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Break Dancing, NGOs, and Global Lives

Break Dancing, NGOs, and Global Lives | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Deported to Cambodia, Former Gang Member Gets A Second Chance. When Tuy Sobil was deported to Cambodia from the U.S., it was the first time he had ever stepped foot in the Southeast Asian country.

Seth Dixon's insight:

My students have enjoyed this video about a break-dancing NGO that was created by a former refugee from the United States who was subsequently deported to Cambodia (this article serves as some added background and a follow-up to the story).  This story shows the influence of urban youth culture and various strands of geography in this young man's global life.

 

Tags: Cambodia, diffusion, cultureNGOs, globalization.

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Globalization in a Nutshell

"The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a good video to explain globalization (although this is my personal favorite), to see that it not just an economic force, but one that touches just about every facet of modern life.
 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:24 AM

Globalization in a Nutshell

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, November 2, 2014 4:29 PM

Integração seletiva...

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Where the extremely poor live

Where the extremely poor live | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The World Bank has produced a report entitled "Prosperity for All."  In this, the extremely poor are defined as making less than $1.25 a day.  Two thirds of the extremely poor live in just 5 countries (India, China, Nigeria, Bangladesh and DR Congo).  This article from the Guardian argues that development should measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements. 


Tags: poverty, development, economic, globalization, labor, NGOs.

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dilaycock's curator insight, May 5, 2014 8:52 PM

This information is taken from the World Bank's 2014 report "Prosperity for All." The report looks at "progress to date in reducing global poverty and discusses some of the challenges of reaching the interim target of reducing global poverty to 9 percent by 2020.... . It also reports on the goal of promoting shared prosperity, with a particular focus on describing various characteristics of the bottom 40 percent."

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:48 PM

This graphic reveals the poorest populations and where they live and even though India and China are economic competitors on the global stage they still have the poorest communities. 

IN poor communities, the human place is changed by using less structurally sound architecture and disregarding cultural presence for functionality though holding true to cultural presence in individual lives.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 2014 11:49 AM

I agree with this article from the Guardian that development should be measured in human rights gains more than economic advancements.  While globalization is taking place and allowing countries to trade and maximize profits, a large percent of people in the world are deprived basic human rights and are entirely forgotten about and not valued.

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Water and Development

Australia's engagement with Asia: Water - a case study on Flores
Seth Dixon's insight:

For a the full lesson on how access to clean drinking water and human well-being are connected on the Indonesian island of Flores, visit World Vision Australia.  On a related note, this article from the Guardian discusses the trouble of securing clean drinking water in Bangladesh.   


Tags: Indonesiawater, development.

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, April 18, 2014 8:38 PM

The children of this village were once sick and could not regularly wash their hands due to the fact water was hard to find, and if it was found the quality was poor. World Vision helped by building a pipeline, which brings clean drinking water to this village. They can now bathe regularly and drink clean water.

Having this clean water also benefits the community from an economic standpoint. The abundance of clean water now attracts educators to their village and it also helps with creation of bricks. These bricks can be sold and can be used for their home improvement projects. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:29 PM

This video shows a positive side to globalization.  The Australian organization that worked with the people in these rural villages to get them access to clean water.  The quality of life when up hugely when the people could access water in their homes.  The hours needed to trek to the wells was eliminated and the water have created jobs and better quality of life for the villages.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 9:48 PM

This is a pretty sad short documentary, it tells of the diseases and the amount of people that go without water. Just to get water women will have to go to a well and walk a couple hours through a forest. Sometimes the well can be dry. The women and children are affected greatly. The women have neck and knee pain from the weight of the water they are carrying and the children are always sick from the poor drinking water so they are constantly missing school.  With permission, the people of the villages were able to engineer a freshwater system that ran through the different villages, a total of 27 kilometers. This made life significantly better than what it used to be. The one thing that really surprised me is that the villagers opted out to pay $120 a year to neighboring villages to keep the water clean and allow them use. 

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In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A rice enriched with beta-carotene promises to boost the health of poor children around the world. But critics say golden rice is also a clever PR move for a biotech industry driven by profits, not humanitarianism.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great podcast that emphasizes various geographic themes including agriculture, development and economics.  This new genetically-modified rice was designed to provide vitamin A (something no natural rice provides) to impoverished diets.  Skeptics point out that the history of the industry shows that the goal is to enrich a select number of corporations while some are hailing this as a major advancement that will benefit the poor.  Where people side on this is often ideological, so those that are firmly against genetically modified foods find the flaw in the plan and vice versa.  What do you think?  How might this change food production and consumption worldwide and at a local scale?  

Tags: GMOs, development, NGOs, Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.   

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:07 PM

I thought this NPR broadcast was a great out of class referece to listen too.  As it explaine all the work and research that was being done with GMOs, it also exposed them for there flaws and what the real motives behind them are. While this ex source of rice with extra vitman A will deffenitly provid more nutitonal value then regular rice, it also provides higher profit margins for the bioengneer compaines that make it. So its almost hard to say weather GMOs are a bad or good thing beacuse they do have benifts, but one thing is clear there not just being made to help the poor, there being made for big profit possibilities.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:52 AM

Alright this is a reason GMF's can be used for good. Asian children do not get enough vitamin a. "When children are weaned, they're often weaned on a rice gruel. And if they don't get any beta-carotene or vitamin A during that period, they can be harmed for the rest of their lives,".

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 3:58 PM

This is a great podcast that emphasizes various geographic themes including agriculture, development and economics.  This new genetically-modified rice was designed to provide vitamin A (something no natural rice provides) to impoverished diets.  Skeptics point out that the history of the industry shows that the goal is to enrich a select number of corporations while some are hailing this as a major advancement that will benefit the poor.  Where people side on this is often ideological, so those that are firmly against genetically modified foods find the flaw in the plan and vice versa.  What do you think?  How might this change food production and consumption worldwide and at a local scale?  

Tags: GMOs, development, NGOs, Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.   

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Africa for Norway

Africa for Norway | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This website is an incredibly humorous parody of Eurocentric charitable organizations that, while well-intentioned, propogate many negative stereotypes about Africa. 

    

Questions to Ponder: What do you think the 'point' of Radi-Aid is?  Do you agree with their point?  How does the media influence our idea of places?   


Tags: Africa, development, NGOs, Norway.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 16, 2014 11:48 PM

This video is a satire regarding the aid sent to Africa, in this case it is aid from Africa sent to Norway. This was created as many within Africa feel the aid given is the wrong things or simply old unwanted garbage. If America and Europe wish to actually send effective aid to Africa its important to diagnose the problems and then send them goods that can actually address the problem.  

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 11:01 AM

This comedic video of Africa sending Radiator's to Norway, a country that experiences cold weather every year, demonstrates how (we as westerners especially) tend to overwhelm the continent with things they have an overwhelming collection of. Africa is sometimes seen as a continent in need, but people who are sending "aid" to the continent often neglect to understand that they continent have made great stride to be able to compete in the global economy. Now that the roles have been reversed, its funny to see African's taking initiative to help Norway combat there winter weather.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 6:12 PM
After seeing this video, I can do nothing but laugh. "Raid - Aid" I see the point that the African people are thinking, it is cold in Norway and Africa can be a hot country, so the idea of sending the unused radiators to Norway to warm them up is funny. In reality, Norway is a very advanced country technologically, actually, as a matter of fact, it is also one of the most stable countries too. For Africa to send radiators to Norway, it is useless and they would probably just end up scrapping the metal from the radiators.
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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.


Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?


Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.

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Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

Altaira Wallquist's curator insight, March 18, 2015 4:47 PM

This article goes in depth to define and describe globalization.  It discusses globalization  through an economical, political, and cultural standpoint.

 

This connects to Unit 1 in that it discusses globalization and things from a global perspective. It all discusses the society we live in today.

Devyn Hantgin's curator insight, March 22, 2015 10:18 PM

globalization

This video describes and really breaks down globalization. The video talks about how some countries benefit and some countries don't benefit from globalization. The video also separates globalization into three parts: economic, politics, and culture. It goes over the huge role that technology plays in globalization and covers it well.

This relates to our unit, because globalization is a huge factor in human geography as a whole. It is one of the main factors why our cultures are beginning to intertwine and have things in common.     

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Botswana's 'Stunning Achievement' Against AIDS

A decade ago, Botswana was facing a national crisis as AIDS appeared on the verge of decimating the country's adult population. Now, the country provides free, life-saving AIDS drugs to almost all of its citizens who need them.

 

This is a great example, and possibly a template on how to tackle the AIDS/HIV crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Botswana was as hard hit as any country, but they fully invested their economic initiatives into tackling this and actively changed cultural attitudes and behaviors that faciliate transmission.  Not all is 'doom and gloom' when looking at poverty and disease-stricken countries.   

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James Hobson's curator insight, November 3, 2014 8:36 PM

(Africa topic 9)

This video illustrates many of the factor which have contributed to Botswana's success (as well as other nations' failures) against HIV/AIDS. Preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS is not just a "yes or no" decision.

Many people live in areas where treatment is not available. Others live where treatment is available, but it is inconsistent or improper. And yet even some of those to whom proper treatment is available choose not to receive it.

Just as has been associated with cancer, many believe (and some statistics seem to support this, even if only indirectly) one's attitude is a major influence on one's outcome. The same can be said for the outcome of all those in a region as well. In this sense, a little can go a long way.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 4:13 PM

Media often depicts Africa and the HIV/AIDS crisis as a hopeless, out of control issue. Despite the media, Botswana has actually almost reversed its AIDS issues with diligent work by the government. Instead of relying on foreign aid, Botswana took matters into its own hands. Knowing that its people's survival was on the line, the government put both money and resources into finding ways to stop the spread and to make the lives of those infected much better. By changing the cultural outlook on the virus, people are starting to seek help and to no longer fear those with the disease. Botswana's new challenge will be to educate its people so they do not underestimate the treatable virus and practice prevention. 

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 2:04 PM

Working with the government can help improve the lives of people. Availability of drugs across social strata helps. 

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Emergency Management: #ActNow, Save Later

Since the year 2000, almost 1 million people have lost their lives to disasters caused by natural hazards. 2 billion people have been affected. 1 trillion do...

 

In the last decade, almost one million people have been killed by disasters and more than one trillion dollars have been lost. Yet only 1% of international aid is spent to minimize the impact of these disasters.  Every $1 spent on preparedness saves $7 on response, so the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) has established http://www.actnowsavelater.org to prepare for the disasters which will surely come. 

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Kim Vignale's comment, July 5, 2012 8:18 PM
I think this is a great video depicting how disasters are handled today. Lack of preparation increases more damage caused by natural disasters. If more time and money is spent on devising plans on how to prepare for disasters, preventing it, and alleviating the issue, there would be less money lost and most importantly more lives saved.
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US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005

US Foreign Aid, 1946-2005 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Distribution of US Foreign Aid over time, 1946-2005...

 

This interactive graph is not visually intuitive and easy to interpret, but it is a wealth of information about the United States geopolitical policies throughout time in addition to it's humanitarian aid throughout the developing world.  For example, you can see that the aid to Vietnam from 1965-1973 exploded, and to Israel from 1976-2002.  In 1947, the United Kingdom (under the Marshall Plan) accounted for over half of all of the international aid.   

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 5:05 PM

In this graph it shows the US foreign aid over time from 1946-2005. In this diagram it shows the difference in 1965-1973 from Vietnam sky rocketed and the same thing happened in '76-2002 in Israel.  But the Marshall plan once enacted helped the UK people and other nations.

Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, August 13, 2014 3:15 AM

Foreign Aid

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INGOs in a changed world order

INGOs in a changed world order | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The future of international NGOs depends on what the post-western world will look like in ten years from now. The nature of the post-western world is likely to challenge the legitimacy, funding and effectiveness of INGOs generally and particularly of those from the West...


Via Tony Burton
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Egypt's NGO crackdown

Egypt's NGO crackdown | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Tensions rise in Cairo as Egyptian forces raided the offices of human rights and pro-democracy groups.

 

When there is a new political regime, what impact does it have on Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) operating within that country?  While many NGOs attempt to stay out of partisan politicals so as not to compromise the future of their organization or cause, sometimes the cause is in direct conflict with the policies of the regime.  

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 17, 2013 5:25 PM

Egyptian security forces stormed the offices of 17 human rights and pro-democracy groups across the country causing harsh critism and threats toward Egypt from the US that they would freeze aid. 

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UNDP - Somalia Cash for Work

The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) is working to be a force for good in the least developed parts of the world that often face political and economic instability.  This is one program designed to help.  For more on the UNDP's work in the Horn of Africa, visit: http://www.undp.org/hornofafrica

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Haiti: From Recovery to Sustainable Development

"Since the 2010 earthquake, Haiti has successfully pulled through the humanitarian recovery phase and seen significant socioeconomic gains. Yet as Haiti moves toward long-term, sustainable development, the country faces significant challenges. The political system remains fragile, sustainable jobs are scarce, and the environment is still as vulnerable now as it was then."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is primarily a promotional campaign for the UNDP's efforts in Haiti, it nicely contextualizes the problems that Haiti faces before discussing how to improve the situation.  Some keys for the future include: 

  • Governance and Rule of Law
  • Recovery and Poverty Reduction
  • Disaster Risk Reduction
  • Environmental Management
  • Medical Outbreak Management  

 

Tagsdisasters, Haiti, NGOspoverty, development, video.

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Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 10:19 PM
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Ebola easier to stop now than later

Help must come within weeks, or Ebola will require unimaginable resources. Data sources: http://nej.md/1wS4zeN & http://reliefweb.int/disaster/ep-2014-000041...
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Ebola outbreak has been a horrific event and its spread has demonstrated many of the principles of viral diffusion.  Hans Rosling, the face of Gapminder, shows that immediate action now can prevent this from becoming a much worse crisis.  


Tags: medical, development, diffusion, Africa.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, October 6, 2014 12:36 PM

unit 1 diffusion!

Michael Mazo's curator insight, October 6, 2014 2:54 PM

Ebola has been a growing concern for some time now. With its origin in Africa to its spreading throughout the world, people have become increasingly worried about contracting Ebola. With the initial diagnosis of the first patient infected with Ebola in the US, the CDC has been working constantly to prevent further spread of this infectious disease. Not only has this raised medical concerns, but as soon as the Ebola outbreak has entered the United States Biotechnology stocks began to rise. With the help of devices and programs stemming from Biotechnology there is great hope for eradicating the disease once and for all. Even healthcare workers are hesitant upon working with infected individuals, so hopefully biotech will enter with a grand entrance by providing materials or machinery to help prevent these workers from getting Ebola.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, October 16, 2014 11:46 AM

Although Ebola is a disease that can be stopped now, different measures need to be taken now. With the vaccines that were administered to the Ebola aid workers that were working in the site of the outbreak, mass production of that vaccine should be created and made available to those who are believed to be infected with this parasite.

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AID Data: Open data for international development

AID Data: Open data for international development | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The AidData Center for Development Policy creates geospatial data and tools enabling development stakeholders to more effectively target, coordinate and evaluate aid. Funded through a five-year, $25 million cooperative agreement with USAID, the Center is a partnership between the College of William and Mary, Development Gateway, Brigham Young University, the University of Texas at Austin, and Esri."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This article in the Washington Post asks if foreign aid can make elections more competitive (spoiler alert: mapping the data at the sub-national level helps answer research questions like this).  What intrigued me even more than the article was the mapping platform that it was introducing. AidData is a fabulous new mapping platform to access information about international aid, it's effectiveness and where it is needed and what current projects are being funded by U.S. AID. 

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, November 26, 2013 2:12 AM

Interesting database/viewer for exploring international development/metrics.

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Crop Diversification in Malawi

Crop Diversification in Malawi | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The tiny black-eyed pea is about to wage battle in Malawi.  The small country in southeast Africa is the site of a project to help with food security, nutrition and income.  Western University researchers are among those who will work with 30,000 farmers to help diversify crops into protein-rich legumes, such as the black-eyed pea, a popular type of cow pea in Malawi."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: food, agriculture, Africa, Malawi, unit 5 agriculture.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, March 14, 2013 3:48 PM

Review for you!

Seth Dixon's comment, March 15, 2013 8:44 PM
A good friend of mine is currently working for USAID in Malawi. This is what he had to say: I think crop diversification is really important here in Malawi. Most farmers have a heavy reliance on maize,which results in reduced hunger but there continues to be persistent malnutrition among children as their diets consist of mostly maize.Almost everyone here grows maize, you might be a school teacher or a health worker, but you are also most likely growing maize as well. Farmers are very risk averse here, so introducing a new crop takes time, finding the few willing to experiment and then using them to show their neighbors of the benefits. Other organizations are working on crop diversification here in Malawi, the US government, Catholic Relief Services, and other international development partners. Although not spelled out in the article, the majority of farmers are actually women, and agricultural production is typically for household subsistence with minimal cash cropping. As crop diversification increases, cash crops will provide more resources for families to pay for education and health for their families, but probably more importantly families will start diversifying their nutritional intake beyond maize. In a country where 42% of under 5 children are stunted, this will be a positive development. My wife was just out in the South of the country with CRS and was seeing some of the work that they are doing towards crop diversification as a result of USAID funding. She was really impressed to see how different vulnerable groups have been targeted by similar programs. She was able to see changes in rural villages in very insecure food zones. She saw how those lead farmers, willing to adopt new techniques or diversify crops, plant cash crops, etc, are reaping the benefits. Their neighbors are seeing it in action and are now adopting the techniques. It is not an immediate adoption, you have to give it time. These people are very risk averse, when set backs aren't just an inconvenience, but translate into starvation, it is understandable why it takes time. It also makes it more impressive when you find those willing to take the risks and try to set aside some land for a new crop. I am sure my agricultural colleagues would have more sophisticated answers but just some of my personal thoughts/observations."
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Climate Change Video Guide

Climate Change Video Guide | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An in-depth, multimedia look at climate change, its global impact, and efforts to combat it.


This guide on climate change from the Council on Foreign Relations (independent think tank) covers many of the geopolitical, economic and environmental issues that confront the Earth as global temperatures rise.  Rather than produce a full length feature film, they have organized the this as an interactive video, allowing the user to get short (a couple of minutes) answer to specific questions about the science, foreign policy or economic ramifications of adapting to climate change. 


Tags: climate change, environmental adaption, economic, industry.

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Seth Dixon's comment, November 27, 2012 8:21 AM
Thanks for sharing this Giovanni!!
Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, November 27, 2012 8:38 AM
Thanks to you, Seth! :-)
Jose Sepulveda's comment, January 13, 2013 8:58 AM
Very good information, Thanks!
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Africa Next

Africa Next | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?


This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 


Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry

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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 2:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:01 AM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
Aliah Therese's curator insight, April 3, 9:48 AM
I
Its not just artists that reach struggle with certain issues.
 
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The business of US food aid – interactive

The business of US food aid – interactive | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Nearly $1bn was spent last year buying wheat, sorghum and other products for the controversial US 'in-kind' food aid programmes.   Over 40 companies sold food aid last year

But big agribusinesses are not the only ones winning US food aid contracts. Over 40 companies sold nearly 1.8m tonnes, or $1bn worth, of food aid last year.

Some have developed entirely new product lines, specifically to sell as overseas food aid. Others have fought to get their products on the list of eligible commodities, which includes items such as canned pink salmon and dehydrated potato flakes.

Didion, a private, family-owned company headquartered in Wisconsin, has developed a special line of corn-based food aid products. Last year it was the government’s top supplier of corn-soy blend, a fortified food of choice for the UN’s World Food Programme.  What Crops are being donated?  To which countries?  From which companies?  The answers lie in this interactive feature.

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The Geography of Foreign Aid

The Geography of Foreign Aid | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This map is a graphical representation of the Dashboard’s available data on foreign assistance appropriations by fiscal year. The darker a country’s shading appears on the map, the more funding that U.S. Government country office received in that fiscal year. Users can switch between fiscal years by using the dropdown box in the top right corner of the page. Users can choose a country by clicking the map or by selecting the name of the country from the drop down box above.

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Niger 'worst place to be mother'

Niger 'worst place to be mother' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The West African state of Niger is now the worst place in the world to be a mother, a Save the Children annual report says.

 

Gender, demographics and development are the main geographic themes that run through this report.  As many countries prepare to celebrate Mother's Day, the Non-Governmental Organization Save the Children considers the geography of motherhood and the difficulties in raising a healthy, educated, well-fed child with economic opportunities for the future.  The variables used in the index included factors such as health, education, economic status and nutrition as key indicators that would be pertinent to motherhood. 

 

The most difficult place to raise a child according to the report are: 1) Niger, 2) Afghanistan, 3) Yemen, 4) Guinea-Bissau and 5)Mali.  The best places to raise healthy, education children are: 1) Norway, 2) Iceland, 3) Sweden, 4) New Zealand and 5)Denmark.  For more information about Save the Children, see: http://www.savethechildren.net/

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NGOs, Corporations and the Changing Geography of Poverty

NGOs, Corporations and the Changing Geography of Poverty | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Brazil, Russia, India and China are profoundly shaking up the G8. All of these newcomers give aid to developing countries. And yet some still receive substantial aid themselves from the U.S. and other donors.

 

This seems to be a is a strange juxtaposition: surging countries in the global economy are also recipients of international aid from NGOs.  Too often we view the country as though that is the logical scale at which to discuss all issues such as economic growth and poverty.  Too often we view the border as though all things within the border are homogenous and difference lies on the other side of the border.  The author of this article argues that the future for NGOs is increasing collaboration and partnerships with the private sector to lead to a 'convergence' between the economic aims of the local economy and the humanitarian goals of the NGOs.

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Brianna S.'s comment, August 27, 2012 11:17 AM
I find that this article interestingly explains how NGOs are becoming more prevalent in both private and public sectors, especially as the BRIC nations continue to move up in GDP and economic prosperity. However, countries such as China and Russia are not exactly welcoming NGOs with open arms. It begs the question of whether or not these communistic countries are willing to adapt their hostilities toward international private aid, especially considering large amounts of their own citizens continue to live in poverty.
Niu Zi Bin's curator insight, January 17, 2013 1:20 AM

wow

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Haiti: After the Quake

Haiti: After the Quake | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Al Jazeera's Sebastian Walker asks why a system that was designed to help Haitians ended up exacerbating their misery.

 

Why isn't more money the answer to the 'poverty problem?' What geographic factors make Haitian development such a difficult issue? 

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Tracy Galvin's comment, January 30, 2014 2:41 PM
Once again, American's arrogant beliefs about how everyone else SHOULD live their lives has caused a bad situation to become worse. We rush in to help, with good intentions, but we fail to see what the Haitians really needed help with. Instead of asking them "What can we do for you?" and really listening to the answer, we rush in and help them the way WE want to. Ultimately our 'help' actually makes their situation worse.
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, February 4, 2014 5:57 PM

Once again, American's arrogant beliefs about how everyone else SHOULD live their lives has caused a bad situation to become worse. We rush in to help, with good intentions, but we fail to see what the Haitians really needed help with. Instead of asking them "What can we do for you?" and really listening to the answer, we rush in and help them the way WE want to. Ultimately our 'help' actually makes their situation worse.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 11:58 PM

I couldn't stop watching. I felt horror for those people who so desperately needed help and instead were treated like criminals. The mass injustices were ridiculous. The continuous tropical storms, earthquakes, and flooding create disastrous situations for Haitians in poverty. The way the government tried to desert them in a barren area was disgraceful if they were afraid those people would be angry they should be. They have a right to be angry. People were more busy guarding spilled milk then saving the lives that were still alive in that market!!! It absolutely was a massive failure!

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