Geography Education
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Supporting geography educators everywhere with current digital resources.
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Pink Lakes

Pink Lakes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Photo by Jean Paul Ferrero/Ardea/Caters News (via Exposing the Truth   Lake Hillier is a pink-coloured lake on Middle Island in Western Australia. Middle island is the largest of the islands a...
Seth Dixon's insight:

Pictured above is Lake Hillier, located on a small island south of Western Australia.  Around the world there are many pink lakes; most of them can attribute their hue to their high salinity composition.  Some algaes that thrive in salt water produce organic pigments with a reddish/pinkish coloration.  This particular lake's coloration is a mystery.  If you any additional information, feel free to share in in the comments section below.  

   

Tags: water, physical, images, Australia.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 11:44 PM

The pink lake, Lake Hillier,  located in Western Australia is stunning. The aerial view of the lake makes the lake seem unreal that is was is fascinating. What gives the lake its pink color is a mystery, but it may be from bacteria, but it shows how some places in the world are affected differently than others and it produces remarkable results.

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:48 AM

Now this is bizarre.  A pink lake and no one is really sure as to why it is pink.  It is not on the top of my list of places to go swimming, that is for sure.  Although scientists don't seem too concerned about the safety of the lake for people but are curious as to what is causing the lake to be pink.  Thoughts on algea and bacteria levels or the amount of salt are included in the potential reasoning for the pink color.  Even on google earth you can see that the lake is in fact pink.  Even when scientists come to a conclusion as to what is causing the pink colored lake, as far as it isn't causing any environmental issues, I think that the lake should be left pink as a type of wonder of the world attraction for people to see.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, May 7, 2015 11:54 AM

This article caught my eye because I have never seen a pink lake before. This lake is on Middle Island in Western Australia. The lake is 600 meters wide but the reasoning behind the color of it is still yet to be determined. White salt rims the lake and the color may be caused from a low nutrient concentration and even just bacteria. The pictures of this lake are beautiful and there is not anything like it. 

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The Changing Geography of Quinoa

The Changing Geography of Quinoa | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Bolivian and Peruvian farmers sell entire crop to meet rising western demand, sparking fears of malnutrition
Seth Dixon's insight:

Quinoa was once a traditional Andean grain that few outside of South America consumed, but it has quickly become a staple among the health-conscious in developed countries in recent years.  Dieticians and nutritional experts give it their seal of approval because it is a low-fat starch that is high in protein and filled with amino acids.  This rapid adoption of quinoa in high-priced whole food stores has changed the economics of quinoa dramatically.  Peruvian and Bolivian farmers are selling at high prices with huge global demand.  Local consumers who have traditionally relied on this crop however, now have to pay triple the price to eat quinoa, causing some to question the ethics of quinoa consumption.  A simple change in cultural eating habits in one part of the world can have some major impacts on the economy and agriculture of another region.  


Tags: food, agriculture, South America, consumption, unit 5 agriculture.

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 8:48 PM

Bolivia and Peru once enjoyed Quinoa as a locally grown grain that was used in a nutritious diet. However, because  other parts of the world are becoming increasingly accustomed to Quinoa it is driving the price of the grain in both countries, which is putting the locals in a tough pot because it is practically tripling in price. The poorer citizens are struggling to get Quinoa, something that they once got relatively easy.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:12 PM

This is an example of the harmful effect of globalization, those who grew quinoa for food are now forced to ship away their food source leading to starvation and a slew of other issues. Those in the west with their obsession with "Super Foods" have without realizing it driven up the price of this grain to the extend that those who relied upon it as their staple crop can no longer afford to eat it themselves.

Joshua Mason's curator insight, March 3, 2015 12:54 PM

I remember walking into Panera Bread one morning a few months back. In the doorway, they had a sign that read, "Now serving Quinoa Oatmeal." I thought to myself, "What the hell is a Key-noah?" Now, it seems I can't go anywhere without hearing about this grain.

 

Touted as the super grain, Quinoa has been used for centuries as a source of sustenance for the dwellers of the Andes. But what happens when a traditional food source, only able to grow in a small region is suddenly desired by large parts of America and Europe? Supply and demand has kicked in and if it's more profitable to eat something else and sell your crop, then I'd imagine most folks would do just that like they are in the Andes. The problem with selling your main source of nutrition is that when you aren't eating it, you're not getting the nutrients you normally got. Is stripping a people of their ancestral food source and malnutrition worth it for a bowl of oatmeal at Panera? 

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Geography of Sports League Alignment

Geography of Sports League Alignment | Geography Education | Scoop.it
The NBA has the cleanest map of all the sports leagues.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Sports league have historically used geographic references to describe their league, conference or divisions (This was just one of the many reasons I was so appalled that San Diego State was going to join the Big East.  Thankfully that plan was stymied).  To have successful rivalries, teams often play up local proximity of fan bases (Yankees/Red Sox, Duke/North Carolina, Michigan/Ohio State) to add intensity to the on-field action.  Given that teams and fans travel, the logistics make regionally based division economically prudent.  This map (and the full set of major professional leagues in North America) shows that the NBA has the most geographically consistent divisions.   


Tags: sport, mapping, regions.

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Inverted Earth

Seth Dixon's insight:

These maps were purposefully designed to break all the cartographic conventions and consequently conceal as much as they reveal.  When land is colored blue, what happens in the mind of the map viewer?  Why is psychology important in how we design maps?     


Tags: images, mapping, cartography.

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Dewayne Lawson's comment, January 19, 2013 9:19 PM
very cool!
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When it comes to geography, are we lost in the world?

When it comes to geography, are we lost in the world? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Geography contributes to a sense of identity on a personal level and collectively as a nation. So what does it mean when we don’t know where Africa or Europe is on a map?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This article by the chair of the Canadian Council for Geographic Education shows how the decline in student's geographic knowledge is linked to it's erosion within the curriculum.  In an era of globalization, geographic knowledge and spatial thinking becomes all the more essential. 


Tags: geography education, geo-inspiration.


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Emergency and Disaster Information Service

Emergency and Disaster Information Service | Geography Education | Scoop.it

Map of the World, in real time with natural disaster information.

"This is a Emergency and Disasters Information and monitoring services. Hosted by National Association of Radio-distress signalling and Infocommunications.

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Stores reject 'wasted food' claims

Stores reject 'wasted food' claims | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Britain's biggest supermarkets defend their practices after a report suggested that up to half of the world's food is thrown away.
Seth Dixon's insight:

The mechanization of the all stages of food production has lead to some strange practices.  The geometry of a food matters for a mechanized processing and also for the aesthetics at the grocery store which leads to slightly misshaped vegetables and fruits are routinely discarded.  There is waste throughout the system, from 'field to fork.'  

 

Tags: food, agriculture, consumption, sustainability, unit 5 agriculture.

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Tourism's comment, January 16, 2013 11:29 PM
thanks for the info
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Don't make the same anti-terrorism mistakes in Mali

Don't make the same anti-terrorism mistakes in Mali | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Balancing the interests of stakeholders in the Malian polity will be difficult, however some key steps should be taken.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a great article for give to students to provide them with the geo-political context to understand the situation in Mali.  It also give a great reminder for observers and the involved parties to not lump all Tuareg civilians in the north with the Islamists groups that are in control.  "This failure to consistently distinguish between different groups in the North by multiple stakeholders...portends longer term trouble."  For additional reading, see this Geography in the News article on Mali, tailor-made for classroom.    


Tags: Mali, Africa, political, conflict, war.

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 2014 10:33 AM

Problems in this area will only increase if the powers that be do not take the innocence of the civilian population into account.  When trying to put down a terrorist insurgence it is imperative that a government tries to safe guard the population.  If not it will only drive these people into the arms of the insurgents.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 2014 8:44 PM

Removing the Mali president was only the first thing French military did to this nation. Mali needs to move forward from anti-terrorism and hopefully they can do so with little difficulty.

Shounam's curator insight, October 8, 2014 6:08 PM

Stop mistaking the image of muslim or islamic people as terrorists.

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Public Transit and Density

Public Transit and Density | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

This image is an excellent visualization to use when teaching about density, public transportation and urban planning. 


Questions to Ponder: How is this a persuasive image?  Do you argee with the argument that the planning office is making? Are there something important factors that this image ignores?


Tags: transportation, urban, planning, density, sustainability, unit 7 cities.

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Imran Ahmed Khan's comment, January 17, 2013 3:44 PM
Good picture! It defines the growth of the city that impact on urbanization rate, public health, socioeconomic environment. It also tell us that if we reduce vehicles on the road more space and clean environment may we get, that reduce motality and morbadity of several disease especially lung diseases.
Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, April 8, 2013 9:31 PM

What are the benefits for each?  Drawbacks? You decide!

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How The States Got Their Shapes

Amazon.com: How The States Got Their Shapes: Season 1, Episode 10 "Mouthing Off": Amazon Instant Video
Seth Dixon's insight:

Many have raved about the TV show airing on the History Channel "How the States got their Shapes."  For Amazon Prime users, season 1 is now free to stream.   I'm looking forward to watching this.

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Tara Cohen's comment, January 14, 2013 11:33 AM
We show this episode in class to demonstrate standard language, dialects, divergence, isogloss, etc. Once you purchase it through Amazon it remains in your library with unlimited use. It's short enough to show in one class period and the kids really enjoy it.
Seth Dixon's comment, January 14, 2013 10:01 PM
Great ideas Tara. I think that each episode will be filled with applicable teaching materials.
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Pop culture in the Arab world

TED Talks At TEDGlobal University, Shereen El Feki shows how some Arab cultures are borrowing trademarks of Western pop culture -- music videos, comics, even Barbie -- and adding a culturally appropriate twist.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This TED talk cleverly discusses the cultural processes of globalization by examining two examples from the Islamic world.  The examples of the TV station 4Shbab and the comic book series The 99 show that all global cultural interactions don’t have to result in a homogenous “melting pot.”  Local cultural forces can tap into the powers of globalized culture that can create dynamic local cultures that are both intensely local and global. 


Questions to Ponder: What does the speaker mean when she by refers to cultural interactions as a mesh (as a opposed to a clash or mash) of civilizations?  What other examples of cultural meshes can you see that show these processes? 


Tags: TED, religion, culture, Islam, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, December 17, 2013 11:23 AM

I don't think popular culture and folk culture interact very well. They believe in completely different things and live different types of lives according to their values. The speaker means that the cultural interaction is intertwined together because of the islamic people who have borrowed cultural ideas from other ancient and modern civilizations and adapted it to their own. That's why it's meshed as a opposed to clashing or mash. For example, the music video channel that's like MTV. I think it's kind of funny how they made the people in that music video, that's from the USA, look like we also worship Allah. Also, the comic books show religious values in it, especially since the characters come from it. They want young people to not get sucked in to the outside world or modern culture from different societies, so instead they want to incorporate their religion with our ideas of culture.

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, November 5, 2014 8:22 PM

unit 3

Jamey Kahl's curator insight, March 27, 11:09 PM

This TED talk cleverly discusses the cultural processes of globalization by examining two examples from the Islamic world.  The examples of the TV station 4Shbab and the comic book series The 99 show that all global cultural interactions don’t have to result in a homogenous “melting pot.”  Local cultural forces can tap into the powers of globalized culture that can create dynamic local cultures that are both intensely local and global. 


Questions to Ponder: What does the speaker mean when she by refers to cultural interactions as a mesh (as a opposed to a clash or mash) of civilizations?  What other examples of cultural meshes can you see that show these processes? 


Tags: TED, religion, culture, Islam, globalization, popular culture, unit 3 culture.

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Hope during Economic Crisis

Flashmob en Madrid (España) organizado por el programa de radio CARNE CRUDA 2.0 Martes y jueves, 16:00, http://www.carnecruda20.es Lunes, miércoles y viernes...
Seth Dixon's insight:

I have previously posted on how successful flashmobs often times use public places in a way that symbolically merges the meaning of that space with the message of the that place.  This is a fabulous example of that and I find it incredibly moving and poignant, given the recent economic woes of southern Europe.  


As Jordan Weismmann said about this flashmob in the Atlantic, "I'm not sure if this video is more heartbreaking or heartwarming, but it pretty well captures what's going on in Europe's economy right now. While the day-to-day drama of the continent's debt crisis has subsided, painful austerity measures have helped leave huge swaths of the population jobless. In Spain, unemployment is at 25 percent."   

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Trisha Klancar's curator insight, January 13, 2013 2:15 PM

We never know when we will make a difference in people's lives. Spain has undergone a very difficult time the last couple years...this is short video reminds us we all need to smile and enjoy no matter what!

Shelby Porter's comment, September 19, 2013 1:46 PM
This video is a great example of what a difference someone can make. Before this group started playing, you could see that most of the people on that room looked down, but they certainly got some sun and happiness brought to them. It doesn't matter where in the world you are, the littlest things can certainly make a difference.
Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:21 PM

Flashmobs bring so much positive energy to any environment. In Madrid, this video shows how positive vibes from music are contagious and transmitted into positive energy at an unemployment office. "Here comes the Sun" is a way of saying things are going to get better, just look at the bright side. 

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Boontling: A Lost American Language

Boontling: A Lost American Language | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Watch the video Boontling: A Lost American Language on Yahoo! Screen
Seth Dixon's insight:

In Booneville, CA, local residents literally created their own language over 150 years ago and had it was locally accepted enough to be taught within the school district.  This language of Boontling (Boont Lingo) but one that the younger generation has not fully adopted, but is still spoken by the older residents. 


Tags: folk culture, language, culture, rural, unit 3 culture, California.

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Digital Map Error May Have Led To Minesweeper Grounding

Digital Map Error May Have Led To Minesweeper Grounding | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A digital chart used by the minesweeper USS Guardian to navigate Philippine waters misplaced the location of a reef by about eight nautical miles, and may have been a significant factor when the ship drove hard aground on the reef on Jan.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Accurate, reliable data is crucial for countless applications. 

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Mark Trinidad's comment, January 24, 2013 4:29 PM
strong magnetic current??
Deborah Vane's curator insight, January 25, 2013 10:45 AM

Digital gone wrong. 

Mark Trinidad's comment, January 30, 2013 5:26 PM
well they are already warned by PCG but they have their own water line..
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What if Greece quits the euro?

What if Greece quits the euro? | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A Greek exit from the euro has become a bomb fizzling at the heart of the eurozone. What could happen if it explodes?
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is still all speculation, but this speculation is grounded in the very real possibility that Greece may leave the Eurozone.  This one possible scenario would have a profound ripple effect throughout the European Union and beyond.  This interactive explores each of these 8 possible results.  


Tags: Greece, Europe, supranationalism, currency, labor, economic



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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:05 PM

Money controls everything. Because parliament has to make some budget cuts, money must be spent elsewhere. Because of this, Greece leaving the euro could lead to a downward spiral including a sovereign debt crisis, a recession and political backlash. Should Greece keep the euro?

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 17, 2014 8:02 AM

This article explains eight possible outcomes of Greece leaving the Euro Zone. None of them favorable for Europe, except maybe the UK which could possibly borrow more cheaply. For the rest of Europe, the results are either increased burdens for the more economically strong EZ nations like Germany, or a domino effect which accelerates the decline of the struggling economies of countries like Italy and Spain.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 8:09 PM

If Greek were to quit/ be forced out of the Euro, according to this article, would not bode well for the country. As the graph suggests, Greece would experience multiple consequences if their vote fail then Greece will possibly suffer a government shutdown due to the debt they find themselves in.

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Martin Luther King-Then and Today

I Have a Dream Speech Martin Luther King's Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring fro...
Seth Dixon's insight:

There is much to glean from Martin Luther King's famous I Have a Dream speech as a fantastic rhetorical device. This speech has a profound impact on the the psyche of the America culture and it has endured as a pivotal moment in history.  As we celebrate his life and legacy this Monday, it is an appropriate time to contemplate that the ending of segregation (a spatial division of races) has reshaped the United States. 


Many streets in the United States bear the name "Martin Luther King Jr." to memorialize both the man and the Civil Rights movement.  This streets, as this YouTube video suggests, are often in poor, crime-ridden and violent neighborhoods.  This video highlights the irony between the historical memory of Martin Luther King Jr. and places of memorialization that bear his name.  This video echoes much of what the authors of the fantastic book "Civil Rights Memorials and the Geography of Memory" say (in fact one of the authors is shown in this video). 


Questions to ponder: If Martin Luther King Jr. represents non-violence, then why are streets bearing his name often in 'violent' neighborhoods?  Where should Martin Luther King be memorialized in the United States?  Only in the South?  Only in predominantly African-American communities?  What does the geography of the spaces where he is memorialized say something about the United States?    

 

Tags: historical, culture, landscape, place, race, unit 3 culture, USA, urban, poverty, unit 7 cities, book review

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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, January 20, 2013 10:38 AM

Teachers:  How great would it be to use the actual speech?  Can you say, "primary source?"  Here's an idea:  Print it out and let students close read this important speech, too.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:56 PM

Probably they think that martin Luther king is more important to African American, then the rest of the United States population, but I personally feel that martin Luther king, represent a changing America also he is a very important figure in American history, he should be place in a better location so people that come to visit united states could venerate him as a man who fought for not only for African American but also for every minorities living in the United States.

Norman Chan's curator insight, July 12, 2014 7:50 PM

After watching his speech, I feel that he really worked hard fighting for the African Americans. He must have been really brave to step up and fight for the African American. If there was someone like him at this date, I feel that racism would greatly decreased as many would be inspired one his/her words.

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A Review of Jared Diamond's "The World Until Yesterday"

A Review of Jared Diamond's "The World Until Yesterday" | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Should we look to traditional societies to help us tweak our lives? Wade Davis takes issue with the whole idea
Seth Dixon's insight:

Jared Diamond is famous for his work in writing Guns, Germs and Steel as well as Collapse.  His latest work, The World Until Yesterday, he encourages modern readers to examine the traditional societies for insights on how to improve the human condition.  In this book review by Wade Davis, he critiques this approach and suggests that we should see indigenous societies as reminders that our modern lifestyle is not the only way.


Tags: book reviews, folk cultures, indigenous.

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Kendra King's curator insight, April 13, 2015 9:21 PM

As a member of the Western world where technology and modernity are at the forefront of the way we live, the author of the article made a refreshing point. I quote, “The other peoples of the world are not failed attempts at modernity, let alone failed attempts to be us.” This quote was incredibly interesting because far too often our society views others against our standards. Yet, as the author points out, who is really to say this is the correct way of living? I personally don’t have an answer, but I do admire the work of Boas mentioned in this article as he actually tried to live within a culture and judge it without prior “prejudice.” Yet, most people aren’t about to live in another society just to better understand them. Furthermore, with our world becoming increasingly interconnected more and more information becomes disseminated and more technology and modernity occur. So those who don’t partake are seen as alien. Now as Diamond’s newest book tried to show, different isn’t bad. To Diamond, some aspects of more traditional indigenous people are actually better than ours. Unlike the author, I don’t find this offensive and maybe I don’t because I am taking into account the forces of globalization. The author, was offensive because Diamond should have realized that living another way is the point. Not that blending the two should even be considered. Yet, in a world where everyone is becoming so interconnected, I don’t think purely isolated cultures can stand. Furthermore, nor do I think it is bad to pull the good from one culture and apply it to another. What I find more disturbing is the fact that Diamond isn’t truly an expert on any region outside of Guinie. So, honestly what authority does he have to be advising on those matters? Yet again we see the good and bad of globalization, one doesn’t have to move outside of ones out area to obtain second hand information (enough to write a book). Yet, one can at least look at the information to see that other cultures do have value and can stand up for those good aspects (even if it may be a superficial understand) as it does give food for thought. In this instance, I think what Diamond did was good because it reminds the people who overlook tradition to pause and see there is good.   

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City & Country Ground Image Quiz

City & Country Ground Image Quiz | Geography Education | Scoop.it

"Can you use physical and cultural geography clues to match the ground photograph with its location? Identify the 10 cities and 10 countries. In so doing, you are thinking spatially and considering language, culture, climate, landforms, land use, transportation methods, etc. to determine the correct answers."

Seth Dixon's insight:

This quiz and others like it are great ways to get students utilize all the information available in a photograph and really plumb the depths of their knowledge about places.  


Tags: games, spatial, landscape.

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The School Aranda's curator insight, January 21, 2013 6:00 AM

Should be great for FCE speaking speculation. . . .

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A Mysterious Patch Of Light

A Mysterious Patch Of Light | Geography Education | Scoop.it
If you are up in space looking down on America west of the Mississippi, one of the brightest patches of light at night is on the Great Plains in North Dakota. It's not a city, not a town, not a military installation.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This patch of light is baffled me since clusters of light on this image almost always are connected to high levels of urbanization and North Dakota has no major population center of that magnitude.  This is the Bakken formation, a new oil and gas field that is producing over 600,000 barrels a day.  The lights are oil rigs that are lit up at night, but even more because many gas flares are burning leading locals to call the area "Kuwait on the Prairie."  Oil men from far and wide are flocking to the rural, lightly populated area raising rents sky-high.  This has caused a huge localized gender imbalance, changing the demographic and cultural character of the region because of the drastic the economic and environmental shifts in the area (see the national gender balance here).  This is a great reminder that the physical and human geographies of a region are fully intermeshed one with another. 


Tags: resources, gender, environment, economic, migration.

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Heidi Zumbrun Bjerke's comment, February 12, 2013 9:52 PM
Use google earth and you can compare the two images.
Mary Patrick Schoettinger's comment, February 12, 2013 11:55 PM
that's an excellent idea, especially to have students suggest what the light might be in the photo. The question is , is the bright light a one time occurrence or does it continue?J
Mary Rack's comment, February 13, 2013 6:08 AM
I'm having trouble installing GoogleEarth on my iMac. Looking forward to the comparison. Big adjustment after years in the PC world.
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Iconic Landscapes

Iconic Landscapes | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Time lapse video compilation Civilization: Part I - Europe by professional photographer Dominic Boudreault. Shot in England, France, Spain and Italy.
Seth Dixon's insight:

This is a gorgeous video that was very intelligently constructed.  The title 'civilization' coupled with the images of iconic architecture, makes me think differently and question how we conceptualize the ideas of civilization and society. 


Tags: landscape, historical, Europe, time lapse.

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Lauren Stahowiak's curator insight, February 27, 2014 5:11 PM

Europe is such a beautiful place where its landscapes, architecture, and waterways have shaped its future. This video shows the beauty of the towns and how everything in is has remembrances of the past. This video is a definite must see!

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:33 AM

I found this very stirring.  To see the old and new buildings side by side makes one think about what came before and how the past influences the future.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2014 6:03 PM

This video of iconic landscapes displays beautiful and historic architecture throughout Europe. This video allows the viewer to see these great areas of Europe. I have a great deal of respect for those who built things such as the Colosseum in Rome years ago, as it is amazing that some of these historic buildings are still standing today. 

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Recruiting High School Teachers

Recruiting High School Teachers | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

Are you a high school teacher looking for some funds for your classroom?  The My Community, Our Earth: Global Connections and Exchange Program (PDF) is connecting high school students in the U.S. with their peers abroad (in Bolivia, Ghana, Nicaragua and the Philippines) through virtual online meetings.  The Association of American Geographers is especially eager to have AP Human Geography teachers participate in this program.  These meetings are arranged through online video conferences, online phone calls and chat sessions using Skype. The purpose of these meetings is to stimulate thinking and collaboration between high school students across international borders around sustainable development themes such as climate change, green economy, food security and hazards and vulnerability, while enriching cultural literacy. We are looking for formal and informal educators in the U.S., at the high school level, who would like to participate with us.

For every time that you complete one hour of exchange and submit one MyCOE exercise to our online system, you will receive $300 for your classroom (personal check or Amazon gift card). 


Ready to Participate? Please send e-mails to mycoe@aag.org


Tags: AAG, teacher training, APHG.

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Courtney Holbert's curator insight, February 3, 2013 10:21 PM

Could have great potential experiences for the classroom

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Interactive Earth at Night

Interactive Earth at Night | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

You've seen the this image as a static map, as a video and as an adjusted cartogram here before.  This link is especially intriguing because this same data has been added to Google Maps so a user can interactively explore this layer and compare it to daytime satellite imagery or a standard map (it can also be seen on an interactive globe on http://www.geteach.com/ ). 


The first impulse of most students is to note when analyzing this image is to note that the map will show us where people live, where the cities are or some other comment that speaks to the magnitude of the population in the white areas.  Let them analyze this for more time, and they'll notice that population isn't the whole story of this image.  A place like India shines, but less brightly than the eastern part of the United States.  I like to point out that South Korea appears to be an island (because North Korea is literally blacked out).  Politics, development, affluence and population information are all embedded in this image.  As with all maps, the more information you have about the place in question (in this case, Earth), the more meaningful information you can extract out of the map.


Tags: remote sensing, images, mapping, cartography, geospatial, edtech, geography education, unit 1 GeoPrinciples.

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Giovanni Della Peruta's curator insight, January 14, 2013 11:54 AM

Thanks to Nic Hardisty

Giovanni Della Peruta's comment, January 14, 2013 12:02 PM
Very good comment, Seth
سعيد محمد's comment, January 15, 2013 11:03 AM
ok
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Impacts of the Demographic Transition

Impacts of the Demographic Transition | Geography Education | Scoop.it
A look at how the notion of family is evolving in this country. 
Seth Dixon's insight:

The traditional family is declining in social prominence in many developed societies (this is hardly a phenomenon unique to Canada) as fewer young people are choosing to marry and have children.  How does this impact individuals, families, communities and countries? 


Tags: Canadadeclining population, population, demographics, unit 2 population.

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megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 12:35 AM
This article talks about how the new Canadian Family. How the traditional family used to have children and people were getting married. Now people not only do not necessarily get married, but they also may not even have children either. It just shows how times and the people are changing from the older and more traditional days.
Nathan Chasse's curator insight, January 25, 2014 10:35 AM

This infographic is showing a shift which has occured over the last several decades from larger, traditional families to smaller, multicultural, non-traditional families. This infographic concerns Canada, but the reduced birthrate is a problem for many developed countries in Europe as well. While the multi-cultural and same-sex families likely have no negative effects, the rise in lone parent families is problematic as single parents have an increased financial burden while raising children. The low birthrate, when lower than replacement level (2.0 per woman), will likely lead to a stalling economy to be outpaced by growing nations.

Paige Therien's curator insight, February 3, 2014 12:45 PM

How exactly will a shifting family demographic affect us?  We can only speculate.  This phenomenon happening in Canada is also happening in most developed like the United States and Japan.  The problem with analyzing specific demographics like this one, is that they are taken out of cultural (local and global) context.  There are many things that may be influencing the familial demographic shift.  More people are moving into cities, where life is busy, fast-paced, "anonymous", and space-limited.  Having kids does not seem very conducive in this setting.  Are we as humans actually creating issues for ourselves?  Are we creating different meanings for "family"?  Are we adapting to our ever-changing world?  This issue will prove to be a mix of all of these things.  ...Maybe there is even an unseen, unfelt ecological and physiological cue to stop procreating when there are too many within a population?  However people who do not want children, have to ask themselves "why?"  Is being selfish really worth removing humans that much further from the natural harmony of the world?

Scooped by Seth Dixon
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Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead

Somalia: A failed state is back from the dead | Geography Education | Scoop.it
Eighteen months ago, central Mogadishu was like an African Stalingrad.
Seth Dixon's insight:

Somalia's political troubles are not over, but it is no longer the drought-ridden country overrun by Islamist extremist that it was two years ago.  For years it held the dubious title of "the world's most failed state."  Al Shabbab, the militant group linked to Al Qaeda, left the capital of Mogadishu in 2011 and in 2012 lost their last stronghold.  Piracy still exists off the Somali coast, but it has lessened as a semblance of political order is being restored to the Horn of Africa.

 

Tags: Somalia, Africa, political, conflict, war.

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Cam E's curator insight, March 18, 2014 12:57 PM

Somalia has been the go-to criticism example for anarchy and lawlessness in my generation, but with the times our metaphors must also change. I'm interesting in seeing how Somalia gains control after a time of such factionalism.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 25, 2014 1:12 PM

This article describes the stabilizing political situation in Somalia. The country was long without a central government and the instability made Somalia a haven for Islamic extremists and piracy. In 2012, Somalia held successful elections and the new government, located in the Puntland region, has been taking territory from Al Shabaab and reducing piracy. The increasing stability could improve Somalia's economy as interest in its oil could see significant foreign investment into the former "failed state."

Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:58 PM

Somalia, or as we referred to it last class "a country that is not really a country".  Somalia is famous for being a fractured, failing state.  The American war film, "Black Hawk Down" is set in Mogadishu and shows the country even in the 1990s fracturing apart under the influence of various warlords.  The movie was based on an actual event that occurred in the early nineties, in which the US tried to oust a large scale crime boss, supposedly to stabilize the nation, however this plan failed, as the nation continued to be fractured.  This article claims that there is progress being made in the country (Circa 2013) as the pro-"government" forces and a coalition for African security pushed back a terrorist group out of the capital and back to their stronghold in the country.  During 2012, the terrorist group lost its last stronghold.  However, Somalia still has a great deal of challenges facing it.  Al Shabbab is not fully eliminated, just weakened.  The pirates still exist on the Somalia coast, and trying to recreate a country out of something that hasn't existed as one for decades will be difficult.  However, I am pulling for the nation to succeed, the people in the region need stability.

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Migration and Geography

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Tony King's comment, January 13, 2013 11:35 AM
Just in case a lot of perfectly sane Americans decide to migrate to a civilized country like Canada
Trisha Klancar's curator insight, January 13, 2013 2:04 PM

I like this as it also sets up the beginning of the lesson if you were were unsure what to do with this.

Anhony DeSimone's curator insight, December 18, 2013 10:07 PM

Migration is what is need in order for the human race to relate to one another and survive. This shows us how we can learn form Migration from a geographical stand point. If you look at the Geography of how and where people move you will it will help you to develop a sense of what is next to come or what is needed to survive.