Geography Education
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Geography Education
Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
Curated by Seth Dixon
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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | Geography Education | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images

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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 2015 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

Anneliese Sjogren's curator insight, December 10, 2015 10:27 PM

I didn't realize how big Africa is before looking at this image. It's really interesting to see how the other countries fit inside of it.

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The Body in Public Space

The Body in Public Space | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Here are some seemingly eclectic topics.  All of them center around the appropriateness of the body being displayed publicly and the cultural norms that shape how we think about the issue.  I've included a sensational restroom, public nursing, top-free protests, and of course, the Kate Middleton scandal.


Tags: culture, popular culture, gender, place, space.

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 26, 2012 10:11 AM
Hilarious! The breasts of women are human parts of a woman which should be respected because it is where a human being feeds. It is a symbol of life.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 30, 2012 8:07 PM
This cartoon clearly shows how breast are sexually marketed in our society and how we will can accept the fashionably sexual display of breast in public yet consider breast feeding offensive. In many ways this cartoon seems to show how some social norms seem to interfere with common sense as we should be more critical of the sexual advertisement of breast while breast feeding on the other hand should at the very least be tolerated.
Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:37 PM

I think the men who prohibit public breast-feeding of babies should be starved.  I have a baby cousin, whom I love dearly, and I would hate to delay his lunch as much as anyone else would hate to have their own lunches delayed.  To prohibit public-breastfeeding is cruel, discriminatory, and hypocritical, as these prohibitors were likely publicly breastfed at some point in their infant days.  A message overall about other people acting 'scandelously'- get over it.  Grow up.  I don't like having to hear from or about you, and it takes away from my definition of a perfect world when I see people starving my baby cousin.  Culture should accomodate to the entirety of the population, not a majority.  After all, as for babies- we've all been there, and as for old people- we'd be lucky to live that long, but we'll llikely be there too.  I don't think we should be governed by someone that some people elect and other people don't vote for, because it's really not fair... it would be better and a compromise to not be governed at all!  So don't be critical, be understanding... Peace and Love!

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Earth's City Lights

Earth's City Lights | Geography Education | Scoop.it
NASA's Visible Earth catalog of NASA images and animations of our home planet...


This classic image is full of classroom applications.  The first impulse of most students is to note that this image will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map. 


Tags: remote sensing, worldwide, consumption, poverty, population, spatial, political, regions.

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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 18, 2012 12:35 PM
This image is pretty amazing to see. It shows what parts of the world are more modernized just by the lights seen from space. Looking at the U.S. and Europe, they are lit up very bright because they are richer parts of the world. As you look at places like Africa and some parts of South America, they are shown in darkness due to poorer areas in those regions.
Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:07 PM
I was impressed with the explanation of this picture especially for the simple fact that I thought it was a picture that depicted the population of certain areas of each country. Places like Africa, Brazil, areas of Mexico, and Southern US are not lit because of the areas of forest, desert and less population. Very nice picture. -Michelle Carvajal-
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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Until now, there has been a lack of solid, comprehensive spatial data about African groundwater resources.  Researchers have now done so.  For a more academic article on the subject, here are their findings in Environmental Research Letters


Tags: water, Africa, resources, physical, environment, environment depend.    

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Ephemicropolis

Ephemicropolis | Geography Education | Scoop.it

If you have over 100,000 staples, you can create an startlingly creative rendition of an urban landscape (well, Peter Root could).   It is interesting how our cultural and historical context shape what we see as a human landscape.  I can't help but think that if I lived 2,000 years ago this uneven jumbled metallic mass wouldn't remind anyone of any place they'd ever been. 

  

Tags: art, urban, landscape, unit 7 cities, historical.

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Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
Don Brown Jr's comment, October 1, 2012 9:42 PM
This video makes me think what other simple items or objects cause us to automatically associate with modernization and urban environments today such as Styrofoam cups. It also makes me wonder how certain tools and objects can be more strongly associated with different time periods, people, cultures and environments.
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Image Analysis

Image Analysis | Geography Education | Scoop.it
One of a number of large wildfires that have affected northern California in 2012, the Chips fire burned more than 75,000 acres by the time firefighters had contained it.



Seth Dixon's insight:

2012 is going to go down in United States history as the year with the most acres burned in a single year (statistics only go back to 1960).  The two featured images were taken earlier this month to display a Northern California wildfire; both with the same spatial resolution and acquired for the same instrument (Advanced Land Imager on EO-1 satellite), yet they are quite distinct.  One shows an aerial photograph, displaying exactly what standard visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (showing us what our eyes would normally see).  The other image displays a false color (near infrared) image. 


Questions to ponder: what advantages does each image have for analyzing the fire damage?  Drawbacks?  How does the data from both images work together to create a more complete picture of the situation?     


Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography.

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m burr's comment, September 17, 2012 10:16 AM
These images are very similar and different one you can see the smoke but you cant really see much of the damage on the land. where as the infrared image shows the areas that have been damaged but also makes the areas more easily able to depict the different features.
Lisa Fonseca's comment, September 17, 2012 10:22 AM
The first image displays a better visual of exactly where the fire damaged the land, the second image doesn't provide a clear visual to someone, the land effected is foggy. If I was going to visit this specific area in Northern California I would much rather use the first aerial image.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:31 AM
The first image gives a good spatial shot of where the exact hot spots are located that cannot be seen by the naked eye. The second photo will give you a spatial view of what you can actually see. Both are needed to put out the hot spot because they each will provide two different solutions to stop the burning acres.
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Homemade Butterfly Feeder

Homemade Butterfly Feeder | Geography Education | Scoop.it

According to a study published in the June 2003 issue of "Conservation Biology," there are 561 known butterfly species in the U.S. and Canada.


"Not only are these insects beautiful, they're important pollinators and vital to the health of their natural habitats. You can encourage these gentle creatures to visit your yard by using easy-to-make butterfly food and feeders."

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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:13 AM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:13 AM
Amazing and so beautiful..... How I wish I could have this at home...
Lena Minassian's curator insight, January 27, 2015 7:12 PM

This article was nice to read. We tend to overlook the butterfly species as a whole and many people wouldn't know that there are only 56 species remaining when there are 561 known species in the United States and Canada. This species is slowly disappearing and this article sheds some light on why they are important and beneficial. Butterflies are important for the health of the nature around us because they are pollinators. This encourages individuals to make butterfly feeders which is not something that most people would think about doing. Creating a feeder would not be harmful in any way because these creatures are beneficial and beautiful to look at. They provided different recipes to put in the feeder such as overripe fruit and other ingredients such as honey. Butterflies like fermented fruits and if you have some in your yard, this article encourages you to start your feeder through that. Make your feeder eye-catching and appealing so that a butterfly will actually approach it. This is such a simple way to give back to nature and allow the rest to take its course. 

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An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World'

An Annotated Map of Today's Protests and of the 'Muslim World' | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The violent backlash against the American film is taking place in Muslim societies, but it doesn't seem to correlate with Islam's reach.


This is a good reminder that the generalizing about "all Muslims" is as inaccurate as generalization about "all Christians" or any other group.  The world and people are much more nuanced than that. 


Tags: MiddleEast, Islam, conflict.

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Martin Daumiller's comment, September 16, 2012 2:53 AM
The map is slightly poor. 100% and more world muslim population? There is a great mix-up between muslims living in a country and percentage of muslims living in a country, therefore turning the U.S., Russia, etc. also into the discussion.
Also there is a distinction between not-protesting and not supporting the protests, which should influence the authers comparision of different mentalities.
The main idea against stereotypes and generalization is a very worthy one, but the way is article shows it is flawed.
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The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans Gives New Meaning to ‘Urban Growth’

The Lower Ninth Ward in New Orleans Gives New Meaning to ‘Urban Growth’ | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Since Katrina, the cartoonish pace of vegetation growth in the Lower Ninth Ward of New Orleans resembles something out of a Chia Pet commercial.


The ecosystem is reclaiming parts of New Orleans that have been physically or economically abandoned.  This is part elevation, climate and ecosystem; but it is also about urban land uses, disinvestment and socioeconomics.


Tags: urban ecology, environment, ecology, urban, unit 7 cities, disasters, land use

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Kayla, Sean, and Max's curator insight, February 26, 2015 1:21 PM

Max

Due to all the death and destruction brought upon New Orleans by hurricane Katrina, areas like the lower ninth ward have been partially abandoned and left unmaintained. What was once neat, urban blocks has now become a jungle. Along with the vegetation becoming a nuisance, it has also brought along with it pests such as possums, coyotes, and even alligators. The vacant lots have also become places criminals sometimes use for murder/rape, making the neighborhood much more dangerous.

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Global Closet Calculator

Global Closet Calculator | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The Global Closet Calculator aggregates the contents of your closet by origin to generate a map showing your unique global footprint, and puts you in charge of the global journey your stuff takes to get to you.


As I've worked now with the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance, I've had the good fortune to interact with the folks at National Geographic.  They are preparing for Geography Awareness Week (Nov 11-17th) with the theme "Declare your Interdependence!"  This newly released interactive feature allows students of all ages to see the global interconnections in their lives.   By analyzing the items in our closets (or any of the items that we consume), we can easily see that  our own personal geographies create a web of global interconnectedness.

 

Tags: NationalGeographic, GeographyEducation, K12, consumption, globalization

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Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, September 10, 2014 3:16 PM

A fun way for people to interact with there online closet and see how the world ties into our clothes!!

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Burning Man

This annual arts festival with a strong counter-cultural ethos literally is an experiment in producing alternative urban and cultural geographies.  They reject many normative regulations embedded within mainstream society.  These geographies created last only about a week, as an escape from the regular strictures of society.  The ephemeral alternative geographies then fade back into the desert but not without creating a visually remarkable place that has a lasting impact for participants.  A word of caution, it is a 'clothing-optional' event, so launching a Google image search live in class is not recommended.


I'll let the producer of the video explain: "It is an 8-day event which takes place annually in late August in the temporary city of Black Rock City located in a dry lakebed in northwestern Nevada, USA.  The radial streets are laid out like a clock face, from 2:00 to 10:00. I have marked some of these streets as well as some of the prominent and favorite theme camps and villages.  The attendees are all participants in a sense and are themselves the attraction. There is no corporate sponsorship or presence of any sort. Only ice and coffee are sold (and proceeds benefit community projects). Everything else is brought in under the concept of 'radical self-reliance' or gifted by others. Most 'burners' participate by finding the creative or artistic thing that they enjoy most and do best, do it to the fullest extent, and share it as much as possible."


Tags: art, culture, unit 3 culture, popular culture

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Nicholas Rose's comment, December 6, 2012 11:40 AM
Well, when I think of this festival called Burning Man it seems to violate the social norms that we have as a society. As for the previous video we saw, people can get seriously hurt at a festival like this especially at Woodstock in which that festival's been going on for years.
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NASA animation of temperature data from 1880-2011

Tags: video, environmentvisualization, climatechange, environment modify

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Harvest

Harvest | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Harvest is a time of plenty, when the season's hard work is rewarded by bounty. Many of the rhythms of our lives are shaped by the gathering of crops, even if most of us now live in cities.


This photo essay shows people from around the world harvesting their crops and taking them to the market. Pictured above, farmers who were waiting for customers gathered alongside corn-laden trucks at the market in Lahore, Pakistan earlier this month.


Questions to Ponder: What is similar in these images? What is different? How do those similarities and differences shape the geography of a given region?


Tags: Food, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture, worldwide, comparison, images.

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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 16, 2012 6:59 PM
The similarities in this photo are the type of people. From my observation, and the fact that corn is being produced and delivered to the markets, I would say these farmers are native Mexicans. These similarities shape the geography of a region, because we are aware of what Mexican culture includes - the land's productionof corn and its indigenous people having the characteristic of a darker shade of skin.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 18, 2012 6:31 PM
How we cultivate crops can reveal a lot about the society we live in. The scale of agricultural production can show us the socio-economics behind who in society does the cultivation and the technological level or resources available to the society that cultivates it. Some of the differences depicted in these harvest pictures tells me that in lower developed societies cultivation can be associated with tradition and rural surroundings while in developed nations it is more industrialized. However the pictures also show the similarities of how agricultural production overlaps into other aspects of society in some nations more than others. Also another similarity I see is that cultivation is still a very social practice and requires the cooperation and coordination of many people.
Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:17 AM
This is a very inspiring picture. What we see is the product of labor. If men will only cooperate and work together, we will have an abundant world, no famine, no war. In this picture, I still see a lot of people missing. With only a few people working, we see a lot of products. Therefore, if many people will work together, we can expect more products.
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Live Flight Tracker

Live Flight Tracker | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Flightradar24 is the best live flight tracker that shows air traffic in real time. Best coverage and cool features!


Ever wanted to find out where that plane overhead came from?  Where is it going?  Here it is.  The flight that was over Rhode Island 5 minutes ago that left the JFK airport?  It's officially on it way to Geneva Switerland and now over the Atlantic.   


Tags: mapping, worldwide, geospatial, transportation

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Four Environmental Innovations that have Revolutionized Architecture

Four Environmental Innovations that have Revolutionized Architecture | Geography Education | Scoop.it

The green revolution has impacted almost every sector of the economy. Now, eco-friendly technology is revolutionizing the way we think about architecture. Every part of the architectural process is undergoing huge changes.


When people think of green architecture, they often picture simple modifications, such as the substitution of environmentally friendly materials for less sustainable ones. While this can certainly be a viable means of reducing a project’s carbon footprint, it is by no means the only way to make a positive impact. The best green projects are the ones that go above and beyond, completely altering the way people think of architecture as a whole. The following are just a few of the spectacular developments taking place in architecture today.

  1. Vertical Gardens 
  2. Disaster-Resisant Buildings 
  3. Walkable Roofs 
  4. Garden Skyscrapers 

Tags: urban, urban ecology, sustainability, unit 7 cities.


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Kimberly Hordern's comment, April 28, 2013 8:49 PM
This idea is pretty cool. With all the pollution we have in the world today we need to start replanting the trees and plants we have tore down. Especially since more people are wanting to live in the big cities making the cities larger decreasing on our natural environment.
A. Perry Homes's curator insight, July 24, 2014 9:20 PM

These are beautiful ways to combine urban and natural environments. 

Zoya Ayaz's curator insight, September 9, 2014 8:24 AM

http://goo.gl/dfeUbh
We offer you Architectural Engineering Services at the affordable cost :)
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Latitude and Longitude of a Point

Latitude and Longitude of a Point | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Find the latitude and longitude of a point using Google Maps.


Simple, straightforward and easy to use.  All you do is point and click on the map to get latitude and longitude in both decimal degrees and DMS (degrees, minutes and seconds).  You can also quickly enter coordinates in either format an have the location displayed on the map.


Tags: GPS, mapping, location.

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Wade Lytal's curator insight, August 26, 2015 4:23 PM

This can help with your homework assignment. 

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | Geography Education | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.

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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush

Seeds of A Revolution » 21st Century African Land Rush | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Interesting map about farming land lending to other countries in Africa. Impossible to find the original source, but is attricuted to the Financial Times. 


Here is a link to the image (in low res) without political content (UN related): http://new.uneca.org/lpi/africanlandrush.aspx 


Tags: Africa, agriculture, unit 5 agriculture.

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Disputed Isles

Disputed Isles | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Competing territorial claims have led to maritime disputes off the coast of Asia. See a map of the islands at issue.


This is an nice interactive map that allows the reader to explore current geopolitical conflicts that are about controlling islands.  This is an good source to use when introducing Exclusive Economic Zones, which is often the key strategic importance of small, lightly populated islands.   


Tags: EastAsia, SouthEastAsia, political, unit 4 political, territoriality, autonomy, conflict, economic

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2014 2:40 PM

This interactive page gives relevant information about islands that are disputed over in southeast Asia.  I liked it because you could see the information in context with the map.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 9:47 PM

This is like a game of Monopoly when people try and get all the houses or businesses. Except this is real life and real isles. Whose is whose? How does Asia decide where and how the EEZ's should be divided.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, December 14, 2015 12:05 PM

considering that half of the nations involved are island nations, this is hardly surprising. every nation has issues with their neighbors. even the us and Canada dispute some territory. but these disputes can hardly end as well, when half of these nations have fought wars with each other for most of their histories.

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States


Tags: USA, historical, visualization

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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories

On Israel's system of segregated roads in the occupied Palestinian territories | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Tags: MiddleEast, territoriality, transportation, borders, conflict, governance, political, unit 4 political

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Cam E's curator insight, March 4, 2014 11:32 AM

A relatively grim reminder that even things as clear-cut as road systems can be inherently political. This system forces segregation by the law of which roads can be driven on, but it's a good jumping point to remember that even the placement of roads can exclude or include communities. I'm reminded of the proposed idea for a NAFTA superhighway running through Mexico, Canada, and the US. One of the criticisms was that the highway would not provide exits for anywhere but major economics centers, effectively cutting off small towns from the rest of the area.

Zach & Wafeeq's curator insight, November 4, 2014 5:04 PM

Area/Geography: This is a diagram of what Israel is like for Palestinians and Israelis. It shows extremely restricted access for Palestinians. Whereas Israelis have all of the roads. This diagram fairly falls under the Area/Geography category because of the fact of how the Israeli government is manipulating the area/geography of the land of Israel to suit their best interest. 

Jacqueline Garcia pd1's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

Here one can see the political territoriality among Israel. For example in this article webpage we saw that people with Palestinian license plates can not drive on Israeli roads. This is one of the many instances where people are segregated according to their beliefs. 

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Bounces in GPS signals reveal snow depth

Bounces in GPS signals reveal snow depth | Geography Education | Scoop.it
UNAVCO, a non-profit university-governed consortium, facilitates geoscience research and education using geodesy.


"Researchers at the University of Colorado Boulder and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research have been using what is typically considered an error in the GPS signal to measure snow depth around GPS receivers. A GPS receiver records both direct and reflected signals from a satellite. A reflected signal bounces off of whatever is around the GPS station before being recorded, and therefore can contain information about the ground surface close to the station.

Traditionally snow depth has been measured by hand. In other words, someone had to go out with a measuring stick to whatever location they were interested in.  GPS snow depth measurements solve both of these problems: once a GPS unit is installed, it can function on its own throughout the winter, and will make a measurement every two hours, which is then averaged for a daily position, or in this case, snow depth."


Tags: GPS, climatechange, water, technology,

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GPS or Maps?

GPS or Maps? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

We are a society that is reliant on modern navigational devices.  This is an interesting article that argues for keeping modern equipment, but asks us not to eliminate older technologies in our haste to embrace the shiny and new.  "Technology as great as it is should never be a replacement for skills, but a tool used to assist you."


Tags: GPS, technology, spatial.   

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melissa stjean's comment, September 15, 2012 4:15 PM
Driving in New York City is as scary as it gets with all the craziness going on everywhere. When my GPS signal decided to go out was not a fun time, thankfully in my car i had a real map of the city to come to my rescue. I totally agree with this article because although new technology is great, it can give out on you at any time. So knowing how to read and use real maps is crucial when driving in new territories.
Jeff F's comment, September 17, 2012 6:49 PM
I love gps, however, I always look at a map before hand and get an idea of what the major streets in the area are. GPS also sometimes does not take into effect things like bridges being down. Two months ago, I was trying to find some place and my gps kept trying to lead me to a bridge which was closed. I ended up zooming out and looking at the map to know where the street was I was looking for. I then managed to find a route that lead around the bridge.
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Welcome To The New Middle East

Welcome To The New Middle East | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The violent protests at U.S. embassies this week seemed to catch the new Middle East governments flat-footed. So are these attacks an aberration on the rocky road of nation building, or a harbinger of a region moving toward greater chaos?


This nicely puts the political instability of North Africa in context to understand the recent attack on U.S. embassies.


Tags: MiddleEast, political, states.

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Don Brown Jr's comment, September 18, 2012 6:33 PM
Although change is continuous we must remember that it does not occur instantaneously. The Arab Spring and the removal of many autocratic governments has created in many of these countries a power gap that the new governments are trying to fill among other local competing factions. Before we judge the New Middle East we must take into account that these actions were done by individuals in the response to a video uploaded by an individual. Should the worth of a nation be measured by the acts of a few people? Likewise the anti-Islamic video that went viral stuck at the heart of Middle Eastern beliefs and it should not be surprising that it was not well received by Muslims. Remember the public outcry in the US over the “victory” Mosque in New York? Multiply that feeling by a factor of 10 and we might understand how many Muslims felt about this video.
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La Historia con Mapas

La Historia con Mapas | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Diccionario Enciclopedia de la Historia y los Mapas...


Para los que hablan español, hay muchos recursos en este sitio que merecen más attención.


Tags: Mapping, historical.

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