Geography Education
1.4M views | +886 today
Follow
Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You

The Arctic Suicides: It's Not The Dark That Kills You | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Greenland has the world's highest suicide rate. And teen boys are at the highest risk.

 

Like native people all around the Arctic — and all over the world — Greenlanders were seeing the deadly effects of rapid modernization and unprecedented cultural interference. American Indians and Alaska Natives (many of whom share Inuit roots with Greenlanders) had already seen many of their communities buckle under the same pressures.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an incredibly tragic story; if I could add one word to the sub-title, it would read, "It's not JUST the dark the kills you."  I'm not an environmental determinist, but we can't pretend that the climate/darkness don't play some role in Greenland having 6x the suicide rates of the United States.  See also this article/photo gallery about a similar suicide problem in the indigenous far north of Canada.    

 

Tags: Greenland, Arctic, genderpodcast, indigenous.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Arctic Trivia Quiz

Arctic Trivia Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"From icebergs and Inuit legends to polar bear organs and exploration disasters, 50 questions to truly test your northern knowledge."

Seth Dixon's insight:

These are 50 HARD questions (any student not from Canada that gets over 50% right should pat themselves on the back). 

 

TagsCanada, trivia, games, Arctic, landforms.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Canada's secret plan to invade the U.S. (and vice versa)

Canada's secret plan to invade the U.S. (and vice versa) | Geography Education | Scoop.it
After World War I, Canada drew up classified plans to invade the U.S. Meanwhile, the U.S. had its own secret plot to create the "United States of North America."
Seth Dixon's insight:

I never knew 1921 to 1930 was such a frosty time in Canadian-U.S. relations that BOTH sides drew up possible invasion plans.  Judging by these amazing arrows, these plans were never seriously about to be executed, but it is a good reminder that geopolitical partnerships (and rivalries) are ever-changing.  Today, if there are border tensions between these two allies, it might just center around the Arctic as it's geopolitical importance is rising, but the U.S. doesn't have a very successful track record against Canada.  Also, I did enjoy the 1920s reference that Americans simply assumed that Canada (once the British Empire was dismantled) would naturally be absorbed by the United States. 


TagsCanada, geopoliticspolitical, war.

more...
Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 17, 2015 8:30 AM

I never would have imagined that both Canada and the United States had secret plans to invade each other as late as 1930. I had assumed that after the United States failed  to take Canada during the War of 1812, that we as nation had just given up on the idea of Canadian annexation. It appears the ideals of Manifest Destiny survive. It is interesting to speculate how history may have been different had this come to pass. In the war between the two nations, Britain would probably have intervened on behalf of Canada. A British intervention would have destroyed the Anglo- American Alliance. Which means that during the Second World War, the United States would probably have refused to aide the British in the fight against the Nazis. A British defeat would have lead to a Nazi occupied Europe. A scary proposition in deed.

Luis Cesar Nunes's curator insight, September 17, 2015 9:36 AM

hoax?

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 18, 2015 11:30 PM

adicionar sua visão ...

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

4 animations that show what's really going on with our climate

4 animations that show what's really going on with our climate | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Trying to understand what’s actually going on in the world’s climate seems like it might be truly impossible. For one thing, there are so many different factors at work. Everything from how light travels through the atmosphere to how the winds move the ocean around to how rain hits the ground has an effect on what actually happens on Earth both now and in the future. That also means there’s absolutely no use in looking at each piece individually … to understand what’s really going on, the climate jigsaw puzzle needs to be complete.

That, says climate scientist Gavin Schmidt, is where climate modeling comes in. The discipline synthesizes data from multiple sources, including satellites, weather stations, even from people camping in the Arctic and submitting measurements of the ice they see around them. Climate modeling, Schmidt says, gives us our best chance of understanding the bigger picture of the world around us. 'We take all of the things we can see are going on, put them together with our best estimates of how processes work, and then see if we can understand and explain the emergent properties of climate systems,' he says. These four silent animations show what he means."


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica, climate change.

more...
Lora Tortolani's curator insight, February 2, 2015 6:59 PM

This makes me think of so many more things than just Geography and climate!

Nathalie Mercken's curator insight, February 11, 2015 3:33 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

Rich Schultz's curator insight, February 11, 2015 11:22 AM

All about climate change...

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic?

What’s the deal with Antarctica and the Arctic? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Perhaps the biggest misunderstanding is that the Arctic and Antarctic are similar. One’s in the north and the other is in the south; but other than that, they’re the same, right? No, this couldn’t be more wrong. These polar opposites are literally polar opposites.
For starters, the Arctic is a small, shallow ocean surrounded by land: Eurasia, Greenland, Canada and the United States. It’s only about 5 ½ million square miles, which is five times smaller than the Atlantic and 11 times smaller than the Pacific. Antarctica, on the other hand, is a continent surrounded by the entire Southern Ocean.

This may seem like no big deal, but it makes all the difference in the world. It takes a lot of energy to change water temperature compared to what it takes to change land temperature, which means Arctic seawater isn’t as cold as the continental ice sheet covering Antarctica. So, the Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) is about 10 feet thick, whereas the Antarctic ice sheet (compacted freshwater ice) is over a mile thick."


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, Antarctica.

more...
Ruth Reynolds's curator insight, November 12, 2014 9:05 PM

It would be nice to keep both

Javier Antonio Bellina's curator insight, November 17, 2014 2:51 PM

If we are

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

This Pulsing Earth

This Pulsing Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Spring comes, then summer, fall and winter and if you are off the planet with a camera looking down at Earth, the seasons seem like breaths. Speed up the imagery, and the planet seems to pulse, like a living thing.
Seth Dixon's insight:

I'm sorry that this site cannot display the animated GIF version, but just follow the link to see how the seasonal rthymns of the climate and biomass pulsate (at a much slower rate than our bodies, but still a system with it's ebbs and flows).  


Tags: physical, remote sensing, geospatial, biogeography, weather and climate, Arctic.

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Michael Miller
Scoop.it!

Out in the Great Alone

Out in the Great Alone | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race pushes participants to the brink on an unforgiving trek to the end of the world. And, as one writer who tracked the race by air discovers, that is exactly the point.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Iditarod is as much about conquering the physical environment and harsh climates as any sporting event in the world.  This article about this famous Alaskan race also has a unique geo-visualization component to it that is worth exploring--it has a map showing where the action takes place in the article and as the reader scrolls through the article, the map changes and it highlights the progression along the trail.   


Tags: physical, weather and climatesport, Arctic, visualization.

more...
chris tobin's comment, April 26, 2013 6:18 PM
very good story describing the long and dangerous trek. Its pretty amazing. I appreciated the video commentary and pictures of scenery and animals of the areas.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Dazzling Northern Lights Anticipated Saturday Night

Dazzling Northern Lights Anticipated Saturday Night | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"A solar flare that occurred around 2 a.m. Thursday morning may create a spectacular display of northern lights Saturday evening. The midlevel flare had a long duration and was directed at Earth.  Solar flares create auroras when radiation from the sun reaches Earth and interacts with charged protons in our atmosphere. The effects are greater at the magnetic poles and weaken as they move south from the Arctic or north of the Antarctic. In the northern hemisphere the results are called the aurora borealis, with the aurora australis being its southern counterpart. The result is a spectacular display of light and color for areas with clear enough views."


Seth Dixon's insight:

For more information and predictions, see the Alaska Geophysical Institute's website, which has plenty of experience predicting the Aurora Borealis. 

more...
Yann Chemali's comment, September 12, 2013 7:30 PM
I never thought that it was possible to see see northern lights as south as Nebraska. That's very cool.
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:43 AM
The aurora borealis (may have butchered that word) is one of the manh beautiful and amazing things that this Earth offers to us! Sadly living in virginia beach it is definitely not as easy to see the lights! Possibly the ONLY reason i would move to alaska/canada and/or some country up north!
Zakkary Catera's comment, September 13, 2013 12:43 AM
The aurora borealis (may have butchered that word) is one of the manh beautiful and amazing things that this Earth offers to us! Sadly living in virginia beach it is definitely not as easy to see the lights! Possibly the ONLY reason i would move to alaska/canada and/or some country up north!
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Dramatic Greenland Ice Melt

Scientists capture dramatic footage of Arctic glaciers melting in hours Scientists have captured dramatic footage of massive lakes in the Arctic melting away...

 

An amazingly extreme place that is far removed from inhabited regions of our planet, but still heavily impacted by people nonetheless.  

more...
Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 10:10 PM
It shows us how humanity impacts the planet wherever we are
Suggested by Kristen McDaniel
Scoop.it!

Unexpected Consequences

Unexpected Consequences | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Climate change has numerous casualities: the melting of the Arctic Sea ice is one such environment nightmare that's a result of global warming (don't worry Texans, you can just call it a "freak heat wave" or an "inexplicable anomaly").   But like all global processes, not all places are impacted equally.  Even in an economic recession, some find fortune while the majority flounder.  Same is true with the melting of the Artic; the melting might potentially opening up the fabled Northwest Passage and create new, seasonal shipping lanes.  Who would benefit from this?  Who would suffer?  To see a short video on this, see: http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/09/melting-arctic-sea-ice-and-shipping-routes  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

If Atlantic and Pacific Sea Worlds Collide, Does That Spell Catastrophe?

If Atlantic and Pacific Sea Worlds Collide, Does That Spell Catastrophe? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
While the Arctic ice melt is opening up east to west shipping lanes, some 75 animals species might also make the journey

 

Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arcticbiogeography, climate change.

more...
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, January 31, 6:14 PM

.Mientras que el derretimiento del hielo del Ártico se está abriendo de este a oeste  , especies de unos 75 animales también podrían hacer el viaje.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz

The Ultimate Canadian Geography Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"From treasure maps to smart phone apps, geography makes sense of our world by describing locations, patterns and relationships of the Earth’s natural and social systems — both past and present. Canadian Geographic’s editors, along with the help of a number of Fellows of The Royal Canadian Geographical Society and other experts, compiled this ultimate Canadian geography quiz to truly test you. Think you’re a geo genius? Prove it!"

Seth Dixon's insight:

These are 50 HARD questions (any student not from Canada that gets over 50% right should pat themselves on the back).  I will only give you one of the 50 answers since most of you have never been to the explore the frozen tunda; pictured above is a pingo.  Pingos form when groundwater is pressurized and forced upward in a concentrated area by advancing permafrost. This groundwater-saturated sediment freezes and expands as it’s driven toward the surface, causing the earth above to bulge and eventually break open. 

 

TagsCanada, trivia, games, Arctic, landforms.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze

How the warming Arctic might be behind Boston's deep freeze | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There may be a counterintuitive explanation for the deep freeze that hit New England this winter: The rapidly warming Arctic is causing big disruptions in the jet stream, which carries weather across North America. Is this the worst winter you've experienced?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, ArcticBoston, climate change, podcast.

more...
Gail McAuliffe's curator insight, March 1, 2015 11:12 AM

Perhaps this article will sway some climate change skeptics...

Paul Farias's curator insight, April 9, 2015 11:33 AM

So bizarre how the rate of the arctic warming causes us to get smacked with the cold weather. Its one of those things that are like how does the jet stream actually work. Including the fact that California is getting hit with a major drought. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Who Owns The North Pole?

"Though uninhabited and full of melting ice caps, the Arctic is surprisingly an appealing piece of real estate. Many countries have already claimed parts of the region. So who technically owns the North Pole? And why do these nations want it so bad?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

Denmark is now being more assertive in their claimsWhy is this happening now?  As climate change threatens polar ice caps, some see the receding ice as an economic and political opportunity.  Canada, Russia, Denmark (Greenland) and the U.S. are all seeking to expand their maritime claims in the Arctic.  When trapped under ice, extracting resources is cost prohibitive, but the melting sea ice will make the Arctic's resources all the more valuable (including the expanded shipping lanes).  Even a global disaster like climate change can make countries behave like jackals, ready to feast on a dead carcass.  For more, read this National Geographic blogpost.  


TagsArctic, economic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, unit 4 politicalclimate change, political ecology.

more...
Rich Schultz's curator insight, January 2, 2015 5:52 PM

Great question!  I think we all know the answer...Santa Claus!! ;)

Sammy Shershevsky's curator insight, January 17, 2015 4:57 PM

The video discusses a big topic in discussion today - Who really owns the North Pole? Although the North Pole is uninhabited, many countries have claimed to take ownership of the vast majority of land (or, ice). Canada has already claimed that the North Pole is part of its nation. Russia has put up Russian flags on the North Pole (such as underwater) but does that really make North Pole a Russian territory? The media plays a role in this by offering different opinions on who should and who deserves the right to own the North Pole. You might read a Canadian article that lists all the outright reasons why the North Pole is or deserves to be a Canadian territory. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 6, 2015 7:26 PM

In my opinion, I don't understand how the United nations can be seen as an entity that, essentially, controls who would have rights to a place like the North Pole(technically, not owned by anyone).  I, naively, understand the basics of the U.N.  In short, it is an organization that was formed, post-WW I or II, as a governing board for world-issues.

 

 With that being said, how can they believe that their "law" is the all-powerful one?  If I'm a leader of a country who is not a member of the U.N., do I really care what they say?   I just find it odd that this narrator speaks about the issue while holding the U.N. as a supreme authority.  I know that this video is just a quick fun type of video but it leaves me with wanting to hear the perspective of a non-U.N. member.  But a very interesting topic, none the less.

 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries

Canada on mission to map Arctic, lay claim to broader boundaries | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Canada has dispatched two icebreakers to map the Arctic seabed beneath the North Pole to support a bid to extend the country's maritime territory deeper into the waterways at the top of the world.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Canada, Russia and Denmark (Greenland) are all seeking to expand their maritime claims in the Arctic.  Globally speaking, the retreat of Arctic sea ice can be seen as a unmitigated disaster, but disasters for the many can open up new economic opportunities for the few.  When trapped under ice, extracting resources is cost prohibitive, but the melting sea ice will make the Arctic's resources all the more valuable (including the expanded shipping lanes).  This fits in with the APHG new course outline which includes political ecology (the study of the political and economic principles controlling the relations of human beings to one another and to the environment).
 

Tagseconomic, environment, political, resources, water, sovereignty, coastal, environment depend, territoriality, unit 4 political, Arctic, climate change, political ecology.

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 18, 2014 7:19 PM

Option - marine environments and management

Kevin Barker's curator insight, August 19, 2014 8:53 AM

Canada and Russia have at least one way they will benefit from a warming climate and both are eager to see that they take advantage of it.  Using remote sensing is a way to identify and formalize where is their legitimate claim to territory and resources.  What problems might arise with the retreat of the arctic ice?

MsPerry's curator insight, August 25, 2014 3:30 PM

APHG-Unit 4

Suggested by Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
Scoop.it!

The Hottest Day On Record ... In Siberia?

The Hottest Day On Record ... In Siberia? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Did the Arctic region break a heat record?
Seth Dixon's insight:

The Siberian Times is reporting a record heatwave for towns such as Norilsk that are both North of the Artic Circle and built on permafrost.  While on the global scale the climatic shifts are quite alarming, there are many in Siberia that see global warming as a mixed bag.  In what some would have you believe is an unrelated news item, the North Pole is experiencing the formation of large meltwater ponds


Tags: physical, weather and climate, Arctic, climate change.

more...
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, July 28, 2013 4:25 PM

Global warming...no...Siberia is supposed to be a cold dark place...according to my Dad!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Night Sky Comes Alive With Aurora Borealis

Night Sky Comes Alive With Aurora Borealis | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Peak season to spot rare, dazzling night skies over Canada and Alaska."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While I didn't get to personally witness this phenomenon over the weekend, many farther north took some incredibly images.  This ABC video nicely summarizes the Aurora Borealis.  

more...
Lorraine Chaffer's comment, June 1, 2013 7:49 AM
Aurora Borealis has cultural significance for many people in the arctic
Morgan Stewart's comment, July 25, 2013 9:15 PM
This is so beautiful! Seeing an aurora borealis is one of the things on my bucket list and I really hope I get to experience it.
Chloe Williamson's comment, August 13, 2013 10:12 AM
This is would be an incredible sight to witness! I hope I can see is beautiful aurora one day.
Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012

The 10 Stories You Missed in 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it
2012 has had many stories around the globe have grabbed the headlines with their shocking tales.  Some of the most important shifts in the world however are incremental processes that happen slowly...


This article from Foreign Policy shares some great global stories that may end up impacting the coming years as well:  


1) India and Pakistan start trading more

2) Brazil becomes an immigration destination

3) Inuits strike it rich

4) A tropical disease nearly eradicated

5) The copyright wars go 3-D

6) The end of the Indian call center (Philippines)

7) Hong Kong fights back

8) Moscow on the Med (Cyprus)

9) Oil discoveries in Central Africa

10) Island dispute between Iran and UAE

more...
Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, January 4, 2013 9:57 AM

What was missed in the news?  Take a look at some of the stories from around the world!

Scooped by Seth Dixon
Scoop.it!

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt

Satellites Reveal Sudden Greenland Ice Melt | Geography Education | Scoop.it
NASA researchers are expressing concern about something they've never seen before: the melting of ice across nearly the entire surface of Greenland earlier this month.

 

Climate changes are afoot in the Arctic and the Greenland ice sheet.  For more on the Arctic. In related news, Texas and Louisiana have introduced education standards that require educators to teach climate change denial as a valid scientific position. South Dakota and Utah passed resolutions denying climate change. Tennessee and Oklahoma also have introduced legislation to give climate change skeptics a place in the classroom.

more...
Sarah Curtis's comment, September 3, 2012 3:33 PM
I didn't know how bad global warming was until I read this article and I don't think many people realize it either. We need to start changing our ways if we want to live in a safe and healthy environment. I think more people need to see images and read articles like this so they have a better knowledge on how little time we have.
Morgan Halsey's comment, September 10, 2012 11:30 PM
Some people still don't believe in global warming, but now with new technology, there is great evidence. New technology has allowed us to explore our world in ways that we have not been able to before. We are now able see things about our world and fix problems before they become worse.
Michael Grant's comment, September 12, 2012 4:12 PM
I am surprised about how the polar ice caps are melting and that global warming is very real, but on the other hand it's just part of the Earth maturing
Rescooped by Seth Dixon from History and Geography in the 21st Century Classroom
Scoop.it!

Frozen Planet - An Interactive Exploration of the Poles

Frozen Planet - An Interactive Exploration of the Poles | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Very cool way to explore the colder realms of our planet.  This web-based "Google Earth-like" resource comes preloaded with layers  (ice extent, temperature, permafrost, biogeography, etc.) that would make for a great interactive lesson for many grade levels. 


Via Carla Saunders
more...
No comment yet.