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Cotton Candy Grapes?!?

Cotton Candy Grapes?!? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

After years of seeing fruit-flavored candy, we are now seeing candy-flavored fruit. The company Grapery is very careful to highlight that these patented fruit varieties are not GMOs, but the cotton candy flavored grapes are cross pollinated by hand (by fruit geneticists). You can watch this 4 minute CBS video about the agricultural production and marketing of this new product. Yes, I've experimented with these at a friend's house, and they really do taste like cotton candy (and no, I'm not planning on purchasing any).     

 

Questions to Ponder: Does this make you leery about eating this or totally excited to try it? How come?  Why is the company so adamant to state that these grapes are non-GMO? According to the video, what are the primary concerns of most grape producers and how does that contrast with this company?  

  

Tagsfood, food production, agribusiness, agriculture, GMOstechnology.

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Shir Turgeman's curator insight, April 11, 9:24 AM
טעמו של סוג ענבים זה הוא בדיוק כמו של "שיערות סבתא" שהיינו אוכלים בתור ילדים. בנוסף, בשונה מ"שיערות סבתא", ענבים אלו אינם דביקים ואינם מלאים בתוספי סוכר אבל הם הרבה יותר מתוקים בטעמם מענבים רגילים ומכילים יותר מיץ. על ענבים אלו מדברים בכל העולם- מעיתונים וכתבי עט ועד חדשות בפריים טיים. אנשים לא מאמינים עד כמה זה קרוב בטעם לממתק (שיערות סבתא) המוכר, עד אשר הם טועמים את זה.
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The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind?

The Danger Of GMOs: Is It All In Your Mind? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Genetically modified foods are often regarded as "unnatural" and approached with distrust. Commentator Tania Lombrozo considers the psychology behind these reactions.

 

Why do so many people oppose genetically modified organisms, or GMOs? According to a new paper forthcoming in the journal Trends in Plant Science, it's because opposition to GMOs taps into deep cognitive biases. These biases conspire to make arguments against GMOs intuitive and compelling, whether or not they're backed by strong evidence.

The authors of the paper — a mix of philosophers and biologists — turn to research in the cognitive sciences to shed light on the mismatch between the public's perception of GMOs (which is fairly negative, especially in Europe) and the state of the evidence about their safety (which is fairly positive).

 

Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture.

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Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago

Natural GMO? Sweet Potato Genetically Modified 8,000 Years Ago | Geography Education | Scoop.it
People have been farming — and eating — a GMO for thousands of years without knowing it. Scientists have found genes from bacteria in sweet potatoes around the world. So who made the GMO?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Yes, the title is somewhat misleading (isn't that almost expected these days?), since humanity has been selectively breeding crops since the first agricultural revolution and genetic alteration can occur independent of human intervention.  Humanity has always been using the best technologies available to improve agricultural practices.  The term GMO though, is usually reserved for scientific, technological modifications that were unimaginable 100 years ago.  


Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture.

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newgen's comment, July 9, 2015 5:42 AM
thanks for share!
Jose Soto's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:48 PM

Yes, the title is somewhat misleading (isn't that almost expected these days?), since humanity has been selectively breeding crops since the first agricultural revolution and genetic alteration can occur independent of human intervention.  Humanity has always been using the best technologies available to improve agricultural practices.  The term GMO though, is usually reserved for scientific, technological modifications that were unimaginable 100 years ago.  

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture.

Dawn Haas Tache's curator insight, March 11, 2016 9:32 PM
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We're all gonna die!

We're all gonna die! | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Yes. It’s true. In the meantime, I’d also like to live. Except, nobody wants to let me live--they all want to remind me of how I’m going to die, or how I’m going to cause my children to die. I was packing my kid’s lunch the other day, and tossed in a Twinkie with a smile and stroke of endearment, when I happened to glance at my kid's class newsletter on the table. It informed me that if I feed my child Twinkies, I might as well be feeding him rocket fuel."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I can't agree with everything mentioned in this article, but the overall message something that I do think is worth discussing.  Our society can be swayed by fear and a few statistics to wildly overreact to a situation (Ebola, Y2K, etc.).  So many movies tap into the our societal fears that an over dependence on technology or chemical alterations will destroy humanity (like Terminator, the Matrix, the Net, etc.).  The anti-GMO movement successfully taps into that cultural zeitgeist, and some like 'the Food Babe' stir up fear to the chagrin of many scientists.     

 

Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture, agribusiness.

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asli telli's curator insight, April 15, 2015 12:49 AM

Who's feeding us rocket fuel?

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GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Would you like to map out the GMO-free regions of Europe?  Looking for resources discussing the impacts of GMOs on society?  This is a partisan site with some nice resources for a student project. Additionally, in this NPR podcast they discuss how some American companies are trying to be GMO free in a GMO world.  

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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 29, 2015 8:23 AM

This is an interesting development that has major implications for the world and its food supply. The social and political buzz combined with corporate profits intersecting with morality about sums up this complex and diverse issue.

One platform is the compliance of companies using GMO's without placing it on the ingredient label. People clearly have a right to know what's going in their bodies, and to choose whether or not they want to.

Another is that GMO's are nearly everywhere in the food system, with some estimates that 70% of the corn produced is of this variety. For folks who want to feed the world and prevent hunger more efficiently this is a huge win. Think of the lives disease resistant grains alone could save.

But is it safe?

Other issues include, how crops that are non-GMO can be inadvertently cross-pollinated with those that are naturally grown. How is that being monitored, and who is doing it? Is it self-policed or are governments watching over this?

My personal worry is that we create a crop that causes digestive or nutrient issues that "infects" the food supply, or worse, we take the technology to humans with dire consequences. This will be one of the hot topics that will be debated for decades to come. Corporate greed versus what's right for the people of the world. Call me a romantic, but I hope we as society do the right thing and feed our planet first. Perhaps money can be genetically modified to have less of an importance in society.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:55 PM

Would you like to map out the GMO-free regions of Europe?  Looking for resources discussing the impacts of GMOs on society?  This is a partisan site with some nice resources for a student project. Additionally, in this NPR podcast they discuss how some American companies are trying to be GMO free in a GMO world.  

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Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont

Monsanto threatens to sue the entire state of Vermont | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Lawmakers in Vermont are looking to regulate food labels so customers can know which products are made from genetically modified crops, but agricultural giants Monsanto say they will sue if the state follows through.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Questions to ponder: Why is Vermont the first state to make some headway in producing this type of legislation?  Will other states follow suit?  What would the economic impacts be if all places required labels on products that contain genetically modified organisms?  How would that change the agricultural industry?  

 

Tags: GMOs, food, agriculture, agribusiness.  

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Blake Welborn's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:30 AM

If monsanto can win a course a battle saying they don't have to represent their GMO's on products, then they will be able to win in other places which will further murk up the waters of GMO presentation.

Obed Hernandez's curator insight, February 18, 2015 5:34 PM

Figures!

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:58 PM

Questions to ponder: Why is Vermont the first state to make some headway in producing this type of legislation?  Will other states follow suit?  What would the economic impacts be if all places required labels on products that contain genetically modified organisms?  How would that change the agricultural industry?  

 

Tags: GMOs, food, agriculture, agribusiness.  

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What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food

What You Need to Know About Genetically Engineered Food | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Myths and facts about health, corruption, and saving the world

Tags: food, agriculture, agribusinesslocavore, unit 5 agriculture.

Seth Dixon's insight:

So many articles about organic or genetically engineered foods are written with someone with a very defined position on the subject (much like abortion, gun control or other controversial topics).  This article is an attempt to separate out the good the bad and the ugly regarding genetically engineered foods.   

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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, November 27, 2013 4:59 PM

I mentioned this through an allusion in another article, but GMOs and the movements against them perplex me.  I don't think that fossil-fuel burning engines are natural, but many anti GMO people that claim they are bad for the environment leave me completely stunned as to their intolerance for what could possibly  benefit other people.  I feel very much an outsider when I examine many topics of controversy related to GMOs, and I am quite sure that I have consumed them before -- and loved them?  as for the FDA... I don't approve of the FDA.  They like more money coming into their pocket more than bettered well-being of citizens.  When I mentioned to my doctor that I wanted to apply for medical marijuana for a series of conditions that I have following a severe accident, I was told that they refused because it was not fully endorsed, approved, or even allowed by the FDA.  That really pissed me off because I suffer from excruciating pain every day and night of my life.  Could you imagine being a poor person in need of food, and the only viable way of getting food was through the production of GMOs...? and then some pseudo-hippie activists that didn't live through the 1960s trying to be all like, "We don't want anyone to have GMOs!"... I pose that abstractly, because I view most everything with a level of abstraction and distance from the situation, sampling perspectives with which I may empathize or consider.  I keep thinking that this world around us all came from a big bang, with other possible universes before that, and something  before that... and I really can't see Capitalism ever becoming as bad as it is, with such disregard for other people's wellbeing, until I look at today's world.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 4:02 PM

So many articles about organic or genetically engineered foods are written with someone with a very defined position on the subject (much like abortion, gun control or other controversial topics).  This article is an attempt to separate out the good the bad and the ugly regarding genetically engineered foods.   

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 2016 12:00 PM
unit 5
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Industrial Foods, Allergies and Cancers

Robyn shares her personal story and how it inspired her current path as a "Real Food" evangelist. Grounded in a successful Wall Street career that was more i...

 

Robyn authored "The Unhealthy Truth: How Our Food Is Making Us Sick and What We Can Do About It." A former Wall Street food industry analyst, Robyn brings insight, compassion and detailed analysis to her research into the impact that the global food system is having on the health of our children.  As new proteins are engineered into our food supply to maximize profits for the food industry, childhood food allergies are on the rise.  What are the connections between cancer and modern consumption patterns?  The correlation is clearly there; is causation also present?  How have the economics of agriculture shaped this situation?  How will the future economics of agriculture reshape food production? 

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Genetically Modified Foods

"93% of Americans want the FDA to label genetically engineered foods. Watch the new video from Food, Inc. Filmmaker Robert Kenner to hear why we have the right to know what's in our food."

 

Clearly this video has a political agenda, but this is a pertinent video to show in an Agriculture unit.  Many countries around the world require the labeling of genetically modified food products, while the United States (currently) does not. 

 

For more on the organization that sponsored this video see: http://justlabelit.org/

 

For a Health blog about how this impacts nutrition, see: http://blogs.prevention.com/inspired-bites/2012/03/14/french-women-dont-eat-what/

 

For more on political action currently underway in the United States, see: http://www.foodsafetynews.com/2012/03/55-congress-members-ask-fda-to-label-genetically-engineered-foods/

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:21 PM

Why does the United States not have laws on the books that force companies to list GMO products on labels?

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 2:51 PM

When looking at the issue of GMO there is one things that clear... people want to know what food is Genneictly Modified. While most poeple dont read every lable of every food product, it is different when decided how many claories something has versus knowing weather its been genneitcly enginegnered or not. I also think anouther factor why the US hasnt enforced the labeling of GMO is beacuse many companies may be forced out of business and could have a efffects on encomy.

Justin McCullough's curator insight, December 12, 2013 12:43 PM

Looking at the issue of GMOs, I think it is important to label the foods that we are consuming. As it is stated over and over in the video, we do have a right to know. If cigarettes are labelled to be dangerous and hazardous to your health, shouldn't we do the same thing with our foods that we eat on a daily basis? I feel that the map that was given in this video was very helpful and exposing. 

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How The Russians Saved America's Sunflower

It's one of the few food crops that actually originated in North America. But the sunflower was just a pretty diversion until Soviet breeders came up with oil-rich varieties that became a staple.

 

This podcast discusses the foods that are native to the U.S., diffusion of species and the advantages of sunflower oil in the making of potato chips.  All of these become salient points for enhancing spatial thinking, understanding geographic patterns and processes.  


Via Mr. David Burton
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 12:54 PM

This is an interesting video because it explains how an American grown food is getting help from overseas and it just shows how important geography is to the betterment of world foods.

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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

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Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, March 7, 2013 8:38 PM

How is the concept of agribusiness changing the way we think about food?

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:44 PM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:59 AM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.
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Monsanto, Bayer and Dow face trial for 'systematic human rights abuses'

Monsanto, Bayer and Dow face trial for 'systematic human rights abuses' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Permanent Peoples' Tribunal accuses biotech giants Monsanto, Dow, Bayer, Syngenta, DuPont and BASF of promoting dangerous pesticides including endosulfan, paraquat and neonicotinoids...


The world's major agrochemical companies, Monsanto, Dow, Bayer, Syngenta, DuPont and BASF, will face a public tribunal in early December accused of systematic human rights violations.  As modern agriculture and industry are merging in food production, we need to rethink health and the environment. 

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Stop opposing GMOs, Nobel laureates say

Stop opposing GMOs, Nobel laureates say | Geography Education | Scoop.it
It's the latest sign of a rift between the scientific establishment and anti-GMO activists.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Environmental activists are often frustrated when climate change skeptics do not listen to the scientific consensus that the Earth's climate has changed because of humanity's collective actions.  On the flip side, some environmental organizations, such as Greenpeace, ignore the overwhelming scientific consensus that GMOs are safe for human consumption.  Both have been highly politicized and tap into larger narratives that confirm particular world views.  Most of the opposition to GMOs is not because of the information that is out there, but the fear of the unknown that GMOs illicit.  

 

Tags: GMOs, technology, agriculture, agribusiness.  

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Marc Meynardi's curator insight, July 2, 2016 3:42 AM
And then ? Should everyone blindly accept what scientists have discovered ? No opposition for nothing ? This is the end of the humanity if we do so Mr Nobel Laureate.
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Changes in Mortality: 1900 to 2010

Changes in Mortality: 1900 to 2010 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The New England Journal of Medicine looks at death reports in 200 years of back issues. The first thing to notice here is how much our mortality rate has dropped over the course of a century, largely due to big reductions in infectious diseases like tuberculosis and influenza."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer).  


Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors shape mortality rates and shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, development, historical, USA, population, statistics, unit 2 population, infographic, models.

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Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:37 AM
Mortality
pascal simoens's curator insight, October 26, 2015 7:34 PM
A méditer
AHS Model UN's curator insight, November 19, 2015 2:12 PM

This infographic shows the main causes of death in 1900 in the United States and compares that with the 2010 figures.  The United States, during that time underwent what many call the epidemiological transition (in essence, in developed societies we now die for different reason and generally live longer).  

 

Questions to Ponder: What geographic factors shape mortality rates and shifts in the mortality rates?  What is better about society today then before?  Has anything worsened?  How come?

 

Tagsmortality, medical, development, historical, USA, population, statistics, unit 2 population, infographic, models.

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The case for engineering our food

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.


Tags: GMOstechnology, agriculture.

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Eden Eaves's curator insight, May 27, 2015 12:57 PM

Pamela Ronald studies the genes that make plants more resistant to disease and stress. In an eye-opening talk, she describes her decade-long quest to help create a variety of rice that can survive prolonged flooding. She shows how the genetic improvement of seeds saved the Hawaiian papaya crop in the 1950s — and makes the case that it may simply be the most effective way to enhance food security for our planet’s growing population.

Jill Wallace's curator insight, May 30, 2015 9:38 PM

Agriculture

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 1, 2015 9:44 AM

unit 5

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Spoof on Agricultural Standards

Seth Dixon's insight:

These spoofs are just for fun...but they are basic ways to start some conversations about  modern agricultural practices, especially the local and organic movements.  Here is another spoof, mocking paleo and crossfit trends.  

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Josune Erkizia's curator insight, March 5, 2014 2:49 AM

Very funny

Marie-Ann Roberts's curator insight, March 5, 2014 3:51 AM

Good for sessions on Animal Welfare and Farm Assurance.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, September 11, 2014 2:07 PM

unit 5

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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.
Seth Dixon's insight:

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 


Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

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Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:56 PM

In the long run, a successful farmer needs to find a balance between economic and environmental sustainability.  Some big farms are working towards that so the 'big-equals-bad' narrative about agriculture may be easy, but it doesn't tell the whole story about modern agriculture. 

 

Tags: GMOssustainability, agriculture, agribusiness

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In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods

In A Grain Of Golden Rice, A World Of Controversy Over GMO Foods | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A rice enriched with beta-carotene promises to boost the health of poor children around the world. But critics say golden rice is also a clever PR move for a biotech industry driven by profits, not humanitarianism.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great podcast that emphasizes various geographic themes including agriculture, development and economics.  This new genetically-modified rice was designed to provide vitamin A (something no natural rice provides) to impoverished diets.  Skeptics point out that the history of the industry shows that the goal is to enrich a select number of corporations while some are hailing this as a major advancement that will benefit the poor.  Where people side on this is often ideological, so those that are firmly against genetically modified foods find the flaw in the plan and vice versa.  What do you think?  How might this change food production and consumption worldwide and at a local scale?  

Tags: GMOs, development, NGOs, Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.   

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 4, 2013 3:07 PM

I thought this NPR broadcast was a great out of class referece to listen too.  As it explaine all the work and research that was being done with GMOs, it also exposed them for there flaws and what the real motives behind them are. While this ex source of rice with extra vitman A will deffenitly provid more nutitonal value then regular rice, it also provides higher profit margins for the bioengneer compaines that make it. So its almost hard to say weather GMOs are a bad or good thing beacuse they do have benifts, but one thing is clear there not just being made to help the poor, there being made for big profit possibilities.

Shane C Cook's curator insight, May 27, 2015 4:52 AM

Alright this is a reason GMF's can be used for good. Asian children do not get enough vitamin a. "When children are weaned, they're often weaned on a rice gruel. And if they don't get any beta-carotene or vitamin A during that period, they can be harmed for the rest of their lives,".

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:58 PM

This is a great podcast that emphasizes various geographic themes including agriculture, development and economics.  This new genetically-modified rice was designed to provide vitamin A (something no natural rice provides) to impoverished diets.  Skeptics point out that the history of the industry shows that the goal is to enrich a select number of corporations while some are hailing this as a major advancement that will benefit the poor.  Where people side on this is often ideological, so those that are firmly against genetically modified foods find the flaw in the plan and vice versa.  What do you think?  How might this change food production and consumption worldwide and at a local scale?  

Tags: GMOs, development, NGOs, Food, agriculture, agribusiness, unit 5 agriculture.   

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Wild rice gene gives yield boost

Wild rice gene gives yield boost | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A gene from wild Indian rice plants can significantly raise the yield of common varieties in nutrient-poor soils by boosting root growth.

 

While many are leery of GMOs (with good reasons linked to health), it is important to recognize that there is society value to agricultural research that works on improving yields.  This article would be a good "other side of the coin" resource to share when discussing GMOs.   

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Learn about your Food

Learn about your Food | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Many consumers don't know much about the production of their food.  Is your food Genetically modified?  Organically produced?  Learn how to know.   

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Dan Barber: How I fell in love with a fish

Chef Dan Barber squares off with a dilemma facing many chefs today: how to keep fish on the menu.

 

This is a compelling analysis of the agricultural food system through the case-study of fish farms.  If we fish the seas like we clear-cut forests, the biodiversity of the world's waters will be seriously depleted.  That has been the economic model for fishing for hundreds of years and it is obviously not sustainable given the growing population and demand for fish.   However, not all "sustainable" fish farming businesses are equal, and this TED talk demonstrates some of the best practices to restructure the food industry for the best food and environmental results.

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EnviroJMS's curator insight, September 18, 2013 7:29 AM

This is an interesting video on sustainable fish farming, it might be helpful to someone who wants to write about sustainable farming. Apologies, it is quite long

 

Aleksandre da Silva

 

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NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner

NYTimes Video: Cultivating Dinner | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Americans ate 475 million pounds of tilapia last year, making this once obscure African native the most popular farmed fish in the United States.

 

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape? 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 25, 2013 9:04 AM

Industrial farming, human-introduced species, GMOs, outsourcing and environmental impacts are but some of the relevant themes from this video.  How are global taste buds reshaping the geographic landscape?


Tags: GMOsindustry, food, agriculture, agribusiness,

 

Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 25, 2013 12:44 PM

My concern is how safe is bioengineered food?  How has its nutritional content been altered?  Until some of our questions about bioengineered food can be answered by the FDA and other government officials I remain leery about the potential side effects that might occur from eating it and wonder how nutritious it really is.

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:59 AM
The video discusses how now alot of countries are industrially farm raising their fish. Tilapia is a perfect example Americans ate 475 million pounds of Tilapia last year. Ten years ago you would never even hear about Tilapia because it was not a popular fish. Times have changed how they raise them and then ship them out the video shows one of the farms where they grow the TIlapia.
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Hungary Destroys Monsanto GMO Corn Fields

Hungary Destroys Monsanto GMO Corn Fields | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Hungary has taken a stand against biotech giant Monsanto and genetic modification by destroying 1000 acres of maize grown with genetically modified seeds.

 

Peru and Hungary have both banned GMOs. What are the reasons that many are critical of GMOs? What should the government's role be in agriculture and food systems? Are bio-tech companies too strong?

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Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:57 PM

With Monsanto having such a large political power, this is very interesting tat Hungary took a stand. 

Maria Bustamante's comment, February 22, 2013 11:56 AM
This article is about countries that are taking a stand against the company Monsanto. Many people in those countries are critical against the use of GMOs because they're not sure about how the genetic engineering will affect the crops. Already GMOs have had negative effects. The use of GMOs reduces the variety between the seeds. Not only that but the farmers are no longer getting the money the deserve for their hard work and they are not allowed to save their seeds. The government should have little control over the agriculture and what they decide to plant. They should take more precautions against the GMOs and they should make sure that the food system companies in charge of checking the safety food should not have a connection to the very food companies they are supposed to be condemning. Bio-tech companies are getting too strong because they're gaining too much control of the fields due to the patents they hold on their GMOs. This is dangerous because they could end up having a monopoly on the franchise and when they due if something happens to their crops it will happen to all the crops. It will be, for lack of a better word, very bad.
Rescooped by Seth Dixon from Agricultural Biodiversity
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Investing in Diversity - a view of IRRI's International Rice Genebank

For 10 years I had the great privilege to lead the genetic resources program at the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI) in the Philippines, and work...

 

A lengthy clip (I would only show the first 4 minutes with a class) that demonstrates the vast amount of scientific energy focused on agriculture.  Unspoken is the vast amount of resources invested in genetically modified organism that is leading to a loss of genetic biodiversity that poses some potential risks for our most important crops. 


Via Luigi Guarino
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Kara Charboneau's comment, March 11, 2013 7:48 AM
this video link no longer works