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City Life Changes How Our Brains Deal With Distractions

City Life Changes How Our Brains Deal With Distractions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A new study finds that urban minds don't pay as much attention to their surroundings unless they're highly engaging.
Seth Dixon's insight:

It's often noted that people from smaller towns prefer a slower pace of life and people from large cities enjoy the hustle and bustle more.  So does the urban environment change how we handle the vast quantity of information in major metropolitan areas?  This article points to data that says it does.  


Tags: rural, housing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

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nancercize's curator insight, May 31, 2013 10:03 AM

This helps explain why we are exhausted at the end of the day, and why a walk in the park is so refreshing. We need to make sure city folk have parks nearby.

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Mercator Puzzle

Mercator Puzzle | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This online game where you return the "misplaced" country on the map is more than just an exercise in locating places (there are many online map quizzes for that sort of activity).  What makes this one unique is that as you move the country north or south the country expands or contracts according to how that country would be projected if that were its actual location on a Mercator map.  This is a great way to introduce projections.

 

Tags: map projections, mapping, cartography.

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, February 11, 2013 12:03 PM

Great site to show projection and changes in perception on maps.  

John Nieuwendyk's curator insight, December 17, 2014 5:45 PM

This mercator puzzle was especially interesting. It illustrated how various countries look on a mercator map compared to other maps.

Alex Smiga's curator insight, September 7, 2015 4:45 PM

Cool activity / puzzle that plays with projection and shows you a comparative view of the "true" size of countries compared to others 

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The Top Ten places to visit in Africa

The Top Ten places to visit in Africa | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Africa has a lot to offer the adventurous traveller. We've compiled a list of the must-see places any trip should include.
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are great iconic places of Africa in this Top 10 list  (and yes, I'd love to see Victoria Falls from above). 


Tags: tourism, Africa.

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Giselle Figueroa's curator insight, November 4, 2014 11:00 PM

 Even though their is a bad situation going on in some parts of Africa, we can not discount the beautiful places  in this beautiful continent. I really love the ten places, but there was three places which I will love to go some day. The first one is Victoria Falls in Zambia is a beautiful place I love it, its looks like The Niagara falls but much better. The second one is Valley of the kings in Egypt, this place is an ancient place, very interesting. The last one is Cape Town in South Africa, this is an amazing place, it have beautiful beaches, the nature in there is awesome, and I could read that has great cuisine. Definitely is in my plans to go someday.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 11, 2014 8:37 PM

I have never been outside of the country. Although I would really love to visit a country in each continent before I die. Being a huge Disney fan, all that comes to mind when I think of Africa is The Lion King. However, the top places ranked on this website were just as beautiful. A must see for me would be The Maasai Mara located in Kenya. It looks like a replica of the opening scene in The Lion King. Another beautiful sight to see would be Mount Kilimanjaro. I'm not sure I would make it to the top, but even seeing it from a distance looks like a breath-taking view. Number one on this top places to visit list was Cape Town, which consisted of beaches, food, and amazing scenery. Sounds perfect for a relaxing day!

Lena Minassian's curator insight, April 8, 2015 1:11 PM

I liked this article because a lot of times, many indivduals do not realize that there are many great places to visit in Africa. Africa has a big stereotype of just having poor countries and not having much to see visually. This articles shows the top ten places to see if you travel there and these images are beyong beautiful. If you like to travel this is definetly something that you should look at. Geographically, there are mountains. rain foreswt, craters, pyramids, and towns you can visit. Africa is a big continent and one of my favorite images that I saw was Mt. Kilimanjaro and Virunga Mountains.

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Recycling Awareness Campaign

Seth Dixon's insight:

I've posted on this topic now, so regular readers will know that I love a good flashmob that changes our perception of public places.  This flashmob from Quebec makes me wonder, "if there were a bottle on the ground, would I pick it up and recycle it?"  I'd like to think that I would, but the numbers show that most people would just walk right on by.  For more of my favorite flashmobs in public places, see http://geographyeducation.org/whats-new/articles/place-and-flash-mobs/  

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Trisha Klancar's curator insight, August 21, 2013 10:07 AM

I love this...We are in Quebec City..this is in Montreal but it is the same. Very little recycling is done...people in homes do it then in the news we hear how it sits outside and rots, rusts or is wasted as the recylcing plant can not handle the amount it receives.This fact causes people to be upset and then to junk what they have.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 17, 2013 5:50 PM

I have to confess that I probably wouldn't pick up a bottle in a public place because I would be worried with germs. I most definately would at work or somewhere I was fimilar with or had a sink available to wash my hands. I probably sound like a germ nut but you never know. I think when people are fimilar with an area or care about the appearance of a place they are more likely to pick it up. I did appreciate the cheers after the lady picked it up. 

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, September 21, 2015 1:02 PM

Excellent way to raise awareness to people who doesn't recycle or just ignore a plastic bottle in front of a recycling bin. It amazed me to see that it's such an simple task can be ignored, especially when the bin was right next to the bottle. It raised the question that are people just to lazy or is it human nature to mind our own affairs and walk away from things that doesn't pertain to us. In any case, it takes one person to make that difference and show everyone that it is THE normal thing to do and should become a habit rather than a chore. 

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NFL fans by U.S. county, according to Facebook

NFL fans by U.S. county, according to Facebook | Geography Education | Scoop.it
On the surface Facebook is a social network, but those in the know recognize that it's actually one of the largest datasets of human trends, preferences and activity ever catalogued.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a crowd-sourced map of NFL fans is very different from this more stylized version

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Heather Ramsey's curator insight, January 31, 2013 2:27 PM

This map shows fans of NFL teams by county. The data was collected from Facebook posts and people's pages. What patterns do you see for the fans in states that do not have a professional football team? In states that DO have a pro team, does everyone root for the home team? Why would a state have fans who root for another team? (Think geographically.)

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15 foods you can regrow from scraps

15 foods you can regrow from scraps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The interest in urban gardening and organic foods has grown as a reaction against a mechanized, commercialization agricultural industry with genetically-modified produce.  Modern consumers are seek...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Modern consumers are increasingly seeking diverse options and don’t want to passively accept the most economically efficient method of food production.  City-dwellers sometimes feel disconnected from the land and their food and some are trying to culturally re-establish that connection in the 21st century.  So how can you engage in some urban agriculture using your food scraps?  This could be a way to make an agricultural unit more hands-on with a fun project


Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture

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Mary Burke's comment, April 14, 2013 5:56 PM
I love this idea. And I every one of these foods. When I'm done with school in two years I'm going to have a garden and get my grandchildren involved. They need to know where food comes from. My dream would be to grow my own food.
Meg Conheeny's comment, April 26, 2013 7:37 PM
This is really cool. In this day and age so many consumers are trying to find ways to stay away from the “genetically-modified produce." Many people want to grow gardens and eat more organic and natural products. This article shows ways to grow products from scraps of food such as growing carrots from carrot tops or tomatoes from seeds. This concept is really interesting I had no idea this could be done. I think this idea will catch on and could ultimately make people healthier.
Dave Cottrell's comment, April 27, 2013 4:01 PM
This works very well. I don't just throw out tomatoes that spoil in the house or even on the vine late in the season. If you throw them into a heap in the fall with other garden scraps, they will produce very hardy plants that you can transplant in the spring. When you buy a (non GMO) pumpkin in the fall, save the seeds. Clean them well by washing them, dry them on an old towel, and plant them in cardboard egg cartons in some compost in the spring. These are just a few of the things you can grow from so-called waste!
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Housing Patterns

Housing Patterns | Geography Education | Scoop.it
See the big picture of how suburban developments are changing the country's landscape, with aerial photos and ideas for the future
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are many types of housing development patterns throughout the world.  This article provides a summary of approximately 20 different housing patterns common in the United States with a visual example demonstrate the impact on the urban footprint (Pictured above is an example of new urbanism in Boulder, CO).  Each neighborhood has distinct cultural amenities and attracts particular socioeconomic market segments. 


Questions to Ponder: What housing patterns are you drawn to?  How come?  What are the advantages for the residents to live in that type of community?  What are the impacts that the housing pattern has on the physical environment and the urban system?  What systems are most profitable for developers?  How does the layout of the neighborhood alter the sense of place?  

   

Tagshousing, urban, planning, density, urbanism, unit 7 cities.

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Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, December 10, 2013 4:13 PM

A very interesting article on changes in landscape, while looking though this I came aross so many little things i never noticed about the topical layout of housing. The main thing that is apparent is density, how closely each house is put together, the amount of land each has as well as the view from the property. Its aslo interesting to see how the design of the area can be made for easy access or be desigend to keep people out with only one enctancte and exit. All of these charasticts make up how the land is desired as well as econimcly priced, which then determins who will be able to live there.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, December 15, 2013 8:53 PM

Having the streets interconnected allows for easy  traveling throughout the area.  when there is more density in an area it means there are more houses , more people.  The sprawl has the center on the place and the streets go out around it. The way the streets are made are for different reasons,.

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:57 AM
This article talks about twenty different housing patterns and how we base these housing patterns around our society or enviroment. How looking at housing patterns can tell you what kind of neighborhood one lives in from the sky. Looking down and seeing a golf course with lush grass and big backyards shows you that this neighborhood is very expensive. Or Canal houses that utilize every inch of the waters edge to financially make them able to charge higher prices for the homes because each house has a water view and is on the waters edge.
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Adaptive Roots in the Concrete Jungle

Adaptive Roots in the Concrete Jungle | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"In this fantastic sighting by photographer Horst Kiechle, we see the roots of a tree in Bangkok, Thailand (Lat Yao, Chatuchak to be exact) growing into the grooves and cracks of an interlocking sidewalk. Even the colour of the roots gradually fade into the pavement."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This startling image is a powerful testament to the adaptive nature of many species to the urban environment.  Some species will adapt in beautiful ways such as this tree, while other will adapt in ways that go against our plan for that urban space (think rats, pigeons and cockroaches).  We adapt to our environment and the environment adapts to us as well; but that relationship is not always peaceful and symbiotic.  We can also destroy ecosystems that are fragile and not as resilient to change as this tree is.  See this same tree's root network one year later

 

Tags: urban ecology, environment adapt, sustainability, biogeography.

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Google releases detailed map of North Korea, gulags and all

Google releases detailed map of North Korea, gulags and all | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Google Maps rolls out a detailed may of the secretive state.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Citizen cartographers have edited Google's North Korea map, putting information on what was previously an absence of data concerning one of the most secretive countries in the world.  In essence, as explained in this video, Google is crowd-sourcing the map.  How might this geographic knowledge change our perception of North Korea?  How might the dissemination of this information affect North Korea?  

 

Tags: North Korea, mapping, cartography.

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Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, January 30, 2013 9:41 AM

Des cartes pour comprendre le monde: la géographie participative de Google. 

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WebGL's Digital Globe

WebGL's Digital Globe | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A showcase of creative experiments programmed in JavaScript, HTML5, and WebGL
Seth Dixon's insight:

Pictured above is a still image of an interactive digital globe with population density data with colored bar graphs to symbolize the data.  This is a great open-source platform for geographic data visualization. There are not many data layers currently, but possibly there will be more in the future (best viewed in Google Chrome).  


Tagspopulation, demographics, unit 2 population, visualization, mapping.

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IGO's curator insight, January 30, 2013 5:12 AM

"Pictured above is a still image of an interactive digital globe with population density data with colored bar graphs to symbolize the data.  This is a great open-source platform for geographic data visualization. There are not many data layers currently, but possibly there will be more in the future (best viewed in Google Chrome)."

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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I love this time-lapse animation of all the county and state-level boundary changes in United States history.  Would you like to see this in greater detail?  Would you want to download the data and create your own visualization of this?  The Atlas of Historical County Boundaries has all of this data as GIS shapefiles, Google Earth KMZ files and PDFs for the whole country as well as for each individual state.  This project sponsored by The Newberry and the National Endowment for the Humanities has tremendous potential for use in the classroom for history and geography teachers alike.  


Tags: historical, USA, borders, time lapse, mapping, edtech.

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Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

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The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013

The countries most at risk for a coup in 2013 | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"The map [above] sorts the countries of the world into three groups based on their relative coup risk for 2013: highest (red), moderate (orange), and lowest (beige)."

Seth Dixon's insight:

While this is not predicting a coup in any of these places, this map is a visualization of data that was used to assess the factors that would make a coup likely (to see an alternate map, here is the Washington Post's review of the same data that mapped the 30 countries most likely to have a coup). 


Questions to Ponder: What factors do you think would be important in compilling data of this nature?  What makes a country susceptible to this type of governmental overthrow?  What creates governmental stability? 


Tags: political, conflict, unit 4 political, governance, Africa.

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wereldvak's curator insight, January 26, 2013 5:28 AM

Factoren die meespelen zijn hieronder genoemd.

 

The algorithm for successful coups uses just four risk factors, one of which is really just an adjustment to the intercept.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Degree of democracy (Polity score, quadratic): higher risk for countries in the mid-range of the 21-point scale.Recent coup activity (yes or no): higher risk if any activity in the past five years.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.

The algorithm for any coup attempts, successful or failed, uses the following ten risk factors, including all four of the ones used to forecast successful coups.

Infant mortality rate (relative to annual global median, logged): higher risk in countries with higher rates.Recent coup activity (count of past five years with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more activity.Post-Cold War period: lower risk since 1989.Popular uprisings in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Insurgencies in region (count of countries with any, plus one and logged): higher risk with more of them.Economic growth (year-to-year change in GDP per capita): higher risk with slower growth.Regime durability (time since last abrupt change in Polity score, plus one and logged): lower risk with longer time.Ongoing insurgency (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Ongoing civil resistance campaign (yes or no): higher risk if yes.Signatory to 1st Optional Protocol of the UN’s International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (yes or no): lower risk if yes.

from:http://dartthrowingchimp.wordpress.com/2012/01/30/assessing-coup-risk-in-2012/ ;
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Historical Interactive Topographic Map of Switzerland

Historical Interactive Topographic Map of Switzerland | Geography Education | Scoop.it


 

Seth Dixon's insight:

This is an excellent interactive topographic map of Switzerland with great detail at a variety of scales with historical layers from 1938 to the present. 


Tags: Switzerland, historical, mapping.

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Photographing Iconic Landmarks

Photographing Iconic Landmarks | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Oh, Machu Picchu, ancient city of the Incas, pride of Peru, must-see travel destination: You've never been so appropriately photobombed by a llama.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Millions of tourists have already taken a picture of Machu Picchu from this angle, and yet, tourists all want to replicate the iconic shot as for themselves--proof that they were there and had the full experience.  Iconic images are perfect for internet memes (and in this instance a photobomb) because there is a shared cultural understanding of what the picture should look like normally and inverting that provides the comic relief.  CAPTION THIS PHOTO IN THE COMMENTS SECTION. 


Tags: Peru, South America, tourism, images.


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:59 PM

While humorous these pictures really show that certain areas and regions are often imagined by a set and specific image. When Machu Picchu is thought of it is always seen from the same peak, making this an incredibly popular photo spot for tourists, or in this case a llama.  

Michael Eiseman's curator insight, December 18, 2014 7:19 PM

#LlamaHam we at www.viptourgroup.com have about 20 pictures of Llamas that are pretty photogenic. I have one that was stuck in a split tree on purpose in Salta Argentina.  Seems they have personality! and want to get a few bucks now for a photo. #paytoplay hipsters.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 2015 1:21 PM

This is hilarious. It's a perfect moment to capture a picture, while also distracting from how actually beautiful Machu Picchu really is. But, if anything this will probably make people want to visit even more, because they'll all want to take this picture themselves. Which, will undoubtedly be good for Peru's economy. Who says photobombs can't be a good thing?

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Roots of the Mali Crisis

January 19, 2013—The West African nation of Mali is making headlines after a wave of French military actions on Islamic extremist groups now controlling the northern part of the country. National Geographic Senior Writer Peter Gwin has...
Seth Dixon's insight:

This 6-minute video clip is a good way to help students understand the ethnic and geopolitical context of the Mali conflict.  What impact did the superimposed borders of colonialism have in creating the conflict? 


Tags: Mali, Africa, borders, political, conflict, war, colonialism, National Geographic.

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Araceli Vilarrasa Cunillé's curator insight, February 6, 2013 6:37 AM

La crisi propera no es deixa fer prou atenció als canvis geopolítics a l' Africa.

Al Picozzi's comment, July 18, 2013 12:15 PM
The borders were randomly drawn without taking culture, language, beliefs of the native populations etc into account. However drawing borders along ethnic lines didn't work in Europe after WWI. Alot of ethnic minorities were in countires that did not feel welcome. That was one reason for WWII
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Lawns Into Gardens

Lawns Into Gardens | Geography Education | Scoop.it
There are joys and rewards in growing some of your own crops; there's even beauty.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Although a front lawn is not ecologically the best use of urban space, there are strong cultural pressure to conform to that aesthetic ideal.  When individuals choose to grow vegetables and fruit, they often face some push-back from the city or homeowners associations with a different vision on the appropriate use of space.  Some have estimated though, that if we were to convert 10 percent the country's grass lawns to vegetable gardens that they could supply roughly a third of our fresh vegetables. 


Tags: agriculture, food, urban, unit 5 agriculture.

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Chris Scott's curator insight, July 14, 2013 10:14 AM

I think that having having an urban garden whether it be in the front yard or the backyard should be a must in every state even if it is a little garden, I think it will make great use of the land.

Drake's curator insight, September 4, 2013 12:11 AM

Yes, I agree, it is an act of bringing nature close to you. 

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Super Bowl rooting interests

Super Bowl rooting interests | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Facebook Data Science wrote a note titled NFL Fans on Facebook. Read the full text here.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Who is rooting for which team in the Super Bowl?  How does regional geography play a role in this distribution of the data captured in this map? 

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Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.!

Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.! | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An advertising campaign designed to illustrate the drawbacks of living in the U.K. is being planned to deter an expected surge of immigrants, according to reports
Seth Dixon's insight:

Immigration is a sensitive topic so I'll tread lightly.  There appears to be some support for a campaign that would target would-be migrants specifically from Romania and Bulgaria that life in the U.K. isn't as as grand as it may seem (ironic coming of the heels of the Olympics).  This obviously isn't something that is universally supported by the British, but it does highlight the fact that more and more European countries are seeking ways to deter migrants from crossing their borders as economic struggles continue. 


Tags: migration, UK, immigration, Europe, unit 2 population

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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 5:22 PM

It appears the U.K. is designing this campaign due to the fact they are struggling financially and they cannot afford to give benefits to some of the immigrants coming into the U.K., as immigrants are entering at a high rate.

When the Olympics games were hosted in London, the weather was beautiful and the sun was shining almost everyday, (which is rare in the U.K.) That made the U.K. even more attractive to foreigners and potential immigrants. This advertising campaign is displaying the drawbacks of living in the U.K., such as the rainy weather and constant grey skies.  

Flaviu Fesnic's curator insight, September 17, 2014 6:02 AM

UKIP launched an aggressive campaign against Romanians and Bulgarians by the end of 2013 and the beginning of 2014 which completely turned out to be a trick to gain some more votes.Not only this chauvinistic campaign showed a misleading message but it stirred an unjustified feeling of hatred toward Romanians&Bulgarians.Latest figures showed an influx of mostly high qualified persons , in fact !
Unlike the immmigration to Spain and Italy (1mill. to both of these countries) Romanians usually only work there and come back after a while,they don't settle there... It's probably, the Latin blood ! :)

Flaviu Fesnic's comment, September 17, 2014 6:14 AM
so, there was no influx but misleading UKIP politics... visit Cultural Geography on Facebook !
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The Geography of Evolution Education

The Geography of Evolution Education | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

What is taught in biology classes varies considerably in the United States for a host of political and religious reasons that are particular to each state.  What influences the educational decisions being made in your state?

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Tony Hall's curator insight, February 5, 2013 12:11 AM

This is a really interesting infographic. It blows my mind everytime I see something like this. The US is such an interesting place to study!

Ann-Laure Liéval's curator insight, February 6, 2013 1:10 PM

Religion et société aux EU: sur la postérité du procès du singe et l'enseignement du darwinisme aux EU. 

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Transportation and Population

Seth Dixon's insight:

The highway system (and the widespread usage of air conditioning) in the later half of the 20th century dramatically changed the population settlement patterns of the United States and reshaping our cities.

 

Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, unit 7 cities.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:30 PM

Very Interesting HUGGERS...we didn't always have highways to cruise on!

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A Layman's Geography Guide to the Most Confusing Region Of the World: Iran

A Layman's Geography Guide to the Most Confusing Region Of the World: Iran | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Iran's geography plays heavily in the foreign affairs issues it is a part of, and the policies it makes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

"Iran sits smack in the middle of one of the most important geopolitical regions on Earth. Much of its western flank is bordered by either Iraq or the Persian Gulf, and it has considerable control over one of the world’s most important waterways for oil shipping and trade, the Strait of Hormuz." 


Given it's context, Iran is a country that students should know beyond the three main facts that that most Americans are aware of (Iran has an Islamic-based government, an emerging nuclear program and a ton of oil).  This article is a good starting point. 


Tags: Iran, political, Middle East.

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France bans popular English expressions

France bans popular English expressions | Geography Education | Scoop.it
France declares war on the English language. Erin Burnett reports....
Seth Dixon's insight:

France is famous for trying to slow the linguistic diffusion of globalization's most powerful online language (which also happens to belong to their age-old cultural and political rival).  France has a commission dedicated to removing new words that have English origins since 1996 with the goal of introducing words with have linguistic roots in French. Recently then have done away with the Twitter term #hashtag to #mot-dièses.  This video criticizes this cultural practice and it is also derided in this NPR article.   However this does not mean that France is immune to cultural pressure to change linguistic traditions.  There was been a movement to alter the term Mademoiselle on official documents with a new title that allows women the freedom to choose the form of address that they prefer (and not to force them to reveal their marital status--think Ms. vs Miss).


Questions to Ponder: Why (and how) do languages change over time?  Is it possible to keep a language 'pure?'


Tags: language, culture, globalization, unit 3 culture, France, gender.

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Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:21 PM

unit 3

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 16, 2015 2:52 PM

I can't say I was a fan of Ms. Burnett's reporting style. First of all, implying that America is the only country that speaks English was a little blind. Second, the little chuckles and smirks she gives is a bit condescending. She came off rather harsh and confronting of the French. And I'm sure France isn't "declaring war on English" as they are probably doing this to other languages. Finally, her last remark referencing the song "Voulez vous coucher avec moi" was a tad inappropriate in my opinion. That being said, it's understandable for a country to try and protect its language. It's part of its culture and its heritage.

 

Languages change overtime through interaction with other people. Like Ms. Burnett pointed out, there are some French words that have become common use in the everyday American conversation like a la carte and bon voyage. It is impossible to keep a language "pure" or rid of other language influences in today's society. With all the interaction happening via the web and other media outlets, people are bound to pick up words from other languages to use in their lives. 

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 9, 2015 10:45 AM

Frances attempts at keeping the French language pure are futile. It is impossible to stop the spread of information in a society. In the age of the internet, information is going to spread. If the internet can take down middle eastern dictators, it is going to expose French children to English words. This entire policy is a bad public relations move for the nation of France.  It makes the nation and its government seem as if they are intolerant of other cultures and views. France prides itself on being an open democratic society. An open society can not ban a language. France should reverse this policy immediately.

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Feuding Over Food

Feuding Over Food | Geography Education | Scoop.it
In the Caucasus, culinary nationalism is an extension of the region's long-simmering disputes.
Seth Dixon's insight:

"There is perhaps nothing more closely bound up with one's national identity than food. Specific local dishes are often seen as the embodiment of various cultures and many nations promote their food as a celebration of national identity. Sometimes, however, a country's cuisine can also be used to highlight national rivalries." 


This opening paragraph nicely shows how cultural traditions from a similar cultural hearth may have much in common.  However, since these groups are neighbors, the geopolitical relationship may be strained despite the cultural commonalities. 


Tags: food, culture, unit 3 culture.

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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, January 29, 2013 2:36 PM

This is a great addition to include for my World Food Problems course this semester.

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 30, 2013 11:25 AM

A nations food is often used to celebrate their national identity but it can also be used to highlight national rivalries. For example the Czechs reffer to their Slovak cousins as Halusky after one of their traditonal dishes. Culinary flashpoints can also arise when nations claim the same dishes as their own.  

Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 18, 2014 3:30 PM

Azerbaijanis, Turks, and Armenian share a lot of the same foods. Instead of enjoying the similarities and cultural nationalism, they are disputing. Eat, drink and be  merry?

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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | Geography Education | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.
Seth Dixon's insight:

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

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Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
chris tobin's curator insight, February 21, 2013 3:06 PM

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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Mount Dixon Explodes!

Mount Dixon Explodes! | Geography Education | Scoop.it
An initial analysis of the Mount Dixon landslide in New Zealand on Monday
Seth Dixon's insight:

There are some great images (and a post-landslide helicopter flight video) of the massive landslide that occurred Jan 21, 2013.  The rockslide extends over 3 km, with an elevation change of approximately 800 meters.  This is an excellent example to help students visualize mass wasting, alpine glaciation and erosion in general.  While the mountain didn't explode strictly speaking, I couldn't help but love the headline "Mount Dixon explodes!"    


Tags: New Zealand, physical, geomorphology, erosion.

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Al Picozzi's curator insight, December 5, 2013 4:58 PM

Just an incredible sight to see.  The helicopter video is truly an amazing must see for anyone.  Just to imagine what it would be like to be there when it happened.  The speed at whcih the landslide moved plus the sounds it must have made would have been a once and a lifetime even, but if you were that close when it happened, it might be the end of your lifetime...what a way to go!

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 2014 10:49 AM

Mount Dixon's landslide is due to the mountain itself being unstable. The landslide pattern is normal in retrospect to other landslides that have happened over the years. The before and after pictures are a clear depiction of the landslide path from top to bottom.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 2015 12:13 PM

There was a large landslide on Mount Dixon in New Zealand and this article not only explains what may have happened, there is also a video that you can watch to try and understand it better. This landslide had a large fall height and a long distance that it fell out from. The landslide fell on the west side of the mountain and removed a big section from the top. These photographs are miraculous to see and give you a better perspective of the fall and the direction of the landslide. The impact removed all of the snow and ice that was on the surface and the slide appeared to have ran energy by where it stopped.