Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The Most Complex International Borders in the World

"In this video I look at some of the most complex international border. Of course, there are more complex borders in the world, but this video looks at some of my favourites."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video shows some great examples of how the political organization of space and administration of borders can get complicated.  Here are the examples (and time in the video when they are covered in the video):


Tags: borders, political, territoriality, sovereignty, video.


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ELAdvocacy's curator insight, October 3, 2014 9:40 AM

There are so many reasons our immigrant students come to the United States.  Some stories are so complex and painful it can be extremely difficult for Americans to understand.

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, October 3, 2014 10:21 PM

Interesting!

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 6, 2014 5:39 AM

The Most Complex International Borders in the World

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The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
2012 has had many stories around the globe have grabbed the headlines with their shocking tales.  Some of the most important shifts in the world however are incremental processes that happen slowly...


This article from Foreign Policy shares some great global stories that may end up impacting the coming years as well:  


1) India and Pakistan start trading more

2) Brazil becomes an immigration destination

3) Inuits strike it rich

4) A tropical disease nearly eradicated

5) The copyright wars go 3-D

6) The end of the Indian call center (Philippines)

7) Hong Kong fights back

8) Moscow on the Med (Cyprus)

9) Oil discoveries in Central Africa

10) Island dispute between Iran and UAE

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:57 AM

What was missed in the news?  Take a look at some of the stories from around the world!

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Dubai, The World Islands

We are told that we should change the world to be what we think it should be...this urban development has taken that to the extreme, showing human/environmental interactions, development and urban issues in Dubai, UAE.  For more information about this place, see: http://www.theworld.ae/ 

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 1:46 AM

This is an example of a nation coming into vast amounts of wealth, in this case oil and spending said money largely to show the world it can. Does Dubai expect to make a ton of profit from this? While I can assume I can't see thing being a business driven decision. Instead I see this as an way of yet again showing the world how wealthy their nation is and how they're able to create a world of their own using man made islands. 

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:38 PM

Dubai has gone into a massive transition over the past few decades. Once oil was discoveredit has become a thriving city full of many high rise buildings and other rich amentities that people like to experience. Its a land that was built from sand and building up from the sea floor. This includes palm tree shape jetties, high rise tennis courts, and an overwhelming strip of buildings. Many of the things that are done here in Dubai are taken to the extreme with human and the environmental interactions.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:30 PM
This is amazing! It is a country of high advancement. After it found oil, it became something it never was. Over the past decade or so, Dubai has come from nothing, to something with everything. Although there is probably still high poverty that is not shown. The fact that something like this can be done is quite amazing, pretty much building a world inside a single country.
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Dubai's Growth

Dubai's Growth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
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steve smith's curator insight, March 31, 2014 4:03 AM

Great for tourism development

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:48 AM

This series of pictures shows the extremely rapid growth of Dubai. An extremely wealthy city, the oil richness of Dubai has allowed for it to grow at an unprecedented rate from a desert to a sprawling metropolis. Such an impressive city springing up in a desolate desert speaks to how much resources can dictate where and how city growth occurs.

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 14, 2014 5:13 PM

 Dubai has drastically changed throughtout it's time before the globalization boom and was one of the only cities to be impacted positively by globalization. As you can see from the depiction that Dubai in 1991 was a deserted place and then in 2005 it transformed into becoming somewhat of a city. In 2012 this city drastically transformed in order to help the globalization process and the whole city in general was trasformed into a mega city.

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The Dubai Skyline In The Fog

The Dubai Skyline In The Fog | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Now this is an amazing sight...no doubt where the main boulevard is. 


Via axelletess
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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:01 AM
Dubai a country that has developed itself. It is a country that is extremely rich and beautiful.
Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 16, 2013 9:02 PM

This is pretty cool. You can tell how  high that main strip of buildings are. Very unique 

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What happens when you flush a toilet in the world's tallest building?

What happens when you flush a toilet in the world's tallest building? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Dubai, in the United Arab Emirates displays an image that is hyper-modern, sophisticated and technologically advanced.  The "Mall of the Emirates" even has a ski lift in it.  Dubai is now home to the tallest skyscraper in the world, matching that image perfectly.

 

But is this perception that is carefully choreographed the full picture?  When you flush in this magnificent building, the waste is removed by truck.  This jarring juxtaposition of cosmopolitanism and under-developed infrastructure shows an intriguing glimpse to the inner workings of urban and economic geographies of the UAE.      

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Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 4, 2014 1:04 PM

This is an interesting article of cities growing so fast that their infrastructure literally cannot keep us. In Dubai and in India, large skyscrapers are in charge of disposing their own waste because there isn't infrastructure put in place to support them. This seems like a worrisome situation. If these countries don't find a way to build infrastructure to support such large upscale developments then they will find themselves in dire straights. As of now trucks can wait up to 24 hours to dispose of their waste. If these developing cities keep growing the problems will only be amplified more. 

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 2:28 AM

This article highlights an interesting concept, the building up and improving of structures without the industry and logistics to truly support it. In Dubai not only to many have great deals of money but they want to rest of the world to know it as well. This is a immense modern building with state of the art features, all except waste management. Here the buildings have simply cropped up faster than the ground work can be built. In this case all the waste has to be trucked out everyday because their is seemingly no septic or sewer system attached to the building's plumbing.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 7, 2015 4:46 PM

In the worlds tallest building where does the septic go but down when there is no drainage system? Thats right down and into a holding tank located somewhere within the building then emptied out byt a truck. Once emptied this truck takes it to a sewage plant where it can wait for hours. Some implicationsof this in a city that has developed so fast is that not all things were sorted out to make use of the best possible way. This could also cause a health risk for the people working within the buildings. This is a very outdated source of sewer removal in a very rich city.