Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline

Changes on the Cape Cod Coastline | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Beaches are dynamic, living landscapes. The coast off of Chatham, Massachusetts, provides a prime example of beach evolution.
Seth Dixon's insight:

To quote coastal geologist Robert Oldale, "Many people view coastal erosion as a problem that needs to be addressed and, if possible, prevented.  However, storm and wave erosion along the shore of Cape Cod has been going on for thousands of years and will likely continue for thousands of years more. It is a natural process that allows the Cape to adjust to rising sea level. Erosion is only a peril to property. If we build on the shore, we must accept the fact that sooner or later coastal erosion will take the property away.”


Tagscoastal, remote sensing, mappingerosion, landscape.

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Sam Burden's curator insight, June 16, 2014 7:40 AM

The NASA Earth Observatory is a teaching tool used to assist educators in teaching students about the environmental, including natural hazards with visualizations depicting the date and time these vast changes in the climate occurs. There are multiple global maps which  depict data over a period of time which can be used as a tool to see the effects of global warming it’s the implications on the environment on a global scale. Animations, videos and side by side images are also available to teachers to show how sustainable choices or designs can influence our environment. I really enjoyed looking at all of the real-world images on this site and it opened my eyes to how creating a more sustainable environment could influence our world on a global scale. 

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Media regarding ESRI's ArcGIS K-12 Donation

Media regarding ESRI's ArcGIS K-12 Donation | Geography Education | Scoop.it
ESRI CEO Jack Dangermond discusses strengthening and investing in stem education with Trish Regan on Bloomberg Television's “Street Smart”. (Source: Bloomberg)
Seth Dixon's insight:

As announced earlier this week, ESRI will be donating ArcGIS organizational accounts to all K-12 schools in the United States, and here is a video of ESRI's CEO Jack Dangermond explaining the importance of spatial thinking in STEM education.  President Obama referenced this donation during his speech at the White House's Science Fair.  Currently many geography educators are planning new ways to use this to their advantage.  Explore what ArcGIS can do,  and consider how this might be a part of what you can do with your students (this article is a primer if you don't know what ArcGIS is yet).  Click here to request an organizational account for your school.


Tagsmapping, GIS K12, ESRI, geospatial, edtech.

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America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts

America’s most gerrymandered congressional districts | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A brief overview of crimes against geography in the 113th Congress.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Redistricting today has become a common tool in American politics.  Every ten years with the new census, political parties seize the opportunity to maximize their political influence by trying to minimize the 'demographic and spatial limitations' of their particular voting bloc.      


Tags: gerrymandering, political, mapping, census, unit 4 political.

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 10:04 AM

This concept is used to favor certain political parties in certain areas. There are rules like the ditrict has to be all connected but they can manipulate the redrawing to make it that a certain party still wins that district.

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 12:29 PM

A showing of the gerrymandering districts of the most absurd kind.

Gerrymandering bases itself off the place of the districts in an attempt to sway voting in favor of one party or another or even for the most equal by dealing with similar human characteristics.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, May 30, 2014 3:15 PM

unit 4

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Defining 'the South'

Defining 'the South' | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Southerners were considerably more certain of which states are their own. While the top few Midwest states barely pulled 80 percent of the vote, nearly 90 percent of respondents identified Georgia and Alabama as Southern, and more than 80 percent placed Mississippi and Louisiana in the South. South Carolina, Tennessee, Florida and North Carolina all garnered above 60 percent."

Seth Dixon's insight:

I enjoy activities that challenge students to map out vernacular regions since it forces them to establish some criteria and consider the attributes of particular places.  So what does your 'South' look like? 


Tags: mapping, the South, regions.

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Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, November 1, 2014 10:40 PM

When I think of states that constitute as being a part of southern United States, I think of VA, NC, SC, GA, MS, AL, LA, TX, and FL. I never thought of KY as being a state a part of the south. Although its geographical location demonstrate it being relatively close to being in the south, I always thought of KY being a Midwest because of the weather similarities with states that are located in the Midwest.

Miles Gibson's curator insight, November 22, 2014 8:08 PM

Unit 1 nature and perspective of geography 

This map is a map of the p.o.v. of a surveyed group stating what they think the south is. They answered with suprising accuracy overall with some outliers. This map shows the stereotypes of the area that people deem it.

This relates to unit 1 because it shows a perceptual map of an area that isn't truly defined. This is a perceptual map because of its undefined borders and a level of accuracy at the personal level.

 

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 4, 2015 9:37 PM
As someone who had a summer home in Orlando, Florida, and having friends and family there too, we would occasionally have the discussion what we considered the South. For myself, I always had the idea that the south was from North Carolina to Florida and from Florida as far west as Texas. As for the deep south, I would consider Alabama, Georgia and Florida to be the deep south. I have a friend currently stationed at Camp Lejeune in North Carolina and he considers NC and anything under to be the South.
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A Map of Baseball Nation

A Map of Baseball Nation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Fans may not list which team they favor on the census, but millions of them do make their preferences public on Facebook. Using aggregated data provided by the company, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This isn't just a fun sports map--there are some good geographic concepts that can be used here.  When discussing cultural regions, many use the core-domain-sphere model.  This map uses the brightest color intensities to represent the core regions and the lightest hues to show waning strength, but to still signify that the area is a part of a team's sphere of influence.  Essentially, this map is begging you to explore the borderlands, the liminal "in-between" spaces that aren't as easy to explain.  What other phenomena can be used to demonstrate the core-domain-sphere model of cultural regions?  What other geographic concepts can you teach using this map?  


Tags: fun, sport, placeborders, statistics, mapping, regions.

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Greg Russak's curator insight, April 29, 2014 12:53 PM

Maps and baseball - a good combination!

Wyatt Wolf's curator insight, October 30, 2014 7:46 PM

My favorite baseball team is the Philadelphia Phillies, here's everyone else's.

Global Speechwriter's comment, November 4, 2014 2:52 AM
Jays? C'mon.
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The Science behind Google Earth

The Science behind Google Earth | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Google is using a new technology to automatically generate  3D buildings from 45-degree angle aerial photography made by overlapping passes of aircraft.  The aerial photos are combined to create 3D models."

Seth Dixon's insight:

Some of the nuts and bolts behind Google Earth might be difficult to replicate in the computer lab, but it is critical to conceptually understand how geospatial data is used today.  This series of images shows how important remote sensing is for our modern digital mapping platforms.  


Tags: cartography, visualization, mappingremote sensing, google.

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Annenkov's curator insight, April 16, 2014 12:46 AM

This technology of visualization I would name "3D landscape"

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, April 16, 2014 8:40 PM

Tecnología para generar imágenes en 3D con Google Earth

Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:06 PM

Google Earth has made the Earth easier to decipher and examine in a geographical sense of location and place by being able to see multiple layers. This article goes into the 3D designs and usage of aerial photography to create 3D images.

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Human Development Index variation

Human Development Index variation | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Here's how the United States looks when it is measured on the county level by the same standards used to rank countries by the UN, the Human Development Index.  Five variables are taken into account: life expectancy, income per capita, school enrollment, percentage of high school graduates, and percentage of college graduates." 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Often we treat countries as solid areas and miss many regional patterns; in part because we view global data sets that are at that scale. 

Questions to ponder: what regional patterns do you see?  What accounts for these patterns?  What do you think other countries would look like with data at this scale?    


Tagsmapping, regions, censusdevelopment, USA.

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steve smith's curator insight, March 26, 2014 3:53 PM

A fantastic resource for development studies.

Ms. Harrington's curator insight, March 26, 2014 6:57 PM

Regional patterns?

Brian Altonen's curator insight, March 26, 2014 9:18 PM

A WHO map of what life in the U.S. is like demonstrates the role of urbanization and heavily population regions for defining where U.N.'s Human Development Index scores are highest.

Three of the metrics pertain primarily to education.  The fourth is a measure of financial success for a region.  The fifth is most likely a consequence of scoring well for these first four measures.

An obvious next step in making additional use of this map is to compare its findings with the distributions of various language, culture and ethnic groups in this country, according to most recent US Census patterns.  

 

 

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Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings

Battling Blight: Detroit Maps Entire City To Find Bad Buildings | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The high-tech project would help officials decide which abandoned buildings can be demolished.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This crowd-sourced mapping project is an great example of how a community can work together (using geospatial technologies and geographic thinking) to mitigate some of the more pressing issues confronting the local neighborhoods.  Many optimists have argued that Detroit has "good bones" to rebuild the city, but it needs to built on as smaller scale.  This project helps to assess what is being used by residents and should stay, and what needs to go.  Want to explore some of the data yourself?  See Data Driven Detroit.      

 

Tagsurban, unit 7 cities, housing, economic, povertyplace, socioeconomic, neighborhoodmapping, GIS, geospatial.


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, September 17, 2014 1:18 PM

So many of the buildings in Detroit have fallen out of use, and are being inhabited by squatters, drug users and vermin. The kindest thing to do is to demolish the ragtag structures in hopes of a chance to revitalize the fallen city. It was one of the first major cities in the US to be primarily built for the automobile. Although the city has fallen out of favor as industry has relocated, it was a well planned metropolis, and has a repairable infrastructure. The sewer lines, electric grid and paved streets lend to the idea of regrowing the city. By using input of the citizens, the government and city planners are able to identify what is useful and what needs to be demolished.

 

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GMO-Free Europe

GMO-Free Europe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Would you like to map out the GMO-free regions of Europe?  Looking for resources discussing the impacts of GMOs on society?  This is a partisan site with some nice resources for a student project. Additionally, in this NPR podcast they discuss how some American companies are trying to be GMO free in a GMO world.  

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Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 2014 6:44 PM

This map is the epitome of agricultural geography and the beginning of a series of questions such as why did all of Europe choose to be GMO-free? Or, does the proximity of European countries have to do with the fact that they share similar values (such as being GMO-free)? What does the EU have to do with this pattern? Because the EU chooses to be GMO-free, European countries are making a statement and consequently refining agricultural markets by refusing to import certain genetically modified foods. Agricultural geography thus shares some patterns across space- with all of Europe sharing simile agricultural policies. 

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 29, 2015 8:23 AM

This is an interesting development that has major implications for the world and its food supply. The social and political buzz combined with corporate profits intersecting with morality about sums up this complex and diverse issue.

One platform is the compliance of companies using GMO's without placing it on the ingredient label. People clearly have a right to know what's going in their bodies, and to choose whether or not they want to.

Another is that GMO's are nearly everywhere in the food system, with some estimates that 70% of the corn produced is of this variety. For folks who want to feed the world and prevent hunger more efficiently this is a huge win. Think of the lives disease resistant grains alone could save.

But is it safe?

Other issues include, how crops that are non-GMO can be inadvertently cross-pollinated with those that are naturally grown. How is that being monitored, and who is doing it? Is it self-policed or are governments watching over this?

My personal worry is that we create a crop that causes digestive or nutrient issues that "infects" the food supply, or worse, we take the technology to humans with dire consequences. This will be one of the hot topics that will be debated for decades to come. Corporate greed versus what's right for the people of the world. Call me a romantic, but I hope we as society do the right thing and feed our planet first. Perhaps money can be genetically modified to have less of an importance in society.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:55 PM

Would you like to map out the GMO-free regions of Europe?  Looking for resources discussing the impacts of GMOs on society?  This is a partisan site with some nice resources for a student project. Additionally, in this NPR podcast they discuss how some American companies are trying to be GMO free in a GMO world.  

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Place-based Geography Videos

Place-based Geography Videos | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Professor Seth Dixon shares over 50 of his favorite geography videos in this online map http://bit.ly/KDY6C2

Seth Dixon's insight:

Have you ever wanted to watch a video and to have a map handy at the same time?  Ever since I first watched Raiders of the Lost Ark, I love the idea of combining video with maps.  I produced this bare-bones map on ArcGIS online to spatially index over 50 videos that I enjoy using in my classes; all are place-specific videos (so they can be ‘located’ on the map).  These videos have also been shared here earlier, but this map can function as a more user-friendly way to search for engaging video clips.  Do you have a great place-based video that teaches the principles of geography that you love?  Please share the URL in the comments section with a brief paragraph.        


Tags: mapping, video, ESRIgeography education.

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Matt Davidson's curator insight, October 23, 2014 7:54 PM

Great site - showing locational context is important for not just Geography but every subject. How can we understand the complexities of topics like conflict or urban economies or agricultural histories.... without understanding locations and maps?

Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 2014 12:02 PM

It was nice to see where everything was happening. I hope it gets updated to more current events. I wish we had something like this when we were looking at the invasion of Kuwait.

Caroline Ivy's curator insight, March 15, 2015 5:19 PM

Seth Dixon uses ArgGIS to juxtapose maps with the location a video is associated with. 

 

This idea has crossed my mind before. Now, a video can be contemplated with the spatial accuracy needed. This connects events to a place, and can help students more fully grasp the geospatial distribution of events. 

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The Islands of Rhode Island

The Islands of Rhode Island | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"How many islands are in Rhode Island?"

Seth Dixon's insight:

I recently received this question and immediately thought that this is a great geographic question, but one that geographic tools can be used to find the answer.  I downloaded all the Rhode Island toponymns (place names) listed by the United States Board on Geographic Names and filtered out all the listed Islands (108 is the answer!!).  A spreadsheet of the data didn't help to visualize this data so I created this interactive mapOnly 1 of the locations didn't have coordinates, some are scarcely more than rocks, and this is only according to the the U.S. Board on Geographic Names, but this is the most complete map of islands in the state of Rhode Island that I could produce.  Additionally, here is an article about some sailors who sought to explore every island of the Narragansett Bay.  

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 8, 2013 4:17 AM

It is interesting that RI as a small state has alot of areas to discover with a map and a good drive. There are many islands near jamestown and Newport and also near Westerly that resemble the Jettey rock like formations that  also have lighthouses. There is so much to see and discover for its natural beauty. I am still amazed at the areas yet to discover in Rhode island. There are about thirty islands in Rhode Island Aquidneck is the largest, Conanicut is the second largest and Prudence ranks third

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Urban Exploration

Urban Exploration | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The French have a wonderful word—flâneur—for someone who seeks to explore and understand the nature of a city’s landscape, usually by taking spontaneous adventures amidst the ebb and flow of life going on around them. In this week’s theme we invite you to lose yourself reading about the flâneur-esque adventures of Maptia’s streetwise connoisseurs and explore a myriad of cities through their eyes."

Seth Dixon's insight:

If you have yet to discover Maptia, a hybrid map/storytelling online platform, this is a good introduction.  This article also serves as portal for 21 city profiles of cities around the world. 


Tags: neighborhoodurban, place.

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Tony Aguilar's curator insight, December 1, 2013 12:29 AM

This article demonstrates that there are so many places around the world yet to visit and it is important to plan and save as soon as possible becuase seeing all the beautiful cities of the world ma ytake several years, so preperation in is a must, From Cities in Asia, to Paris, London, Russia and Turkey you will be able to travel on festive dates and examine the landscapes that define these beautiful metropolises. From Cathedrals, to Big Ben, and Haggia Sophia in Instanbul, one will be marveled by the multicutural beauty and night life that exists around the world

Helen Rowling's curator insight, December 1, 2013 8:18 PM

Gr8 immersion of stories of lives in other countries.

Tony Gough's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:09 AM

Travel the world and read the short stories to learn more!

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Precipitation Mapping

Precipitation Mapping | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

In New Hampshire they are doing great work to make mapping data useful in the classroom.  This site is one that they use to show how students can map locally relevant data from an online data set.  CoCoRaHS (Community Collaborative Rain, Hail & Snow Network)  is a crowd-sourced network that gathers North American precipitation data.  The data (especially the total precipitation summary) can be easily copied into as spread sheet and saved as a CSV file (which can be uploaded to ArcGIS online).


Tagsmapping, CSV, water, GISESRIgeography education, geospatial, edtech.

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, September 30, 2014 9:42 PM

This is  COCORAHS. people from different places put this measurement tools to measure the rain fall, and it is different everywhere. this is cool in my opinion.

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GIS in the History Classroom

GIS in the History Classroom | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"I have had a number of requests for copies of GIS in the History Classroom in a format other than iBooks. I have just completed an internet version of the book that works on Safari, Firefox, Chrome, and Internet Explorer."

Seth Dixon's insight:

GIS is not just for geography classes; spatial thinking and spatial data management can help students learn a variety of subjects including history.  This free ebook will help history teachers to see how to unlock the power of Geographic Information Systems. 


Tagsmappinghistorical, GIS, geospatial, edtech.

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Catalina Elena Oyarzún Albarracín's comment, June 9, 2014 2:38 PM
Great,than you!!!!
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EnviroAtlas

EnviroAtlas | Geography Education | Scoop.it

EnviroAtlas is a collection of interactive tools and resources that allows users to explore the many benefits people receive from nature, often referred to as ecosystem services. Key components of EnviroAtlas include the following:

Seth Dixon's insight:

This video is a brief introduction on how to utilize the EnviroAtlas mapping platform that has been created by the United States Environmental Protection Agency.  This has great potential for the classroom and as a portal for students to explore the data on their own.      


Tags: mapping, environment, physical.

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steve smith's curator insight, May 23, 2014 3:59 PM

This looks great, will be having a play with this soon !

Mirta Liliana Filgueira's curator insight, May 24, 2014 3:38 PM

Enviro Atlas. Mapa Interactivo.

Allan Tsuda's curator insight, May 25, 2014 9:21 PM

Unbelievable, tremendous resource. I wish I had this one growing up. It is a US gov site (EPA), and is for US geography. I'm betting you can search around for similar sites for other locales around the world. Great demo. Demo runs on Adobe Captivate. The demo took a little bit of time to load on a wired connection through a high speed fiber optic connection. Or skip the demo and play around with the maps. Site not all that fast. Still, it's worth waiting for if you want the data.

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Military Mobilizations: Ukraine and Russia

Military Mobilizations: Ukraine and Russia | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An important look at the military reality of the crisis.
Seth Dixon's insight:

We have known that pro-Russian forces have taken control of government buildings in part of Ukraine, and that forces on both sides have been mobilizing along the border.  It is hard to make sense of all the news reports but this map helps to bring the reality on the ground into sharp focus.  

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Gorete Queiroga de Figueiredo's curator insight, May 4, 2014 7:30 PM

Infográfico para entender a crise ukraniana

Jim Doyle's curator insight, May 9, 2014 10:56 PM

They have to work something out

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Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S.

Google Maps Displays Crimean Border Differently In Russia, U.S. | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"America and its allies have refused to accept the region's separatist move to join Russia.  A look at the maps available on two Google Maps Web addresses — one ending in .com and another in .ru — shows the disparity. In Russia, Web visitors see a solid line dividing Crimea from neighboring Ukraine. In the U.S., a dotted line separates the two, implying a disputed status within the country."

Seth Dixon's insight:

In this podcast we learn that this isn't the only international border dispute that is displayed differently in Google Maps.  Google uses over 30 distinct versions of international borders because there is an underlying geopolitical dimension to cartography.  This brings up more questions than it answers--How is the Kashmir displayed in India?  Pakistan?  The West Bank in Israel or Egypt?  If you haven't explored Google Maps in other languages, consider this your invitation to read maps as you would a text and to think about the political implications of making a map.   


Tags: google, mapping, borders, political.

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Using State Maps in School

Using State Maps in School | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Have you ever seen a map and marveled over all of the information that it contains? It is incredible how maps can capture so much of the real world and depict so many places. From big cities to small towns, maps use characteristics such as topography, hydrography, industry, and recreation to tell the story of a place."

Seth Dixon's insight:

National Geographic Education has just finished producing all 50 State Tabletop Mapmaker kits which focus on basic mapping skills for younger audiences.  This set of tiled 8.5 x 11 sheets really expands what you can do and to help educators know what to do with these resources, they wrote this article that shows 9 ways to use these new state maps in your classroom.  I'm looking forward to printing off the Rhode Island state map!


TagsNational Geographic, mapping, K12.

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Sid McIntyre-DeLaMelena's curator insight, May 29, 2014 2:03 PM

Using maps in school is a concern for many educators that know the value of map skills. This article romanticizes maps and the importance of maps and studying them.

Maps are important for location as they can show absolute location to relative location and help with mental maps.

miya harris's curator insight, August 21, 2014 10:10 AM

I think that it is very smart to show large scale maps in schools.Large scale maps can help students to understand their locations better because they can see them in greater detail.Roads,buildings,and water element become more clear.I think every school should have a large scale map to help students better under stand their town, county, or state.

Rachael Johns's curator insight, August 21, 2014 9:31 PM

This is a great idea because students will be able to learn more with the hands on action. Most students just write or copy down notes that they don't really pay attention to but with this the student is more likely to learn from it because they have to measure out where to put the location, name the place that they're plotting, and put the note beside it about why it's important. This will also help students learn the location of places better because they're the ones actually making the map.     ~ R.J ~

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Logging and Mudslides

Logging and Mudslides | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In recent decades the state allowed logging — with restrictions — on the plateau above the Snohomish County hillside that collapsed in last weekend’s deadly mudslide.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 


View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.


Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   


Tagspolitical ecology, resources, environment, environment modify, industry, physical, geomorphology, erosion, landforms.

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Geofreak's curator insight, April 3, 2014 1:39 PM

Mijnbouw en aardverschuivingen, een goede combinatie ...... 

PIRatE Lab's curator insight, April 7, 2014 11:48 AM

There are several reasons for mudslides--some are purely a result of physical geography and others are related to land use patterns.  This last week's mudslide in Washington state was a combination of the two and although this impacts one place (see on map), it is a good teaching moment to discuss the environmental impacts of land use patterns and resource extraction projects.  As seen in this interactive, the river was cutting at the base of the hill, while loggers were clear-cutting at the top of the mountain.  Trees help prevent erosion as the roots hold the soil in place--a critical piece to the puzzle in a very rainy climate.  With $1 million worth of timber on the slope, logging companies persisted despite objections from the Department of Natural Resources and some restrictions (but in hindsight, those restrictions clearly were not enough). 

 

View the impact in ArcGIS online: Before and After Swipe, LiDAR I and II, and Imagery.

 

Questions to Consider: Other than economic worth, what other ways are there to value and evaluate the environment?  How could this landscape have been protected and managed better or was this mudslide inevitable?   

El Futuro deWaukesha's curator insight, April 18, 2014 12:03 AM

Working on an Inquiry of recent natural disasters with first grader.  

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T-Mobile's tech chief: I want to decimate Verizon's map ad campaign

T-Mobile's tech chief: I want to decimate Verizon's map ad campaign | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In an interview with CNET, T-Mobile's Neville Ray talks about the carrier's plan to fill out its coverage and why it's picking a fight with Verizon. Read this article by Roger Cheng on CNET News.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Maps are not innocent reflections of the truth; and if you do think that they are read some JB Harley.  Maps can be used to cleverly conceal the truth or to accentuate a particular perspective. 

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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This interactive StoryMap is great way to show the historical and geographic context of colonial-era piracy in the Caribbean.

 

Tags: Middle America, ESRI, mapping, historical.

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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:00 PM

This pirate excursion map is so cool and gives a great look at the travels of different pirates.  As we get farther away from these time periods, it seems like the idea of these Caribbean pirates are fictional.  To hear true historical events about these individual pirates is very interesting.  I would  love to take a time machine back to Port Royal during these times to experience that madness.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 9:34 AM

Imagine the horror a native of the Caribbean must have felt when white men came into their scenic lands and pillaged their villages and plundered their treasuries? Blackbeard otherwise known as Edward Teach, would light slow burning cannon fuses and place them in his beard to create an aura about him as he fought and raided these port of call. Calico Jack Rackham, a great pirate name if there ever was one, was best known for having  a pair of female pirates aboard. Instantly becomes one of my heroes! Then you have William Parker who was actually an opportunist backed by England who plundered Spanish treasures throughout Central America. Here is my favorite pirate joke; what is a pirate's favorite letter? "R" you say? No, it's the letter "C", pirates love the sea....

Helen Teague's curator insight, September 14, 2015 9:28 AM

very interesting interactive map

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Great Circle Mapper

Great Circle Mapper | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The Great Circle Mapper displays maps and computes distances along a geodesic path. It includes an extensive, searchable database of airports and other locations."

Seth Dixon's insight:

The shortest distance between two points is not a straight line…well, that depends on your map projection.  A flat map always distorts something when representing our three-dimensional Earth—whether it is distance, direction, shape or area—something gets distorted on our maps.  A great circle is the shortest distance between two points on the surface of a sphere, so that’s going to be the quickest travel route between points (which is why so many airline routes seem to arc).  This website Great Circle Mapper generates great circles that show the shortest distance between two points on many map projects will be an arc.  Why does this particular route arc ‘bend’ north for a while and then south?  Get out a globe for added perspective.   

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YEC Geo's curator insight, January 15, 2014 8:31 AM

Cool tool.

matthias brendler's curator insight, January 16, 2014 10:34 AM

Maps Monster am I!

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 12:59 PM

Because this route from JFK Airport to SYD AUS Airport is not a straight route there are many factors that need to be taken in account because of the overwhelming idea of trade winds and how that affects flight plans and routing for different airways/airlanes.  The plane has to fight against the trafe winds in order to create a specific ETA for the passenger and the flight crue among the plane. This is all dependent upon the trade winds (prevailing and other kinds) transmitting against the plane.

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Global wind conditions

Global wind conditions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
an animated map of global wind conditions
Seth Dixon's insight:

Earlier I shared a dynamic map of near-live wind data for the United States and a static rendering of global wind patterns.  This combines the features of both of those resources to provide a mesmerizing digital globe.  Click on the 'earth' icon in the lower righthand corner to customize the display.  

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Geoff Findley's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:40 PM

Wind...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, January 28, 2014 1:07 PM

This animated depiction of the earth and it's global wind conditions  shows that the northern and southern part of the world refelects the same type of wind conditioons where as the "middle" of the world depicts  different types of trade winds. For example, the trade winds and other prevailing winds change throught time in the world as the axis rotates the different wind patterns rotate with them.

Suggested by Thomas Schmeling
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Gaming to Help Farmers

Gaming to Help Farmers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A computer game wants you to map the world's cropland so farmers can get more out of each harvest.
Seth Dixon's insight:

NPR has recently highlighted Crop Capture; Crop Capture is a game that uses Google Earth imagery to crowd-source agricultural data.  From a pedagogical standpoint, this is a great way to visually introduce students the variety of agricultural landscapes that can be found around the world.  This is an example of what many refer to as citizen science games which provides an alternative rationale for playing the game.


Tags: agriculture, food production, mapping, geospatial, edtech.

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PIRatE Lab's curator insight, December 4, 2013 7:30 PM

These types of approaches to crowd sourcing are becoming bigger and bigger by the day it seems.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 7:34 PM

This is cool, there are many agricultural types and you can see It here. different land areas have different soil and chemicals in it which certain types of crops can benefit from. It is important to know these things. 

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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How to Read a (Good) Map

How to Read a (Good) Map | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Just as you shouldn’t trust everything you read or see on television, you should never blindly trust information just because it is on a map. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. All maps posit arguments. Maps present information about how something is. Just as there are no unbiased arguments, there are no unbiased maps."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a really good article that explores the idea of how to critically read maps. It gives good guidelines, techniques and questions to ask when assessing the positionality of the map.  If you are looking for a video for a younger audience to teach this same principle, see this clip.


Tags: mapping, perspective.

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John Slifko's curator insight, November 23, 2013 5:09 PM

Map skills are vital in the study of democratic place and space. 

YEC Geo's curator insight, November 24, 2013 4:44 PM

Good advice.

Ignacio Garrido's curator insight, November 26, 2013 1:09 AM

Exercise 14 :

 

Read the news and answer the questions:

 

a.What is the news talking about ?

b. There are two maps.Maps that is down has these questions ( Answer them ) :

Who made the map?What is the purpose of the map? That is, what is the map attempting to communicate?Who is the intended audience? (It is important to remember that the map may not have been designed for you, but a more specialized audience.)Does the map effectively achieve its communication goals? Does it present an interesting story or argument?

c.Sum up the news ( five sentences in english )

d.Choose another map ( of Internert  if you want ) and answer the questions 1,2,3 i 4. Add the map.

 

Send by moodle.Good luck¡