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Look Inside The Doomsday Vault That Protects Seeds Of The World

Scientists set up a vault in the Norwegian Arctic to keep as many varieties of seeds as possible in case of a catastrophe.
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's nice to know that if there is a cataclysmic disaster, that Norway has the world's back...you know, just in case.  I really hope that the asteroid of the future doesn't hit the island of Svalbard now.   

 

Tags: sustainabilitydisasters, agriculture, food production, unit 5 agriculture. Norway.

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Americans Try Norwegian Christmas Food

See staff at the U.S. Embassy in Oslo try traditional Norwegian Christmas dishes. Se ansatte på den amerikanske ambassaden i Oslo smake på norsk julemat.

 

Tags: Norway, food, culture, seasonal, perspective.

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Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims

Gaping hole to mark Breivik victims | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A slice of rock removed from the mainland near the island of Utoeya is the winning design for a memorial to commemorate the victims of Norwegian mass killer Anders Behring Breivik."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Monuments are not just in a place...they can create place and place can infuse added meaning to a memorial.  This is a great example of the interplay between memorials, place, artistic and cultural meanings. 

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Giovanni Sonego's curator insight, March 7, 2014 3:43 AM

Il 22 luglio 2011 il fanatico cristiano Anders Breivik ha ucciso 69 ragazzi nell'isola di Utøya in Norvegia e procurato la morte di altre 8 persone in un attentato con esplosivo a Oslo. Una tragedia che ha colpito tutto il mondo e ha lasciato impietrita la civilissima Norvegia.

Per ricordare le vittime di questo massacro sarà creato un monumento. Questo il design selezionato. Un monumento che riesce a riprodurre in modo fisico il dolore procurato dall'esperienza di chi ha dovuto provare in prima persona la perdita improvvisa, brutale e permanente di tante persone care.

JoseMªRiveros's curator insight, March 7, 2014 2:36 PM

Espectacular !!!!

Un trozo de roca retirado de la parte continental cerca de la isla de Utoya. 

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 12, 2014 11:32 AM

This is a creative and beautiful idea for a monument. I have never come across a design similar to this one. This is a great example of taking advantage of the surroundings around you, such as the water, rocks and trees. 

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Africa for Norway

Africa for Norway | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   


Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:48 PM

This video is a satire regarding the aid sent to Africa, in this case it is aid from Africa sent to Norway. This was created as many within Africa feel the aid given is the wrong things or simply old unwanted garbage. If America and Europe wish to actually send effective aid to Africa its important to diagnose the problems and then send them goods that can actually address the problem.  

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:01 AM

This comedic video of Africa sending Radiator's to Norway, a country that experiences cold weather every year, demonstrates how (we as westerners especially) tend to overwhelm the continent with things they have an overwhelming collection of. Africa is sometimes seen as a continent in need, but people who are sending "aid" to the continent often neglect to understand that they continent have made great stride to be able to compete in the global economy. Now that the roles have been reversed, its funny to see African's taking initiative to help Norway combat there winter weather.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:12 PM
After seeing this video, I can do nothing but laugh. "Raid - Aid" I see the point that the African people are thinking, it is cold in Norway and Africa can be a hot country, so the idea of sending the unused radiators to Norway to warm them up is funny. In reality, Norway is a very advanced country technologically, actually, as a matter of fact, it is also one of the most stable countries too. For Africa to send radiators to Norway, it is useless and they would probably just end up scrapping the metal from the radiators.
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Tiny Capital

Created by Eirik Evjen.  The production of this video was made out of 76,940 single photos.


"Norway has recently reached 5 million inhabitants and the capital is growing rapidly. The city scene in Oslo is steadily thickening with taller buildings, more people and the never-ending construction sites. Being by far the most populated city in Norway with 613 000 inhabitants, most Norwegians look to Oslo as a major capital. However, if one compares Oslo to other international capitals, Oslo only ranks as the 112th largest. Oslo is indeed a major capital, just a small one…"


Tags: art, urban, Europe, landscape, unit 7 cities.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:39 PM

Oslo may be small in size, but it is quickly growing and advancing. Norway's capital is now a place of constant travel and exploration. The 76,940 photos used to create this video embrace Oslo's city rush and functionality. 

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An Atlas of the Vikings

An Atlas of the Vikings | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Scandinavia's history has always been shaped by its geography and orientation to the sea.  The shortage of good farmland in Scandinavia on the whole, however, compelled the Vikings to journey outward. Thus, the sea became an omnipresent part of life. Not only did the barrenness of the soil make the sea an important source of food, but the region's terrain made water the easier mode of travel for the thinly scattered populations of Scandinavia."

Seth Dixon's insight:

A student of mine produced this excellent Story Map after being inspired by the History Channel's TV show, Vikings.  History is so often shaped by geographic factors and better understood with maps.     

 

Tags: mappinghistorical, StoryMapESRI, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.

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Corine Ramos's curator insight, January 22, 1:01 PM

A student of mine produced this excellent Story Map after being inspired by the History Channel's TV show, Vikings.  History is so often shaped by geographic factors and better understood with maps.     

 

Tags: mapping, historical, StoryMap,  ESRI, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.

Michelle Nimchuk's curator insight, January 26, 11:47 AM

This story map was created by a student who was inspired after watching a History Channel's Viking show.  Incredible demonstration of allowing students to take an interest and fly with it.

Lilydale High School's curator insight, March 23, 6:07 AM

A student of mine produced this excellent Story Map after being inspired by the History Channel's TV show, Vikings.  History is so often shaped by geographic factors and better understood with maps.     

 

Tags: mapping, historical, StoryMap,  ESRI, Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.

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Scandinavian Energy Usage

Scandinavian Energy Usage | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Which countries consume the most electricity per person? You might guess the United States would top the World Bank’s list, but the Nordic countries of Iceland, Norway, Finland, and Sweden are actually at or near the top. Icelanders consume an average of 52,374 kilowatt hours per person per year, Norwegians 23,174 kilowatt hours, Finns 15,738 kilowatt hours, and Swedes 14,030 kilowatt hours. Americans are not far behind, with an average consumption of 13,246 kilowatt hours per person. The Japanese consume 7,848 kilowatt hours.


This image is part of a global composite assembled from data acquired by the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite in 2012. The nighttime view of Earth was made possible by the “day-night band” of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite. VIIRS detects light in a range of wavelengths from green to near-infrared and uses filtering techniques to observe dim signals such as city lights, wildfires, and gas flares. The city lights of several major Nordic cities are visible in the imagery, including Stockholm, Sweden (population 905,184); Oslo, Norway (634,463); Helsinki, Finland (614,074), and Reykjavik, Iceland (121,490).


Tags: Europeenergyremote sensing, development, Sweden, Finland, Iceland, Norway.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 18, 2015 5:59 PM

It is not surprising to me that these countries, or any country that resides in a high latitude area, have high usage of electricity.  The combination of extreme cold temperatures and times of meager amounts of daylight equal high uses of energy.  High populations of these areas tend to be around the coast as well, so these areas have to work extra hard to keep people warm, fed, etc.  If people were more spread out, the usage might not be as high. 

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 18, 2015 7:17 PM

This articles discusses which countries use the most electricity and believe it or not, the Nordic countries are at the top of the list. It shows two satellite images in the nighttime for you to get a better visual as to which areas of these countries use the most electricity. There are multiple factors that go into these countries consuming this much energy. One factor that is interesting is the high demand for electricity because of the long winters in these countries. 

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, May 6, 2015 9:34 AM

These images are really interesting and expose just how much electricity the Scandinavian countries actually use. It is surprising to think of these nations as large energy consumers because of their general reputation as progressive, clean, and liberal places. This brief article is an excellent example of how maps and satellite images can be misleading, though. As opposed to places like the U.S. or China, energy consumption in the Scandinavian countries actually produces only small amounts of greenhouse gases and is based on renewable energy sources. 

 

This shows an interesting and not immediately apparent geographic distinction between the Scandinavian countries and places such as China and the U.S. Chinese and United States energy consumption is enormous because of those countries' ability and desire to produce large amounts of goods quickly. Household energy use is also high because of the widespread use of electronics such as televisions, computers, and appliances. The Scandinavian countries, on the other hand, have a need for increased energy use because of their geographic location: long, dark winters mean an increased need for electricity and for longer periods. Also, Scandinavia is able to produce energy at lower costs due to its use of renewable energy sources. So though those countries may consume much more energy than their non-Scandinavian counterparts, they are doing so responsibly and for a reason. 

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In Norway, TV Program on Firewood Elicits Passions

In Norway, TV Program on Firewood Elicits Passions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A TV program about firewood, mostly showing a fireplace in use, has aroused passions in Norway.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In so many countries this would be one of the worst rated TV shows of all time, and yet in Norway, where a rustic, outdoorsman connection to the forest is ingrained in the culture, it's a hit and one that sparks debates and discussion.  Isn't it good, Norwegian Wood?  

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chris tobin's comment, February 28, 2013 1:46 PM
So many cultures depend upon using wood and their connection with nature for every day life
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 13, 2014 1:11 PM

Every country has some form of cultural differentiation between different people. The population of Norway is split in half in regards to whether or not wood should be stacked face up, or face down. Norwegians are obsessed with firewood and fireplaces. Because of the cold climate, almost all Norwegians have at least one fireplace in their house. This interest turned into an eight hour program where people chopped and stacked wood, and then the camera focused on a live fire for hours on end. The people were entranced, and it became an immediate hit. Fire and firewood is very symbolic for Norwegians, and many believe that it not only brings warmth, but community and shared happiness and togetherness. Relationships between harsh environments and modes of survival are often turned into a form of national identity. 

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Hiking Preikestolen in Norway

Hiking to the top of Preikestolen (the Pulpit Rock) near Stavanger, Norway. An amazing and wondrous hike.


Seth Dixon's insight:


For the inner explorer in all of us, this is a geographic dream. Click here to read more about this fantastic climb from a National Geographic explorer


Tags: Europe, landforms, NationalGeographic, Norway.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 2014 10:09 PM

(Europe topic 2)

This video offers a quick glimpse into one of the many natural wonders one can experience throughout Norway. What surprised me is the many striking similarities between Pulpit Rock and a place I have climbed called Artists Bluff in New Hampshire's White Mountains. Both are giant overhanging slabs of bedrock carved out by glaciers overlooking deep valleys and lakes. Both are also similar in composition (granite) and are tourist and photographer hotspots of their regions. Though obviously each offers its own experience, it is something to ponder how the geographies of locations thousands of miles apart can be so alike. Aside form physical geography, many separate regions throughout the world share language, tradition, and knowledge. So perhaps this offers a little insight into how things are a little less "foreign" than one might first expect.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:43 PM

This is absolutely amazing.  I think that through all of what we learn and all of what we see and hear in geography and even just in our everyday lives, we forget that places like this exist. Despite all of the disasters and disease and pollution we talk about, there are still beautiful places and it is our job to preserve those.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:07 PM

Well I am afraid of heights and let me tell you I was scared just looking at the picture. I have been to Norway in 1980 and I stayed in a small town and it was snowing, it looked like a Christmas postcard. I stayed in a small hotel which looked like a beautiful home not like hotels we have here. There is only one major highway called route 1 that went from Oslo to Bodo. It is a beautiful country. I was there for military training and we had to snowshoe or cross country ski to get around. This was my first time on either. I wish I could have seen the spring or summer.

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Extreme Sports +Beautiful Landscapes

A few clips from flying in Switzerland the last two weeks, plus some old ones.. First shot is from Trond Teigen (http://www.youtube.com/JumpTeigen )

 

Beautiful physical geography and extreme sports with a video camera gives us a spectacular view of some glaciated valleys, cliff faces, fjords and mountainous terrain. 

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Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 11:09 PM

The physical aspect of the physical geography in this piece shows alot of the beauty side. from valleys, cliff faces, this man knows how to enjoy himself, as he glides across the beautiful landscapes.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:49 PM

This must be an experience unlike any other. You will never get to see the world like this any other way.. unless you ride Soarin' at Disney World, but I would imagine this is a little less expensive, and a little more thrilling, not to mention much more beautiful.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:47 PM

The really cool thing about this is that having extreme sporats in this area is also a way to see how incredible the landscapes really are. It's a combination of two amazing aspects in life that show how the land was formed and how sports can be a way to view this incredible area.