Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze

How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There may be a counterintuitive explanation for the deep freeze that hit New England this winter: The rapidly warming Arctic is causing big disruptions in the jet stream, which carries weather across North America. Is this the worst winter you've experienced?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, ArcticBoston, climate change, podcast.

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Gail McAuliffe's curator insight, March 1, 2015 11:12 AM

Perhaps this article will sway some climate change skeptics...

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:33 AM

So bizarre how the rate of the arctic warming causes us to get smacked with the cold weather. Its one of those things that are like how does the jet stream actually work. Including the fact that California is getting hit with a major drought. 

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The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy

The Dozen Regional Powerhouses Driving the U.S. Economy | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Boston-Washington corridor, home to 18 percent of Americans, produces more economic activity than Germany.
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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 15, 2015 8:54 AM

The United States is home to a number of different so called Mega Regions. We live in the Boston to Washington corridor which is commonly known as the megalopolis. The statistics  from this region are just astounding to behold.  18 percent of the nations population lives in this corridor. That percent is roughly 56.5 million people. The total economic output of the region is an astounding 3.75 trillion. If it were a country, it would be the fourth largest economy in the world.  

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This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now

This Is What It's Like to Be a Muslim in Boston Right Now | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When Anum Hussain heard about the Boston Marathon bombing, she immediately panicked, worried that the culprits would be like her. The 22-year-old Muslim was in the offices of Hubspot, the Cambridge marketing-software company she works for.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an interesting article; place and context mediate cultural interactions.  I can only imagine how incredibly difficult it would be to be a Muslim in the Boston area right now.  This geographer wishes that everyone could feel safe everywhere.    


Tags: terrorism, religion, Boston, Islam.

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Courtney Burns's curator insight, November 20, 2013 3:33 PM

Being from around the area and listening and watching the tv during the boston bombings all I really thought about was how the city and families were effected by the tragic event. However I never really thought about how it impacted muslim people in the area. For people to put a blame on all muslim people is not right. We are not all the same, which means not all muslims are the same. Some muslims have lived their whole lives in the US and for people to catogorize them all as terrorists isn't right. All people should be treated them same way. It is sad to read the article and think that some muslims in Boston walk around in fear of being beat up or killed just because of their culture. The bombings effected an entire city and muslim people people should be able to mourn with the rest of the city. They grew up there just like we did. So what makes them so different from me and you? Not all muslims are killers like the two boys from the bombings. It is really sad to me that they have to live their lives in fear everyday in a place that they call home, just because of their culture. No one deserves to live like that. I can't even imagine how difficult it is for muslim people in Boston. 

Ryan G Soares's curator insight, December 3, 2013 10:38 AM

Terrorism is a huge problem in our Country today. I'm not trying to racist saying this but I feel like they do it to themselves. Coming into our country and terrorizing our nation thats okay? Yes not every Muslim is a terrorist im not saying that but you never know if they are or not. Since 911 we cant trust anyone, and theres a reason for that. I understand that they should not have to feel any different then the average American but the past is what we all dwell on.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:19 AM

Some are saying that racism doesnt exist anymore but it does. Muslims still live in fear that they are being judged everyday because some Americans generalize Muslims with terrorism

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Boston's unnatural shoreline

Boston's unnatural shoreline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Today's 100-year storm surge could be tomorrow's high tide.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This set of maps and articles help to explain why sea level rise is such an issue for many major metropolitan areas.  In coastal cities with substantial economic development, much of the current coastal areas where once underwater until landfill projects filled in the bay.  During storm surges (or if and when sea levels rise) these will be the first places to flood.  


Tags: disasters, water, physical, Boston, weather and climate.

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Charlotte Hoarau's curator insight, February 6, 2013 5:57 AM

Surging sea represented on an imagery background layer.

Color ramp should be graduated.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:18 PM

Here's somehing to "Swett" over for those who live along the coast:

"Coastal cities are now living in what Brian Swett calls a “post-Sandy environment.” In this new reality, there is no more denying the specter of sea-level rise or punting on plans to prepare for it. And there is no more need to talk of climate change in abstract predictions and science-speak. We now know exactly what it could look like."

Keep in mind that as globalization expands, urbanizaion does as well, putting more and more people at this type of risk.

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Coastal Hazard Threat Map

Coastal Hazard Threat Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This interactive map of coastal Massachusetts and Rhode Island shows some basic flooding data including: 1) where are the flood warnings (essential the entire coastline), 2) how high the storm surge is, and 3) how high the waves are.


Tags: Rhode Island, water, disasters, geospatial.

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Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Wealthy cities seem to have it all. Expansive, well-manicured parks. Fine dining. Renowned orchestras and theaters. More trees. Wait, trees?

 

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (for a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning, see: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204607002174 ). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? For more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees (and to share your own), see: http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/income-inequality-seen-from-space/

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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:00 AM
this short article explains the evidence supporting tree to rich cities ratio. it goes to show that if I'm going to pay big bucks for location I would want the scenery to be beautiful hands down. they mention the per capita increase to tree ratio and how its only a dollar that influences such a high quantity of trees in city. bottom line is that it makes sense for the more trees in wealthier neighborhoods of the city because when your in the heart of the city you tend to see quantity of quality of homes and being jammed packed into small square footage doesn't leave much room for nature. but go just outside the city where the real estate is high and more spacious and you will find more trees the further and further from the center.
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:04 AM
Like a previous article it explains how if viewing a neighborhood with lush grass and huge yards with landscaped grounds it is associated with big money. People pay top dollar for houses that have huge back yards and privacy of trees. You would not see yards like this is the city though so these neighborhoods on the outskirts of the citylines.
Shaun Scallan's curator insight, January 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Interesting the value, in the broadest sense, that trees can bring in an urban setting

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Images of Human/Environmental Interactions

Images of Human/Environmental Interactions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The blizzard of 2015 blasted the region with wind-whipped snow that piled nearly 3-feet high in some places.


As of 1 p.m. Monday, Boston set a new record for snowiest seven-day period in the city's history with 34.2 inches.

Seth Dixon's insight:

Weather is one of the most tangible ways in which the physical environment impacts society.  We depend on sunlight and rainfall, we adapt our behaviors to harsh conditions and we are constantly modifying the our environments by heating and cooling our buildings.  This Henry David Thoreau quote reminds us to acknowledge the powerful influence of the environment and to recognize that technological fixes have their limitations.  “Live in each season as it passes...and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.” --Henry David Thoreau


Question to Ponder: In what ways does the weather shape and influence culture and spatial patterns in your region?  How can we make our communities more handicap accessible during winter storms and other extreme conditions?


Tags: environmentweather and climateenvironment depend, environment adapt, environment modify, disasters.

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Paul Farias's curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:16 PM

Not to mention the snow drifts up to 10-12 feet!

Evan Margiotta's curator insight, March 21, 2015 6:39 PM

Human/Environment Interaction is one of the principles of Geography. Weather is about the simplest form of Human/Environment action there is. Weather and climate effect humans in may ways. Both of these have direct impact on agriculture and because of this the rise of civilization in the fertile crescent. But weather doesn't just dictate the rise of agriculture and civilization it effects us everyday. The picture shows Boston covered in record breaking snow fall. This altered many peoples schedules, closed businesses, canceled sporting events, forced people to spend time shoveling snow, gave work for snow plowers, and all in all effected the entirety of Boston.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:18 PM

Weather is one of the most tangible ways in which the physical environment impacts society.  We depend on sunlight and rainfall, we adapt our behaviors to harsh conditions and we are constantly modifying the our environments by heating and cooling our buildings.  This Henry David Thoreau quote reminds us to acknowledge the powerful influence of the environment and to recognize that technological fixes have their limitations.  “Live in each season as it passes...and resign yourself to the influence of the earth.” --Henry David Thoreau


Question to Ponder: In what ways does the weather shape and influence culture and spatial patterns in your region?  How can we make our communities more handicap accessible during winter storms and other extreme conditions?


Tags: environment, weather and climate, environment depend, environment adapt, environment modify, disasters.

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Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data

Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"By using Facebook data from the 2.5 million people in New York or New England that ‘like’ either the Red Sox or Yankees I was able to create a more accurate rivalry map than ever before."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Sports maps with team logos on them are often hand-drawn works of art without much data to back them up--not so with this map.  Read the article to find the actual data which is much messier than these bold color proclaim.  These regions aren't homogenous (are they ever?) but this is the best fit line between the major groups of fans, showing that Connecticut is the true 'battle ground' for this regional rivalry. 


Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions, Rhode Island, Boston, NYC.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:26 AM

Pretty neat use of mapping and facebook to create this. This map is around the idea of what i expected it to look like with a few exceptions. As a yankee fan i expected a little bit more out of fellow Rhode Islanders when it came to the distribution but i guess i was wrong. i would also like to point out that cultural diversity probably has a role to play in this, with western connecticut being more ethnically diverse than eastern.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 15, 2015 8:13 AM

This map pretty much met my general expectations for the size of Red Sox's and Yankee Nations. Most of New England is clearly Red Sox Nation. As a Yankee fan living in hostile territory, I was heartened to know that Yankee territory is not all that far away.  Connecticut is the true battleground in the fight for more territory. That state serves as the crossroads between New England values and culture, and New York values and culture. I think this map says a lot more about New York and New England than just who supports each baseball team. Sports is often a window into our lives and habits. If you asked me to divide New England from New York, I would probably divide it along these lines.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:53 PM

This is a pretty interesting map, I am unsure though if using Facebook is actually an accurate tool of determination for the Yankees and Red Sox borders, but I guess it is alright if someone is just trying to figure out a general idea of what fans live where in the North East. As assumed, most of New England was going to be fans of the Red Sox, and as the more west you went toward NY, that it would change to the Yankees. Clearly though, after looking through the article, Connecticut is where the battle hits hardest, Eastern Conn likes the Red Sox, Western Conn likes the Yankees, with a mix toward the middle. What I find quite interesting though is the map of the Mass/NY line how it shows instantly a diving line between the two teams without crossing borders. 

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Boston and Syria

Boston and Syria | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Tags: Syria, terrorism, Boston.

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Alejandro Restrepo's comment, April 21, 2013 11:49 PM
I came to find out that this was photoshopped, but the message still read the same, except it was Arabic.
Nicholas Patrie's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:03 PM

certainly a powerful picture. as horrible as the Boston bombings were how can anyone imagine living through violence like that day in and day out.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, October 6, 2014 3:18 PM

"Boston bombings represent a sorrowful scene of what happens every day in Syria. Do accept our condolences". These words were posted on a banner that was made by some citizens of Syria after the Boston Marathon bombing. Notice the background of the picture. It does not look like a happy place. It almost looks as if the building behind them may have been bombed. After all, the citizens do tell us that bombings happen to occur every day in Syria. Even though they live a torturous life like this day in and day out, they still felt the need to send their condolences which was very respectful. As I look at this picture more and more, I noticed that all of the people holding up the sign are male. Maybe this has to do with the bombings in such that they maybe all lived in that building in the background. It is amazing to me that despite their world being bombed day after day, some are cracking smiles, they manage to hold up their countries flag, and hold their hands up with peace signs.

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GITN: Pilgrims' Progress

This classic Geography in the News by Neal Lineback has been re-released on his Lineback World View site.  This is an excellent lesson for K-12 educators to prepare their students to understand the historic and geographic context of Thanksgiving.

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Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York

Historic USGS Maps of New England & New York | Geography Education | Scoop.it
This historical collection of USGS 15 minute topographic maps dates from the 1890s to the 1950s. Geographic coverage is complete for New Hampshire and nearly complete for the rest of New England.

 

This is a great warehouse of historical maps of New England.  The picture above what is today South Providence and Cranston, but in 1894 the area around the lakes was a part of the City of Cranston.  Why would the city of Cranston 'lose' territory?  When did this happen?  This is just one example of the questions in historical geography that this resource can inspire.

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Red Sox Radio Rivalry | Bostonography

Red Sox Radio Rivalry | Bostonography | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A fun visualization about the geography of sports fans, specifically where can you get a radio signal for games for the Red Sox or Yankees games.  

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Brett Sinica's curator insight, September 27, 2013 12:16 PM

Now this is very interesting.  First of all I live along the coast of Eastern Connecticut, which essentially is a battleground between New York and Boston.  Sure there is Patriots and Jets/Giants, Celtics and Knicks, but nothing is comparable to the Red Sox and Yankees rivalry.  Fortunately my area is covered by the New York radio stations, as well as the Boston stations, but in an area where you're either "for them or for us" it's almost a judgement depending on which team you favor.  Growing up it was always fun to have half your friends root for the Red Sox, and half for the Yankees.  Yet as I've grown older I've realized it's much more geographical and territorial than I had ever thought.  Hands down, the best rivalry in American sports, and I'm lucky enough to be right in the middle of it.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 15, 2014 9:15 AM

(North America topic 1)
This map of Red Sex vs. Yankees radio coverage caught my eye for 2 reasons. First, the general divide between radio broadcasts seems mostly identical to a map I've seen about fans by county and city. I wonder if the fans caused the coverage, OR if the coverage made the fans?? Hmm...

Also, I couldn't help but notice the uncannily-large Yankee coverage area posted right in the middle of Rhode Island. I'd think that Hartford would have a larger circle.

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:39 PM

New England's most famed baseball team! The Red Sox have a storied rivalry with the New York Yankees from the 2004 MLB Playoffs where the Sox won the last four games of the ALCS to be the first team ever to win a series from being 3 games down and on the brink of elimination in all their remaining games in that series. They also compete with the Yankees with radio broadcasts. Fans mainly in Rhode Island, Massachusetts listen to the Red Sox radio Broadcasts. The areas up for dispute where there is competition is extreme southern Rhode Island, Western Connecticut, and areas on Long Island, and Greenwich Connecticut have people who listen to both broadcasts/