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Geography Education
Geography Education
Global news with a spatial perspective: Interesting, current supplemental materials for geography students and teachers. http://geographyeducation.org
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Demographic Atlas

Demographic Atlas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This atlas shows how the population is changing - growing in some parts of the country, while shrinking in others. The maps show the entire United States by county, using data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2010 Census and Esri. How do things look in your neighborhood?
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Infant Mortality Rates

Infant Mortality Rates | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Are All Mothers Created Equal? From the State of the World's Mothers 2012 report see how mothers locations have an impact on the life and death of their children.
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Population by Latitude and Longitude

Population by Latitude and Longitude | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Radical Cartography, brought to you by Bill Rankin
Seth Dixon's insight:

I was recently reminded of the graph and thought is was worth sharing again.  This is an excellent spatial graph that helps to explain the distribution of the human population.  Why do we live where we live?   The longitude map is still fascinating, but has less explanatory power.  What would be brilliant is a graph that charted population by latitude (as this does) AND charts the amount of land at each given latitude.  Click here for Frank Jacobs analysis on the "Strange Maps" blog.   

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dilaycock's curator insight, January 9, 6:03 AM

Interesting stimulus for discussion of why do we live where we live.

Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 9:37 PM

Cool Cartogram...

 

Keisha Lewis's curator insight, January 12, 8:15 AM

Majorly cool! So many discussions about population distribution can come out of this. :)

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DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population

DON’T PANIC — The Facts About Population | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Don’t Panic – is a one-hour long documentary broadcasted on BBC on the 7th of November 2013.

The visualizations are based on original graphics and stories by Gapminder and the underlaying data-sources are listed here.
Hans’s — “All time favorite graph”, is an animating bubble chart linking health and wealth which you can interact with online here and download offline here.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Population growth in an important topic that is connected to economic development.  If you've seen Hans Roslings TED talks, this is an hour-long version of many of the same concepts and data visualizations.  His Gapminder data visualization tool, it is a must see for geography teachers to show the connections between population statistics and developmental patterns--let students see the data.  This is an article that looks at a different factor, arguing that overpopulation isn't the real issue.  
 

Tags: gapminder, population, demographic transition modeldevelopment.

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Angus Henderson's curator insight, December 9, 2013 1:20 PM

Hans conveys big concepts and facts about population and development  extremely well, usingh is gapminder website and quirky humour. 

Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, January 8, 10:59 AM

Key insight:  The number of children stopped growing in 1980.  Most of the world is now having only 2 children per family.  The reason why the adult population will continue to grow is just because it takes a generation to balance out the bubble of having more children that survive to grow up and have their own children.

Crooms Human Geography's curator insight, February 4, 1:11 PM

Population

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1/5 of Humanity

1/5 of Humanity | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The world divided into 5 regions, each with the population of China."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This map from Amazing Maps (a great follow on Twitter) is a clever way to divide the world into 5 equal population regions.  In many world regional courses, discussion of Asia might be 1/4 of the course content, while the "NATO and the Americas region" might be about half of the class.  Also, think about "the World News" that you see on TV: how much coverage do each of these 5 regions receive?  Why is our news coverage unevenly distributed?


This map would go together nicely with this one to show the demographic importance of South and East Asia.  


Tags: media, population.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, September 11, 2013 3:10 PM

Your thoughts...?

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:42 AM

This map is mind blowning to try to grasp. To think that India has an equvilant population to every country in the Americans has me dumbfounded. Then comparin the economic instability of India to all the economic juggernauts that fit into the light blue regions really shows how poor the distrubution of wealth and population is throught the world.

Trish Pearson's curator insight, April 9, 3:33 PM

A little perspective on population

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American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration

American Centroid Helps To Trace Path Of U.S. Migration | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"David Greene talks to writer Jeremy Miller about the American Centroid. That's the place where an imaginary, flat, weightless and rigid map of the U.S. would balance perfectly if all 300 million of us weighed the exact same."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Every 10 years the centroid (the center of U.S. population) is calculated using the latest census data.  As the map above shows, the centroid has continued moved west throughout history, but in the last 60 years has moved to the south and west.  The recent shift to the south coincides with the mass availability of air conditioning (among other factors) which opened up the Sun Belt.  In this article in Orion Magazine, Jeremy Miller discusses the historical shifts in the spatial patterns of the U.S. population and the history of the centroid.  you can listen to podcast versions of this article as well, one by NPR and a much more detailed one by Orion Magazine.


Questions to Ponder:  Would the centroids of other countries be as mobile or predictable?  Why or why not?  What does the centroid tell us?


Tags: statistics, census, mappingmigration, populationhistoricalUSA.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, August 4, 2013 1:45 PM

Awesome way to show how the settlement of the US continues to move west with the population growing on the West Coast at a faster rate.  If you look at the biggest jump between 1850 and 1860 it shows the mass immigration into the US and the further migration to the western part of the US especailly with the gold rush starting in 1849.  Great littel piece of information.

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 2:23 AM

The centre of population in the USA has moved further inland and southward compared to Australia. Comparing urbanisation in USA and Australia.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, November 11, 2013 10:33 PM

Informative, short podcast that details the changing migration of the US

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UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier

UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The UN projects Kenya to grow older and healthier
Summary:

  • The number of infant deaths per 1,000 live births currently totals 51.6, and is expected to drop sharply to 12.1 by the end of the century.
  • The country will also grow steadily older, with the current median age of 18 expected to more than double -- to 37 years of age -- by 2100.
  • A Kenyan born this year can expect to live for 61.6 years.
  • The nation's population will reach 160 million by the start of the next century, according to the new outlook.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: population, demographicsmodels, AfricaKenya.

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Rebecca Farrea's curator insight, October 2, 2013 2:16 PM

These projections given by the UN in regards to Kenya, specifically life expectancy and health, are very interesting and show how Kenya has the potential to grow.

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, March 17, 4:59 PM

The UN projects that Kenyans will grow older and healthier. Infant deaths will decrease and age expectancy will increase. What will Kenyans have to do to be healthier? Lifestyle changes?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 1:49 PM

This article provides statistics for the population growth of Kenya and other African nations in relation to the rest of the world. Africa features some of the world's highest birthrates and the world's youngest population. In Kenya, improving healthcare will see the life expectancy rise significantly due to less infant death while the population will become older as birthrates begin to decline, as they tend to do as a nation develops, but not before Kenya becomes one of the more populous nations in the world.

 

Kenya's growing population and increasing median age could mean good things for its economic prospects. Population growth along with maturation means there is a large and capable workforce available, but Kenya must have the resources and abilities to create jobs for its burgeoning population or face widespread poverty.

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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster

~ Jonathan V. Last (author) More about this product
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What to Expect When No One's Expecting: America's Coming Demographic Disaster [Jonathan V. Last] on Amazon.com. *FREE* super saver shipping on qualifying offers. Look around you and think for a minute: Is America too crowded?
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have yet to read this book, but the title alone says that it could be an intriguing supplemental text for a unit on population (or an 'opposing viewpoint' to consider).  For those that have read the book, please comment below. 


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels.

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, April 28, 2013 7:36 PM

I really wasn't sure where to put this scoop. There may be a time when the GMOs affect our fertility as many think GMOs are affecting herds fed GMOs. The physical environment might affect this as well. The social and economic challenges may impact fertility and plain selfishness and putting industrial needs over human needs could affect it as well. It looks like an interesting book so I thought I would make note of it.

Tara Cohen's comment, May 1, 2013 2:58 PM
I ordered this book from Amazon because I thought it would be a great fit for AP Human. I read the first 20 pages last night and was blown away. It totally covers all the information in the Demography Unit and the author has a sense of humor. Only 20 pages in, but I give it two thumbs up!
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As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts

As U.S. birth rate drops, concern for the future mounts | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The nation's fertility rate has slipped below replacement levels partly because of the recession and a decline in immigration. That's raising concern about the nation's future."

Seth Dixon's insight:

During this recent recession, fertility rates in the United States have dropped with many speculating that the financial investment in child-rearing caused this shift.  The big question is this: will birth rates bounce back when the economy fully recovers or is the United States population going to follow the example of Western Europe?  What would the impact be for both of these scenarios?


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels, unit 2 population.

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Brett Sinica's comment, April 23, 2013 3:11 PM
These stats are hard to take in, because it seems like even though birth rates are considered to be dropping, the country’s total population continues to rise, and fast. Immigration probably plays a major role in the adding of new citizens, though just because birth rates are decreasing it shouldn’t necessarily mean a bad thing. With a slow increase of people, there could possibly be drops in the unemployment rate, or even poverty level at a big stretch. With fewer people in the country, it could mean less competition among others, leaving more options for people to pursue. It says at the end of the article that, “there are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” This may hold true to an extent, but look at China for example. Their population is the largest in the world, containing roughly 20 of the 30 most polluted cities and being the top consumer of energy. Though the country has an unemployment level which is half of ours, they must put in place family planning methods such as the “one-child policy” to hope for better population control. If I know the United States, I highly doubt they would ever resort to such measures, unless the government wants uproars. So maybe I’m optimistic about the birth rate drops, but it shouldn’t be too much of a problem. Maybe we should rid of the self-checkouts and automated answering machines and slowdown in technology so we don’t find ourselves in a situation that’d become too hard to handle.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 2:48 PM
This decline in birth rates is largely due to the recession; people don’t want to have children because they can’t afford the care. We need to have a balance in our population. Having one age group, like elderly people, dominating over other generations can be a problem. Even though the birth rates are decreasing, our population is still growing at a steady rate. Immigrants trying to make a home for themselves and their families in the United States contribute in a big way to our population increase.
I think that when and if the economy bounces back, families will start to feel comfortable with their finances and the birth rate will spike. Yet, if the birth rate does get back to normalcy and the immigrants continue to come to this country maybe our population will see too much of an increase and overpopulation could be a problem. But I doubt our country will ever adopt the “one-child policy” currently in use in China, we will find some other way to control our population, whatever that may be.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:45 PM
The recession is a huge factor as to why the birth/fertility rate is dropping. It costs a lot of money to have a child and most people can’t afford to care for themselves never mind another baby. Even though the birth rate has been decreasing over the years, the population is still increasing due to immigration. With the birth rate decreasing the level of poverty could potentially decrease as well because there will not be an economic burden. I don’t think there should be too much of a concern about the birthrate dropping because once the economy returns to normal I’m sure people will want to expand their family. I do agree to a certain extent with the statement in the article: “Population growth leads to human innovation, and innovation leads to conservation ... There are no cases of peace and prosperity in the face of declining populations.” Overpopulation, like in China, causes many issues, not just economically.
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WebGL's Digital Globe

WebGL's Digital Globe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A showcase of creative experiments programmed in JavaScript, HTML5, and WebGL
Seth Dixon's insight:

Pictured above is a still image of an interactive digital globe with population density data with colored bar graphs to symbolize the data.  This is a great open-source platform for geographic data visualization. There are not many data layers currently, but possibly there will be more in the future (best viewed in Google Chrome).  


Tagspopulation, demographics, unit 2 population, visualization, mapping.

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IGO's curator insight, January 30, 2013 5:12 AM

"Pictured above is a still image of an interactive digital globe with population density data with colored bar graphs to symbolize the data.  This is a great open-source platform for geographic data visualization. There are not many data layers currently, but possibly there will be more in the future (best viewed in Google Chrome)."

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Impacts of the Demographic Transition

Impacts of the Demographic Transition | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A look at how the notion of family is evolving in this country. 
Seth Dixon's insight:

The traditional family is declining in social prominence in many developed societies (this is hardly a phenomenon unique to Canada) as fewer young people are choosing to marry and have children.  How does this impact individuals, families, communities and countries? 


Tags: Canadadeclining population, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:35 AM
This article talks about how the new Canadian Family. How the traditional family used to have children and people were getting married. Now people not only do not necessarily get married, but they also may not even have children either. It just shows how times and the people are changing from the older and more traditional days.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 10:35 AM

This infographic is showing a shift which has occured over the last several decades from larger, traditional families to smaller, multicultural, non-traditional families. This infographic concerns Canada, but the reduced birthrate is a problem for many developed countries in Europe as well. While the multi-cultural and same-sex families likely have no negative effects, the rise in lone parent families is problematic as single parents have an increased financial burden while raising children. The low birthrate, when lower than replacement level (2.0 per woman), will likely lead to a stalling economy to be outpaced by growing nations.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 12:45 PM

How exactly will a shifting family demographic affect us?  We can only speculate.  This phenomenon happening in Canada is also happening in most developed like the United States and Japan.  The problem with analyzing specific demographics like this one, is that they are taken out of cultural (local and global) context.  There are many things that may be influencing the familial demographic shift.  More people are moving into cities, where life is busy, fast-paced, "anonymous", and space-limited.  Having kids does not seem very conducive in this setting.  Are we as humans actually creating issues for ourselves?  Are we creating different meanings for "family"?  Are we adapting to our ever-changing world?  This issue will prove to be a mix of all of these things.  ...Maybe there is even an unseen, unfelt ecological and physiological cue to stop procreating when there are too many within a population?  However people who do not want children, have to ask themselves "why?"  Is being selfish really worth removing humans that much further from the natural harmony of the world?

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Census Dotmap

Census Dotmap | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive dot distribution map of the United States 2010 census data has many great applications.  The conversation can focus on the symbology of the map (for example, this could lead to a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of dot distribution maps) or notice how certain physical landforms are visible for either their high or low population density.  One of the advantages of this map is that it uses census data at the block level.  This means that the user can visualize distinct scale-dependent patterns.  Sharp divisions (e.g.-urban vs. rural) might have less of a distinct edge as you zoom in.  

UPDATE: This map now includes Canadian and Mexican census data as well as the United States.


Tags: cartography, technology, mapping, visualization, population, density.

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Charlie Koppelson's curator insight, February 7, 2013 2:40 PM

This map is very useful in examining the distribution of people and geography in North America. It's easy to see that our once rural based country is completely dominated by cities, most of which are near the coast. It's fun to play around with as you can see where mountain ranges are as well as other topographic changes just by the concentrations of people, or lack there of.

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Elderly Spur Japan Stores

Elderly Spur Japan Stores | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Unicharm Corp.’s sales of adult diapers in Japan exceeded those for babies for the first time last year. At Daiei Inc. supermarkets, customers can feel Japan aging -- literally: It has made shopping carts lighter.


Japan's demographic shifts are well-chronicled: the Japanese are having fewer children and the improvements in healthcare mean that the elderly are living longer than ever.  Combined this means that Japan's population pyramid is getting "top heavy."  This population change is having huge econmic impacts as the percentage of Japanese people is now over 23%.  Retailers and industries are heavily targeting this expanding demographic with financial clout that outspends all other cohorts.


Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia, consumption.

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World Population Prospects

World Population Prospects | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

The United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs produces easy-to-use population charts and graphs (including population pyramids).  This image (courtesy of Hans Rosling) shows the impending changes on Brazilian society based on changing fertility rates. How is this chart an example of population momentum and of the Demographic Transition Model? 


Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining populationmodels, Brazil.

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LeeBurns's curator insight, February 11, 5:20 AM

#unit4 #population

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, February 11, 1:27 PM

This graph depicts the estimated population growth throughtout the years of 1950-2100. Age has a lot to do with the increasing rate by millions. The people that are 65+ represented in the green are "peaking old" at 2080. As for the 15-64 age braket they are represented in the red and are reaching the "Adult peak" at the year 2030. And lastly, the "Peak Child" is represented in the blue achieves that in 1990. All of these statistics stem from the Brazilian records and are relative to the daily life and climate of the specific group or individual.

Albert Jordan's curator insight, February 12, 5:56 PM

Looking at the statistics for South America’s growth rate since 1950, it has grown rapidly. This rapid growth can easily be attributed to modernization, increased stability within the governments(even if corruption is still rampant in some places and the U.S. isn’t fiddling its fingers in politics or funding government overthrows), and increased outside development thanks to increased global globalization. While total population of the region is expected to rise until it peaks in 2050, so is population density and age. This will create sanitation, infrastructure, and healthcare issues that many parts of the continent may not be ready to address or able to. Even though economic strength is typically on the rise, these are still poorer developing nations. The birthrate is already beginning to peak and taper off even if deaths continue to rise. However, there is still predicted to be more births than death. Improved healthcare globally since 1950 has found its way into South America and so has economic output, bringing with it – immigration. Numbers such as South America’s can be used to create a visual representation by using a population pyramid to figure out which phase of the demographic transition model the region, or with more specific numbers, a country was in, is going into, and will predicable be in.

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Will saving poor children lead to overpopulation?

Hans Rosling explains a very common misunderstanding about the world. CC by www.gapminder.org
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, demographicsmodels, gapminderdevelopment.

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Ms. Harrington's curator insight, January 28, 6:18 PM

A clear explanation of how saving the poor will slow population growth.

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Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs

Watch The World Grow Older In 4 GIFs | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Some countries are getting old. Others are staying young — and getting much bigger.
Seth Dixon's insight:

These time-lapse demographic charts help to visualize the impacts of the demographic transition principles on a society.  In the GIFs of the United States and Japan for example, you can clearly see the baby boomer generation and the 'greying' processes respectively. 


Tags: population, demographic transition model, declining population, population, demographicsmodels.

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CHS AP Human Geography's curator insight, December 14, 2013 11:00 AM

A cool look at the DTM and population pyramids

RobersonWG's curator insight, December 27, 2013 10:52 PM

Read the article and review the GIF image data.  Think of these as non-gender specific population pyramids.  How would you explain the growth in our older population age ranges 50+?  Why such a growth in older people and a decline in younger people?

Noah Duncan's curator insight, January 13, 5:44 PM

There are many countries that are growing old. The United States of America isn't as much as Japan. Japan must have a low fertility rate because there are more elders. There are some countries that are not getting older Like Nigeria. Nigeria has a very high fertility rate, and children are a huge share of the people in those countries.

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Fertility Rates in Gapminder

Fertility Rates in Gapminder | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"CATHOLIC Argentina, Mexico & Phillippines have more babies born per woman than MUSLIM Indonesia, Iran & Turkey."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Gapminder is a tremendous resource that I've shared in the past and total fertility rates is an ideal metric to see in this data visualization tool.  As Hans Rosling said in one of his TED talks using Gapminder, religion and total fertility rates are not as connected as previously thought.  In this particular mode, you can see how three predominantly Catholic countries (Philippines, Argentina and Mexico) compare in Total Fertility Rates to three predominantly Muslim countries (Indonesia, Turkey and Iran).  


Questions to Ponder: Historically many have assumed that Catholic and Muslim populations would have higher birth rates; why is this changing?  How important a factor is religion in changing fertility rates?  What are other factors impact a society's fertility rate?


Tags: population, demographicsvisualization, religion.

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Mathijs Booden's comment, September 28, 2013 3:03 PM
Any mention of Gapminder gets an upvote from me. One of the best resources in and outside of the classroom, period.
jon inge's curator insight, October 11, 2013 5:20 PM

awesome site for development economics

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 2, 6:15 PM

When watching the video it was apparetnt that for Iran during the 1950-early1970's there was an increase in fertility and then decreased to almost 1.32% in 2010. These facts were very interseting to see and the way that we as historians/ georgraphers can predict the future with the past facts.

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Declining Fertility Rates

Declining Fertility Rates | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The American birthrate is at a record low. What happens when having it all means not having children?
Seth Dixon's insight:

The demographic transition is an important model in human geography that explains many of the declining birth rates in the more developed parts of the world and the high fertility rates in less developed countries.  This is often discussed within a demographic and economic context.  This article from TIME Magazine struck quite a nerve recently. While it noted that from 2007 to 2011 the fertility rate dropped 9% in the United States, it wasn't the statistical analysis that got people talking (here is another article on the topic).  What did strike a nerve was the discussion of the cultural shifts that are at the roots of this demographic decline, the cover picture that glamorizes a childfree life and a subtitle (when having it all means not having kids) that idealizes not having children.  The demographic transition has what some call a 'cultural lag' where a large family size is still culturally preferred even if it no longer makes the same agricultural and economic sense as it did in the past.  This piece demonstrates the new secularized 'post-cultural lag' values that see children as obstacles to preferable career paths and a limitation on their freedoms.  For one commentator that was opposed to this article's cultural perspective see this article.  While these pieces are decidedly not neutral on the subject, that is the point; opinions widely differ on the cultural impact of these demographic shifts.   

 

Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsmodels, popular culture.

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Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:36 AM
Children are our legacy, they are our future, and if the birth rate keeps depleting then who will be here to be pur next scientists or doctors? Then again a plus to this situation is how much lower the birth rate is, the more resources we have to equally share (i.e oil, food water etc.)
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 11, 2013 11:34 AM

In recent research people found that some women are content with not having any children. People might think this way because without a child people are able to do more things like go out or travel. Some may not want children due to expenses. If more people do not want children birth rates could decline over the years.

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:23 PM

Not to bulky on information but it gets its point across. why are theyre so many social stigmas around having a kid?  A kid cost a little over a million dollars to raise why should it be looked down apon for choosing not to take the finacial and physical hardship. I personally have been on the fence about the subject because Im not a fan of this world is coming to and i wouldnt want to have someone I dearly care about to have to go through it. But thats neither hear nor there. 

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White deaths outnumber births in US

White deaths outnumber births in US | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Deaths of white people outnumbered births for the very first time in US history, the Census Bureau revealed Thursday. The census predicts that significant drops in birth rates v death rates will be regular by 2025.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The United States as a whole does not have demographic numbers similar to European countries with declining populations...but 'white' America does.  The NY Times also noted that this statistical benchmark happened, but it was quietly mentioned with many other demographic statistics without an analysis of how this will impact the United States.  

Question to Ponder: how will this impact the United States in coming generations?  What will the cultural, economic and political impacts be?  Why explains the differents between the distinct populations in the United States?


Tags: USA, declining population, population, demographicsethnicity.

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Cynthia Williams's curator insight, July 10, 2013 12:41 PM

Shrinking white demographics will definitely have an effect on voting blocks in the future.  I would not be surprised if redistricting becomes a very important issue in upcoming elections.  And why was there an attempt to down play the significance of this statistic in the NY Times.  Are they trying to hide this fact from the public? What do they think will happen when it is discovered?

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:08 PM

Population

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Assessing the Validity of Online Sources

Assessing the Validity of Online Sources | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is a fabulous map---but is the statement true?


Seth Dixon's insight:

I present this map (hi-res) without any context to my students and ask the question: is this statement true?  How can we ascertain the truthfulness of this claim?  What fact would we need to gather?  This exercise sharpens their critical thinking skills and harnesses the assorted bits of regional information that they already have, and helps them evaluate the statement.

The answers to these questions can be found here.

 

Tags: density, social media, East Asia, South Asia.

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lalita pradeep's curator insight, May 14, 2013 10:34 PM

wow....lovely map.........

Sascha Humphrey's curator insight, May 15, 2013 4:52 AM

It's quite amazing!

Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 26, 2013 8:45 AM

When we first looked at this picture in class there was no way that I thought this map could be true. We are warned all the time to be careful what we look at on the internet, because for the most part a lot of the information is not true. When we looked at this photo in class we zoomed in on the area in the circle and first determined what was included  in that circle. Once we were able to detrmine what cities were within that circle we were then able to look up the population in each of those cities. We added up the total of each city to get the total population of the places within the circle. Then we researched the total population of the world. Once we were able to find this we subtracted the population from within the circle from the total population, and what we were left with was smaller than the total population within the circle. Which means that the map was true. I was shocked. There was no way that I thought this was true. What was interesting to me was the process we went through to determine that this map was even true. We had to detrmine the area we were working with and then research the information to get a solution. I think you learn a lot just by this simple picture. This map happened to be true however there are many picture listed under this map that are untrue that we are faced with all the time, that if we took the time to research we woudl realize are silly pictures. Just by researching information about a picutre like this can teach us a lot about a place. 

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Technology and Tradition Collide: From Gender Bias to Sex Selection

Technology and Tradition Collide:  From Gender Bias to Sex Selection | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Every year, as a result of prenatal sex selection, 1.5 million girls around the world are missing at birth.  How do we know these girls are missing if they were never born? Under normal circumstances, about 102 to 107 male babies are born for every 100 female babies born. This is called the sex ratio at birth, or SRB."


Seth Dixon's insight:

How do local cultures create these demographic statistics?  How do these demographic statistics impact local cultures? 


Tags: gender, technologyfolk culture, statistics, China, population.

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China's New Bachelor Class

China's New Bachelor Class | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Gender imbalances in China have created a generation of men for whom finding love is no easy task
Seth Dixon's insight:

Cultural preferences for boys in China has led to a gender imbalance which has some unintended consequences, especially for the those seeking to have families with limited financial resources.


Tags: gender, China, population

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Cassie Frazier's comment, May 4, 2013 8:45 PM
Today in China, love has become more about wealth than romance. Because of the gender imbalance created by the one child policy, there are many more men than women, as boys are the preferred sex. This has shifted the task of choosing a spouse to the women, and they want fancy things. Therefore, they tend to choose the rich to marry. The problem is that there are at least 40-50 million poor men in China, and the majority are alone. When men reach 30 and are still unmarried, they are called "leftovers". These men are much more likely to get into trouble. This is so sad because they are so lonely. By preferring males, China has created a huge group of men who may have to live forever alone.
Taylor Anderson's comment, May 6, 2013 1:43 PM
There is a huge gender imbalance making people choose between love and money
Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 11:19 AM

Because of china’s one child policy the pool of available women had gone down, this leads many rural women to wish to marry up in economic circumstances leaving many rural men unmarried and once they pass the age of 30 less likely to ever marry.  China’s quandary with unbalanced sexes is a graphic example of what happens when one gender is preferred above anther leading to a reversal within a generation when scarcity of the other sex sets in.  Hopefully this experience will teach China to value both men and women in the future.

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Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister

Let elderly people 'hurry up and die', says Japanese minister | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Taro Aso says he would refuse end-of-life care and would 'feel bad' knowing treatment was paid for by government
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's no secret that Japan's population is aging and can not replace itself.  Since it is not a destination country for migrants, this is going to have serious economic ramifications as the percentage of the Japanese population over 60 is expected to rise above 40% over the course of this next generation.  Given the harsh statements by the new Japanese finance minister, it's a huge political concern (although a difficult one mention in campaigns).  Some have already questioned Japan's ability to survive this demographic implosion as adult diapers are now a bigger moneymaker in Japan than children's diapers.

 

Tags: Japan, declining population, economic, population, demographics, unit 2 population, East Asia.

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Greg Hill's curator insight, January 30, 2013 1:17 AM

Tell us how you really feel

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:30 AM

Its clear that Japan is overpopulating. People are living long lives in a big country like Japan and people just keep reproducing. The Japense  minister in my opion is very wrong here. A minister should never wish deaths upon his people.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 10, 11:11 AM

As populations age and the younger generations have less children the burden of government to provide care for the elderly becomes a big issue.  In countries where the government pays for their health care this will only become a bigger issue.  When the needs of the old and the needs of the young become a conflict what is a country to do?  These issues will only increase as the birth rates of developed countries declines.  

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The Greek island of old age

The Greek island of old age | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The inhabitants of a small Greek island live on average 10 years longer than the rest of western Europe. So what's the secret to long life in Ikaria?
Seth Dixon's insight:

As more countries have entered the later stages of the Demographic Transition, we expect people to live longer than ever.  On this island and other "blue zones" they attribute their long life to a traditional diet and an unpolluted environment.  


Tags: aging population, medical, population, demographics, unit 2 population, Greece, Europe.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 25, 12:49 PM

It is nice to know there are still areas in the world, such as Ikaria in Greece, with little pollution. The air is much cleaner, people are more active, there are plenty of  natural foods and unpreserved wine keeps natives young. By making the simple move to his homeland, a man diagnosed with lung cancer lived decades longer than expected. These simple changes in lifestyles pay off in the long run.

Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 11:35 AM

In my travels through the Greek Islands I never made it to Ikaria as it was closer to Turkey and I mostly traveled along a route to Crete. I'm not surprised that this isolated enclaves allow for longer life. Our modern world has many advancements, but it was not all gain. On an island like Ikaria there is no pollution, and people are kept active by force in the mountainous terrain. Compare this to the US where a recent study found that some people get less than an hour of exercise in an entire year due to the availability of services and transportation.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 7:41 AM

This article describes the "blue zone" of Ikaria, a small Greek island where the people, on average, live longer than elsewhere. The people in these blue zones seem to mostly preserve and enjoy old traditions and diets which keep them from eating processed foods while keeping them more active. In the case of Ikaria, the preservation of the traditional diet and active lifestyle is a probably result of isolation. The island itself has kept Ikaria and its traditions protected from some of the unhealthy effects of globalization.

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Special Series: 7 Billion

Special Series: 7 Billion | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There will soon be 7 billion people on the planet. Find out why you shouldn’t panic—at least, not yet.


This whole year, National Geographic has been producing materials on the impacts of a growing global population (including this popular and powerful video).  Now that the year has (almost) concluded, all of these resources are archived in here. These resources are designed to answers some of our Earth's most critical questions:  Are there too many people on the planet?  What influences women to have fewer children?  How will we cope with our changing climate?  Are we in 'the Age of Man?'  Can we feed the 7 billion of us? Are cities the cure for our growing pains?  What happens when our oceans become acidic?  Is there enough for everyone?


Tags: population, National Geographic, sustainability, density.

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