Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Climate Change Music Video

A musical video that serves as investigation into the causes and effects of global climate change and our opportunities to use science to offset it. Featuring Bill Nye, David Attenborough, Richard Alley and Isaac Asimov. "Our Biggest Challenge" is the 16th episode of the Symphony of Science series.  Visit http://symphonyofscience.com for more science remixes!


Tags: climatechange, environment, K12.

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 2:11 PM
I am from the Philippines, and the effect of global warming in our country is really sad. Flash floods, earthquakes, heavy rains.... wasted lives. I wish there could be a true solution to this problem.
Wanda Faye Bryant's curator insight, January 7, 2014 9:51 PM

An interesting way to present the problem and solutions of rapid climate change to students.

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Africa Next

Africa Next | Geography Education | Scoop.it
For the first time in generations, more investment than foreign aid is pouring into Africa. But is that growth enough to change its future?


This is the first article in six-part series designed to investigate the changing economic and developmental possibilities that are facing the African continent.  As more foreign investors are exploring potential windfalls in Africa, it is making places that were on the margins of a global economy more directly tied to the process of globalization. 


Tags: Africa, development, globalization, economic, NGOs, unit 6 industry

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Rich's comment, September 24, 2012 7:12 PM
So why is it that only one village has been recieving funding and jobs while the other is being left in the dust (almost literally) with barely any water? It is no wonder why the village that is getting left behind is resistant to the change, they have recieved nothing in return compared to the others who are recieving funding aswell as jobs. This company is endangering the lives of those people, they are poor enough as it is without their food/water sources.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 2:01 PM
Africa is a rich country with so many problems. If you consider the fact how rich is Africa when it comes to their natural resources, then you will realize that there is a deeper problem. The investments that are pouring into Africa, hopefully will solve a lot of problems. God save Africa!
Aliah Therese's curator insight, April 3, 2:48 PM
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Its not just artists that reach struggle with certain issues.
 
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11 Guerrilla Street Art Greats

11 Guerrilla Street Art Greats | Geography Education | Scoop.it
When guerrilla-geographer Daniel Raven-Ellison travels, he always keep his eyes peeled for unexpected works of art that creatively subvert culture, rules, and politics and force us to see...


Not all cultural landscapes are officially sanctioned by city planners or government officials.  These landscapes of resistance are often poignant critiques on society and represent the mulitplicity of voices within places.  There isn't one "Geography" with a capital G of a given place, but many geographies.  Many people and demographic groups interact and use the same place in distinct ways and the meaning of that place is socially mediated within the cultural landscape.   


Tags: art, landscape, culture, place, unit 3 culture.

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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | Geography Education | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.

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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 6:51 PM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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How future urban sprawl maps out

How future urban sprawl maps out | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Projections of urban growth indicate areas where biodiversity is at high risk.


The AAG Smart Brief is a fantastic source of geographic news.  This is what they said about this article:  "Areas such as tropical Africa and eastern China are expected to be hot spots of urbanization during the next several years, according to researchers, who used satellite imagery and other data to project future urban expansion through 2030. 'We're not forecasting population, we're forecasting the expansion of urban space,' said Yale University geographer Karen Seto. Their efforts could be used to assist conservation initiatives, Seto noted."


Tags: AAG, urban, sprawl, land use, urban ecology, biogeography, unit 7 cities, environment.

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Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 24, 2013 12:56 PM
This article is about urban growth and decline, Africa and Asia are predicted to be hot spots of urban growth in the next few years. Geographer Karen Seto of Yale University in New Haven has creted a graph that finally accounts for variations in how individual cities occupy their land and the impact they have on local ecosystems.
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Tiny Capital

Created by Eirik Evjen.  The production of this video was made out of 76,940 single photos.


"Norway has recently reached 5 million inhabitants and the capital is growing rapidly. The city scene in Oslo is steadily thickening with taller buildings, more people and the never-ending construction sites. Being by far the most populated city in Norway with 613 000 inhabitants, most Norwegians look to Oslo as a major capital. However, if one compares Oslo to other international capitals, Oslo only ranks as the 112th largest. Oslo is indeed a major capital, just a small one…"


Tags: art, urban, Europe, landscape, unit 7 cities.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 10:39 PM

Oslo may be small in size, but it is quickly growing and advancing. Norway's capital is now a place of constant travel and exploration. The 76,940 photos used to create this video embrace Oslo's city rush and functionality. 

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Live Flight Tracker

Live Flight Tracker | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Flightradar24 is the best live flight tracker that shows air traffic in real time. Best coverage and cool features!


Ever wanted to find out where that plane overhead came from?  Where is it going?  Here it is.  The flight that was over Rhode Island 5 minutes ago that left the JFK airport?  It's officially on it way to Geneva Switerland and now over the Atlantic.   


Tags: mapping, worldwide, geospatial, transportation

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Four Environmental Innovations that have Revolutionized Architecture

Four Environmental Innovations that have Revolutionized Architecture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The green revolution has impacted almost every sector of the economy. Now, eco-friendly technology is revolutionizing the way we think about architecture. Every part of the architectural process is undergoing huge changes.


When people think of green architecture, they often picture simple modifications, such as the substitution of environmentally friendly materials for less sustainable ones. While this can certainly be a viable means of reducing a project’s carbon footprint, it is by no means the only way to make a positive impact. The best green projects are the ones that go above and beyond, completely altering the way people think of architecture as a whole. The following are just a few of the spectacular developments taking place in architecture today.

  1. Vertical Gardens 
  2. Disaster-Resisant Buildings 
  3. Walkable Roofs 
  4. Garden Skyscrapers 

Tags: urban, urban ecology, sustainability, unit 7 cities.


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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 29, 2013 1:49 AM
This idea is pretty cool. With all the pollution we have in the world today we need to start replanting the trees and plants we have tore down. Especially since more people are wanting to live in the big cities making the cities larger decreasing on our natural environment.
A. Perry Homes's curator insight, July 25, 2014 2:20 AM

These are beautiful ways to combine urban and natural environments. 

Zoya Ayaz's curator insight, September 9, 2014 1:24 PM

http://goo.gl/dfeUbh
We offer you Architectural Engineering Services at the affordable cost :)
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Latitude and Longitude of a Point

Latitude and Longitude of a Point | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Find the latitude and longitude of a point using Google Maps.


Simple, straightforward and easy to use.  All you do is point and click on the map to get latitude and longitude in both decimal degrees and DMS (degrees, minutes and seconds).  You can also quickly enter coordinates in either format an have the location displayed on the map.


Tags: GPS, mapping, location.

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Wade Lytal's curator insight, August 26, 2015 9:23 PM

This can help with your homework assignment. 

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.

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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 11:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 9:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, May 1, 2013 3:23 AM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Interesting map about farming land lending to other countries in Africa. Impossible to find the original source, but is attricuted to the Financial Times. 


Here is a link to the image (in low res) without political content (UN related): http://new.uneca.org/lpi/africanlandrush.aspx 


Tags: Africa, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.

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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.


This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   


Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 7:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 5, 2014 2:47 AM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 5:05 PM

considering that half of the nations involved are island nations, this is hardly surprising. every nation has issues with their neighbors. even the us and Canada dispute some territory. but these disputes can hardly end as well, when half of these nations have fought wars with each other for most of their histories.

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States


Tags: USA, historical, visualization

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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 3:19 PM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 3:21 PM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 3:42 PM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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The New World

The New World | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An interactive series of maps show possible new additions to the world’s list of independent nations.


This is great way to show examples of devolution and political instability.  Included are 11 potential scenarios where further fragmentation/disintegration might occur or even greater regional integration that would redraw the map.  These case studies include: Somalia, Korea, Azerbaijan, Belgium and the Arabian Gulf Union.


Tags: political, devolution, supranationalism, war, autonomy, unit 4 political.

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Benjamin DeRita's comment, September 24, 2012 2:36 AM
Very interesting and informative piece, I found slide (10) especially intriguing with its discussion on the possibility of China claiming parts of Siberia.
Anna Sasaki's curator insight, March 24, 2015 12:53 PM

This article is probably one of my favorites I have read so far. It describes perfectly the political instability still present in the world, and that the globe and its boundaries are constantly changing, never staying put for too long. It surprised me at the new borders which most likely are going to happen, such as the unification of parts of Pakistan and Afghanistan. Also, the fact that South Korea is subtly getting ready for the reunification of North and South Korea. Also, there may be devolution in Mali and splintering devolution in the Congo's.

This shows devolution as the power in these nations in which are breaking up, such as Belgium and the Flemish peoples. It shows the centrifugal forces behind the breakup of nations, such as ethnicities which vary, or the centripetal forces which bring nations together such as the combination of South and North Korea. 

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, May 21, 2015 4:12 PM

Devolution/Fragmentation

 

This article is about nations that could become potentially independent in the near Future, whether due to chronic ethnic incoherence, redrawn governemnt policies, or a growing stateless nation group. Some examples given are an independent Khurdistan, a larger Azerbaijan, and the split of Belgium. 

 

Centrifugal forces are the root of conflict in many countries. These forces include ethnic variety, lack of common language, political instability. These are what may be causing a split in both Belgium (developed country) and Somalia (developing country). There may also be a unification of countries—the map gives an example of the Saudia Arabia, Oman, Yemen, Bahrain, and other melding into one Arabian Gulf Union, of China absorbing Siberia. This does not necessarily herald the presence of centripetal forces, as these countries may be the result of military conquest. 

 

 

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Our Place in the World

Our Place in the World | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: scale, K12, location

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Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 3:21 PM

As I am almost finished with my teacher degree I always look for great ideas that will help the students I will teach some day. This will be great for kids to get the concept of location and scale.  Scale is critical to know where something is, This is a great frame of reference.  

Luke Walker's curator insight, October 3, 2014 8:48 AM

An easy way to understand scale and location.

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The League of Dangerous Mapmakers

The League of Dangerous Mapmakers | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Redistricting today has become the most insidious practice in American politics—a way, as the opportunistic machinations following the 2010 census make evident, for our elected leaders to entrench themselves in 435 impregnable garrisons from which they can maintain political power while avoiding demographic realities.


Tags: political, gerrymandering, mapping, unit 4 political.

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David Holoka's curator insight, February 10, 2:48 PM

Mapmakers seem to have a larger effect on elections, more so than the voters or candidates do. This is utterly unfair, because voters need to have the largest part. 

Lilah Rozar's curator insight, February 10, 2:50 PM

Gerrymandering is a very manipulative and unfair way of setting up the votes. It is a way for them to take control over how the voting will be set up in their favor and it is cheating out the public. Although, it is a way for the elected officials to get re-elected.

Peyton Conner's curator insight, February 10, 2:58 PM

 Redistricting is one of the most deceptive  political task that is given to select few committee and legislature officers. Redistricting is definitely "dangerous" and "unpredictable" ,and as this article says not for everyone.  Redrawing a district sure is something to be proud of. PC

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5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism

5 Ideas That Are Changing the World: The Case For Optimism | Geography Education | Scoop.it
From technology to equality, five ways the world is getting better all the time...


This article by former President of the United States Bill Clinton, outlines numerous ways that globalization can improve the world, especially in developing regions.  He uses examples from around the world and includes numerous geographic themes. 


  1. Technology-Phones mean freedom
  2. Health-Healthy communities prosper
  3. Economy-Green energy equals good business
  4. Equality-Women rule
  5. Justice-The fight for the future is now


Tags: technology, medical, economic, gender, class, globalization, development, worldwide.   

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The Real World at Night

The Real World at Night | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Earlier I have posted the classic image of "Earth Lights at Night," and discussed the classroom uses of the image.  This cartogram helps take that analysis one step further.  This cartogram helps students to visualize the magnitude of population (with the cartogram adjusting area for population) and then to see the patterns of energy use, global consumption and urbanization with in a new light. 


Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, October 1, 2012 4:29 PM
This map is obviously not the actual size of countries, but it is in a way. The populations of China and India are so great compared to the rest of the world and this map shows that.
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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images

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Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 2014 3:10 PM

Just a reminder

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 4:01 PM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 8:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

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The Body in Public Space

The Body in Public Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Here are some seemingly eclectic topics.  All of them center around the appropriateness of the body being displayed publicly and the cultural norms that shape how we think about the issue.  I've included a sensational restroom, public nursing, top-free protests, and of course, the Kate Middleton scandal.


Tags: culture, popular culture, gender, place, space.

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 26, 2012 3:11 PM
Hilarious! The breasts of women are human parts of a woman which should be respected because it is where a human being feeds. It is a symbol of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 1:07 AM
This cartoon clearly shows how breast are sexually marketed in our society and how we will can accept the fashionably sexual display of breast in public yet consider breast feeding offensive. In many ways this cartoon seems to show how some social norms seem to interfere with common sense as we should be more critical of the sexual advertisement of breast while breast feeding on the other hand should at the very least be tolerated.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 11:37 PM

I think the men who prohibit public breast-feeding of babies should be starved.  I have a baby cousin, whom I love dearly, and I would hate to delay his lunch as much as anyone else would hate to have their own lunches delayed.  To prohibit public-breastfeeding is cruel, discriminatory, and hypocritical, as these prohibitors were likely publicly breastfed at some point in their infant days.  A message overall about other people acting 'scandelously'- get over it.  Grow up.  I don't like having to hear from or about you, and it takes away from my definition of a perfect world when I see people starving my baby cousin.  Culture should accomodate to the entirety of the population, not a majority.  After all, as for babies- we've all been there, and as for old people- we'd be lucky to live that long, but we'll llikely be there too.  I don't think we should be governed by someone that some people elect and other people don't vote for, because it's really not fair... it would be better and a compromise to not be governed at all!  So don't be critical, be understanding... Peace and Love!

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Earth's City Lights

Earth's City Lights | Geography Education | Scoop.it
NASA's Visible Earth catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet...


This classic image is full of classroom applications.  The first impulse of most students is to note that this image will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map. 


Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 18, 2012 5:35 PM
This image is pretty amazing to see. It shows what parts of the world are more modernized just by the lights seen from space. Looking at the U.S. and Europe, they are lit up very bright because they are richer parts of the world. As you look at places like Africa and some parts of South America, they are shown in darkness due to poorer areas in those regions.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 11:07 PM
I was impressed with the explanation of this picture especially for the simple fact that I thought it was a picture that depicted the population of certain areas of each country. Places like Africa, Brazil, areas of Mexico, and Southern US are not lit because of the areas of forest, desert and less population. Very nice picture. -Michelle Carvajal-
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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Until now, there has been a lack of solid, comprehensive spatial data about African groundwater resources.  Researchers have now done so.  For a more academic article on the subject, here are their findings in Environmental Research Letters


Tags: water, Africa, resources, physical, environment, environment depend.    

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Ephemicropolis

Ephemicropolis | Geography Education | Scoop.it

If you have over 100,000 staples, you can create an startlingly creative rendition of an urban landscape (well, Peter Root could).   It is interesting how our cultural and historical context shape what we see as a human landscape.  I can't help but think that if I lived 2,000 years ago this uneven jumbled metallic mass wouldn't remind anyone of any place they'd ever been. 

  

Tags: art, urban, landscape, unit 7 cities, historical.

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Don Brown Jr's comment, October 2, 2012 2:42 AM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 2, 2012 2:42 AM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 2, 2012 2:42 AM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
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Image Analysis

Image Analysis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One of a number of large wildfires that have affected northern California in 2012, the Chips fire burned more than 75,000 acres by the time firefighters had contained it.



Seth Dixon's insight:

2012 is going to go down in United States history as the year with the most acres burned in a single year (statistics only go back to 1960).  The two featured images were taken earlier this month to display a Northern California wildfire; both with the same spatial resolution and acquired for the same instrument (Advanced Land Imager on EO-1 satellite), yet they are quite distinct.  One shows an aerial photograph, displaying exactly what standard visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (showing us what our eyes would normally see).  The other image displays a false color (near infrared) image. 


Questions to ponder: what advantages does each image have for analyzing the fire damage?  Drawbacks?  How does the data from both images work together to create a more complete picture of the situation?     


Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography.

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m burr's comment, September 17, 2012 3:16 PM
These images are very similar and different one you can see the smoke but you cant really see much of the damage on the land. where as the infrared image shows the areas that have been damaged but also makes the areas more easily able to depict the different features.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, September 17, 2012 3:22 PM
The first image displays a better visual of exactly where the fire damaged the land, the second image doesn't provide a clear visual to someone, the land effected is foggy. If I was going to visit this specific area in Northern California I would much rather use the first aerial image.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 3:31 PM
The first image gives a good spatial shot of where the exact hot spots are located that cannot be seen by the naked eye. The second photo will give you a spatial view of what you can actually see. Both are needed to put out the hot spot because they each will provide two different solutions to stop the burning acres.
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Homemade Butterfly Feeder

Homemade Butterfly Feeder | Geography Education | Scoop.it

According to a study published in the June 2003 issue of "Conservation Biology," there are 561 known butterfly species in the U.S. and Canada.


"Not only are these insects beautiful, they're important pollinators and vital to the health of their natural habitats. You can encourage these gentle creatures to visit your yard by using easy-to-make butterfly food and feeders."

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 2:13 PM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 2:13 PM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 28, 2015 12:12 AM

This article was nice to read. We tend to overlook the butterfly species as a whole and many people wouldn't know that there are only 56 species remaining when there are 561 known species in the United States and Canada. This species is slowly disappearing and this article sheds some light on why they are important and beneficial. Butterflies are important for the health of the nature around us because they are pollinators. This encourages individuals to make butterfly feeders which is not something that most people would think about doing. Creating a feeder would not be harmful in any way because these creatures are beneficial and beautiful to look at. They provided different recipes to put in the feeder such as overripe fruit and other ingredients such as honey. Butterflies like fermented fruits and if you have some in your yard, this article encourages you to start your feeder through that. Make your feeder eye-catching and appealing so that a butterfly will actually approach it. This is such a simple way to give back to nature and allow the rest to take its course.