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Who Likes Whom in The Middle East? Key players & Notable relationships

Who Likes Whom in The Middle East? Key players & Notable relationships | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An interactive network visualisation of key players & notable relationships in the Middle East region. Continually updated. Awesome looking.
Seth Dixon's insight:

News flash:the Middle East is complicated.  In a region where the enemy of an enemy can be your friend, keeping track of local, regional, and global interests can be a staggering proposition.  This flow chart is both incredibly complex, but also aids the user in making sense of the relationships that help to define the region.  

 

Tags: MiddleEast, conflict, political, geopoliticsregions.

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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"If ever there was a demonstration of the power of science, it is the course of the fight billed 'Mankind v AIDS'. Until 1981 the disease (though already established in parts of Africa) was unknown to science. Within a decade it passed from being seen as primarily a threat to gay men, and then to promiscuous heterosexuals, to being a plague that might do to some parts of Africa what the Black Death did to medieval Europe. But now, though 1.6m people a year still die of it, that number is on a downward trajectory­, and AIDS rarely makes the headlines any more. How was this achieved?  The answer has two parts: sound science and international co-operation."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The Ebola epidemic has dominated headlines recently.  In their haste, it has been lost on that media the scary medical story of the 20th century (AIDS) that was going to doom Africa is now a success story.  Some of the stories about Ebola have treated Africa as one monolithic place--Africa is not a single story.  


Tagsmedical, diffusion, Africa, regions, perspective.

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Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, December 15, 2015 12:07 AM

Over the last quarter century, the medical technology has ever so changed. Simple tests and modernized medications can help slow the progress of the HIV infection. The tests can tell if someone has advanced AIDS or early stages of the HIV virus itself. However, over the last year and a half, the epidemic has been placed on the back burner with the Ebola epidemic that has and still occurring. The fact that Ebola spread as rapidly as it did, shows that any virus or disease can spread extremely quick if someone comes in contact with bodily fluids of another human and can be contracted pretty quickly.

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:10 PM

this is a media issue all over the world. focusing on one part of a story and not revealing the rest. people can focus on how bad things are or they can focus on the advancements and how much better things are than how they were and how they continue to get better, especially in regards to medical care in africa. their level of care is still just awful but is obviously steadily improving. especially in south africa.

Brett Laskowitz's curator insight, October 17, 2016 1:55 PM
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AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa

AIDS, TB and Malaria in Africa | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Despite the gains, more Africans still die from Malaria even as the spotlight remains firmly fixed on HIV/AIDS.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is just the map portion of a very detailed infographic on the medical geographic situation in Africa. Click here to see the full infographic.


Tags: Africa, medical, development, infographic, diffusion.

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Nathan Chasse's curator insight, April 1, 2014 10:41 AM

This infographic shows how pervasive disease is in Africa. Though HIV gets a lot of attention, malaria and tuberculosis are just as prevalent as HIV/AIDS. The attention given to HIV/AIDS is reflected in the amount of aid sent to Africa, with a significant amount more being spent to halt the spread of HIV. These efforts are not entirely in vain as there have been decreases for all three diseases, but the funding necessary to make serious progress not on its way.

 

Though there is an even greater need to fight malaria, more international aid for HIV/AIDS is likely because most of the countries sending aid are not as familiar with malaria and HIV/AIDS has become sensationalized.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 3:52 PM

Disease is a global problem. Not having enough resources to keep diseases such as malaria out of Africa is unfortunate. People are dying every day and in efforts to save these people, it still can't be done. In the past, AIDS was the main disease that killed people in Africa. More recently, malaria is working its way through humans and killing them more than AIDS.

TavistockCollegeGeog's curator insight, July 4, 2014 7:41 AM

Fantastic infographic on health risks in Africa. Particular focus on infectious diseases.

Suggested by Marc Crawford , Mankato East High School
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AIDS/HIV

AIDS/HIV | Geography Education | Scoop.it

AIDS is a global issue, but clearly this impacts Sub-Saharan Africa far more than any other region. 


Tags: Africa, medical, infographic, development.

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, November 11, 2014 2:59 PM

If AIDS is obviously a bigger problem in SUb-Saharan Africa i would hope that, that is where we would send the most help and further educate people about safe sex and how to prevent from spreading AIDS.

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South Asia doing worst on UN development goals

South Asia doing worst on UN development goals | Geography Education | Scoop.it
South Asian nations are making the least progress in the Asia-Pacific region on meeting MDGs, an Asian Development Bank official says...

 

The UN's developmental goals are include reducing child and maternal mortality, halving poverty and hunger, providing universal primary education, gender equality and halting the spread of HIV/AIDS. In the Asia/Pacific region there are 17 countries that are not meeting the goals and all South Asian countries (except Sri Lanka) are labeled as 'off track.'

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Justin Ng Jie Ern's curator insight, January 20, 2014 10:22 AM

There are about 17 countries who are off-track the Millennium Development Goals. Out of the 17, all South Asian countries are included with the exception of Sri Lanka.

These countries are experiencing poverty and the lack of proper education.

I am worry for these 17 countries, as most of them are undevelop countries. I am afraid that as the world continues to move forward for the better,  these undeveloped countries would get left behind in the process.

I am dissapointed by the fact that some countries' government are not taking the initiative to help the country to stop poverty, and end the misery of these countries.

But i am enlighted and encouraged by the fact that, some of the governments are taking up the initiative to stop poverty. I am also enlighted that these governements are trying their best to improve their education system for young minds too.

In my opinion, all government should take the initiative to clear this obsacle called 'poverty' and help improve their education system, to help educate this country's children.

BrandonTeoZX's curator insight, January 21, 2014 7:41 AM

Reading this article, i feel a bit spoilt. Why? Here i sit, in a comfortable armchair and with a roof over my head, food on the table, clothes to wear, i feel like a king compared to them. People in southeast asia are not doing very well, children having no basic education, people contracting HIV or AIDS easily, some do not even have clean water to drink from. Singapore is a country in Southeast asia, and yet we are one of the world's richest nations, in stark contrast to the other parts of Asia. What can people do about this? What can we do to help? 

jerriel wai's curator insight, January 26, 2014 8:55 AM

connect: The UN has been helping countries facing poverty issues for quite some time now. They are a great corparation that helps

 

extend: I thought they only helped the countries not solve the countries problems. This should be done by the government.  I believe that this can be done by making the government corruption free.

'

challenge: Lets try to stop poverty in south asia, shall we?

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AIDS/HIV Video: Development and Disease

Justine Ojambo, co-founder of the SLF-funded project PEFO in Uganda, talks about losing his mother to AIDS and PEFO's work to support children orphaned by AI...

 

THis is a great video on AIDS/HIV in Africa.  So many show Africans as passive victims of global and environmental forces beyond their control, this one is of empowered and inspiring people seeking to change the world.  For more inspiration AIDS/HIVS videos from Africa, see: http://stephenlewisfoundation.org/news-resources/multimedia/video-clips

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Peter Siner's comment, November 16, 2011 10:08 PM
it seems as though there is little we can do to help help end this horrible plague in africa besides donate money or food , relgion is such a huge factor in their decision making process
Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 9:31 PM

One thing that stuck out to me in this video is when he spoke about the making sure the children’s basic needs are met so they can concentrate on school. That is such a problem in our education system today that people don’t wish to address. I wonder how our education system would be if we made sure our children also had their basic needs met.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 16, 2014 8:11 AM

Ojambo has founded a project that addresses the extremely sad issue of orphans who have lost their parents to AIDS. These children need help because they do not have parents to support them, leaving them with their Grandparents who struggle to support these children. This video made me think of AIDS in Africa in a different way. When I thought of AIDS in Africa, I always focused on how many people were dying and how tragic that was. I seldom thought of the people they were leaving behind and what their death would mean to those still living.

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What's the tallest mountain on Earth?

What's the tallest mountain on Earth? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Mount Everest is usually said to be the highest mountain on Earth. Reaching 29,035 feet at its summit, Everest is indeed the highest point above global mean sea level—the average level for the ocean surface from which elevations are measured. But the summit of Mt. Everest is not the farthest point from Earth’s center.

Earth is not a perfect sphere, but is a bit thicker at the Equator due to the centrifugal force created by the planet’s constant rotation. Because of this, the highest point above Earth’s center is the peak of Ecuador’s Mount Chimborazo, located just one degree south of the Equator where Earth’s bulge is greatest. The summit of Chimborazo is 20,564 feet above sea level. However, due to the Earth’s bulge, the summit of Chimborazo is over 6,560 feet farther from the center of the Earth than Everest’s peak. That makes Chimborazo the closest point on Earth to the stars.  

You may be surprised to learn that Everest is not the tallest mountain on Earth, either. That honor belongs to Mauna Kea, a volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Mauna Kea originates deep beneath the Pacific Ocean, and rises more than 32,800 feet from base to peak."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've tried to answer this question without any visual aids and there is always at least one confused look in the class.  This infographic is the most straightforward way to give the 'long' answer to a seemingly simple question, "what is the tallest mountain on Earth?"  It all depends on how you measure it and what your reference point is.   

 

Tags: physicalEcuador, Nepal.

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How was the AIDS epidemic reversed?

How was the AIDS epidemic reversed? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The breakthrough came in 1996, when a new class of antiretroviral drug called protease inhibitors was launched. These were used in combination with two older drugs that worked in different ways. The combination meant that evolving resistance required the simultaneous appearance of several beneficial (from the virus’s point of view) mutationswhich is improbable.  With a viable treatment available, political action became more realistic. AIDS had been a “political” disease from the beginning, because a lot of the early victims were middle-class gay Americans, a group already politically active. Activists were split between those who favoured treating people already infected and those who wanted to stop new infections. The latter were more concerned to preach the message of safe sex and make condoms widely available, so that people could practise what was preached. Gradually, however, activists on both sides realised that the drugs, by almost abolishing the virus from a sufferer’s body, also render him unlikely to pass it on. They are, in other words, a dual-use technology."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The article in the Economist points to the successes the international scientific community has made to minimize the impact of AIDS, but some doctors have wondered, "but what if AIDS didn't impact the wealthy and politically active?"  In this op-ed, a doctor says that medicine is just for those that can afford it because many pharmaceutical companies aren't interested in developing treatments for tropical diseases. 


Tags: AIDS, Africa, medical, development, diffusion.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 3:22 PM

As the article states, the AIDS virus was not known to the science community during the diseases' first years of emergance, but thanks to science, research was put on the forefront to stop AIDS. Unfortunately, the Disease is still incurable, but as the author says, some cases of the virus disappearing from the sufferers' body, it gives hope that a cure may be found someday. The AIDs virus will always be a hot topic and is referred to as the "Political" disease and must pose a threat to rich people in order for the pharmaceutical companies to develop cures.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 12:52 AM

This article discusses the recent treatments and their success in treating AIDs. For many years AIDs spread rapidly across Africa and even today it still spreads, luckily two things have begun to slow down it's advance. Both the increase in the use of contraception such as condoms which protect against AIDs as well as the production of antibiotics  made available to many at risk of AIDs. This shows that with decent government backing it is possible to stem outbreaks such as this.

Norka McAlister's curator insight, March 28, 2015 3:13 PM

In the late 1990s, it is estimated that 15 million of people had died because of AIDS in Africa. As all social classes were  affected by the virus, even political figures, many international organizations and private businesses were integrated into research treatment. However, the main obstacle in combating this disease is that there is not enough money to fund the necessary treatment for people in many African countries. Although, many organizations have embarked on campaigns regarding how to prevent this dreadful disease from spreading further and these efforts have proved successful in the past decade.

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The Spread of AIDS

The Spread of AIDS | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A handful of AIDS cases were first recognized in the U.S. at the beginning of the 1980s. By 1990, there was a pandemic. In 1997, more than 3 million people became newly infected with HIV.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The spread of AIDS/HIV since the 1980s has varied greatly over time and space.  The red lines represent Sub-Saharan countries and the dark blue line on this interactive is the regional average of Sub-Saharan African countries.  The regional trend was on the rise at the end of the 20th century, but is now on a slight decline (but still an major impact on the continent).  Countries such as Botswana and Zimbabwe have made some significant strides in limiting the spread of AIDS (Zimbabwe is the country that 'peaked' in 1997 and has had the steepest decline).


Tags: Africa, medical, development, infographic, diffusion.

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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:36 PM

Lack of education, social stigma, and poverty all play into the role of the spread of HIV in the sub sahara African region. This is a stoppable disease, but only with understanding of how it is passed, and education on how to stop the spread. Condoms, monogamy, good hygiene around bodily fluids and education on intravenous drug use are the only ways to slow the progress of AIDS.

 

Martin Kemp's curator insight, December 17, 2015 3:07 PM

you always hear about the aids problem in africa but this graph really puts it into context and you can see how huge of a problem this is. obviously better doctors/education is needed in these places to halt this pandemic

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Botswana's 'Stunning Achievement' Against AIDS

A decade ago, Botswana was facing a national crisis as AIDS appeared on the verge of decimating the country's adult population. Now, the country provides free, life-saving AIDS drugs to almost all of its citizens who need them.

 

This is a great example, and possibly a template on how to tackle the AIDS/HIV crisis in Sub-Saharan Africa.  Botswana was as hard hit as any country, but they fully invested their economic initiatives into tackling this and actively changed cultural attitudes and behaviors that faciliate transmission.  Not all is 'doom and gloom' when looking at poverty and disease-stricken countries.   

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James Hobson's curator insight, November 3, 2014 8:36 PM

(Africa topic 9)

This video illustrates many of the factor which have contributed to Botswana's success (as well as other nations' failures) against HIV/AIDS. Preventing the spread of HIV/AIDS is not just a "yes or no" decision.

Many people live in areas where treatment is not available. Others live where treatment is available, but it is inconsistent or improper. And yet even some of those to whom proper treatment is available choose not to receive it.

Just as has been associated with cancer, many believe (and some statistics seem to support this, even if only indirectly) one's attitude is a major influence on one's outcome. The same can be said for the outcome of all those in a region as well. In this sense, a little can go a long way.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, November 22, 2014 4:13 PM

Media often depicts Africa and the HIV/AIDS crisis as a hopeless, out of control issue. Despite the media, Botswana has actually almost reversed its AIDS issues with diligent work by the government. Instead of relying on foreign aid, Botswana took matters into its own hands. Knowing that its people's survival was on the line, the government put both money and resources into finding ways to stop the spread and to make the lives of those infected much better. By changing the cultural outlook on the virus, people are starting to seek help and to no longer fear those with the disease. Botswana's new challenge will be to educate its people so they do not underestimate the treatable virus and practice prevention. 

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 23, 2014 2:04 PM

Working with the government can help improve the lives of people. Availability of drugs across social strata helps. 

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Awaiting Tomorrow - People Living with HIV/AIDS in Africa

From http://www.witness.org | "Awaiting Tomorrow" tells the story people living with HIV/AIDS in the war-torn Eastern region of the Democratic Republic of Congo...

 

This video provides a chilling glimpse into the struggle of Africans with AIDS/HIV without sufficient medical care.  

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Lisa Fonseca's comment, December 5, 2011 12:49 AM
Many more people should be aware of this clip. Here is a twenty five year old with four children, and now has been dealing with aids for one year. The likely chance of him surviving being that he is living in such poverty, is very low. It is awful to see his four children watching their father slowly die of aids, but it also can be seen as a lesson to the children to learn and become aware of aids and learn how to avoid them. This young adult not only wanted to survive but also wanted to survive to be a spokesperson to the world. I think more and more people need to be aware of situations like these. Yes, many people know Africa has a high percentage of aids but 2.6 million people in just Democratic Republic of Congo are living with aids. If people became more aware of this situation by watching videos like these and seeing how they could make an impact I think this number could be lowered. Possibly we can start by showing videos like this to adolescents and getting them knowledged in this area at a young age.
Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 8:36 PM

This video is so sad because HIV/AIDS  in the DRC and other African countries is definitely preventable and treatable but due to the immense amounts of poverty and the lack of information about contraceptives and protection, millions are infected every year.

The man featured in this video mentions that the government does nothing to help fund medical centers or any other assistance and it is truly shameful.

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 16, 2014 12:17 PM

Unit 2

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Hans Rosling on global population growth

TED Talks The world's population will grow to 9 billion over the next 50 years -- and only by raising the living standards of the poorest can we check population growth.

 

TED talks are great resources, and this one about global population growth, is a great link with Hans Roslings trademark data visualizations that simplifiy complex data and 'tell the story,' but this time using far more common visual aids.

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Ken Morrison's comment, September 29, 2012 10:01 PM
Hello. Sorry about the suggestion. I thought I was posting that to my site. Have a great day. I really like your site. Ken
Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:28 PM

Unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:25 AM

This is a brilliant video to help you understand the QoL and SoL linked to population.