Geography Education
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Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal

Troubles on Russia's Lake Baikal | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Workers at an ailing paper mill in Siberia are clinging to their jobs in the face of financial pressure and criticism from environmentalists.

 

The environment, industry and politics play key roles in this story of an old style Soviet mono-town on Lake Baikal.  Monotowns had planned economies that revolved around one industry and today many of these are struggling in the post-Soviet era.  While the particulars of the political situation are a bit dated, the overall issue is still quite relevant to understanding Russia today.   

2013 update: The paper plant is now officially closed  

 

Tags: Russia, industry, labor, environment, economic, water, pollution, environment modify, unit 6 industry.

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Paige Therien's curator insight, May 4, 2014 12:05 PM

The Soviet Union scattered "monotowns" around their territory; these monotowns consist of a job-creating industrial institutions like factories which then allow the formation of towns around them.  They are located all around the former Soviet Union and are very isolated.  After the collapse of the Soviet Union, these towns continued to run due to the privatization of the industrial center.  Today, Russia's Lake Baikal, which is the deepest lake in the world and contains 20 percent of the Earth's fresh water, is home to one of these monotowns.  This particular town's economy is based on their paper mill which uses and deposits tons of chemicals.  Environmentalists are very concerned for the future of the lake while the citizens are only concerned with feeding their families and this is creating social unrest.  Due to the isolation and distance from Moscow, people cannot just pick up and leave.  Also, working with "cleaner" alternatives is way out of this town's budget.  Today, many citizens in these monotowns miss the support that the Soviet Union offered and people are literally stuck in a place where their only income is dirty.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, November 25, 2015 2:31 PM

This mill on Lake Biakal was created in the soviet era. This was created and made a increasing well place to work with the promise of a bright future for its workers. Instead when it comes to the post soviet era its a failing community. Not because of the workers but because of the era that they live in. The age of environmentalists. because of this the mill and its workers are suffering. Many of the people that had moved there to work in the mill in the 60's with a promise of a bright future. However today the people who originally moved there and the descendents are paying the price for the soviet promise. If the mill were to forever close then the people of the area would basically have no life and future. They wouldnt even have enough money to move out of look for jobs.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 14, 2015 1:28 PM

Seeing this video and the lack of human development in this small town is astounding. They are destroying a lake and the environment about them, they do not care though. Unfortunately, they have to not care about the environment, they are so desperate for work to make money to live and support themselves and family, that they are willing to do what it takes to keep their jobs at the mill. The workers and citizens of the area know about the consequences of the pollution, they know it needs to be taken care of, but with the depravity they have, they have to. They are faced with a situation no one want to be in... work and destroy the environment so they have money to live, or be without life necessities. 

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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.


I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."


Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.

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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 1:29 PM
The request video is not available ...
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Digital Topographic Maps

Digital Topographic Maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Home page of USGS Topographic Maps...

Seth Dixon's insight:

The last paper editions of USGS topographic maps came out in 1973 and 1992.  If you are waiting for the next print edition, you'll be waiting a long time.  Like so many other agencies with information distribution, the USGS topo maps have gone digital.  In 2001 the USGS announced the production of a current, seamless digital National Map.  You can still quadrangle chunks of the National map and download them for free as PDFs (with geospatial extensions for measuring).   You can search for aerial imagery here.


Tags: mapping, cartography, geospatial.

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Geographic Analysis of 2012 Presidential Election

Geographer Andy Baker provides an excellent spatial analysis of the key voting patterns that will shape the 2012 presidential election in the United States.

 

Tags: political, statistics, spatial, regions, USA.

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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:24 PM
This video was very helpful for me because the speaker clearly gave visual examples of the many topics that can steer certain voters in the U.S. to vote a certain way, during election time. It helped me better interpret political data, since I am a visual learner.
Betty Denise's comment, October 15, 2012 6:19 AM
RT the comment !
Frank Fenn's comment, March 2, 2013 2:09 AM
I used this during the Political Unit. I find that 9th graders know nothing about politics beyond what concerns them at the moment. Stretching their brain back to when they were 7 helps build the political foundations of the future!
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Geographic Ignorance

Chelsie Hightower is confused on DWTS. Helio Castroneves does his best to educate her. Does he succeed? LET'S FIND OUT.


This is painful, but highlights once again why everyone should learn some basic geography.  


Tags: GeographyEducation, video.

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Kalin B.'s comment, November 5, 2012 11:31 AM
It's somewhat depressing to see when people don't grasp the very world they inhabit.
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The Global Food Waste Scandal

"TED Talks Western countries throw out nearly half of their food, not because it’s inedible -- but because it doesn’t look appealing. Tristram Stuart delves into the shocking data of wasted food, calling for a more responsible use of global resources."

Seth Dixon's insight:

No one should be surprised that more developed societies are more wasteful societies.  It is not just personal wasting of food at the house and restaurants that are the problem.  Perfectly edible food is thrown out due to size (smaller than standards but perfectly normal), cosmetics (Bananas that are shaped 'funny') and costumer preference (discarded bread crust).  This is an intriguing perceptive on our consumptive culture, but it also is helpful in framing issues such as sustainability and human and environmental interactions in a technologically advanced societies that are often removed form the land where the food they eat originates. 


Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, TED, video, unit 5 agriculture.

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Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:39 AM

It isn't surprising that the more a country has developed, the more wasteful they are. I just think that we need to change this standard. We can not keep this up if we want to sustain ourselves for centuries to come. If we are going to change our consumption culture, we need to look at why it has become the way it is. Why do we see food as unappealing? This is an interesting video and certaintly makes you think twice about throwing anything away. 

Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 29, 2013 6:13 PM

Ted explains it well how we all waste perfectly good food that people would like to eat. Also it was amazing how much food was in the dumpsters that was just a day or week old. That meat could feed hundreds of people that are struggling to eat and all that meet to waste. 

megan b clement's curator insight, December 16, 2013 1:51 AM

Ted talks about just how wasteful our planet is. How we just ignore the issue and act like it will  not affect us in the future. When he shows you video and pictures of massive piles of the ends of a loaf of bread or all the food that Stop and Shop throws out because it does not "look" good for the customer. How every little bit of help counts you can try to make a little bit of an effort to be less wasteful. We have so much unnecessary waste. Like when he uses the example of how many people throw away the ends of a loaf of bread then he shows the waste of the ends of bread in massive piles it makes you sick. Especially with all of the hungry people in the world we need to be more resourceful.

 

 

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The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.


Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.

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Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 26, 2014 12:43 PM

Unit 2 population and migration 

This map shows the population of migrants in certain states and compares them to other states. This demographic specifically highlights Texas and shows its migrant information. Texas has the highest immigrant income out of all of the states. Also Texas has very few naturalized citizens who used to be an immigrant.

This map relates to unit 2 because it shows the illegal immigration. And immigration theories. This proves ravensteins laws correct because it shows how people move a short distance to migrate, knowing that most migrants to America come from Latin America. This map is a great example of ravensteins theories and unit 2

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Mixing Past And Present In Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea, once home to cannibals, still has an exotic aura. The local tourist economy caters to those notions, and visitors may see a hybrid of the traditional and the modern.


This story is an intriguing blend--we see traditional cultures engaging in the global economy. They have created two villages: a traditional one designed for tourism filled with emblems of their folk cultures, and another one where people work, live eat and play with various markers of outside cultural and technological influence.


"Tourists are taking pictures. They don't want to take pictures of those who are in Western clothes.  People who are in Western clothes are not allowed to get close to people who are dressed up in the local dressings."


Questions to Ponder: Which village do you see as the more "authentic" one? How can culture also be a commodity?


Tags: folk culture, tourism, indigenous, culture, economic, rural, historical, unit 3 culture, Oceania.

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Kendra King's curator insight, May 3, 2015 1:40 AM

The title of this article seemed to be a little bit of a misnomer given how the geographic forces impact Papua New Guinea. Part of the population caters to the tourist desire to see the "exotic." However, this Papaua New Guinea is in the past. While the rest of the population lives in the present where the citizens live without the tourist dictating how they live.   

 

Given the impact of the forces, the split makes figuring out which Papa New Guinea is actually the most "authentic" is tricky. There are elements of Papa New Guinea in each place. The perfect way to obtain authenticity is blending them as the title suggest, but that is not that case. Under the circumstances, I think the village in which tourist are not present are the most "authentic." It is because of the tourist that the past village exits and while some members of the population like that this helps preserve their past culture, Papa New Guinea has clearly started to move on.  It reminds me of the Plymouth plantation field trips in which the tourist view america during the times of the pilgrims. Clearly, America has moved on, but continues to honor their roots. Due to this idea of moving on, I think the other village that shows the present is more authentic because it is a closer measure of what the village realistically acts like without interference from the outside world.  


While, I realize Papa New Guinea is more than the past, a fair amount of the world doesn't. As a few tourist mentioned, they were eager to hear about cannibalism despite the practice stopping years ago. Yet, from an outsiders perspective, they don't see this other Papa New Guinea and because the country plays into this idea of a village stuck in the past, it gives the world the wrong impression. As such, I wonder how how much catering to the rest of the world holds Papa New Guinea back economically. Being perceived as less developed won't generate lenders and living up to that expectation curbs other modern economic sectors. So it seems the overall affect might actually be more detrimental then helpful from an economic stance.   

Kristin Mandsager San Bento's curator insight, May 4, 2015 12:38 PM

I believe these indigenous people found a way to survive.  They were smart!  Globalization and tourism were gonna happen with or without them.  Now they found away to keep on existing.  Authentic?  How do they live their lives now, thats authentic.  The past history is just that, the past.  Its a commodity because they've found a way to exploit their culture to benefit them.  

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 8:47 PM

This podcast talks about two different areas of the same area. One section living in the past and one living in the present. I believe that the section that is living in the past is more authentic. This is a group of people who have had to learn their way of life. The present would have had to learn to adapt to new ways in life and this new way would be truly authentic to their religion.

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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.


Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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Social Media and Place

Social Media and Place | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Facebook most social cities: People everywhere use Facebook to check in to places. Here you can see the 5 top hotspots of the most "social"cities.


Questions to ponder: What attributes do these commonly 'checked into' landmarks have in common?  Are you surprised that some are or are not on the list?


Tags: socialmedia, place, tourism, infographic, London, NYC, Paris.

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Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century

Beautiful Data Visualizations from the 19th Century | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Do you want some inspiration to create a visually stunning - yet fully optimized - data graphic? Well, let's go back about a 140 years... Handsome Atlas developed by Jonathan Soma of Brooklyn Brainery, provides a stunning new online interface to a large collection of beautiful data visualizations from the 19th century.


TR: Taking into account the age of these visualizations, one has to wonder if they intended them to be used by our generation in this way. I see potential for a "web 2.0" update of these charts to make them interactive . . .


Tags: infographic, historical, visualization, statistics.

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Iceland's Volcanic Rivers

Iceland's Volcanic Rivers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Time and time again, we're reminded of nature's beauty. It's hard to believe, but these photos of real landscapes, not abstract paintings.


Andre Ermolaev, through his photography has captured the beauty of Iceland's geomorphology.  Being on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has abundant volcanic ash which adds rich color to the fluvial systems.  

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.

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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:20 AM

Iceland is one of my favorite countries, and the place I most want to visit and would most likely move to if I had to leave the United States. The landscape is insanely beautiful and the population is extremely small, something I enjoy as I dislike cities and a high population density. Even the capital of Iceland looks akin to a relatively average fishing town in the Northern US or Canada, and the entire country has less people in it than any given state in the US.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:57 PM

Nature has an incredible way at depicting and displaying its true beauty to the rest of the world. These images captured by photographer Andre Ermolaev looks like something that would be captured at a museum opening displaying some remarkable pieces of abstract work. Though this may not be the case, it gives you the desire to want to travel and experience this for yourself.

Keone Sinnott-Suardana's curator insight, June 22, 9:39 PM
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Selecting a Map Projection

Selecting a Map Projection | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Video. Cartographers at National Geographic discuss how they select an appropriate map projection for the September 2012 magazine map supplement.


There is no one perfect map projection that fits all circumstances and situations. Think of a situation in which this map projection would be an ideal way to represent the Earth and in another situation that same projection would give you an incredibly limited perspective. 


Tags: cartography, K12, geospatial, NationalGeographic, water

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The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless

The Hidden Cost of Counting the Homeless | Geography Education | Scoop.it

A professor criticizes the "culture of quantification," (in the journal cultural geographies) arguing that we don't do enough with the data we collect.  If all we do is count (or attempt to count the homeless), does that help them in any way or change the realities that lead to homelessness?  Are we counting them just to give us the numbers to receive credit that may help other programs but not help the homeless?  Is data for data's sake of any value?


UPDATE: Another geographer noted some other issues of homelessness on the website facebook page, specifically in regard to this map of homelessness: "A problem associated with this map is that while the numbers get smaller, it raises the question: where did they go? (answer: Hollywood, after an emphasis on policing pushed them out)...this could be tied in to a discussion about map scale."


Tags: statistics, class, census, socioeconomic, housing, poverty.


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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.


This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  


Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHGunit 2 population

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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 2014 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 2014 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

MissPatel's curator insight, December 16, 2014 3:24 AM

A little overview of Malthus's theory on population. 

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U.S. Protestants Lose Majority Status

U.S. Protestants Lose Majority Status | Geography Education | Scoop.it

For the first time in its history, the United States does not have a Protestant majority, according to a new study.


Interestingly, this is not due to the rise of a new religious group, but the rise of secularism in the United States. The fastest growing group in the United States is the religiously unaffliliated. Click here for a simplified AP news story on the report. 


Questions to ponder: What are some causal factors that might explain why there is an increase in the non-religious population in the United States today? How does this impact American culture and politics?


Tags: religion, USA, culture, unit 3 culture.

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Seth Dixon's comment, October 9, 2012 9:20 AM
And the report outlines that since 2010 (when the chart data ends) Protestants have continued to lose members.
Ali and bradyn's curator insight, December 1, 2013 1:14 PM

A religious article that shows U.S Protestants Lose Majority Status 

 
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The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine

The Archipelago of Eastern Palestine | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The shape of a state can greatly impact the political cohesion of a country as well as it's economic viability.  While this is obviously a fictitious map, it draws our attention to the logistic difficulties that confront Palestine with the Israelis controlling crucial transportation access points and corridors.   


Questions to Ponder:  How is this a 'persuasive map?' What are some of the geographic impacts of this fragmentation on Palestine? For Israel?

 

Tags: cartography, MiddleEast, political, states, territoriality, unit 4 political.

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Melissa Burr's comment, October 10, 2012 10:13 AM
This map is persuasive because it does not show the usual Palestine. This map is fragmented and the geographic impacts it shows are the routes taken in at leisure for maritime activity and also shows the urban and popluated areas in the past and how how the sraelites impact those areas.
Matthew Jones's comment, October 10, 2012 10:16 AM
The reason this is a persuasive map in my opinion is that this map does a very good job of allowing the reader to understand the focus in which it intends to present. information key which it offers is crucial to the map b/ it help the reader better understand and analyze this map in its entirety. as far As the second question unfortunately I am not very knowledgeable as far as the impact his map as on palestiine or isreal.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 10, 2012 11:24 AM
This map is unique and not typical. The way that Palestine's land is severed and each transportation access point is clearly shown and highlighted, makes this map's data very persuasive and impactful. This map examines the Israelis' control of the land.
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The Digitally Curated Textbook–My NCGE Presentation

The Digitally Curated Textbook–My NCGE Presentation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The 2012 NCGE conference has been tremendous; I plan on sharing many of the resources that I’ve discovered with you over the next few weeks.  October 6th is the day of my presentation and I’ve uploaded my slides (with hyperlinks included) here: Empowering Students: The Digitally Curated Textbook.


Tags: training, edtech, NCGE, social media.

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oyndrila's comment, October 7, 2012 8:52 AM
I really liked the post and found it very useful. Thank you....
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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   


Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.

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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 1:26 PM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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Making Sense of Maps

TED Talks Map designer Aris Venetikidis is fascinated by the maps we draw in our minds as we move around a city -- less like street maps, more like schematics or wiring diagrams, abstract images of relationships between places.


This video touches on numerous themes that are crucial to geographers including: 1) how our minds arrange spatial information, 2) how to best graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your audience and 3) how mapping a place can be the impetus for changing outdated systems. This is the story of how a cartographer working to improve a local transportation system map, which in turn, started city projects to improve the infrastructure and public utilities in Dublin, Ireland. This cartographer argues that the best map design for a transport system needs to conform to how on cognitive mental mapping works more so than geographic accuracy (like so many subway maps do).


Tags: transportation, urban, mapping, cartography, planning, TED, video, unit 7 cities.

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Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:42 PM
When trying to graphically represent spatial information in a useful manner for your particular audience, you will have a lot to take into consideration. How familiar are the travelers with the area you map out? Are there visuals to precisely mark on the map so that will they accurately correspond to the area?
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NCGE Conference 2012

NCGE Conference 2012 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The National Council for Geographic Education's Annual Conference 2012 is this week in San Marcos, Texas!  I'll excited to hear so many engaging presentations (I'm on page 66).  The latest edition of the NCGE newsletter is here as a flipboard and as a PDF.  If you are at the conference, I hope you'll say hi!


Tags: NCGE, training, GeographyEducation, aphg.

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Martin Luther King Street

A teaser trailer for the MLK Streets Project, a documentary film examining the state of the many avenues, boulevards and thoroughfares named after the slain ...


This video echoes much of what the authors of the fantastic book "Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory" say (in fact one of the authors is shown in this video).  Throughout America, streets that are named after Martin Luther King Jr. frequently are in poor, crime-ridden neighborhoods.  This video highlights the irony between the historical memory of Martin Luther King Jr. and places of memorialization that bear his name.   


Questions to ponder: If Matin Luther King Jr. represents non-violence, then why are streets bearing his name often in 'violent' neighborhoods?  Where should Martin Luther King be memorialized in the United States?  Only in the South?  Only in predominantly African-American communities?  Do the geography of the spaces where he is memorialized say something about the United States?    

 

Tags: historical, culture, landscape, place, race, unit 3 culture, USA, urban, poverty, unit 7 cities, book review

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melissa stjean's comment, October 8, 2012 9:49 PM
These streets are the most popular in the country, but they are located mostly located in areas with profoundly poorer incomes. With poorer incomes, leads to increased crime rates, does naming a street after an iconic hero please the people who live here? It seems like the geography of these places is creating a line of segregation by using his name for a street.
Jeff F's comment, October 8, 2012 10:42 PM
Martin Luther King Streets are places into prominently African-American neighborhoods because that is where the dominant white culture says they belong. Martin Luther King jr was a powerful African-American man and a powerful African-American man has no place in white communities according to this philosophy. If a MLK street was to be placed into a white suburb it would likely cause controversy. Cries of myths such as "reverse racism" would likely run rampant. This would be accompanied with the idea that a MLK street should only belong in an area with a heavy African-American population.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 14, 2012 3:49 PM
I think Martin Luther King should be memorialized in all parts of the country, and why not with all cultures and races. He did stand for non-violence and non-discrimination, which happens among all types of people.
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Campaign 2012: Ohio turns blue

Campaign 2012: Ohio turns blue | Geography Education | Scoop.it

“It should have been a good year for the Republicans,” said Beckwith. “You have an incumbent president who is not doing well. The economy is bad. But Romney’s own mistakes have undermined his claim that he understands the voters …"

 

 DB: In this election both presidential candidates are attempting to appeal to the heritage, identity and community of the “American” people, leaning strongly towards middle and working class citizens who been hit hard the past decade by the countries economic downturn. States, especial during national elections can become highly symbolic of certain issues prevalent within America society. For example in the state of Ohio, the decline of manifesting jobs has become quite symbolic of the plight that is happening to hard working-class citizens across the country, particular the struggle of the American auto-industry. Ohio in many ways has become the electoral jewel of the Midwest serving as the political battleground in which both Democrats and Republicans alike are fighting for at all levels of government. The main reason why spectators believe that Ohio is gradually swinging towards Obama is Romney’s failure to connect with them. Despite all his campaign contributions a growing number of voters believe Romney does not share their identity or interest making him an outsider as they increasingly gravitate towards Obama. Furthermore, Romney seems unable to shed his identity as a wealthy businessman or "1%"er who represents corporate America. During different times in history states take on certain identities that may symbolize the agenda of specific groups within American society. The 2012 election has become highly symbolic of the economic uncertainty of the times we live in and the political competition between how it should be resolved.  So, what impact do you think Ohio will have on the upcoming election in November?

 

How can things like heritage, identity and community effect what a state or any other territory around the globe symbolize? Is the symbolism embedded in these areas continuous throughout history, inconstantly reinterpreted by different groups or both?

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Hiking Preikestolen in Norway

Hiking to the top of Preikestolen (the Pulpit Rock) near Stavanger, Norway. An amazing and wondrous hike.


Seth Dixon's insight:


For the inner explorer in all of us, this is a geographic dream. Click here to read more about this fantastic climb from a National Geographic explorer


Tags: Europe, landforms, NationalGeographic, Norway.

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James Hobson's curator insight, October 9, 2014 10:09 PM

(Europe topic 2)

This video offers a quick glimpse into one of the many natural wonders one can experience throughout Norway. What surprised me is the many striking similarities between Pulpit Rock and a place I have climbed called Artists Bluff in New Hampshire's White Mountains. Both are giant overhanging slabs of bedrock carved out by glaciers overlooking deep valleys and lakes. Both are also similar in composition (granite) and are tourist and photographer hotspots of their regions. Though obviously each offers its own experience, it is something to ponder how the geographies of locations thousands of miles apart can be so alike. Aside form physical geography, many separate regions throughout the world share language, tradition, and knowledge. So perhaps this offers a little insight into how things are a little less "foreign" than one might first expect.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:43 PM

This is absolutely amazing.  I think that through all of what we learn and all of what we see and hear in geography and even just in our everyday lives, we forget that places like this exist. Despite all of the disasters and disease and pollution we talk about, there are still beautiful places and it is our job to preserve those.

Gene Gagne's curator insight, November 18, 2015 3:07 PM

Well I am afraid of heights and let me tell you I was scared just looking at the picture. I have been to Norway in 1980 and I stayed in a small town and it was snowing, it looked like a Christmas postcard. I stayed in a small hotel which looked like a beautiful home not like hotels we have here. There is only one major highway called route 1 that went from Oslo to Bodo. It is a beautiful country. I was there for military training and we had to snowshoe or cross country ski to get around. This was my first time on either. I wish I could have seen the spring or summer.