Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Canada is a huge country. Most of it is unfit for human habitation.

Canada is a huge country. Most of it is unfit for human habitation. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The area below the red line includes most of Nova Scotia, in Canada's east, but most of the population comes from the area a little farther west, in a sliver of Quebec and a densely populated stretch of Ontario near the Great Lakes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Admitted, the web Mercator projection of this map distorts the far northern territories of Canada, but still it hammers home some fascinating truths about Canada's population distribution.  Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  

 

TagsCanada, map, North America, population, density.

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Ivan Ius's curator insight, June 4, 10:27 AM
This article highlights the geographic concept of Spatial Significance
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, June 4, 5:13 PM

Factors influencing settlement patterns - concentrations of population 

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How the British (literally) Landscaped the World

How the British (literally) Landscaped the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Did you hear about the Five Pillars of the British Landscaping Empire during your religion classes? To sort them by order of importance within the Holy Book of Grass: First is grass. Second is past...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscape.  Those difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     


Tags: UKlandscape, culture, Canada, land use.

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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 3, 10:31 AM

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscape.  Those difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     

 

Tags: UKlandscape, culture, Canada, land use.

Christian Allié's curator insight, March 5, 3:11 AM

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscape.  Those difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     


Tags: UK, landscape, culture, Canada, land use.

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 12, 6:07 AM

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscape.  Those difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     


Tags: UK, landscape, culture, Canada, land use.

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Language Reflects Culture

Language Reflects Culture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Being a fluent speaker of English and Saulteaux, I have to say that I view the world in two different ways. I have two different attitudes and even two different personalities, depending on which language I use...English offers me one way to order information and cope with reality, one set of attitudes and behavioral styles, and Saulteaux offers me a different way. When I switch languages, I also move from one constellation of attitudes and thought patterns to another.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

This passage was written by Margaret Cote, a  member of the Saulteaux people, who are part of the larger Ojibwa or Chippewa Native American tribe. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does language shape cultural attitudes, traits, and customs? How does language shape a speakers world view and personality?  How does language influence how a speaker may feel about place?

 

TagsCanadalanguage, placeculture

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Jeremy Hansen's curator insight, January 21, 11:35 AM
Seth Dixon's insight:

This passage was written by Margaret Cote, a  member of the Saulteaux people, who are part of the larger Ojibwa or Chippewa Native American tribe. 

 

Questions to Ponder: How does language shape cultural attitudes, traits, and customs? How does language shape a speakers world view and personality?  How does language influence how a speaker may feel about place?

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The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz

The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"From treasure maps to smart phone apps, geography makes sense of our world by describing locations, patterns and relationships of the Earth’s natural and social systems — both past and present. Canadian Geographic’s editors, along with the help of a number of Fellows of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society and other experts, compiled this ultimate Canadian geography quiz to truly test you. Think you’re a geo genius? Prove it!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

These are 50 HARD questions (any student not from Canada that gets over 50% right should pat themselves on the back).  I will only give you one of the 50 answers since most of you have never been to the explore the frozen tunda; pictured above is a pingo.  Pingos form when groundwater is pressurized and forced upward in a concentrated area by advancing permafrost. This groundwater-saturated sediment freezes and expands as it’s driven toward the surface, causing the earth above to bulge and eventually break open. 

 

TagsCanada, trivia, games, Arctic, landforms.

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Half of Canada’s population

Half of Canada’s population | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Half of Canada’s 33.5 million people live in the red part, the other in the yellow. More population divided maps (Source: reddit.com)"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Land-wise, Canada one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, most of it is quite barren.  What geographic factors explain the population concentration and distribution in Canada?  


TagsCanada, map, North America.

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JeanneSilvey's curator insight, November 17, 2015 10:09 AM

A great illustration of population concentration and high density in Urban centers. 4.6 million of the remaining 17 million (approx.) live in British Columbia.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 17, 2015 11:41 AM

First economically for trade routes you have the St. Lawrence river which was originally the most influential route for French explorers. You have Toronto the Canada's financial center which forms the core of the "Golden Horseshoe" region, which wraps around the western end of Lake Ontario, population wise a quarter of Canada's population lives here.  Politically it makes sense that government would be set up in that area because of the population in that area.  Which population leads to the social aspect because all activities of night life, restaurants, businesses, entertainment, malls, etc. are located in this area.  And lastly, it makes easy access for United States and Canada to exchange tourism and jobs and goods.

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Fuzzy Borders

TagsCanadalanguage, social media, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Island in a Lake on an Island in a Lake on an Island

Island in a Lake on an Island in a Lake on an Island | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Here’s a winning question for your next trivia night: Where is the world’s largest island-in-a-lake-on-an-island-in-a-lake-on-an-island? According to stories published here and here, the distinction currently goes to a nameless isle within Victoria Island in Canada’s Nunavut Territory.

On August 21, 2014, the Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 captured this natural-color view of the “sub-sub-sub-island.” The top image shows a close-up view of the unnamed island, while the bottom image shows a wider view of Victoria Island’s lake-littered landscape (download large image here)."


TagsCanadatrivia, remote sensing, geospatial.

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SaskatcheWHAT?!

"How well do you know your Saskatchewan slang? At Insightrix in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, we've got the prairies down flat!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Here's an entertaining clip on different regionalized vocabularies and a hint of accent confusion thrown in there.  The portrayal is over the top, but it's all local vocabulary that life-long residents certainly understand.  Here's 320 more Canadian slang terms for you (scroll to the bottom).    


TagsCanada, language, fun.

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LEONARDO WILD's curator insight, March 29, 2015 11:14 AM

Live languages are never as straight forward as the Royal Academies of Language would like them to be. Rules are crystallizations that get shattered in daily use.

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Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared

Damage from cancelled Canadian census as bad as feared | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The cancellation of the mandatory long-form census has damaged research in key areas, from how immigrants are doing in the labour market to how the middle class is faring, while making it more difficult for cities to ensure taxpayer dollars are being spent wisely, planners and researchers say.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Canada got rid of the mandatory census, and is discovering it can no longer know much about itself. 


Tag: Canada, populationcensus.

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Emma Conde's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:41 PM

Unit 1 Geography: Its nature and Perspectives

This article is about how Canada switched its census from being mandatory to voluntary, and how this has had many negative effects. By not having a mandatory census, Canada has saved the national government money, but in truth has really lost a lot. It is much harder to have accurate demographics for city planning, research purposes, and business marketing. Researchers are unable to tell the distribution of racial equality in neighborhoods, the demographics of neighborhoods, and are completley unable to track immagration. There is a voluntary census in place, but this produces much lower quality results, and is expensive to obtain this data.

 

This relates to the theme of how information such as census data is used, and through this article you are able to tell how important something like the census is to providing data for so many different oraganizations/people. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:45 AM

As much as Americans hate the Census, this article proves that it is an important governmental instrument. There are many in this nation that would probably desire a similar proposal. They should read this article before ever speaking on the subject again. A Census is nessacary  to tell us about ourselves. How can a government formulate a public policy, if it does not know who lives within its borders?

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Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S.

Dozens Of Countries Take In More Immigrants Per Capita Than The U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If you think the United States is every immigrant's dream, reconsider. Sure, in absolute numbers, the U.S. is home to the most foreign-born people — 45.7 million in 2013. But relatively, it's upper-mid-pack as an immigrant nation. It ranks 65th worldwide in terms of percentage of population that is foreign-born, according to the U.N. report 'Trends in International Migrant Stock.'  Whether tax havens and worker-hungry Gulf states, refugee sanctuaries or diverse, thriving economies, a host of nations are more immigrant-dense than the famed American melting pot.  Immigrants make up more than a fourth (27.7 percent) of the land Down Under; two other settler nations, New Zealand and Canada, weigh in with 25.1 and 20.7 percent foreign-born, respectively. That's compared to 14.3 percent in the United States." 


Tags: migration, population, USAAustraliaOceania.

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Chris Costa's curator insight, November 30, 2015 3:08 PM

The son of an immigrant, I am always taken aback at the intensity of the hatred that is held by certain Americans towards foreign born individuals, as if being born in a different country is the greatest affront to all that we as Americans are supposed to hold dear to us. There is a lot of rhetoric in the current political climate concerning the rate of immigration to the US, with most conservatives unanimously declaring that there are too many foreign born peoples in the US; that our economy, ways of life, and culture are doomed to collapse under the weight of huge waves of uneducated, impoverished immigrants. While immigration is a controversial topic in this country that does deserve a portion of the attention that it receives, it was interesting to learn that immigration is so largely blown out of proportion here in the US, especially compared to other countries. 14.3% of Americans are foreign born; this number seems relatively large, until you learn that 1 in 4 New Zealanders were not born in New Zealand, and yet the immigration debate isn't anywhere near as fierce in New Zealand as it is here in the states. Perhaps we should borrow from the New Zealand model, and show a little more tolerance towards those who were born elsewhere, but call our country home. We pride ourselves on being the "melting pot" of the globe, and it's time that we actually start acting like it, instead of giving into ignorance, fear, and internal fighting.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:35 AM

Immigration has become a dominate issue in the 2016 presidential campaign. For those who believe that the United States is letting in to many immigrants, I refer you to the statistics in this article. Only 14 percent of our population is foreign born. The United States ranks 65th in the world in the percentages of the population that is foreign born. We are far behind the two most prominent Oceanic nations, Australia and New Zealand. Nearly twenty eight percent of Australians are foreign born. Twenty five percent of New Zealanders are also foreign born. Those nations are actually more representative of the melting pot philosophy, than the United States is.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:16 PM

the us is not the choice nation of nations. it is not the most sought nation for migrants. that means we must be doing something right or wrong.

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Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists

Quebec Voters Say 'Non' to Separatists | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Quebec voters gave a resounding no to the prospects of holding a third referendum on independence from Canada, handing the main separatist party in the French-speaking province one of its worst electoral defeats ever."  


Quebec, which is 80 percent French-speaking, has plenty of autonomy already. The province of 8.1 million sets its own income tax, has its own immigration policy favoring French speakers, and has legislation prioritizing French over English.  But many Quebecois have long dreamed of an independent Quebec, as they at times haven't felt respected and have worried about the survival of their language in English-speaking North America.


TagsCanadapolitical, devolution.

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:32 PM

The politics of Quebec are interesting to say the least. Originally founded by the French in the 17th century and then later conquered by the English in the late 18th century Canada is a nation with a mix if influences. While much of Canada today is something of a standard English colony Quebec has desperately hung on to it's French roots. In Quebec City their are laws ensuring that all store signs are in French, even making sure the font is large enough. In spite of their dogged interest in preserving their culture they've voted against spiting from the body of Canada repeatedly. This is largely because even the more die hard French Canadians know their small territory is unable to economically survive on its own.

Bob Beaven's curator insight, January 29, 2015 2:57 PM

This article is interesting to me, due to the fact that part of my family is French Canadian.  I have always found it interesting how the Quebecois have tried to become their own country but could never quite pull it off.  In fact, I had a teacher in high school who was from the Canadian Mid-West and disliked French Canadians, however he said that although the French community is different from the rest of Canada, he believed that separation was not going to happen.  This article shows that the Parti Quebecois will, for the time being, have to regroup and "clean the salt from their wounds" from this defeat.  For now, it appears Quebec is not going anywhere.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:39 AM

This is quite a turnaround from the vote that you showed us in class from the mid 90s. The younger generations that have come of ages sense the previous vote are most likely non separatists. Overall I think this just about ends the talk of an independent Quebec. The nation of Canada is best when unified, as is every other state on the globe. This result, along with the results of the proposed Scottish separation seem to indicate that the wave of separation is dying out. Though I honestly think that theses movements never had much of a chance anyway.

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Bizarre Borders

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you want more of the same, watch Bizarre Borders, part 1 which focuses on countries within countries and single-neighbor countries.


Tags: borders, political, North America.

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Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, January 29, 2015 6:31 PM

Craziest thing I've ever seen!  The poor kids on Robert's Island that has to cross through Canada to go to school.  I think it's crazy that the borders were defined when they didn't even have a complete map.  Taking a guess obviously didn't work out.  It seems very difficult to define a border.  

WILBERT DE JESUS's curator insight, February 12, 2015 6:39 PM

Sometimes borders between frendly neighbours like Canada and USA are less protected than borders between countries with conflicts.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 10:01 PM
before watching this video, to be very honest, I thought we really did have the longest straightest possible border between two countries. What really blows my mind is that there is literally a gap between the two countries signifying the border. Another one is the random tip of land that goes into Canada, but it is not really land, it is a lake. But by far, the most bizarre border to me is the Point Roberts in Alaska, where the high school students have to actually pass international borders just to go to school.
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Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands

Keystone Pipeline and Canadian Tar Sands | Geography Education | Scoop.it
By Neal Lineback and Mandy Lineback Gritzner, Geography in the NewsTM and Maps.com KEYSTONE PIPELINE AND CANADIAN TAR SANDS CONTROVERSY Supporters and protesters continue to lobby both the White House and U.S.

Via Neal G. Lineback
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Paige Therien's curator insight, February 22, 2014 4:01 PM

This controversial pipeline project would allow the transportation of crude oil from Alberta, Canada's Athabasca Oil Sands to the United State's Gulf Cost.  This proves to be a difficult feat.  Extracting oil from this source is very difficult since it is also mixed with clay and sand, making it very dirty.  Transportation of this dirty substance through the pipeline would be equally as hard and risky since there is a risk that the oil could corrode the pipe.  This poses severe environmental and safety risks.  This pipeline passes through an international border and seven U.S. states which play huge roles in feeding the country.  A pipeline passing through this area could easily pollute the Mississippi River Basin, which is the main water source for the people and the crops located in the central area of the country.  There have also been cases where corroded pipelines have allowed widespread fires to occur, which is a possibility here.  Extracting oil from this source would allow North America to be self-reliant, however, there are many drawbacks to creating such a huge pipeline which originates in such dirty oil sources.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 15, 2014 12:57 PM

The three main arguments against Keystone XL is, one; making liquid fuel from tar sands keeps the United States dependent on a very polluting source of energy. Instead of moving towards cleaner sources of energy, the US would continue being one of the highest in CO2 in emissions. Secondly; the pipeline  has risks that include spills because the tar sands oil could corrode the pipe line and leak. And thirdly, the oil from keystone could be sold to foreign markets instead of staying domestic. Although the US needs to start being less dependent on foreign oil the Keystone pipeline is not the way to do so. Oil itself is not a permanent solution, it will run out and it continues to harm the environment. This pipeline defiantly poses more risks than anyone should be comfortable with.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:43 PM

The Keystone Pipeline is a pipeline bringing natural gas from Canada into the States. Many politicians are against the XL project to connect the pipeline from the Tar Sands in Alberta to the Gulf Coast. However, there has been much rebuff from the Democrats within the Congress and the White House.

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Your Backyard is Bigger Than What You Can See

Your Backyard is Bigger Than What You Can See | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“Geography is linked to the environment,” says Connie Wyatt Anderson, of Canadian Geographic Education. “In the Lake Winnipeg watershed, what you throw into the Bow River in Calgary eventually ends up in Hudson Bay.”

Seth Dixon's insight:

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


TagsCanada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale

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Digitalent's curator insight, March 16, 3:29 AM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

Niall Conway's curator insight, March 16, 1:38 PM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

ismokuhanen's curator insight, March 27, 7:36 AM

More than anything I love the idea of using watersheds to connect students to their location environment and to think about places that are beyond the backyard, but are connected to them.  If they see themselves as more intimately connected to these places, it can only increase their spatial awareness, geo-literacy and hopefully their commitment to protect their expanded backyard.   This is an effective way to help students 'jump scale' in a way that will still keep things relevant to their lives. 


Questions to Ponder: What watershed do you live in?  Where does your drinking water come from?  When you flush the toilet, where does it go? How are places in your watershed linked?  


Tags: Canada, environment, resources, water, environment depend, spatial, scale. 

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Arctic Trivia Quiz

Arctic Trivia Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"From icebergs and Inuit legends to polar bear organs and exploration disasters, 50 questions to truly test your northern knowledge."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These are 50 HARD questions (any student not from Canada that gets over 50% right should pat themselves on the back). 

 

TagsCanada, trivia, games, Arctic, landforms.

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Cross-Canada route severed after Northern Ontario bridge splits apart

Cross-Canada route severed after Northern Ontario bridge splits apart | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A newly constructed bridge in northern Ontario has heaved apart, indefinitely closing the Trans-Canada highway — the only road connecting Eastern and Western Canada. At least one town has declared a state of emergency.
Seth Dixon's insight:

One bridge going down isn't noteworthy, but when that functionally separates Canada in two...that IS noteworthy.  A detour into the U.S. and around some Great Lakes is one heckuva detour.   

 

Tags: transportationCanada.

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Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds?

Can You Guess Where You Are in 60 Seconds? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you guess where we are taking you today? Here's a clue: This city's name translates to "where the river narrows."
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is a delightfully simple premise to National Geographic video's newest series: after seeing scenes from the cultural and physical landscapes of a place can you guess where in the world it is?  You can find more resources about this unnamed country (no cheating) here.   


Tags: images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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Why Americans should care about the Canadian election

Why Americans should care about the Canadian election | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The close race comes after a decade of leadership by Stephen Harper, whose relationship with Barack Obama has suffered. But a victory for Justin Trudeau and the Liberals on Monday could help the US and Canada forge renewed ties
Seth Dixon's insight:

Last night the Liberals in Canada had a resounding victory...this will profoundly impact Canadian politics but also will change some of the frostiness in U.S.-Canadian relations.  Trudeau was stated that Canada will return to its old role in the world by reversing many of the conservative stances of the Harper government instituted over these last 10 years. 

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Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, November 9, 2015 3:12 PM

As Americans, we often forget about how major a player Canada is in all of our economic sectors. But, despite the ignorance of most American citizens on Canadian politics, the results of the coming election in Canada will have a major impact on the lives of every US citizen in the next few years (at least until the next US presidential election).

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Canada's secret plan to invade the U.S. (and vice versa)

Canada's secret plan to invade the U.S. (and vice versa) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
After World War I, Canada drew up classified plans to invade the U.S. Meanwhile, the U.S. had its own secret plot to create the "United States of North America."
Seth Dixon's insight:

I never knew 1921 to 1930 was such a frosty time in Canadian-U.S. relations that BOTH sides drew up possible invasion plans.  Judging by these amazing arrows, these plans were never seriously about to be executed, but it is a good reminder that geopolitical partnerships (and rivalries) are ever-changing.  Today, if there are border tensions between these two allies, it might just center around the Arctic as it's geopolitical importance is rising, but the U.S. doesn't have a very successful track record against Canada.  Also, I did enjoy the 1920s reference that Americans simply assumed that Canada (once the British Empire was dismantled) would naturally be absorbed by the United States. 


TagsCanada, geopoliticspolitical, war.

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:30 AM

I never would have imagined that both Canada and the United States had secret plans to invade each other as late as 1930. I had assumed that after the United States failed  to take Canada during the War of 1812, that we as nation had just given up on the idea of Canadian annexation. It appears the ideals of Manifest Destiny survive. It is interesting to speculate how history may have been different had this come to pass. In the war between the two nations, Britain would probably have intervened on behalf of Canada. A British intervention would have destroyed the Anglo- American Alliance. Which means that during the Second World War, the United States would probably have refused to aide the British in the fight against the Nazis. A British defeat would have lead to a Nazi occupied Europe. A scary proposition in deed.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:36 AM

hoax?

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:30 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

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Political Symbolism in the Religious Landscape

This is a great juxtaposition of communal identities. Before becoming a part of Canada, this was the Cathedral of St. James. As a part of the British Empire, places such as Victoria Square became a part of the Montreal landscape. In what appears to me as a symbolic strike back against the British Monarchy's supremacy, this Cathedral is renamed Marie-Reine-du-Monde (Mary, Queen of the World). The fact that the Hotel Queen Elizabeth is looming overhead only heightens the tensions regarding whose queen reigns supreme; this isn't the real issue. The dueling queens served as a proxy for tensions between British political control and French cultural identity in Quebec several generations ago.

Seth Dixon's insight:

I was recently in Montreal; my last few Instagram posts aren't the prettiest pictures of my time in Canada.  I tried to select images that represented geographic concepts and would be the things I'd mention if we were on a walking tour of the city. 


TagsCanadasocial media, urban, economic, images, placeculture, landscape, tourism

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The Search for the Lost Ships of the Franklin Expedition

The Search for the Lost Ships of the Franklin Expedition | Geography Education | Scoop.it
All the latest news on the the search for the lost ships of the Franklin Expedition, as well as information on past searches, the technology used in the searches, historical information about the Franklin Expedition itself, and much more.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Come learn about one of the greatest discoveries and explorations in our time that recovers the memory of explorers of yesteryear.  These 6 lesson plans are incredibly engaging and are a fantastic example of geographic concepts. 


TagsCanada, teacher training, edtech.

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Jacob McCullough's curator insight, March 23, 2015 6:46 PM

I am totally into archeology and the study of the past I feel it is valuable for all people to learn as much they can from past mistakes and success 

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Human Landscapes of Canada

Human Landscapes of Canada | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Canada is a massive country, yet it has one of the lowest population densities in the world. Despite this, Canadians have made a wide impact on their land, much of it visible from aerial and satellite photography. Hydroelectric facilities, roads, mines, farms, ports, resource exploration, logging, canals, cities, and towns have altered much of the landscape over the years.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great set of images showing the human impact on the environment, with a special nod to our neighbors for the north.  These images have an artistic beauty and I hope every geographer maintains a sense of wonder at the details and beauty of the Earth. 


TagsCanada, images, art, remote sensing, land use, landscape

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Vincent Lahondère's curator insight, March 8, 2015 11:20 AM

Un vrai plaisir

Michael Amberg's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:28 PM

This shows how even small populations can make a big impact on the world from the changes in urbanization.

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Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada

Why Almost Nobody Lives In Most Of Canada | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Canada: land-wise, it's one of the world's biggest countries, but population-wise, it's anything but.The map comes from the Government of Canada's 'Plant Hardiness Site,' which contains images showing 'Extreme Minimum Temperature Zones' throughout the Great White North."


TagsCanada, map, North America, weather and climate.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 4, 2015 6:25 PM

 While Canada is very cold during the winter, to say that people shouldn't live there because plants don't might be a little excessive.  These temperatures are clearly only in the winter time and are extreme lows.  Canada in the summertime is quite beautiful, has plenty of vegetation and is probably very pleasant and comfortable to live.  Just like people who live in very hot, uncomfortable areas, i'm sure the inhabitants of Canada adapt to the colder season and take great pride in where they live.

Kevin Cournoyer's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:18 PM

It's a little strange to think that one of the world's largest countries in terms of area does not boast a very large population. Then again, when we think of Russia (the largest country by area in the world), many of its regions are uninhabited as well because of extreme climatic conditions. Countries like India, China, and Brazil, however, have enormous populations because they are located in more temperate zones, and so almost every area of the country is habitable.  There are places in every country, however, that are uninhabitable due to the terrain, the weather, or other factors. 

 

What we end up with, then, is the idea of geography as a misleading discipline. Okay, maybe the discipline itself is not misleading, but we have to be careful about making assumptions about a place based merely on its size or location. Some people may assume that some of the world's larger countries have strong and stable economies due to their size, but this is not always the case. Some of the most economically stable countries in the world are found in the relatively small nations of Europe. This map of Canada and the accompanying article, therefore, are a cautionary tale about taking things at face value and the importance of doing our own investigation and research. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:51 AM

Canada is large relatively uninhabitable country. Most of the nation is basically barren frozen wilderness. This article shows the key point that climate plays in the question of where humans decided to live. Warm and temperate climates traditionally attract the most people. Know one wants to live with polar bears. While their are many geographic factors to were people live, climate may be the most important.

Rescooped by Seth Dixon from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names

How the Canadian Provinces and Territories Got Their Names | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Here's a little more Canadian history on this Canada Day.    

Via AP US History, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm a little late for Canada Day, but the information about the origins of the names of all the Provinces and Territories is great information any time of year. 


Tags: Canada, toponyms, historical, trivia.

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 3, 2013 11:42 AM

Like Seth said - a little late for Canada Day, but we can certainly use in our World Geography  unit on North America.   

 

Sara Kanewske's curator insight, July 12, 2013 10:07 PM

Toponyms

English Gallery's curator insight, July 17, 2013 9:04 AM

Great for a little extra look at toponyms

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Crack Shack or Mansion?

Crack Shack or Mansion? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Can you tell a Vancouver mansion from a crack shack?
Seth Dixon's insight:

Which homes were once being used to sell illegal drugs and which homes could be sold for over $1 million?  It is not as easy to distinguish between the two as you might think.  What constitutes affordable housing can change dramatically from neighborhood to neighborhood.  Want more?  Try Crack Shack or Mansion II.


Tags: housing, narcotics, urban, economic, place, socioeconomic, neighborhood.

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 4:31 PM


In this world any house can be held as a drug location. in the neighbor I live there was a house that broken into by the cops in which they found hundreds of pounds of drugs and none of the neighbors knew. We thought it was an abandoned home. a crack shack or mansion it is difficult to determine if it is or not.

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:58 AM

This I found to be very interesting. To me it was very sterotypical and much harder than I thought it would be. I figured it would be easy to depict a Mansion from a Crack Shack, but I guess I was wrong. Different areas different lifestyles.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 9:55 AM

A fairly funny game that makes fun of the astronomical real estate prices in Vancouver, BC. I actually wasn't incredibly surprised as I've watched some HGTV. Since many of the shows are Canadian imports the extremely high priced homes in Vancouver and Toronto are often featured.

 

I guessed 10/16. The game should branch out to Toronto, we might've caught a glimpse of Rob Ford.