation, race, class, culture, historical, USA, ethnicity.

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John Puchein's curator insight, November 12, 2015 8:08 AM

All I have to say is....wow. 

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Where U.S. Immigrants Came From

Where U.S. Immigrants Came From | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The new Pew interactive map covers 1850 to 2013."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps are produced by the Pew Research Center and show the main country of origin of each states' foreign born population.  Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the dramatically on the rise, maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a massive flow of immigrants coming from south of the border.  The reality is that percentage of foreign-born migrants in the United States from Mexico, and most Latin American countries, has steadily dropped since 2000.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mappingcensus, ethnicity.

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, October 11, 2015 2:58 PM

Une carte interactive utilisable en classe notamment en seconde.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, October 12, 2015 1:44 PM

Immigration was a major contribution to the growing population in the United States. Throughout the 1700s and 1800s the amount of immigration coming into the country was huge. The main immigrants were coming from Europe and other countries they were fleeing from because of persecution from the government or even because of the huge potato famine that occurred in the 1845-52. 1850, saw the highest amount of German immigrants and Irish immigrants were noticed throughout the map. Because of these high numbers of immigration, the United States has many cultural backgrounds that show that the country is diverse in that aspect because not one culture is the same and many people can see this within a common household.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:20 PM

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps are produced by the Pew Research Center and show the main country of origin of each states' foreign born population.  Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the dramatically on the rise, maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a massive flow of immigrants coming from south of the border.  The reality is that percentage of foreign-born migrants in the United States from Mexico, and most Latin American countries, has steadily dropped since 2000.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mapping, census, ethnicity.

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Changes in Mortality: 1900 to 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 to 2010 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The New England Journal of Medicine looks at death reports in 200 years of back issues. The first thing to notice here is how much our mortality rate has dropped over the course of a century, largely due to big reductions in infectious diseases like tuberculosis and influenza."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer).  


Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors shape mortality rates and shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, development, historical, USA, population, statistics, unit 2 population, infographic, models.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:37 AM
Mortality
pascal simoens's curator insight, October 26, 2015 7:34 PM
A méditer
AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer).  

 

Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors shape mortality rates and shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, development, historical, USA, population, statistics, unit 2 population, infographic, models.

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America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it

America's most embarrassing statistic — and one effort to change it | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Why is the US the only industrialized nation with a rising rate of maternal mortality? Supermodel-turned-maternal health advocate Christy Turlington Burns talks about her latest mission to raise awareness about maternal deaths.


99% of deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth occur in the developing world. The good news is that in most countries the rate of maternal mortality has been going down. The bad news is that in eight countries the rate is going up. The shocking news is that the United States is among them. It is the only industrialized country to have that dubious distinction. The rate has in fact been doubling in recent years.


Tag: mortality, developmentgender, statistics, USA.

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Danielle Kedward's curator insight, September 12, 2015 7:34 AM
Excellent article for population geography challenges for the future
Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:17 PM

Good question, Why is the US rate of maternal mortality so high. We pay three times higher the average cost for medical care, then any other industrialized nation of earth? Fred Issa,

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Restless America: state-to-state migration

Restless America: state-to-state migration | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Approximately 7.1 million Americans moved to another state in 2012. That’s over 2.2% of the U.S. population. The United States has a long history of people picking up and moving their families to other parts of the country, in search of better livelihoods. That same spirit of mobility, a willingness to uproot oneself, seems alive and well today based on the visualization of migration patterns above.

The visualization is a circle cut up into arcs, the light-colored pieces along the edge of the circle, each one representing a state. The arcs are connected to each other by links, and each link represents the flow of people between two states."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great way to visualize migration patterns within the United States.  What states are people migrating from and where are they going to?  Which states are more linked through these migratory bonds?  Here are the answers to these types of questions for every state of the union.  


Tags: migration, population, statistics, visualization, unit 2 population.

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Brealyn Holley's curator insight, November 3, 2015 9:18 PM

Many people migrate each and every day, but sometimes when they move to places like the USA, that part of the world can become overpopulated at times. Not having enough resources many begin to slowly die off which is either a good or bad thing while being in this position. However, when people do migrate they are leaving behind their homes and many are losing jobs. ~BH

Rylee English's curator insight, November 4, 2015 9:40 AM

in 2012, 2.2% of the U.S population migrated to different states. I think its  a good thing that people migrate to different states so they can expirience, first hand, how much states other than their home state contribute to our country. RE

Cade Johns's curator insight, November 5, 2015 7:51 PM

Much of the population in America migrates internally, approxamitely 7.1 million Americans in 2012.The only explanation is to go for a better life in another state.

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U.S. military commitments

U.S. military commitments | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The U.S. is bound by treaties to defend a quarter of humanity. Could this drag Americans into a war?"  


Tags: conflictUSA, war, political.

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Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:26 PM

Even though U.S are bound by treaties to defend her allies, it's the political leaders that will be the decisive factor on an full-scale war or not. Depending on the nation's interests risking a full on war will result in catastrophe for both sides. The U.S could simply aid her allies and send in a few thousand troops and supplies to help. Getting fully involved in another nation's war would just backfire and in some cases make the situation even worst. 

Fred Issa's curator insight, October 5, 2015 4:20 PM

With all of our Mutual defense Treaties, that we agreed to protect about 25% of the world's population, could this get us entangled into new wars? A must read. Fred Issa,

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Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion

Christianity faces sharp decline as Americans are becoming even less affiliated with religion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are more religiously unaffiliated Americans than Catholic Americans or mainline Protestant Americans.


Christianity is on the decline in America, not just among younger generations or in certain regions of the country but across race, gender, education and geographic barriers. The percentage of adults who describe themselves as Christians dropped by nearly eight percentage points in just seven years to about 71 percent, according to a survey conducted by the Pew Research Center.


Tags: religion, culture, Christianity, USA.

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Quentin Sylvester's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:23 AM

As scientific knowledge and material goods continue to rise in abundance for many Americans, the need for religion and otherworldly salvation is declining, which can be found in recent census surveys of religion and affiliation, which sees many Americans becoming unaffiliated with religion in favor of a more secular lifestyle.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:23 AM

It is a shame that millennials are declining religion more. Religion is one of the bases of culture. If you take away a base from a house it crumbles. The more we deny our religion, values, and culture in general the more we will become plain, and no longer culturally diverse.

MsPerry's curator insight, May 27, 2015 9:35 AM

Religion-Christianity in USA